Kerry McCarthy Portrait

Kerry McCarthy

Labour - Bristol East

First elected: 5th May 2005

Shadow Minister (Climate Change and Net Zero)

(since June 2022)

Energy Bill [HL]
17th May 2023 - 29th Jun 2023
Hunting Trophies (Import Prohibition) Bill
18th Jan 2023 - 25th Jan 2023
Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill
22nd Jun 2022 - 7th Jul 2022
Public Order Bill
25th May 2022 - 21st Jun 2022
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL]
9th Feb 2022 - 10th Feb 2022
Glue Traps (Offences) Bill
12th Jan 2022 - 19th Jan 2022
Animal (Penalty Notices) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 8th Dec 2021
Shadow Minister (Transport)
10th Apr 2020 - 4th Dec 2021
Environmental Audit Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 8th Jun 2020
Petitions Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 8th Jun 2020
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
11th Dec 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environmental Audit Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Environmental Audit Committee
4th Jul 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Sep 2015 - 26th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
7th Oct 2011 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Opposition Assistant Whip (Commons)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
6th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
South West Regional Select Committee
3rd Mar 2009 - 6th May 2010
Treasury Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 4th Jun 2007


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Kerry McCarthy has voted in 845 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Kerry McCarthy Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Rebecca Pow (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(31 debate interactions)
Victoria Prentis (Conservative)
Attorney General
(31 debate interactions)
Graham Stuart (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(25 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(59 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(58 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Agriculture Act 2020
(13,163 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(8,343 words contributed)
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Act 2022
(4,650 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Kerry McCarthy's debates

Bristol East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to amend the Grocery Supply Code of Practice (GSCP) to require retailers, without exception, to:

- Buy what they agreed to buy
- Pay what they agreed to pay
- Pay on time

We believe the current GSCP is inadequate and doesn't protect farmers from unfair behaviour.

We want the Government to repeal the Dangerous Dogs Act and replace it with legislation that focuses on early intervention to prevent dog bites and tackle dog-related issues regardless of breed or type, based solely on their behaviour.


I believe that the XL bully is a kind, beautiful natured breed that loves children and people in general, and are very loyal and loving pets.

People with a lifelong illness should not be subject to regular reviews for eligibility for the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) or Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). People suffering lifelong conditions should not have to prove they are still ill every couple of years.

The Government should remove the requirement for people claiming disability benefits, such as the Personal Independence Payment (PIP), to have to go through an assessment process. Claims should be based solely on evidence from medical professionals, such as a letter from a GP or consultant.

We want the Government to conduct a full review of the PIP process. This should look at DWP policy and the performance of ATOS and Capita, which conduct the health assessments for applicants. We believe the current process is inherently unethical and biased, and needs a complete overhaul.

Swifts have declined by over 50% in the UK. Adult swifts, known for site-fidelity, return to the same nests. We want swift bricks to be required in all new housing, to provide homes for these birds. Surveys show these are used by red-listed swifts, house martins, starlings and house sparrows.

The Government must exercise its power under s.23 of the Gender Recognition Act to modify the operation of the Equality Act 2010 by specifying the terms sex, male, female, man & woman, in the operation of that law, mean biological sex and not "sex as modified by a Gender Recognition Certificate"

It has been reported that the Government may amend the Equality Act to "make it clear that sex means biological sex rather than gender." The Government has previously committed to not remove legal protections for trans people, an already marginalised group, but this change would do so.

No general statutory duty of care exists in HE. Yet, a duty of care is owed to students, and the Government should legislate for this. HE providers should know what their duty is. Students must know what they can expect. Parents expect their children to be safe at university.

We want suicide spoken about in schools in a safe and age-appropriate way. Speaking about suicide saves lives
The Dept for Education are conducting a review of the RSHE curriculum; this petition calls on the DfE to include suicide prevention within the statutory guidelines of the new curriculum.

Mark Avery , Chris Packham and Ruth Tingay (Wild Justice) want the opening of the Woodcock shooting season to be pushed back to 1 December. 160,000 Woodcock are shot for fun across the UK whilst their population is declining. The Defra Secretary of State has powers to vary the shooting season.

The Government should create an emergency fund to deal with the massive waiting lists for autism & ADHD assessments for children AND adults. This would provide resources for local health services deal with current waiting lists and new patients.

The Government should commission a review of how Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) assessments are managed by the NHS, including through Shared Care Agreements, and increase funding to reduce waiting times.

Revoke all licences (PEL) for commercial breeders of laboratory animals. Require all Project Licences (PPLs) applications be reviewed by an independent Non Animal Methods (NAMs) specialist committee. Revise s24 ASPA 1986 to allow review. Urge International Regulators to accept & promote NAMs.

Provide a mechanism within existing legislation whereupon a person with parental responsibility (PR) is found guilty of murdering the other parent with PR, has PR automatically suspended throughout the duration of the term of imprisonment of the aforesaid person convicted.

In 2019 UK Government finalised a free trade agreement (FTA) with Faroe Islands which allows for £100 million of exports of wild caught and farmed fish to Britain per annum (20% of the Faroe Islands global trade). This FTA should be suspended until all whale & dolphin hunts on Faroe Islands end

Make specialist training mandatory for all police and other government agencies that support black women and girls affected by domestic abuse. Police and agencies should have culturally appropriate training to better understand the cultural needs of black women affected by domestic abuse.

The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing death by careless/dangerous driving is between 5-14 yrs. The sentence for failing to stop after a fatal collision must be increased.

The offence of causing 'death by dangerous driving' should be widened to include: failure to stop, call 999 and render aid on scene until further help arrives.

Ensure Water companies treat the sewage they are responsible for. Not discharge it into rivers and water courses. After all what goes into the ocean comes back as the fish we eat.

Chris Packham, Ruth Tingay and Mark Avery (Wild Justice) believe that intensive grouse shooting is bad for people, the environment and wildlife. People; grouse shooting is economically insignificant when contrasted with other real and potential uses of the UK’s uplands.

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

EU law recognises animals as sentient beings, aware of their feelings and emotions. Animals are at risk of losing these vital legal protections, post-Brexit. We want a BetterDealForAnimals: a law that creates a duty for all Ministers in the UK to fully regard animal welfare in policy making.

Across the UK, millions of farmed animals are kept in cages, unable to express their natural behaviours. This causes huge suffering.

We call on the UK government to end this inhumane practice by banning all cages for farmed animals. Cages are cruel.


Latest EDMs signed by Kerry McCarthy

23rd March 2022
Kerry McCarthy signed this EDM on Thursday 24th March 2022

P&O Ferries and DP World

Tabled by: Karl Turner (Labour - Kingston upon Hull East)
That this House condemns in the strongest possible terms the decision of P&O Ferries to fire 800 staff without notice or consultation with their trade unions, the RMT and Nautilus; demands the immediate reinstatement of the sacked workers; condemns their replacement with agency workers earning as little as £1.80 per …
125 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 93
Scottish National Party: 12
Liberal Democrat: 7
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Alba Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
6th February 2020
Kerry McCarthy signed this EDM on Wednesday 3rd February 2021

EU Settlement Scheme

Tabled by: Kate Green (Labour - Stretford and Urmston)
That this House is concerned that the EU Settlement Scheme does not deliver sufficient assurance of their future status to all EU nationals resident in the UK; notes that some EU nationals and non-EU family members will be unable to obtain their status for a number of reasons, including a …
86 signatures
(Most recent: 13 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 22
Liberal Democrat: 9
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Alba Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Independent: 1
View All Kerry McCarthy's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Kerry McCarthy, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Kerry McCarthy has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Kerry McCarthy has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

5 Bills introduced by Kerry McCarthy


A Bill to regulate supported housing; to make provision about local authority oversight and the enforcement of standards of accommodation and support in supported housing; to prohibit the placing of children in care in unregulated accommodation; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 11th November 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to impose a duty on public bodies in relation to the welfare needs of animals as sentient beings.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 3rd April 2019
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision for a scheme to establish incentives to implement and encourage observance of the food waste reduction hierarchy; to encourage individuals, businesses and public bodies to reduce the amount of food they waste; to require large supermarkets, manufacturers and distributors to reduce their food waste by no less than 30 per cent by 2025 and to enter into formal agreements with food redistribution organisations; to require large supermarkets and food manufacturers to disclose levels of food waste in their supply chain; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 9th September 2015

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require large food retailers and large food manufacturers to take steps to reduce food waste and donate surplus food to charities for redistribution and, where food is unfit for human consumption, to make it available for livestock feed in preference over disposal; to encourage and incentivise all other businesses and public bodies which generate food waste to donate a greater proportion of their surplus for redistribution; to protect from civil and criminal liability food donors and recipient agencies where food has been donated in good faith; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 14th March 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to make provision to extend the system of parental responsibility agreements to enable a kinship carer to obtain parental responsibility for a child they are raising without having to bring a case to court; and for connected purposes

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 7th June 2011

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
18 Other Department Questions
14th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking with Cabinet colleagues to ensure that people with neurodivergent conditions receive appropriate and accessible support when using public services.

The government are implementing a National Autism Strategy and the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan.

Additionally, the Department of Health and Social Care are rolling out the Oliver McGowan Mandatory Training where part one has been completed by over 1.4 million people.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the Government has undertaken an equality impact assessment of the Autumn Statement 2023.

In developing proposals for the Autumn Statement, the Treasury took care to consider the equality impacts on those sharing protected characteristics, in line with its statutory obligations and strong commitment to promoting fairness.

Providing increased opportunities for everyone, including the most vulnerable in society, has been at the centre of the decisions taken at Autumn Statement 2023.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent discussions she has had with the Leader of the House on the Parliamentary timetable for the Worker Protection (Amendment of Equality Act 2010) Bill.

The Worker Protection (Amendment of Equality Act 2010) Bill is a Private Member’s Bill. As the Bill is now in the Other Place, scheduling is a matter for the Lords Chief Whip. My officials and I are in regular contact with the Lords and Commons Whips offices in relation to this Bill.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when she plans to respond to recommendations in the Children's Commissioner's report A positive approach to parenting; Part 2 of the Independent Family Review.

The Government will respond to the recommendations in the report ‘A positive approach to parenting; Part 2 of the Independent Family Review’ in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
8th Jul 2022
To ask the President of COP26, how many nations have submitted updated Nationally Determined Contributions in advance of COP27 as of 8 July 2022.

Since COP26, there have been 16 NDC submissions. This represents progress but the Government continues to work closely with partner countries and organisations to drive climate ambition, and to urge all countries to revisit and strengthen their NDCs by the end of 2022 to close the ambition gap and keep 1.5C within reach.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what discussions he has had with his Egyptian Government counterpart on establishing a finance facility for countries affected by loss and damage at COP27.

Making practical progress on averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage this year is a priority for the UK. We are working closely with Egypt, as well as other key partners, to achieve this. At COP26, parties agreed to set up the Glasgow Dialogue on Loss and Damage, which aims to discuss the arrangements for the funding of activities to enhance action to address loss and damage, concluding in 2024.

Alongside the dialogue, we are also working with Egypt and other countries and institutions to press forward the final operationalisation of the Santiago Network on loss and damage, and secure offers of funding for this operation and the technical assistance the Network provides.



Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what recent discussions he has had with other signatories of the Glasgow Leaders’ Declaration on Forests and Land Use made at UNFCCC COP26 on (a) governance of the Declaration, (b) accountability for implementation, and (c) tracking of progress.

The Glasgow Leaders’ Declaration on Forests and Land Use is an unprecedented commitment from over 140 countries covering over 90% of global forests to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030. It is underpinned by almost $20bn of public and private finance, by commitments to sustainable trade and by support for indigenous peoples’ rights. We are working with other countries that endorsed the Declaration to convert this political commitment into strong action on forests and land use. This will include working through multilateral events in 2022 such as meetings of the G7 and G20, and at COP15 of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

All Parties to the Paris Agreement must report on their progress towards its goals via their national Greenhouse Gas Inventories - which cover every emitting sector including forests and land use. In addition, where Parties have opted to include forests and land use in their nationally determined contributions, they will also be obliged to report on these to show progress towards achieving their emission reductions targets. At COP26, as part of the Glasgow Climate Pact, countries agreed to revisit and strengthen their current emissions targets to 2030 in 2022.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
2nd Feb 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he is taking during the UK's COP presidency to address the barriers posed by debt to climate-vulnerable countries’ ability to respond to the climate crisis.

The Presidency has prioritised the issue of debt sustainability in the lead up to and since COP26. The UK has championed the IMF’s $650 billion allocation of Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) to help boost global liquidity and we are supporting the IMF in establishing a Resilience and Sustainability Trust that will provide a long-term financing offer for vulnerable countries facing structural challenges including climate change.

To support low-income countries to tackle their debt vulnerabilities, in November 2020 the UK, alongside our G20 and Paris Club partners, agreed a new Common Framework for Debt Treatment beyond the Debt Service Suspension Initiative. This brings together G20 and Paris Club creditors to coordinate debt treatments following a request from any of the 73 eligible low-income countries. Private sector creditors will be expected to implement debt treatments on at least as favourable terms as those agreed by official creditors. The UK-led G7 Private Sector Working Group is also exploring ​​Climate Resilient Debt Instruments (CRDIs), which will crucially suspend any debt service repayments in the event of a natural disaster in climate vulnerable countries.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the President of COP26, how many staff in his Department have been assigned to work on the Convention of Biological Diversity; and how many Ministers in his Department plan to attend the conference from 25 April to 8 May 2022.

The 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity represents a historic opportunity to secure an agreement to ambitious global action over the next decade. The UK is committed to playing a leading role in developing an ambitious post-2020 global biodiversity framework to be adopted at COP15. The COP is due to take place in Kunming, China, later this year; though, due to the coronavirus pandemic, we expect a delay to the planned dates of 25 April to 8 May. Minister Goldsmith will head the UK delegation.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is the lead department for the Convention on Biological Diversity, working closely with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and Cabinet Office. A core team is in place in DEFRA, drawing on expertise across DEFRA, its specialist arms-length bodies, working with other Government departments, civil society organisations and society at large. This includes working with the FCDO and our Posts across the diplomatic network, through which we are engaging host governments to support the delivery of our objectives. Nature is one of the key priorities in the UK’s COP26 Presidency, and so the Cabinet Office COP26 Unit is also supporting preparations for COP15 to ensure successful delivery of our COP26 objectives.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what recent estimate he has made of the value of investment and liquid assets of the Church of England (a) centrally and (b) by diocese and cathedral, including those of the Church Commissioners less the liability for pensions for which they are responsible.

At the end of 2020 the total value of the Church Commissioners’ assets, less the estimated value of future pensions obligations, was £7,573m.

The Commissioners have additional and ongoing statutory funding obligations over and above pension liabilities, including support for the work of bishops and cathedrals. The Commissioners also make grants to support the work of the Church across the country, with a focus on supporting the poorest communities.

The Commissioners plan their spending in three year cycles and estimated expenditure in 2020-22 is £930m including £383m for pensions.

Further information is available in the most recent annual report of the Church Commissioners: https://www.churchofengland.org/about/leadership-and-governance/church-commissioners-england/how-we-are-governed/publications

The year end balances for Dioceses in 2019 (the most recent information available) were £1,692m in investments (the majority restricted for particular purposes) and £184m in cash. For cathedrals this was £524m in investments and £50m in cash. The majority of investment assets are in property investments, which are less liquid than stock market investments. Typically around two-thirds of diocesan incomes come from parish share, the majority of which is funded by individuals’ donations to Parochial Church Councils. This funding stream has been impacted by the pandemic and resulted in a significant draw on diocesan reserves.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, how much has been paid in (a) tax rebates, including of VAT on repairs and (b) Gift Aid to Church of England bodies including (i) dioceses, (ii) parochial church councils, (iii) cathedrals, (iv) the Church Commissioners and (v) the Churches Conservation Trust in each of the last five years.

Dioceses, parochial church councils and cathedrals:

Government (DCMS) figures for grants equal to the value of VAT for works to listed places of worship over the past five years are below. These are grants to the value of VAT, not rebates. The Church Commissioners do not hold these figures broken down by Church of England diocese, parochial church council or cathedral:

2016 £20,689,034.00

2017 £23,839,469.00

2018 £24,773,038.00

2019 £24,522,362.00

2020 £24,665,225.00

This website, maintained by DCMS, contains details of the Listed Places of Worship Scheme and recent total disbursement: http://www.lpwscheme.org.uk/

Like all bodies that have charitable status, Gift Aid on donations can be claimed by parochial church councils, dioceses and cathedrals. The funding model of the Church of England means that the vast majority of donations from worshippers, visitors and other supporters are made to parochial church councils and to cathedral chapters. The Church Commissioners do not keep a record of Gift Aid receipts by dioceses, but the amount claimed will be modest.

Parochial Church Council Gift Aid receipts for the past five years are:

2016 £91.9m

2017 £94.5m

2018 £94.3m

2019 £96.4m

2020 £91.3m*

*The figure for 2020 is provisional and yet to be fully reviewed.

See also Parish Finance Statistics 2019, page 12: https://www.churchofengland.org/sites/default/files/2021-01/Parish%20Finance%20Statistics%202019.pdf

In 2018, the most recent year for which statistics are readily available, Church of England cathedrals reported in their accounts a total of £1.3m of Gift Aid from donations.

Church Commissioners:

The Church Commissioners have not received any Gift Aid on donations made by individuals.

Churches Conservation Trust:

The Churches Conservation Trust is an independent charity reporting to both Parliament and the General Synod. It receives income from donations from individuals, trusts and foundations, and core funding from Government (DCMS) and the General Synod of the Church of England via the Church Commissioners.

2016/172017/182018/192019/202020/21
Tax Rebates / LPWGS*£550,556£239,520£318,174£289,460£834,592
Gift Aid£16,063£22,756£28,787£19,824£27,524

*figure includes grants from the Listed Places of Worship Grants Scheme


The Annual Report and Accounts of the Trust are laid before Parliament and are available at https://www.visitchurches.org.uk/what-we-do/about-us/annual-report-accounts.html*figure includes grants from the Listed Places of Worship Grants Scheme

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, how much has been paid in (a) National Lottery Funds and (b) Government grants to Church of England bodies including (i) dioceses, (ii) parochial church councils, (iii) cathedrals, (iv) the Church Commissioners and (v) the Churches Conservation Trust in each of the last five years.

Dioceses, parochial church councils and cathedrals:

The Church Commissioners do not hold figures broken down by Church of England diocese, parochial church council or cathedral, for National Lottery Heritage Fund or Government grants.

Grants from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to Church of England churches and cathedrals over the past five years are as follows. Brackets indicate the number of grants awarded:

2016 £ 49,292,200 (166)

2017 £ 25,264,900 (184)

2018 £12,458,450 (144)

2019 £11,652,300 (57)

2020 £3,376,200 (67)

Government (DCMS) figures for grants equal to the value of VAT for works to listed Church of England places of worship over the past five years are:

2016 £20,689,034

2017 £23,839,469

2018 £24,773,038

2019 £24,522,362

2020 £24,665,225

This website, maintained by DCMS, contains details of the Listed Places of Worship Scheme and recent total disbursement: http://www.lpwscheme.org.uk/

Grants to Church of England listed places of worship under the Government’s Culture Recovery Fund in 2020-21 totalled £54,387,240, broken down as follows:

Building type

Number of grants

Total amount of funding

Cathedral

107

£29,424,529

Major Parish Church

154

£14,903,597

Parish Church

484

£9,889,114

Church Commissioners:

The Church Commissioners do not receive funding from the National Lottery Heritage Fund or Government grants.

Churches Conservation Trust:

The Churches Conservation Trust is an independent charity reporting to both Parliament and the General Synod. It receives income from donations from individuals, trusts and foundations, and core funding from Government (DCMS) and the General Synod of the Church of England via the Church Commissioners. Funding for the last five years is as follows:

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Lottery Grants

£1,325,882

£683,053

£537,795

£1,394,687

£2,193,611

Government Grant Funding

£2,749,000

£2,738,001

£2,604,000

£2,608,000

£4,533,451 of which £2,788,000 grant in aid

Church Grant Funding

£1,355,000

£1,355,000

£1,655,000

£1,430,000

£1,430,000

The Annual Report and Accounts of the Trust are laid before Parliament and are available at https://www.visitchurches.org.uk/what-we-do/about-us/annual-report-accounts.html

The National Churches Trust October 2020 report ‘The House of Good’, found that the total economic and social value that church buildings generate in the UK amounted to at least £12.4 billion per year, an average of around £300,000 per church. The report can be viewed here: https://www.houseofgood.nationalchurchestrust.org/

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Jun 2021
What steps he is taking to raise international ambition to address the climate vulnerability of small island developing states ahead of COP26.

We are committed to working in partnership with Small Island Developing States (SIDS) to keep 1.5 alive and deliver the Paris Agreement goals.

To better support those already experiencing climate impacts, the UK has committed to doubling our climate finance. We are calling on others to follow our lead.

We are amplifying the voices of SIDS and continue to drive action on their priorities - including through our hosting of the Climate & Development Ministerial, co-chairing of the NDC Partnership, and leadership of the Adaptation Action Coalition.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment he has made of the area of Church Commissioner-owned land tenancies, under the Agricultural Holdings Act 1986, that will come up for renewal in the next (a) five years and (b) 10 years.

Over 60% of the tenancies within the Church Commissioners’ rural portfolio are Agricultural Holdings Act 1986 (AHA) tenancies. AHA tenancies granted prior to 11 July 1984 provide for rights of succession. Forecasting the rate and date of tenancy succession with any accuracy is challenging. This is because AHA tenancies can only be succeeded upon the death or retirement of an incumbent tenant and these dates are typically not known.

Specific criteria need to be met by a prospective successor to allow succession to take place. The criteria are reviewed on a case-by-case basis in the context of the tenant and their proposed successor’s situation at the time a succession is proposed. Currently, 17% of the Church Commissioners’ AHA tenants have no rights to succession, 62% have rights to one succession and 21% two remaining successions. As such, we anticipate potentially eligible successors to 83% of the Commissioners’ existing AHA tenancies may apply to succeed the tenancy.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
11th Dec 2020
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2020 to Question 125956, whether the Commissioners in collaboration with the Land Registry has conducted a land survey of land assets held by the Church of England.

As a responsible landowner, the Church Commissioners comply with the requirements of the Land Registration Act 2002, and the Church Commissioners are only responsible for the land which they hold, not all Church of England land.

The Church Commissioner’s land has, to a large extent, been registered with the Land Registry, all such information is publicly available via the Land Registry. The 2002 Act does not provide for the Land Registry and the Church Commissioners to collaborate to undertake land surveys, nor does it require the Commissioners to have a policy on digital maps of their landholding.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
11th Dec 2020
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2020 to Question 125956, whether the Commissioners have made an assessment of the level of compliance with the Land Registration Act 2002 of their policy on digitally mapped Church land assets.

As a responsible landowner, the Church Commissioners comply with the requirements of the Land Registration Act 2002, and the Church Commissioners are only responsible for the land which they hold, not all Church of England land.

The Church Commissioner’s land has, to a large extent, been registered with the Land Registry, all such information is publicly available via the Land Registry. The 2002 Act does not provide for the Land Registry and the Church Commissioners to collaborate to undertake land surveys, nor does it require the Commissioners to have a policy on digital maps of their landholding.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
19th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, with reference to the Cabinet Office Environment Policy Statement, published in April 2013, what progress has been made in reducing the carbon footprint of the Parliamentary estate.

The Houses, acting as Parliament, have their own Environmental Policy Statement and set a target to reduce absolute carbon emissions from energy use by 34% by the end of 2020/21, against an independently validated 2008/09 base year. As at the end of October Parliament was on track to meet this commitment with a 51.3% reduction in absolute carbon emissions, equivalent to a reduction of over 10,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide in the last full year compared to our baseline year.

The House currently only measures and reports on scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions, and is working to produce a system to measure our scope 3 impacts such as those from our supply chain, travel and waste.

4th Feb 2021
What steps she has taken to increase the number of prosecutions relating to rape and sexual assault.

I am committed to ensuring rape and sexual assault cases are conducted effectively – in fact, I recently successfully referred a point of law to the Court of Appeal to ensure that the law is clear in cases of sexual assault.

I have also engaged closely on CPS rape work, including meeting with CPS South East in December 2020 to discuss how their RASSO unit approaches these complex cases. The CPS and police also published their Joint National Action Plan on rape in January 2021 which shows their commitment to improvement.

24th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) minimum durability standards are and (b) average replacement frequency is for (i) computers and (ii) laptops in each Department; and if he will publish each Department's policy on replacing computer and information technology equipment.

The Central Digital and Data Office have advised that it is for each department to make decisions individually.

The Cabinet Office, like all Government departments and employers, needs to provide modern equipment to its staff to ensure that they can work efficiently, effectively and securely.

As laptops/computers age they will become slower, due to upgrades to the operating systems (e.g. Microsoft Windows) and more complex software, which will reduce the efficiency of those using them. The operating systems will also eventually become out of date and the vendors will not supply security patches, thereby making them obsolete (due to being insecure). There are no fixed timelines to these changes. We therefore have to assess on a regular basis to determine whether change is needed.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
16th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what percentage of Government owned buildings have (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines; and how many (i) solar panels and (ii) wind turbines were installed on Government buildings in each of the last 10 years.

Data on the total number of solar panels and wind turbines across the government estate, and how they are distributed, is not held centrally. However, the government is committed to driving forward the renewable energy agenda, both on its own estate and beyond. As set out in the Net Zero Strategy, the government aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from public sector buildings by 75% by 2037. To support this, £2.5 billion is being invested through the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme over the financial years 2020/21 to 2024/25 to provide grants for public sector bodies in England to fund heat decarbonisation and energy efficiency measures, including renewable electricity generation.

The Office of Government Property has published the Net Zero Estate Playbook providing guidance to support government property organisations to decarbonise their estate. This includes recommendations of how to reduce operational energy use, such as through improving renewable energy generation where appropriate through multiple channels.



Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
16th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what percentage of the government estate is on a renewable energy tariff.

8.23% of the government estate (Central Government & Arm's-length bodies) electricity volume is on a renewable or renewable blend tariff.

52.2% of the government estate​ ​(Central Government & Arm's-length bodies)​ ​electricity volume is being supplied from a zero carbon (nuclear) tariff.

The Crown Commercial Service (CCS) is developing a route to market to contract directly with generators of renewable power and source an increasing amount of renewable power for the estate demand. The current timetable will see the agreement in place by the end of 2023.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
15th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether (a) his Department, (b) other Government Departments and (c) other relevant organisations take steps to assess the effectiveness and impact of Carbon Reduction Plans in the context of Procurement Policy Note 06/21.

In June 2021, the Government published Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 06/21 - Taking account of Carbon Reduction Plans in the procurement of major government contracts - requiring suppliers bidding for contracts above £5 million per annum to commit to the Government’s 2050 Net Zero target and publish a Carbon Reduction Plan.

Suppliers who fail to make such a commitment and publish their Carbon Reduction Plan risk being excluded from the procurement process.

In FY 2020/21, 5% (578) of all procurements awarded were above £5m per annum. These accounted for over 90% of the total value of procurements in the same period. Over 2,500 suppliers have submitted compliant Carbon Reduction Plans in response to PPN 06/21, and 40 bids have been rejected for failing to provide a compliant Carbon Reduction Plan since the policy was launched. We do not hold centrally the number of contracts terminated as a result of failure to comply with PPN 06/21.

Individual departments are responsible for monitoring the effectiveness of Carbon Reduction Plans submitted by suppliers as part of their commercial activity. We do not hold this data centrally.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
15th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) bids have been rejected and (b) contracts have been terminated for failure to comply with Procurement Policy Note 06/21 as of 15 May 2023.

In June 2021, the Government published Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 06/21 - Taking account of Carbon Reduction Plans in the procurement of major government contracts - requiring suppliers bidding for contracts above £5 million per annum to commit to the Government’s 2050 Net Zero target and publish a Carbon Reduction Plan.

Suppliers who fail to make such a commitment and publish their Carbon Reduction Plan risk being excluded from the procurement process.

In FY 2020/21, 5% (578) of all procurements awarded were above £5m per annum. These accounted for over 90% of the total value of procurements in the same period. Over 2,500 suppliers have submitted compliant Carbon Reduction Plans in response to PPN 06/21, and 40 bids have been rejected for failing to provide a compliant Carbon Reduction Plan since the policy was launched. We do not hold centrally the number of contracts terminated as a result of failure to comply with PPN 06/21.

Individual departments are responsible for monitoring the effectiveness of Carbon Reduction Plans submitted by suppliers as part of their commercial activity. We do not hold this data centrally.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
15th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of public procurement contracts have an annual value above £5 million excluding VAT.

In June 2021, the Government published Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 06/21 - Taking account of Carbon Reduction Plans in the procurement of major government contracts - requiring suppliers bidding for contracts above £5 million per annum to commit to the Government’s 2050 Net Zero target and publish a Carbon Reduction Plan.

Suppliers who fail to make such a commitment and publish their Carbon Reduction Plan risk being excluded from the procurement process.

In FY 2020/21, 5% (578) of all procurements awarded were above £5m per annum. These accounted for over 90% of the total value of procurements in the same period. Over 2,500 suppliers have submitted compliant Carbon Reduction Plans in response to PPN 06/21, and 40 bids have been rejected for failing to provide a compliant Carbon Reduction Plan since the policy was launched. We do not hold centrally the number of contracts terminated as a result of failure to comply with PPN 06/21.

Individual departments are responsible for monitoring the effectiveness of Carbon Reduction Plans submitted by suppliers as part of their commercial activity. We do not hold this data centrally.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister will Chair the Climate Action Strategy Committee.

GOV.UK is updated regularly with the list of Cabinet Committees, their terms of reference, membership and who chairs each Committee.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, whether she plans to attend the COP27 United Nations Climate Change Summit in Sharm el Sheikh.

My Rt Hon. Friend the COP26 President is working closely with Egypt in the run up to COP27. The composition of the UK Government's delegation will be announced in due course.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Department have been assigned to work on the Convention of Biological Diversity; and how many Ministers in his Department plan to attend the conference from 25 April to 8 May 2022.

The 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity represents an historic opportunity to secure an agreement to ambitious global action over the next decade. The UK is committed to playing a leading role in developing an ambitious post-2020 global biodiversity framework to be adopted at COP15. The COP is due to take place in Kunming, China, later this year; though, due to the coronavirus pandemic, we expect a delay to the planned dates of 25 April to 8 May. Minister Lord Goldsmith will head the UK delegation.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is the lead department for the Convention on Biological Diversity, working closely with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and Cabinet Office. A core team is in place in DEFRA, drawing on expertise across DEFRA, its specialist arms-length bodies, working with other Government departments, civil society organisations and society at large. This includes working with the FCDO and our Posts across the diplomatic network, through which we are engaging host governments to support the delivery of our objectives. Nature is one of the key priorities in the UK’s COP26 Presidency, and so the Cabinet Office COP26 Unit is also supporting preparations for COP15 to ensure successful delivery of our COP26 objectives.

15th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister will be leading the work of the National Economic Recovery Taskforce (Logistics) to tackle supply chain shortages following the recent Government reshuffle.

Government Ministers responsible for the supply chain ecosystem are working collectively, and in close partnership with industry, to drive the development and delivery of plans to strengthen supply chain resilience, supporting economic recovery and levelling up.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of the vehicles used by his Department for Government business are electric vehicles.

The Cabinet Office uses vehicles from the Government Car Service, alongside other providers.

The Government Car Service is already electrifying its vehicles, with nearly 50% of their fleet either full battery electric or plug-in hybrid.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effect on UK trade flows of the end of the EU Exit transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the Written Statement published on 11 March. (https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-03-11/hcws841).

The Reasonable Worst Case Scenario planning assumptions published on 23 September related specifically to the potential for disruption to freight travelling at the end of the Transition Period. The Government is using a broad range of approaches to planning and preparing for the next phases of border controls.

Freight levels have increased since the beginning of the year, and volumes are now at the equivalent 2020 levels. The Border Operations Centre in the Cabinet Office is monitoring border flow.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's research and analysis, Reasonable Worst Case Scenario for borders at the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020, published on 23 September 2020, whether his Department plans to update that research for the introduction of the enforcement of import controls on EU goods from July 2021; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the Written Statement published on 11 March. (https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-03-11/hcws841).

The Reasonable Worst Case Scenario planning assumptions published on 23 September related specifically to the potential for disruption to freight travelling at the end of the Transition Period. The Government is using a broad range of approaches to planning and preparing for the next phases of border controls.

Freight levels have increased since the beginning of the year, and volumes are now at the equivalent 2020 levels. The Border Operations Centre in the Cabinet Office is monitoring border flow.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the readiness of (a) inland and (b) port border infrastructure by July 2021 for the introduction and enforcement of EU import controls.

I refer the hon. Member to the Written Statement published on 11 March. (https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-03-11/hcws841).

The Reasonable Worst Case Scenario planning assumptions published on 23 September related specifically to the potential for disruption to freight travelling at the end of the Transition Period. The Government is using a broad range of approaches to planning and preparing for the next phases of border controls.

Freight levels have increased since the beginning of the year, and volumes are now at the equivalent 2020 levels. The Border Operations Centre in the Cabinet Office is monitoring border flow.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Cabinet Office Policy Paper entitled The Border Operating Model updated on 8 October 2020, what testing has been undertaken of the Check an HGV is Ready to Cross the Border web service.

I refer the hon. Member to the letter from the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the Chair of the Future Relationship with the European Union select committee dated 7 October 2020 and published on the committee website.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Smart Freight system will require verification of completed customs declarations.

Smart Freight will enable a driver or haulier to check and confirm that goods they are carrying are accompanied by customs and import/export documentation and are thus ready to cross the border.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
5th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent progress the Government has made on EU trade deal negotiations; and if she will make a statement.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 39669 on 4 May 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether it is her Department's policy to mandate the use of low-carbon cement in future construction projects.

The Department for Business and Trade works with the construction sector to support decarbonisation and achieving Government’s net zero targets.

This support includes increased delivery of energy efficiency and heat decarbonisation, the use of lower carbon materials and products such as cement and concrete, and tools to help the sector manage carbon and understand whole life carbon considerations of infrastructure and the built environment.

The approach on what materials and products, including lower carbon materials, could be used in construction projects is agnostic, and will be dependent on the type of infrastructure or built environment structure being constructed.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much (a) public and (b) private sector funding for (i) battery and (ii) electric vehicle manufacturing has been announced since July 2022.

Since July 2022, we have seen Tata Group announce an investment of over £4bn in a UK gigafactory. JLR have also announced plans to accelerate their shift to electric vehicles and have committed to a £15bn investment in their industrial footprint, vehicle programmes, autonomous, AI and digital technologies and people skills. In addition, in the wider electric vehicle manufacturing supply chain, we have seen Johnson Matthey announce an investment of over £60m in Hertfordshire to develop hydrogen technologies, Pensana announce an investment of £145m in a rare Earth metal refinery, and Ford announce a further £150m investment in Halewood to manufacture Electric Drive Units, in addition to their £227m investment announced in October 2021.

Details of our support to companies will be published in due course as part of our regular transparency data.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what discussions her Department has had with representatives of the metals recycling sector on (a) potential barriers to the sector reaching net zero, (b) support for the sector to reach net zero and (c) the potential impact of the sector on the ability of other parts of the economy to reach net zero.

The Department for Business and Trade has regular contact with the metals recycling sector and they have raised electrification of sites and access to hydrogen networks as potential barriers. The Government’s Electricity Networks Strategic Framework sets out a vision for the transformation of the electricity network, and the Government aims to respond to its consultation on hydrogen transport and storage infrastructure later this year.

To support decarbonisation, the sector can apply to the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Programme of Research and Innovation for the UK Steel and Metals sector, and the SUSTAIN Future Manufacturing Research Hub.

Metals recycling will play an important role in helping the domestic aluminium and steel sectors deliver net zero production, through the delivery of reduced residual scrap as a key feedstock.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2023 to Question 148550 on Mining: Seas and Oceans, whether she has had recent discussions with the International Seabed Authority on environmental standards for (a) existing and (b) future commercial exploitation.

There is no deep-sea mining currently happening in areas beyond national jurisdictions, there are no exploitation licences for deep-sea mining, and no exploitation regulations have yet been agreed.

In addition, the UK has committed not to sponsor or support the issuing of any exploitation licences for deep-sea mining projects unless and until there is sufficient scientific evidence about the potential impact on deep-sea ecosystems and strong and enforceable environmental regulations and standards have been developed by the International Seabed Authority (ISA) and are in place.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of British Geographical Society’s report entitled Deep-sea mining evidence review – MineralsUK, published in October 2022.

The Government commissioned this independent review from the British Geological Survey, the National Oceanography Centre and Heriot-Watt University to provide a comprehensive description of current research related to deep-sea mining.

Informed by evidence, we continue to contribute to discussions on deep-seabed mining at the International Seabed Authority (ISA), pressing for the highest environmental standards in relation to existing exploration activity, and potential future commercial exploitation should that be approved by the ISA.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
16th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the 2023 UK greenhouse gas emissions, provisional figures, published on 28 March 2024, what assessment she has made of the reasons for the increase in emissions from commercial buildings since 1990; and what steps her Department is taking to help reduce such emissions.

Between 1990 and 2023, provisional statistics show total greenhouse gas emissions from the buildings and product use sectors have fallen by an estimated 28%. However, in the same time period, emissions from commercial buildings have risen by 3% largely due to the use of natural gas for heating. To address this issue, the UK Government is working with industry to understand how to decarbonise commercial buildings in an affordable and appropriate manner, including through supporting energy efficiency improvements, developing the market for heat pumps, and developing heat network capacity. This approach is detailed in the Heat and Buildings Strategy, which can be accessed here.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when she plans to respond to the consultation entitled Non-domestic Private Rented Sector minimum energy efficiency standards: EPC B implementation, published on 17 March 2021.

We have reviewed the responses to our consultation on minimum energy efficiency standards in the non-domestic private rented sector. We are working hard to ensure the policy design remains fair and proportionate for landlords and tenants within the current economic climate and to help realise the benefits of energy efficiency, including reduced energy bills, more comfortable and healthier workplaces and greater energy security. We are continuing to engage with commercial building owners and representative groups to understand the different pathways to support decarbonisation and give certainty to the energy efficiency supply chain. We plan to publish the response in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when she plans to publish a response to the consultation on Introducing a performance-based policy framework in large commercial and industrial buildings, which closed on 9 June 2021.

Government paused the rollout of the operational energy rating pilot scheme but remains interested in exploring the role that operational ratings can play in supporting energy reduction within the wider landscape for decarbonising commercial and industrial buildings.

We continue to engage with stakeholders to understand more about potential options for moving the dial on reducing carbon emissions and Government’s role in this.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities on steps to improve the efficiency of processing planning applications for large energy projects.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with ministerial colleagues on a number of issues. Planning reform is discussed regularly at Cabinet level and there have been major Government announcements recently on this issue as part of the Autumn Statement and Spring Budget.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has made an estimate of the number of energy projects waiting to be connected to the national grid.

Data from the Electricity System Operator (ESO) shows that there were 1530 energy projects in the transmission connection queue at the end of February 2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has made a recent estimate of the total cost to (a) consumers and (b) the Exchequer of issuing curtailment payments to energy companies in the last 12 months.

The System Operator is responsible for managing constraints on the networks. It does this by curtailing a type of generation, for example wind, and turning up an alternative generation, as needed. Costs are funded through electricity bills, not through the Exchequer. Annual network constraint costs for 2023 were £1.4bn (2023 prices).

To manage the level of constraints on the system and ensure the UK's homes can be powered by clean, green energy in future, government is working with Ofgem, network owners and others to halve the build process from 14 years to 7 through our Transmission Acceleration Action Plan.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)