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Written Question
Mental Health Services: Children and Young People
8 Mar 2021

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will set out a timetable for the inclusion of couples therapists trained to address parental conflict in the specification for multi-disciplinary teams working in child and adolescent mental health services.

Answer (Nadine Dorries)

We have no plans to do so.

The inclusion of family-focused interventions are for local commissioning and clinical determination. There is no single ‘specification’ for children and young people’s mental health services or child and adolescent mental health services. It is not a single service or pathway and the term refers to the range of services that offer support based on different needs. In response to a National Health Service benchmarking project on children and young people’s mental health services, 99% of providers that responded confirmed that they offer family therapy in joint and group work.


Written Question
Mental Health Services: Children and Young People
8 Mar 2021

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will set out a timetable for the inclusion of parental conflict being in factors routinely assessed in mental health services for children and young people.

Answer (Nadine Dorries)

We have no plans to do so.

The inclusion of family-focused interventions are for local commissioning and clinical determination. There is no single ‘specification’ for children and young people’s mental health services or child and adolescent mental health services. It is not a single service or pathway and the term refers to the range of services that offer support based on different needs. In response to a National Health Service benchmarking project on children and young people’s mental health services, 99% of providers that responded confirmed that they offer family therapy in joint and group work.


Written Question
Coronavirus: Screening
27 Jan 2021

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the operational false positive rate for population mass screening was for the last four formal internal quality assurance runs, with the supporting report.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

In the United Kingdom population screening is offered across 11 screening programmes which cover over 30 conditions, as recommended by the UK National Screening Committee. These screening programmes do not report on the false positive rates but do include information where further testing is required.


Written Question
Air Pollution
28 Jan 2020

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

What steps he is taking to help reduce the financial cost to the NHS of treating patients affected by high levels of air pollution.

Answer (Nadine Dorries)

The best way to reduce National Health Service costs and improve health is by tackling the sources of air pollution, so that less pollution is emitted in the first place. The actions set out in our Clean Air Strategy are targeted at a range of sources and pollutants and will result in the number of people who live in areas where particulate matter is above the World Health Organization’s guidelines being halved by 2025.


Written Question
NHS: Staff
22 Oct 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure safe and adequate levels of staffing across the NHS to protect patient safety.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) applications to the 15 January deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

UCAS reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see 7,500 new doctors available annually by 2020/21. This expansion has delivered five brand new medical schools in Sunderland, Lancashire, Chelmsford, Lincoln and Canterbury. The upcoming NHS People Plan will examine options for growing the medical workforce further. This includes the possibility of further medical school expansion, as well as increasing part-time study and expanding the number of accelerated degree programmes.


Written Question
Nurses: Recruitment
22 Oct 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to encourage and support people to enter the nursing profession.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) applications to the 15 January deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

UCAS reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see 7,500 new doctors available annually by 2020/21. This expansion has delivered five brand new medical schools in Sunderland, Lancashire, Chelmsford, Lincoln and Canterbury. The upcoming NHS People Plan will examine options for growing the medical workforce further. This includes the possibility of further medical school expansion, as well as increasing part-time study and expanding the number of accelerated degree programmes.


Written Question
Medicine: Education
22 Oct 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to increase the number of medical school places to meet growing demand.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) applications to the 15 January deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

UCAS reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see 7,500 new doctors available annually by 2020/21. This expansion has delivered five brand new medical schools in Sunderland, Lancashire, Chelmsford, Lincoln and Canterbury. The upcoming NHS People Plan will examine options for growing the medical workforce further. This includes the possibility of further medical school expansion, as well as increasing part-time study and expanding the number of accelerated degree programmes.


Written Question
NHS: Renewable Energy
27 Jun 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) NHS Trusts and (b) other public sector bodies have been enabled to receive 100 per cent renewable energy through Crown Commercial Services.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

National Health Service organisations make local decisions on how they contract for their energy supplies, including renewable energy through Crown Commercial Services or other suppliers. Data on which suppliers are used is not collected centrally.


Written Question
East London NHS Foundation Trust: Crown Commercial Service
27 Jun 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what lessons for residential property can be learned from the relationship between Crown Commercial Services and the East London NHS Foundation Trust; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

East London NHS Foundation Trust reports that it has not used Crown Commercial Services for any procurement services in relation to residential property.


Written Question
Sugar
15 May 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timetable is for the publication of the sugar reduction progress report by Public Health England.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Public Health England (PHE) is responsible for overseeing the Sugar Reduction and Wider Reformulation Programme on behalf of the Government. PHE is planning to publish the second-year progress report for the sugar reduction programme at the end of summer 2019.


Written Question
Hearing Impairment: Medical Treatments
20 Mar 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of potential merits of the NHS offering micro suction treatments to improve hearing (a) in addition to and (b) instead of syringing; what information his Department holds on the number of people whose impaired hearing is not improved by syringing; whether the NHS has plans to introduce micro suction as part of NHS Long-Term Plan; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The management of ear wax removal is a decision that is taken at a local level by each clinical commissioning group informed by relevant clinical guidelines. The Department does not collect data on the impact of not syringing on hearing impairment. There are no plans to introduce micro suction as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

To support local practice the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guideline ‘NG98 on Hearing loss in adults: assessment and management’, was published in June 2018.


Written Question
Air Pollution: Health Hazards
22 Feb 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to include the effects on health of air pollution in the (a) Prevention Green Paper, (b) Environment Bill and (c) Road to Zero strategy.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Air pollution is one of the greatest environmental threats to health. The Department’s prevention paper published in November 2018 sets out our ambition to improve air quality and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevention-is-better-than-cure-our-vision-to-help-you-live-well-for-longer

The Department has been closely involved in the development of the Government’s plans to improve air quality, such as the Environment Bill and Road to Zero strategy, in addition to the recently published clean air strategy, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/clean-air-strategy-2019


Written Question
Food: Labelling
23 Jan 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish the outcome of his Department's consultation entitled Calorie labelling for food and drink served outside of the home; and what the timetable is for implementing the recommendations from that consultation.

Answer (Steve Brine)

We will publish the results of the consultation on mandating calorie labelling in the out-of-home sector and set out the timetable for further action later this year.


Written Question
Health Services: Private Sector
15 Jan 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter entitled, Patient safety: letter to independent healthcare providers, published by his Department on 8 May 2018, what steps his Department is taking to improve patient safety in the private sector.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

Under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 all providers of regulated activities, including National Health Service and independent providers, have to register with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and meet a set of fundamental standards of safety and quality below which care should never fall.

The Government recognises the useful role of the independent sector in adding capacity, promoting innovation and offering patient choice.

The CQC raised important patient safety concerns in its ‘State of Care in Independent Acute Hospitals’ report, which the former Secretary of State (Rt. hon. Jeremy Hunt MP) committed to address in his letter of 8 May 2018 to chief executives of independent healthcare providers.

The CQC continues to work with independent health care providers to improve the quality of care and safety including the Independent Healthcare Providers Network, formerly NHS Partners, and the Private Health Information Network.

In addition, in its response to the Joint Committee on the Draft Health Service Safety Investigations Bill, the Government agreed to consult on extending the remit of the new body to investigate independently-funded health care.

The CQC has now completed its programme of comprehensive inspections for all independent acute hospitals in England.


Written Question
Diabetes and Obesity
11 Jan 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to meet the zero per cent prevalence increase target for obesity and diabetes by 2025, recommended by the World Health Organisation in its report: Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020.

Answer (Steve Brine)

We published the second chapter of our world-leading childhood obesity plan in June 2018. This builds on the real progress we have made since the publication of chapter one in 2016, particularly in reformulation of the products our children eat and drink most. Chapter two sets a bold ambition to halve childhood obesity by 2030 and significantly reduce the gap in obesity between children from the most and least deprived areas by 2030. We have reiterated this ambition in our vision document ‘Prevention is better than cure’ published in November 2018.

Many of the key measures in both chapters of our childhood obesity plan will have an impact on tackling obesity across all age groups. These include the soft drinks industry levy, sugar reduction and wider calorie reformulation programme, restricting promotions and calorie labelling in restaurants which will improve our eating habits and reduce the amount of sugar we consume.

‘Healthier You: The NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme’ started in 2016 and has reported that 280,763 individuals at risk of developing type 2 have been referred into the service and 123,249 individuals have now had an initial assessment. In 2018/19 the Programme achieved full national roll out, with services now available to people in every sustainability and transformation partnership in England, making England the first country in the world to achieve full geographical coverage.

It was recently announced that NHS England intends to double the capacity of Programme to up to 200,000 people per annum by 2023/24. NHS England is incorporating the ability to deliver digital prevention services alongside face to face services to expand the range of options for supporting people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.


Written Question
Diseases
9 Jan 2019

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report entitled, Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020, published by the World Health Organisation; and if he will make statement.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The Government supports the World Health Organization’s (WHO) ‘Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020’ and has implemented a range of policies which contribute to reducing and controlling non-communicable diseases (NCDs). These include policies to reduce smoking; promote healthy diets; tackle misuse of alcohol; and encourage physical exercise. All of these policies are well-aligned with the WHO’s recommended actions on NCDs.


Written Question
Obesity
18 Dec 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have received (a) a tier 3 and (b) a tier 4 weight management service in each (i) region and (ii) Clinical Commissioning Group area in each of the last five calendar years.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The requested information is not held centrally. No assessment has been made of the effect on patients of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) decommissioning tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services. CCGs have a statutory responsibility to commission services which meet the healthcare needs of their local population.


Written Question
Obesity
18 Dec 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which Clinical Commissioning Groups commission (a) a multidisciplinary tier 3 and (b) a tier 4 weight management service.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The requested information is not held centrally. No assessment has been made of the effect on patients of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) decommissioning tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services. CCGs have a statutory responsibility to commission services which meet the healthcare needs of their local population.


Written Question
Obesity
18 Dec 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) tier 3 and (b) tier 4 weight management services have been decommissioned in each (i) region and (ii) Clinical Commissioning Group area in each of the last five calendar years.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The requested information is not held centrally. No assessment has been made of the effect on patients of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) decommissioning tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services. CCGs have a statutory responsibility to commission services which meet the healthcare needs of their local population.


Written Question
Lung Diseases: Rehabilitation
22 Oct 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase access to pulmonary rehabilitation.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Pulmonary rehabilitation is one of the most effective treatments for chronic lung disease. Respiratory care is one of the focuses of the National Health Service long-term plan currently in development and new guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence are due to be published in December.

The Department supports the NHS to increase access to pulmonary rehabilitation and improve the quality of care for people with long-term respiratory conditions through the following actions:

- a national roll out of the RightCare programme by NHS England which directs clinical commissioning groups to offer pulmonary rehabilitation as part of an optimal pathway for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients;

- the COPD best practice tariff encourages NHS providers to refer patients for pulmonary rehabilitation as a financial incentive; and

- a pulmonary rehabilitation service accreditation programme run by the Royal College of Physicians.


Written Question
Asbestos: Drinking Water
10 Sep 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the latest advice is that he has received from Public Health England on the risks of ingesting asbestos from drinking water which has been pumped through asbestos pipes.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Public Health England’s advice is in line with that of the World Health Organization Guidelines on drinking water quality that there is no convincing or consistent evidence that ingested asbestos from asbestos cement drinking water pipes provides a risk to public health.


Written Question
Obesity
19 Jul 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will respond to the recommendations in the report, The current landscape of obesity services, published by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity in May 2018; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Steve Brine)

We welcome the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity’s report ‘The current landscape of obesity services’ which makes a valuable contribution to this debate.

We published the second chapter of our world-leading childhood obesity plan on 25 June. This builds on the real progress we have made since the publication of chapter one in 2016, particularly in reformulation of the products our children eat and drink most. As with our initial plan, these new policies were informed by the latest research and emerging evidence, including from debates in Parliament and various reports from key stakeholders.

There are no current plans to commission a cost-benefit analysis of allocating additional funding for the prevention and treatment of obesity.

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/childhood-obesity-a-plan-for-action-chapter-2


Written Question
Obesity
19 Jul 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will commission a cost-benefit analysis of allocating additional funding for the (a) prevention and (b) treatment of obesity.

Answer (Steve Brine)

We welcome the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity’s report ‘The current landscape of obesity services’ which makes a valuable contribution to this debate.

We published the second chapter of our world-leading childhood obesity plan on 25 June. This builds on the real progress we have made since the publication of chapter one in 2016, particularly in reformulation of the products our children eat and drink most. As with our initial plan, these new policies were informed by the latest research and emerging evidence, including from debates in Parliament and various reports from key stakeholders.

There are no current plans to commission a cost-benefit analysis of allocating additional funding for the prevention and treatment of obesity.

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/childhood-obesity-a-plan-for-action-chapter-2


Written Question
Obesity: Children
3 Jul 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Chapter 2 of the Childhood Obesity plan, what the timetable is for the consultation on a 9.00pm watershed on junk food adverts.

Answer (Steve Brine)

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ announced seven consultations on: introducing a 9pm watershed on TV advertising of products high in fat salt and sugar (HFSS) and similar protection online; banning price promotions for HFSS products; banning location promotions for HFSS products; ending the sale of energy drinks to children, introducing consistent calorie labelling for the out of home sector in England; strengthening Government Buying Standards for Food and Catering Services; and revised plans to the Healthy Start vouchers to provide additional support to children from lower income families. All consultations will be launched before the end of 2018.

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/childhood-obesity-a-plan-for-action-chapter-2


Written Question
Obesity: Children
3 Jul 2018

Questioner: Andrew Selous

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Chapter 2 of the Childhood Obesity Plan, what each of the 13 consultations arising from will consider.

Answer (Steve Brine)

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ announced seven consultations on: introducing a 9pm watershed on TV advertising of products high in fat salt and sugar (HFSS) and similar protection online; banning price promotions for HFSS products; banning location promotions for HFSS products; ending the sale of energy drinks to children, introducing consistent calorie labelling for the out of home sector in England; strengthening Government Buying Standards for Food and Catering Services; and revised plans to the Healthy Start vouchers to provide additional support to children from lower income families. All consultations will be launched before the end of 2018.

‘Childhood obesity: a plan for action, chapter 2’ is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/childhood-obesity-a-plan-for-action-chapter-2