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Written Question
Airspace
27 Nov 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to implement the Airspace Modernisation strategy.

Answer (Robert Courts)

The Government recognises that airspace modernisation is an important enabler to allowing us to build back better and to meet out carbon commitment

Airspace modernisation is vital to the future of aviation, to delivering net zero and create opportunities for airports to manage how noise impacts local communities. It is a critical infrastructure programme of national importance that will supporting the aviation sector’s recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

However, in light of the pandemic, we recognise that the timescales in which airspace modernisation will take place will change. We are working with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) to review the Airspace Modernisation Strategy, to consider the recommendations from Airspace Change Organising Group (ACOG’s) recent report ‘Remobilising the Airspace Change Programme’, and will advise stakeholders of our preferred approach shortly.

My officials have and will continue to work closely with all stakeholders to identify ways forward for the programme, considering all options for the future.


Written Question
Jet Zero Council
27 Nov 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans the Jet Zero Council has for airspace modernisation.

Answer (Robert Courts)

At the request of DfT and Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), the Airspace Change Organisation Group (ACOG) was established in 2019 to coordinate the delivery of key aspects of the Government’s Airspace Modernisation Strategy (AMS), namely the national programme of airspace change amongst major UK airports.

The Jet Zero Council (JZC) will take into account all of the decarbonisation levers available to ensure the sector reaches its net zero goals, including Airspace Modernisation. However, it will be primarily focused on driving forward areas that require further coordination where previously, cross-sectoral collaboration was missing; such as zero emission aerospace technology and sustainable aviation fuels (SAF). Critically, the JZC is not seeking to duplicate areas already progressing, such as an agreement on international emissions, or aviation modernisation which has an existing governance/delivery structures in ACOG.


Written Question
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
6 Nov 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made in delivering the 4,000 zero emission buses announced by the Prime Minister in February 2020.

Answer (Rachel Maclean)

The Government is committed to delivering at least 4,000 zero emission buses. Further details, including government support for the additional costs of purchasing zero emission buses, will be announced after the Spending Review has concluded.


Written Question
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
6 Nov 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to support bus operators with the additional costs of purchasing zero emission buses to deliver the Government's policy of 4,000 new zero emission buses.

Answer (Rachel Maclean)

The Government is committed to delivering at least 4,000 zero emission buses. Further details, including government support for the additional costs of purchasing zero emission buses, will be announced after the Spending Review has concluded.


Written Question
Road Traffic Act 2004
13 Oct 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when part six of the Road Traffic Act 2004 will be implemented.

Answer (Rachel Maclean)

The Department has started discussions with key stakeholders about implementing Part 6 of the Traffic Management 2004 and this will inform the drafting of regulations and statutory guidance. Implementation will require a number of statutory instruments to be made covering matters such as enforcement, level of penalties, approved devices, adjudication, representations and appeals. It is not possible at this stage to say when the powers will be available to local authorities.


Written Question
Electric Vehicles: Charging Points
14 Feb 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding has been allocated from the On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme guidance to Central Bedfordshire Council.

Answer (Grant Shapps)

The On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS) is a demand-led funding scheme which assists local authorities with the cost of installing chargepoints in residential streets. The funding available is for 75% of the capital costs of procuring and installing the chargepoint and an associated dedicated parking bay, and is administered by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). In October 2019, I wrote to all local authorities encouraging them to send their strategies for infrastructure deployment and to take advantage of ORCS funding. Last month we announced that Government funding will be doubled to £10 million for the installation of chargepoints on residential streets next year. This could support as many as 3,600 chargepoints for those that do not have off-street parking.

To date, no applications have been made for funding through ORCS from Central Bedfordshire Council. Luton Borough Council, which is in Bedfordshire, has applied for funding under the scheme and has been awarded £23,336 to support the installation of nine chargepoints.


Written Question
Cycling: Per Capita Costs
3 Sep 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much per capita funding has been allocated from the public purse to cycling in each local authority in each of the last three years.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

The Department estimates that over the three years from 2016/17 to 2018/19, a total of around £1.2 billion of funding has been invested in cycling and walking projects in England outside London. This equates to approximately £8.50 per capita per annum, but the amount varies considerably between individual local authorities. The Department will be publishing detailed information on the funding that has been provided from the public purse, including estimates of funding allocations to individual authorities, alongside its report to Parliament later this year on the delivery of the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

Funding for cycling and walking comes from a wide variety of ring-fenced and non-ringfenced sources making it difficult to summarise the information concisely for each local authority. Ring-fenced funds that were available to some or all local authorities over the three years in question include the Bikeability programme, the Access Fund, the Cycle Ambition Cities fund, the Cycle Safety Fund, Cycle Rail grants, and Highways England Designated Funds. Non-ringfenced funds that were available to some or all local authorities over the same period, and of which of a proportion was used to support cycling and walking, include the Local Growth Fund, the Integrated Transport Block, the Highways Maintenance Fund, the National Air Quality Plan, the National Productivity Investment Fund, the Highways Maintenance Challenge Fund, and other cross-Government infrastructure funds, including the Transforming Cities Fund and Housing Infrastructure Fund.


Written Question
Cycling: Bedfordshire
19 Jul 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much per capita funding has been allocated from the public purse to cycling in Central Bedfordshire in each of the last three years.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The Department estimates that on average around £3 to £4 per capita has been allocated from the public purse to cycling and walking in Central Bedfordshire in each of the last three financial years. This estimate is based on both ring-fenced funding streams (including grants from the Sustainable Transport Transition Fund, Access Fund, and Small Business Research Initiative, as well as Bikeability training in schools in Central Bedfordshire), and non-ringfenced funding streams (including the Integrated Transport Block and Maintenance Block) of which a certain percentage is spent on measures which benefit cyclists and pedestrians. Local authorities are also able to use other local funds for cycling and walking projects, making it difficult to give a more precise estimate.


Written Question
Cycling and Walking: Infrastructure
12 Mar 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding his Department plans to make available for constructing schemes in local cycling and walking infrastructure plans.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plans (LCWIPs) are used by Local Authorities to identify and prioritise investment for cycling and walking schemes from local funds and relevant national funding streams, such as the Highways Maintenance Fund, Integrated Transport Block, Transforming Cities Fund, Future High Streets Fund, and the Housing Infrastructure Fund.

Decisions on further future funding for cycling and walking will be made in the context of the forthcoming Spending Review.


Written Question
Transforming Cities Fund
22 Feb 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether market towns will have equal access to the Transforming Cities Fund alongside metropolitan areas; how he plans to achieve equity on access to the Transforming Cities Fund throughout the UK; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Nusrat Ghani)

While the Transforming Cities Fund is aimed at transforming intra-city connectivity and driving productivity in city regions across England, the Government expects that where market towns form part of these city regions, they will also benefit from the improved connections between urban centres and their commuter areas. To ensure that investments are truly transformational across their whole area, the Department will work closely with city regions that have been shortlisted to receive a share of the Fund, to co-develop innovative public and sustainable transport packages.

Alongside this, the £675m Future High Streets Fund will support and fund local areas’ plans to renew and reshape their high streets and town centres in a way that improves experience, drives growth and ensures future sustainability. This fund is open to all places, with no minimum population restrictions.


Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Registration
10 Jan 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

What steps he is taking to ensure the compliance of foreign-registered vehicles with UK laws and regulations.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

UK road traffic legislation applies to everyone who use our roads irrespective of where the vehicle is registered.

It is for the Police to decide what action to take against foreign drivers detected committing criminal traffic offences. This may include impounding.

For traffic offences subject to civil enforcement, persistent evaders found in contravention may have their vehicles immobilised or removed. Some local authorities use international debt recovery agents to recover payment.


Written Question
Trains: Hydrogen
24 May 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the date on which the first UK trains will be converted to run on hydrogen.

Answer (Lord Johnson of Marylebone)

Alstom have recently proposed a trial of trains converted to run on hydrogen in the North in association with Eversholt and Arriva Rail North and will need to develop a business case accordingly. The target date for these trains entering service will be dependent on both the business case and on the regulatory approvals being given.


Written Question
Official Cars: Fuel Cells
23 May 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government plans to introduce more hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to its service fleet.

Answer (Nusrat Ghani)

The Government Car Service (GCS) is currently evaluating a hydrogen fuel cell car to determine fitness for purpose under operational conditions. The restrictions on range, refuelling and passenger capacity will be considerations for this type of car as the fleet is renewed.

GCS are committed to meeting the target announced in the autumn budget that 25% of cars in central government will be ultra-low emission by 2022.


Written Question
Cycling and Walking: Infrastructure
5 Mar 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to update national design guidance on cycling and walking infrastructure.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Department’s guidance for local authorities on designing good, safe infrastructure for cyclists is set out in Local Transport Note 2/08. In line with the commitment made in the Government’s Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, the Department is in the process of updating this guidance to take account of developments in cycling infrastructure since its publication in 2008, and aims to publish a revised version by the end of 2018. Additionally, the Department is in the process of reviewing both the Inclusive Mobility and Tactile Paving guidance and has let a research contract to establish the scope of revisions needed. Research for this is anticipated to be completed later this year.


Written Question
Official Cars: Exhaust Emissions
18 Oct 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has given guidance to drivers in the Government Car Services on Westminster City Councils' initiative Don't Be Idle.

Answer (John Hayes)

Government Car Service drivers are given a clear instruction not to keep engines running whilst parked or stationary and regular reminders are sent out on this subject. This instruction would also cover the aims of Westminster City Councils’ initiative on cars idling, which the drivers have been made aware of.


Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Sales
9 Oct 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of total vehicle sales were ultra-low emission vehicles in the last 12 months for which there are figures.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

Registrations of new ultra low emission vehicles represented 1.40% of total new vehicle registrations between July 2016 and June 2017. For cars, the proportion was 1.65% during the same period. In July and August 2017 registrations of new ultra low emission cars are estimated to have exceeded 2% of total new car registrations.


Written Question
Official Cars: Diesel Vehicles
11 Sep 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, by what date it is planned that the Government Car Service no longer uses diesel vehicles.

Answer (John Hayes)

The Government Car Service will be replacing diesel vehicles on their fleet as they become due for replacement with non-diesel alternatives. It has so far replaced a quarter of its vehicles with petrol hybrid cars. There is no specific target date for this to be completed, it will be dependent on an assessment at time of renewal in the interests of maximising value for money.


Written Question
Department for Transport: Recruitment
28 Feb 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department operates a ban the box employment policy in respect of ex-offender job applicants with unspent convictions; and how many employees of his Department have unspent convictions.

Answer (John Hayes)

The Department for Transport supports ‘ban the box’ and once a provisional offer of employment is made, candidates are asked to disclose unspent convictions and then a criminal record check is undertaken as a part of the Baseline Personnel Security Standard; however, no documentation regarding criminal history is retained by the Department, nor transferred to the employees’ personnel records.


Written Question
Air Pollution
20 Jan 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's objectives are related to air quality.

Answer (John Hayes)

The Department for Transport’s Single Departmental Plan sets out its four objectives. Tackling air quality supports all of these objectives, but it is particularly important for delivering safe, secure and sustainable transport.

The Government’s plans for tackling air quality are set in the National Air Quality Plan for Nitrogen Dioxide, published December 2015, which will be updated shortly.


Written Question
Government Car Service: Diesel Vehicles
16 Jan 2017

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many diesel cars there are in the Government Car Service.

Answer (John Hayes)

The Government Car Service currently operates 55 diesel cars out of 89 overall in the fleet.

The Government Car Service has for some time been reviewing their use of diesel cars and has introduced low emission and ultra-low emission vehicles to their fleet as diesel cars become due for replacement.

Just this month five diesel cars are due for disposal and they are being replaced by petrol hybrid cars.


Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Exhaust Emissions
20 Dec 2016

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many ultra-low emissions vehicles there are on UK roads now; and how many there are projected to be in (a) 2017, (b) 2018, (c) 2019 and (d) 2020.

Answer (John Hayes)

At the end of the third quarter of 2016 there were 87,366 ultra low emission vehicles licensed in the UK. The Government has a clear goal that all new cars and vans should be zero emission vehicles by 2040, and sales growth currently remains on track.

As part of the Government’s forthcoming emissions reduction plan, we expect to update the interim projections set out in the 2011 Carbon Plan and “Driving the future today: a strategy for ultra low emission vehicles in the UK” (2013), to reflect the latest analysis.


Written Question
Railways: Technology
13 Dec 2016

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has assessed the potential merits of developing magnetic levitation trains as part of the Government's industrial strategy.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Department for Transport continually monitors the development of rail technology. The high costs of conventional magnetic levitation trains and their incompatibility with existing rail networks are likely to limit the market opportunities for this technology. We are however also assessing the potential for the development of hyperloop technologies in the UK which may also use magnetic levitation. The Department’s Science Advisory Council intends to publish a paper on hyperloop in early 2017 setting out its position on the technical credibility of the concept and the opportunities it offers to UK industry given our technology and engineering expertise.


Written Question
Driving Under Influence: Drugs
9 Jun 2014

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what guidance will be provided to police officers on the implementation of the new drug driving offence; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Robert Goodwill)

The Department is in regular contact with the Police Service about the implementation of the new drug driving offence and has every confidence that the police will implement it effectively including the application of the statutory medical defence.

The Police Service is in the process of amending their procedures, which will include the statutory medical defence and its operation. These will be issued in advance of the introduction of the new offence. This will provide each force plenty of time to consider the new procedures. We are confident forces will properly consider and include the new offence alongside current drink and drug drive training.


Written Question
Driving Under Influence: Drugs
9 Jun 2014

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with external stakeholders on planned communications regarding the new drug driving offence; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Robert Goodwill)

Officials working on the new drug driving legislation meet regularly with stakeholders from both the law enforcement and healthcare sectors. These meetings include discussions on how the new offence will be communicated.

The medical profession has assisted the Department in developing guidance to healthcare professionals to use in discussion with their patients. We expect to publish the guidance later in the summer and will circulate it to the medical profession. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is currently working with pharmaceutical companies to update the product information of those medicines implicated by the new legislation. MHRA also expect to issue a ‘Drug Safety Update' article later in the summer to include details about the new offence for healthcare professionals. This will be accompanied by an article for patients. MHRA also work closely with the British National Formulary to update the prescribing information for medicines as new safety information emerges and will ensure this new information is brought to their attention. The Think! campaign is in the process of being developed but we expect to start informing the public about the new offence just prior to its introduction followed be a more concentrated campaign on its introduction.


Written Question
Driving Under Influence: Drugs
9 Jun 2014

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answer of 30 April 2014, Official Report, column 760W, on driving under influence: drugs, what the proposed timetable is for the steps his Department proposes to take to communicate the new drug driving offence.

Answer (Robert Goodwill)

Officials working on the new drug driving legislation meet regularly with stakeholders from both the law enforcement and healthcare sectors. These meetings include discussions on how the new offence will be communicated.

The medical profession has assisted the Department in developing guidance to healthcare professionals to use in discussion with their patients. We expect to publish the guidance later in the summer and will circulate it to the medical profession. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is currently working with pharmaceutical companies to update the product information of those medicines implicated by the new legislation. MHRA also expect to issue a ‘Drug Safety Update' article later in the summer to include details about the new offence for healthcare professionals. This will be accompanied by an article for patients. MHRA also work closely with the British National Formulary to update the prescribing information for medicines as new safety information emerges and will ensure this new information is brought to their attention. The Think! campaign is in the process of being developed but we expect to start informing the public about the new offence just prior to its introduction followed be a more concentrated campaign on its introduction.