Do not restrict our rights to peaceful protest.

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

255,664 Signatures

Status
Open
Opened
Tuesday 16th March 2021
Last 24 hours signatures
43
Signature Deadline
Thursday 16th September 2021
Estimated Final Signatures: 257,255

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Recent Documents related to Do not restrict our rights to peaceful protest.

1. Do not restrict our rights to peaceful protest.
11/03/2021 - Petitions

Found: The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed

2. Written evidence submitted by Leeds for Europe (PCSCB01)
19/05/2021 - Bill Documents

Found: (PCSCB01) Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill These comments on the Police, Crime, Sentencing

3. Written evidence submitted by Leeds for Europe (PCSCB01)
19/05/2021 - Bill Documents

Found: (PCSCB01) Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill These comments on the Police, Crime, Sentencing

4. Written evidence submitted by Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO), Bond, National Council of Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), and Small Charities Coalition (SCC) (joint submission) (PCSCB18)
28/05/2021 - Bill Documents

Found: Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill Written evidence submitted by the Association of Chief Executives

5. Written evidence submitted by Zoe Everett (PCSCB03)
19/05/2021 - Bill Documents

Found: Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill Written evidence submitted by Zoe Everett . ( PCSC B

Latest Documents
Recent Speeches related to Do not restrict our rights to peaceful protest.

1. Rights to Protest
26/04/2021 - Westminster Hall

1: that any live legal cases connected with recent protests will engage the House’s sub judice resolution - Speech Link
2: considered e-petition 579012, relating to right to protest.I thank the petition creator Samantha - Speech Link

2. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill (Ninth sitting)
08/06/2021 - Public Bill Committees

1: will now resume line-by-line consideration of the Bill. The selection list for today’s sittings is available - Speech Link
2: parts of the Bill. We have seen fierce debates in Parliament and in the media, and protests up and down - Speech Link

3. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
16/03/2021 - Commons Chamber

1: heard the notion that somehow liberty is an integral part of the English character, and that we fortunate - Speech Link

4. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
15/03/2021 - Commons Chamber

1: more we can do to protect women and girls against crime, and the events of the last few days have rightly - Speech Link

5. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill (First sitting)
18/05/2021 - Public Bill Committees

1: because we are dealing with matters relating to the police and criminal law. The programme motion was discussed - Speech Link
2: amThe National Police Chiefs’ CouncilTuesday 18 MayUntil no later than 11.25 amThe Police Superintendents’ - Speech Link

Latest Speeches
Recent Questions related to Do not restrict our rights to peaceful protest.
1. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
asked by: Rachael Maskell
02/07/2021
... Sentencing and Courts Bill.

2. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
asked by: Rachael Maskell
02/07/2021
... Sentencing and Courts Bill.

3. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
asked by: Ian Byrne
12/07/2021
... Sentencing and Courts Bill 2021.

4. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
asked by: Ian Byrne
19/07/2021
... Sentencing and Courts Bill.

5. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill: Travellers
asked by: Rachael Maskell
28/05/2021
... Sentencing and Courts Bill.

Latest Questions

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Why is a non-violent protest regarded as disruptive? Protests are a fundamental right to our society and have been through history. It is how policies have been challenged and changed in the past. Without them, you are effectively saying nobody has the right to peacefully challenge anything. If people feel the need to protest then the government should listen and not be shutting down this legitimate way of people voicing their concerns and opinions. This is a dismantling of our civil liberties.


Petition Signatures over time

Government Response

Tuesday 6th April 2021

The public order measures in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill do not erode the public’s right to protest; the Government will not be removing these measures from the Bill.


The right to protest is a cornerstone of British democracy and the Government is absolutely committed to maintaining freedoms of expression and assembly. This Bill will enable the police to manage disruptive protests more effectively. The majority of protests in England and Wales will be unaffected by the proposed measures in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill. They will not stop people from carrying out their civic right to protest and be heard.

Existing public order legislation was passed in 1986 and is no longer suitable for managing all the types of protests we experience today. We aim to ensure that legislation remains fit for purpose.

In recent years, we have seen a growing trend in protest groups using highly disruptive tactics that have a detrimental impact on the fundamental rights of others. The misery caused to millions of people by protesters gluing themselves to train carriages, blocking traffic, including emergency vehicles, and preventing newspapers from being distributed is totally unacceptable.

In a recent inspection, the independent policing inspectorate, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary, Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) found that the rights of protesters are sometimes prioritised over the rights of local residents, businesses, and those with opposing views, and recommended a ‘modest reset’ of the balance. This is what this Bill is designed to achieve.

The proposed measures will allow police to better manage highly disruptive protests, protecting the legitimate rights of those affected by the protests whilst remaining compliant with the European Convention on Human Rights.

Articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights set out that everyone has the right to freedom of expression and of peaceful assembly and association with others. However, these freedoms are not absolute, and restrictions may be placed for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.

The police will continue to be required to pay due regard to Human Rights obligations when making use of any powers to manage protests and they must be able to show that their use of powers is necessary and proportionate.

Home Office


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