Ministry of Justice

All 4379 Written Questions max 10000 shown

Date Title Questioner
5 Nov 2019, 5:07 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Ministry of Justice are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

28 Oct 2019, 5:31 p.m. Witnesses Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many witnesses have received support from the court-based witness service in each year since 2010.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

This Government is committed to ensuring that both prosecution and defence witnesses receive timely and effective emotional and practical support to help them give their best evidence in criminal courts in England and Wales.

The number of witnesses who have received support from the Ministry of Justice grant funded court based Witness Service since 2010 (data available pre-2013 is rounded data) as reported by the provider is set out in the table below.:

Year

Number of witnesses supported

Provider

2010/11

268,000

Victim Support

2011/12

240,000

Victim Support

2012/13

204,000

Victim Support

2013/14

198,872

Victim Support

2014/15

193,048

Victim Support

2015/16

178,320

Citizens Advice

2016/17

156,407

Citizens Advice

2017/18

148,592

Citizens Advice

2018/19

125,124

Citizens Advice

28 Oct 2019, 5:24 p.m. Prisons: Private Sector Mr Bob Seely

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of ending private sector involvement in the prison system.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We remain committed to a role for the private sector in operating custodial services. I have not made any assessment of the cost associated with the ending of private sector involvement in the prison system.

The Government believes that the private sector has an important role to play in delivering custodial services in England and Wales, and currently runs some high-performing prisons, in the delivery of an estate which is both decent and secure.

We believe that competition can deliver improvements to service quality, encourage innovation, secure capital investment, and achieve value for money.

28 Oct 2019, 5:23 p.m. Prisons: Overcrowding Steve McCabe

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of overcrowding in prisons on rates of recidivism.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We are committed to ensuring offenders leaving prison have the tools they need to turn their backs on crime - reducing reoffending and ultimately keeping the public safe.

There is currently little evidence of a direct link between overcrowding and recidivism.

Evidence on what works to reduce reoffending suggests that having a job and a home on release from prison are key factors, among others. There is a concerted cross-government effort to reduce reoffending. We recently announced a National Partnership Agreement with DWP, which sets out how the departments will jointly drive rehabilitation and reduce reoffending. We also continue to work closely with our health and justice partners, and are collaborating with MHCLG and local authorities on our offender accommodation pilots. One year ago, we also published our Education and Employment strategy, which set out how we will transform our approach to ensure prisoners develop the skills they need to secure employment on release.

More examples of criminogenic needs that influence reoffending can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/305319/transforming-rehabilitation-evidence-summary-2nd-edition.pdf

8 Oct 2019, 4:28 p.m. Reoffenders Stephen McPartland

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What plans he has to help reduce reoffending.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

This Government is committed to reducing reoffending by ensuring that all offenders have the tools they need to turn their backs on crime.

That is why we are focusing our efforts on supporting offenders to address any health and wellbeing issues; raise their levels of educations attainment and skills; get a job; and rebuild or reinforce their relationships.

We also know that a concerted cross-government effort is required to address reoffending. For example we recently entered into a National Partnership Agreement with the Department for Work and Pensions, to set out how departments will work together to improve offenders’ chances of securing work and integrate into the community on release from prison.

We know that in 39% of violent incidents victims believed alcohol was a factor. We are introducing an Alcohol Abstinence and Monitoring Requirement, giving courts the power to impose a ban on drinking alcohol as part of a community order where alcohol was a factor in the offending.

8 Oct 2019, 4:28 p.m. Members: Juries Bill Wiggin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that hon. Members are not prevented from participating in business in the House due to jury service responsibilities.

Answer (Chris Philp)

Trial by jury is fundamental to our world leading justice system and serving as a juror is one of the most important civic duties that anyone can be asked to perform.

The Jury Manual identifies that MPs who seek excusal on the grounds of parliamentary duties should be deferred in the first instance. This allows them to identify a more convenient time and strikes a sensible balance, ensuring that MPs are able to carry out their crucial role in this place.

If an MP feels that it is inappropriate to serve in his own constituency, he or she should be allowed to serve elsewhere.

Any individual requests for jury service to be deferred would be a matter for our independent judiciary

8 Oct 2019, 4:27 p.m. Prison Accommodation John Lamont

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps his Department is taking to increase prison capacity.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and announced in August an investment of up to £2.5 billion to transform the prison estate and provide 10,000 additional prison places.

Our recent Spending Round settlement provides the funding for MoJ to begin delivering this commitment and outline planning permission has been approved for a new prison at Full Sutton.

The 10,000 places are additional to the 3,500 places, which we have begun at Wellingborough; that we will start building at Glen Parva next year, and; that we have already built at HMP Stocken.

8 Oct 2019, 4:25 p.m. Prisons: Drugs Paula Sherriff

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of drugs being smuggled into prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

One of the first things the Lord Chancellor did was to visit HMP Leeds with the Prime Minister where they set out our focus on tackling crime, investing up to £2.5 billion transforming the prison estate and providing 10,000 additional prison places.

At HMP Leeds there is an X-ray body scanner installed there to identify items internally concealed on prisoners. HMP Wakefield also has an X-ray body scanner. At HMP New Hall in our women’s estate, the drug threat is different and staff there have worked hard to respond to the inspection report published in April. They have put in place an updated local drug strategy, do more suspicion-led drug testing and store medications in line with clinical guidelines.

We have previously invested £70 million to improve safety, security and decency in prisons. We use body, property, cell and area searches across the estate, aided by dedicated search teams and drug detection dogs.

As announced in August, we will be spending a further £100 million on prison security. Airport-style security, including X-ray scanners, will be put into prisons across the estate to help stop contraband such as drugs from getting in.

8 Oct 2019, 4:21 p.m. Rule of Law Mr Gavin Shuker

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What recent discussions he has had with the Prime Minister on the rule of law.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Prime Minister and Lord Chancellor meet regularly and discuss a range of matters. The Lord Chancellor has sworn an oath to respect the rule of law and to defend the judiciary. It is an oath he takes very seriously. The government will always abide by the law.

8 Oct 2019, 4:20 p.m. Reoffenders: Prison Sentences Jeff Smith

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of sentences of less than six months in reducing reoffending.

Answer (Chris Philp)

Sentencing must match the severity of the crime. Whilst there is evidence that short sentences do not help some offenders turn their backs on crime, protecting the public will always be our priority.

As part of our recent review, we have considered changes to sentencing for prolific offenders which could help break the cycle of reoffending.

We know that these offenders generally have multiple and complex needs which are linked to their offending behaviour, in particular drugs, alcohol and mental health needs. Solutions will often lie in effective community sentences.

We intend to bring forward a comprehensive package of reforms, including to community penalties to ensure they both punish and tackle the underlying drivers of offending.

8 Oct 2019, 3:45 p.m. Prisons: Discipline Mrs Madeleine Moon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will detail the definitions of (a) concerted indiscipline and (b) violent incident required to be used at (i) HMP Parc and (ii) HMP Cardiff; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The definitions of concerted indiscipline and assaults are:

Concerted indiscipline: the number of incidents in which two or more prisoners act together in defiance of a lawful instruction or against the requirements of the regime of the establishment. The act of indiscipline can be active or passive (i.e. involving aggression and violence or not) and the protagonists do not necessarily need to be acting in a common cause.

Assaults: refer to unwanted physical contact between two or more individuals, excluding lawful use of force by staff (but including where staff are assaulted during use of force) or anything of a purely verbal or threatening nature.

Assaults in prison custody cover a wide range of violent incidents including fights between prisoners.

Serious assaults are those which involve one or more of the following: a sexual assault, results in detention in outside hospital as an in-patient, requires medical treatment for concussion or internal injuries. It also includes incurring any of the following injuries: a fracture, scald or burn, stabbing, crushing, extensive or multiple bruising, black eye, broken nose, lost or broken tooth, cuts requiring suturing, bites, temporary or permanent blindness.

We do not tolerate violence or disruptive behaviour in our prisons. We’ve recruited 4,366 additional officers and are spending an extra £100m, introducing tough airport-style security, x-ray scanners and phone-blocking technology. We are also committed to ensuring our prison officers have the tools they need to do the job safely with body worn cameras, ‘police-style’ handcuffs and restraints, and PAVA incapacitant spray.

8 Oct 2019, 3:43 p.m. Prisons: Ethnic Groups Mrs Madeleine Moon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many BAME prisoners were held at (a) HMP Parc and (b) HMP Cardiff prison under (i) remand and (ii) sentence following decisions by courts outside of Wales in each year since 2015; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The below table indicates non white (includes prisoners with ‘not stated’ and ‘not recorded’ ethnicities) prisoners in HMPs Cardiff and Parc with an associated court outside of Wales (includes prisoners with ‘Court not recorded’).

30/06/2015

30/06/2016

30/06/2017

30/06/2018

30/06/2019

Total

75

60

105

71

87

Of which:

Remand

11

7

15

5

7

Sentenced

62

46

85

60

74

Non-Criminal

2

7

5

6

6

8 Oct 2019, 3:40 p.m. Prisoners: Childbirth Catherine West

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children were born in prisons in the last year.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information relating to births and pregnancy is recorded locally, and is not collected centrally. Work is currently underway to look at what information related to pregnancy and birth can be collected centrally.

Births in prison are extremely rare. Every effort is made to ensure women are in the appropriate hospital setting in order to give birth, however this is not always possible due to the unpredictability of labour.

All pregnant women in custody have an individual care and management plan that is communicated to all staff and all pregnant women are seen by a mid-wife at least fortnightly or as required. Women can expect to have access to the same range of services as they would in the community. Healthcare in prisons is provided by trained medics and nurses, but we have also made training on dealing with pregnant women available to all prison officers.

A Prison Service Instruction sets out the current policy on Mother and Baby Units (MBUs), and the Policy Guidance adjoining the Women’s Policy Framework 2018 contains comprehensive operational guidance on perinatal support to women in custody. A review of the MBU policy is currently underway.

8 Oct 2019, 3:40 p.m. Prisoners: Pregnancy Catherine West

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what support his Department provides to pregnant female prisoners.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information relating to births and pregnancy is recorded locally, and is not collected centrally. Work is currently underway to look at what information related to pregnancy and birth can be collected centrally.

Births in prison are extremely rare. Every effort is made to ensure women are in the appropriate hospital setting in order to give birth, however this is not always possible due to the unpredictability of labour.

All pregnant women in custody have an individual care and management plan that is communicated to all staff and all pregnant women are seen by a mid-wife at least fortnightly or as required. Women can expect to have access to the same range of services as they would in the community. Healthcare in prisons is provided by trained medics and nurses, but we have also made training on dealing with pregnant women available to all prison officers.

A Prison Service Instruction sets out the current policy on Mother and Baby Units (MBUs), and the Policy Guidance adjoining the Women’s Policy Framework 2018 contains comprehensive operational guidance on perinatal support to women in custody. A review of the MBU policy is currently underway.

8 Oct 2019, 3:29 p.m. Offenders: Employment Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that offenders find employment on release.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Since we launched our Education and Employment Strategy in May 2018, we have overhauled the prison education system, allowing governors to commission skills-based training and education that meets the needs of the local labour market.

We have also introduced the New Futures Network, a specialist part of the Prison Service which brokers partnerships between prisons and employers in England and Wales. New Futures Network is now operating in 14 out of 15 geographical prison group areas and more than 360 businesses have registered an interest in working with prisons to provide work and training opportunities.

Additionally, we established new rules to allow governors to get offenders our to work earlier on temporary licence. This will increase the opportunities available for prisoners to secure jobs on release and reduce their chances of reoffending.

8 Oct 2019, 3:22 p.m. Reoffenders: Sentencing Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to review sentencing policy for prolific offenders.

Answer (Chris Philp)

Protecting the public will always be our priority. One of the first acts by this Prime Minister was to order an urgent review of sentencing. The focus of the review has been on the sentencing for the most serious violent and sexual offenders and the rules governing when and how those offenders are released. As part of the review, we have also considered changes to sentencing for prolific offenders which could help break the cycle of reoffending.

Based on the findings of the review, we will be bringing forward proposals shortly for a comprehensive package of legislative reform. This will include amending the automatic release point for the most serious sexual and violent offenders (where the offence carries a maximum life sentence) from the half-way point to two thirds of the sentence.

As part of this package of reform, we also plan to bring forward proposals for community penalties that offer an appropriate level of punishment, while tackling the underlying drivers of offending. We know that prolific offenders generally have multiple and complex needs which are linked to their offending behaviour, in particular drugs, alcohol and mental health needs. If we are to break the cycle of reoffending, solutions will often lie in community sentences, including those which address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, or provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community. On 1 October we announced that we would be introducing Alcohol Abstinence and Monitoring Requirements (AAMR) across England and Wales, starting in 2020.

8 Oct 2019, 3:16 p.m. Knives: Prosecutions Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking with the Attorney General to ensure that people who carry knives are prosecuted.

Answer (Chris Philp)

We work closely with the Attorney General and Home Office Ministers to ensure the Criminal Justice System commands public confidence and tackles crime effectively.

To address this and other serious crimes we’re recruiting 20,000 new police officers, investing £85 million in the CPS and building 10,000 additional prison places, together with the work of PCCs setting up Violence Reduction Units.

7 Oct 2019, 3:29 p.m. Debt Collection: Enforcement Rachel Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his timescale is for responding to his Department's Review of enforcement agent (bailiff) reforms: call for evidence, published in November 2018.

Answer (Chris Philp)

As set out in the Secretary of State for Justice’s Written Statement on bailiff reform made on 22 July, we’ve been continuing to engage with stakeholders before finalising our response. We will respond in full to the call for evidence as soon as possible.

9 Sep 2019, 11:34 a.m. Remand in Custody: Long Term Unemployed People Jim Shannon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of placements for people on short-term remand that have been in long-term unemployment.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Prisoners on remand are permitted to work while in prison. However, we do not collect data centrally relating to the number of prisoners remanded in custody who are in employment while in prison, or who were unemployed prior to being imprisoned. Sentenced prisoners can be released on temporary licence to attend places of work, provided they meet certain criteria.

Prisons must be places of rehabilitation, which will ultimately reduce reoffending. Our Education and Employment strategy sets out how we will transform our approach to ensure prisoners develop the skills they need to secure employment on release. We are engaging with employers to take on ex-prisoners via the New Futures Network (NFN) and have consulted on proposals to increase the opportunities available to prisoners to gain experience in real workplaces through Release on Temporary Licence.

5 Sep 2019, 3:50 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Gordon Henderson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for personal independence payment appeals to be decided at HM Courts & Tribunals Service Ashford.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Ministry of Justice expects appeal hearings to take place as quickly as possible and is carrying out a series of initiatives to increase capacity which will help reduce waiting times for appellants in Ashford. Since September 2018, three additional judges have been allocated to Ashford as their primary venue and three further judges have been allocated to Ashford as their secondary venue. Furthermore, from November this year the capacity at the Ashford venue will increase from three hearing rooms to four on a daily basis and from August 2019, appeals to be heard at the Ashford venue can now be heard at a new venue in Hastings, depending on the appellant’s postcode.

5 Sep 2019, 2:21 p.m. Translation Services Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 275723 on translation services, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the increase in expenditure between the 2015-16 and 2016-17 financial years.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

Spend on language services increased in October 2016 as a result of an intentional move by the Ministry of Justice to increase the quality of the services. A new set of contracts commenced in 2016 which included various improvements based on independent recommendations made about the previous contract. These changes included a more robust performance management regime, improved data and the implementation of a new quality assurance service.

Spend on Language Services is expected to fluctuate due to the nature of the contracts being demand led.

5 Sep 2019, 1:44 p.m. Marriage Andrea Jenkyns

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much is allocated to be spent from the public purse on conducting the Law Commission's review of the law on how and where people can marry in England and Wales.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

The cost of the project to review the law on weddings and provide recommendations for a simple, fair and consistent system which gives couples choice in to marry in a way that is meaningful to them will be approximately £400,000.

This cost is for the resource for two years of a project team made up of one full-time lawyer, one full-time research assistant, a proportion of the time of a team manager and some travel, publication and translation costs (totalling approximately £150,000 per year) plus the cost of engaging a specialist academic (£50,000 per year).

3 Sep 2019, 2:54 p.m. Prisons: Radicalism Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for the Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the system for collating statistics on extremist behaviours in prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Extremist behaviours in prison are identified and monitored through a robust case management process reviewing Terrorism Act (TACT) and TACT-related prisoners throughout their sentence. Information and statistics relating to extremist behaviours are routinely collected at local, regional and national levels. Related statistics for persons in custody and released from custody are routinely provide as part of Home Office Official Counter Terrorism statistics, published quarterly as statistical bulletins [see link below]. These statistics present details regarding the number of persons in custody for terrorism-related offences in Great Britain, including details of ethnicity, nationality, ideology and religion.

The latest statistics can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/counter-terrorism-statistics

3 Sep 2019, 2:25 p.m. Eastwood Park Prison Dr David Drew

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the accuracy of reports that conditions for prisoners at Eastwood Park have declined; and for how many hours each day prisoners in that prison are confined to their cells.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

HM Inspectorate of Prisons’ recent report on HMP/YOI Eastwood Park was published on 28 August 2019. We take all recommendations made by the Chief Inspector seriously and the prison is taking action to address the Chief Inspector’s findings.

A detailed action plan has been produced to address all the recommendations in the report. The action plan has been published on the prison finder website at: https://www.justice.gov.uk/contacts/prison-finder/eastwood-park

The regime at HMP/YOI Eastwood Park is structured so that prisoners who are engaging with the prison regime are ‘out of cell’ for 9.5 hours a day Monday to Friday and 7.75 hours at weekends. Prisoners located on an enhanced wing have access to the prison grounds for 12.45 hours during the week and 11.75 hours during the weekend.

29 Jul 2019, 3:43 p.m. Prison Officers: Criminal Injuries Compensation Andrew Griffiths

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers have made applications under the criminal injury compensation scheme in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is not available.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority does not ask an applicant to provide their occupation when applying for compensation.

29 Jul 2019, 3:43 p.m. Prison Officers: Criminal Injuries Compensation Andrew Griffiths

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers were awarded compensation under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is not available.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority does not ask an applicant to provide their occupation when applying for compensation.

23 Jul 2019, 4:20 p.m. Universal Credit: Disability Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the average waiting time for an appeal for universal credit by a tribunal for people with a disability in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Waiting times for appeals against decisions made about Universal Credit (UC) are published at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

The specific information requested is not held: Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service does not record whether UC appeals have been made by people with a disability.

23 Jul 2019, 11:37 a.m. Prisoners: Employment Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours of purposeful activity per prisoner were recorded on average in (a) each prison rated in the 2017-18 performance rating as performance is of serious concern and (b) each prisons that was rated as exceptional performance.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Department does not currently collect data on the amount of time prisoners spend out of cell. We are examining the feasibility of developing such a measure and are exploring how this might be done, including working with Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons to understand the methodology it uses in its inspections.

Data are published on GOV.UK on the number of prisoners who have completed accredited programmes in custody, the number of hours worked in prison industries, and the number of prisoners released from prison on a temporary licence.

The introduction of Offender Management in Custody, and the associated staffing, mean that prisons will be better equipped to run fuller regimes with more opportunities for purposeful activity. Our Education and Employment strategy launched last year will create a system where prisoners are on a path to employment, through increased opportunities to gain experience of work in communities while released on temporary licence.

23 Jul 2019, 11:34 a.m. Prisons: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 273816 on Prisons: Education, which providers have been awarded Dynamic Purchasing System contracts to date.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

A total of 92 contracts have been awarded to 46 Suppliers under the Prison Education Dynamic Purchasing System as at 19/07/2019.

Contracts have been awarded to the following organisations:

5 Step Startup School Ltd

x2

Acorn Training Ltd

x2

Advanced Personnel Management Group (UK) Limited

x1

Adviza Partnership

x2

Age UK Nottingham & Nottinghamshire

x1

Astara Trianing Ltd

x1

Beating Time (also known as "Choirs Beating Time")

x1

Bedfordshire and Luton Education Business Partnership (Trading as Develop)

x2

Career Connect - Duplicate registration

x1

Cathedral Training Ltd

x1

Changing Lives

x1

Chichester College Group

x5

Community Arts Projects UK

x1

Cronin Music Ltd

x1

CXK Limited

x1

First Point Training

x1

Fusion21 Ltd

x1

Geese Theatre Company

x3

GLA Group

x1

Good Vibrations

x1

Hillsbridge Services limited

x1

InHouse Records

x1

Karen Mackey Consultants

x2

Life Cycle UK

x1

Lincoln College Group

x1

LTE Group (Trading as Novus)

x12

Magistra Ltd

x1

Mainstream Training

x2

Milton Keynes College

x8

mybe awards Ltd

x1

n-ergy Group Limited

x4

N-Gaged Training & Recruitment Ltd

x2

Prospects Services

x5

RiseUp CiC

x2

RMF Construction Training Academy Ltd.

x2

Seetec Business Technology Cente Limited

x1

SevenThreeOne

x1

Sharon Hardy IAG and Employment Services Adviser

x1

St Giles Trust

x1

Standguide Ltd

x3

The Forward Trust

x2

The Growth Company Ltd

x1

The Junction 42 Foundation

x1

TKO "Training, Knowledge & Opportunities" Limited

x2

User Voice

x1

Weston College

x3

We have overhauled the prison education system and implemented a new Prison Education Framework. Under the new system, governors control their budget, including the power to choose providers and deliver learning that will best support their prisoners.

Our Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS), an innovation that brings in bespoke and short-term provision, is already proving popular, with over 230 providers signed up and over 20 contracts already awarded by governors.

23 Jul 2019, 11:28 a.m. Prisons: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 273816 on Prisons: Education, what the value by lot is of Dynamic Purchasing System contracts awarded to date.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The 17 Lots in the Prison Education Framework (PEF) have awarded the following cumulative values of contracts under the Prison Education Dynamic Purchasing System (PEDPS) as at 19/07/2019.

  • Lot 01 - Avon & South Dorset - £519,011.08
  • Lot 02 - Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire & Norfolk - £429,911.68
  • Lot 03 - Cumbria & Lancashire - £334,311.67
  • Lot 04 - Devon & North Dorset – No contracts awarded currently
  • Lot 05 - East Midlands & Morton Hall - £291,421.86
  • Lot 06 - Gt Manchester, Merseyside & Cheshire - £786,416.84
  • Lot 07 - Hertfordshire, Essex & Suffolk - £ 543,250.00
  • Lot 08 - Kent, Surrey & Sussex - £1,625,170.20
  • Lot 09 – London - £19,100.00
  • Lot 10 - Long Term High Security North - £311,744.91
  • Lot 11 - Long Term High Security South - £242,380.99
  • Lot 12 - North Midlands - £6,840.00
  • Lot 13 - South Central - £311,959.91
  • Lot 14 - Tees & Wear - £1,322,253.00
  • Lot 15 - West Midlands - £76,315.00
  • Lot 16 - Women’s Estate North - £203,702.00
  • Lot 17 – Yorkshire - £630,991.15

We have overhauled the prison education system and implemented a new Prison Education Framework. Under the new system, governors control their budget, including the power to choose providers and deliver learning that will best support their prisoners.

Our Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS), an innovation that brings in bespoke and short-term provision, is already proving popular, with over 230 providers signed up and over 20 contracts already awarded by governors.

23 Jul 2019, 11:24 a.m. Segregation of Prisoners Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have spent time in segregation by prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2019, 1:42 p.m. Youth Custody Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of children in custody were held in (a) Secure Children's Homes, (b) Secure Training Centres and (c) Young Offenders Institutions in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below shows the average monthly youth custody population (under 18-year olds) by sector for the years ending 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2018, and the proportion of the total under 18 custodial population represented by each sector.

Population by sector

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Secure Children's Homes

167

165

166

142

129

101

108

107

106

Secure Training Centres

253

264

280

253

262

223

196

131

166

Young Offender Institutions

1,998

1,610

1,517

1,149

825

714

656

630

623

Total

2,418

2,040

1,963

1,544

1,216

1,037

960

868

894

Share of population by sector

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Secure Children's Homes

7%

8%

8%

9%

11%

10%

11%

12%

12%

Secure Training Centres

10%

13%

14%

16%

22%

21%

20%

15%

19%

Young Offender Institutions

83%

79%

77%

74%

68%

69%

68%

73%

70%

Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

18 Jul 2019, 10:42 a.m. Prisoners: Training Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 11 July 2019 to Question 273806 on Prisoners: Training, what courses are listed on that HMPPS Management Information System for each prison.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The HMPPS Management Information System was introduced alongside the new education contracts in April this year, and its use is still being embedded across the prison estate. I will write to the Hon Member in Autumn with the information requested once a verified list of courses can be provided, and will place a copy of my letter in the Library.

18 Jul 2019, 9:23 a.m. Probate: Fees and Charges Priti Patel

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on the application-processing performance of the Probate Service of changes to the fees structure in 2019; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Full consideration has been given to the effect of the proposed fees structure for grant of probate applications on receipts and subsequently on processing performance. We would expect an increase in the number of applications received prior to the introduction of the new fees, which would be partly offset by a decline in receipts post-introduction.

In March 2019 there was a significant increase of probate applications ahead of the anticipated implementation of the new fee structure but, as the fees were not introduced as planned, the high volume of receipts continued into April.

Urgent action has been taken to address the delays which have been experienced in the probate service. Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service is increasing staffing levels and further improving the digital service to help reduce waiting times.

18 Jul 2019, 9:21 a.m. Probate Priti Patel

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the performance of the Probate Service in processing applications for probate in 2019; how he measures that performance; and how long it took on average to process a probate application in each of the last 24 months.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Official statistics are not published on the average length of time from receipt of the application to the issue of a grant of probate. Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) internal management information, which is not subject to the rigorous quality assurance processes of official statistics, has been used to show the following average times from receipt of an application to a grant being issued:

Month and year

Average Weeks to grant issued

July 2017

3

August 2017

3

September 2017

3

October 2017

3

November 2017

3

December 2017

3

January 2018

3

February 2018

3

March 2018

3

April 2018

3

May 2018

3

June 2018

3

July 2018

3

August 2018

3

September 2018

3

October 2018

3

November 2018

3

December 2018

3

January 2019

2

February 2019

2

March 2019

3

April 2019

2

May 2019

6

June 2019

9

These figures do not include cases which are waiting for a grant to be issued. The data from April 2019 to June 2019 have been extracted from the HMCTS Reform Core Case Data system, which is a new system in active development, and may not be directly comparable with figures for earlier periods. All figures, especially those for April 2019 to June 2019, are provisional and subject to revision.

Some grants are experiencing delays of between four and six weeks outside of our targets as a result of significant increases in work during March and April and some technology issues which have now been resolved. We have recruited more staff and are now issuing in excess of 1,000 grants a day, which is bringing waiting times down further.

Urgent action has been taken to address the delays which have been experienced in the probate service. Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service is increasing staffing levels and further improving the digital service to help reduce waiting times.

18 Jul 2019, 9:21 a.m. Probate Priti Patel

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he is taking steps to reduce the time taken to process applications for probate; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Official statistics are not published on the average length of time from receipt of the application to the issue of a grant of probate. Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) internal management information, which is not subject to the rigorous quality assurance processes of official statistics, has been used to show the following average times from receipt of an application to a grant being issued:

Month and year

Average Weeks to grant issued

July 2017

3

August 2017

3

September 2017

3

October 2017

3

November 2017

3

December 2017

3

January 2018

3

February 2018

3

March 2018

3

April 2018

3

May 2018

3

June 2018

3

July 2018

3

August 2018

3

September 2018

3

October 2018

3

November 2018

3

December 2018

3

January 2019

2

February 2019

2

March 2019

3

April 2019

2

May 2019

6

June 2019

9

These figures do not include cases which are waiting for a grant to be issued. The data from April 2019 to June 2019 have been extracted from the HMCTS Reform Core Case Data system, which is a new system in active development, and may not be directly comparable with figures for earlier periods. All figures, especially those for April 2019 to June 2019, are provisional and subject to revision.

Some grants are experiencing delays of between four and six weeks outside of our targets as a result of significant increases in work during March and April and some technology issues which have now been resolved. We have recruited more staff and are now issuing in excess of 1,000 grants a day, which is bringing waiting times down further.

Urgent action has been taken to address the delays which have been experienced in the probate service. Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service is increasing staffing levels and further improving the digital service to help reduce waiting times.

17 Jul 2019, 5:30 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Children Bambos Charalambous

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children under the age of 18 have been released from custody without accommodation in the last 12 months.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost, as there would be a need to check individual records of young people released from custody in 2018/19.

The first step to reducing reoffending is making sure everyone leaving prison has access to secure and stable accommodation, and we work closely with local authorities to support offenders with their resettlement on release.

17 Jul 2019, 4:52 p.m. Youth Offending Teams: Grants Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 June 2019 to Question 252658 on Youth Offending Teams: Grants, what the value was of youth justice grants allocated to each local authority to fund Youth Offending Teams in 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The value of youth justice grants allocated to each local authority to fund Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) in 2010-2011, is set out in the attached table.

17 Jul 2019, 4:52 p.m. Youth Offending Teams: Grants Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 June 2019 to Question 252658 on Youth Offending Teams: Grants and with reference to allocation of funding for 2019-20, what the value was of youth justice grants allocated to each local authority to fund Youth Offending Teams in 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The value of youth justice grants allocated to each local authority to fund Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) in 2010-2011, is set out in the attached table.

17 Jul 2019, 3:50 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of not-for-profit legal aid providers that have closed in each year for the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The LAA does not hold data on Not For Profit (NfP) organisation closures, only whether they hold a contract to deliver legal aid services. Under the LAA’s contracting regime, an organisation may be contracted to deliver services from one or multiple offices. Contracts may be ended by either party; providers may choose to withdraw from the whole contract, an office or a category of law or the LAA may take action should a provider breach its contract obligations. All contracted providers make their own commercial decisions and withdrawal from a legal aid contract may not be as a result of a closure. For example, NfPs may withdraw from a legal aid contract but continue to operate reliant on other funding, or may choose to consolidate offices but continue to deliver larger volumes of work across a wider area. The table below shows the number of NfP providers (at office level) holding a legal aid contract in any given year. While NfP organisations play a role in helping people access justice, they are not the sole means. We have 1,439 organisations delivering legal aid contracts across the England and Wales – 1,356 of which are with legal firms rather than the not-for-profit sector which includes law centres. We spent £1.6 billion on legal aid last year and in addition to the Civil Legal Advice Telephone service, we are investing £5m in innovative technologies to help people access legal support wherever they are.

Financial Year

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019 September

2019/20

596

495

456

395

397

320

311

295

285

233

213

17 Jul 2019, 3:49 p.m. Trials: Sexual Offences Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time was for a not guilty plea trial for an alleged sexual offence in each court in (a) 2011 and (b) 2018.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The information requested about Crown Court waiting times can be found in the attached excel document. However, due to small numbers of defendants pleading not guilty to sexual offences at magistrates’ court, we are unable to supply the average time between first listing and trial start date – basing an average on such small numbers can skew the mean and result in the figures being unrepresentative.

The overall median waiting time in Crown Courts for defendants in sexual offence cases tends to be higher than that for other offences due to a lower guilty plea rate for these cases. However, from a peak of 25.9 weeks in Quarter three 2018, the average waiting time has fallen by 12% to 22.7 weeks in Quarter one 2019.

Performance, demand and waiting times in the courts are constantly reviewed to balance sitting days with waiting times, disposals and receipts. Resources are adjusted when required. Demand has been falling in recent years and sitting days have been reduced accordingly. Waiting times for trials in the Crown Court for 2018 have been the lowest since 2014, despite the challenge of increasingly complex cases.

17 Jul 2019, 3:19 p.m. Prisons: Staff Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on how many occasions prison staff in each prison had their pay deducted for not being able to complete a shift as a result of an assault in 2018.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

HMPPS does not deduct pay if an employee is sent home as a result of sickness or if they have been assaulted at work.

HMPPS is committed to safeguarding the safety and wellbeing of its staff. A comprehensive occupational health service and employee assistance programme is available to all staff and systems are in place to deal with perpetrators of violence against staff quickly and robustly. Safety remains a top priority and we recently changed the law to double sentences for those that attack our hardworking staff. Additionally, we introduced body-worn cameras and are rolling out PAVA incapacitant spray to keep officers safe.

16 Jul 2019, 11:06 a.m. Probate Service: Length of Service Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length of service for a member of staff at the Probate Service was in each of the last four quarters.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Q1 (JUL18-SEP18) (in years)

Q2 (OCT18-DEC18) (in years)

Q3 (JAN19-MAR19) (in years)

Q4 (APR19-JUN19) (in years)

BIRMINGHAM

16

16

16

16

BRIGHTON

8.2

7.7

7.4

6.2

CARDIFF/BRISTOL

13.65

13.65

13.65

14

LEEDS

18

18

16

16

LIVERPOOL

18.4

17

17

17

LONDON

20.6

18.1

18.1

18.1

MANCHESTER

20

20

20

21.8

NEWCASTLE/IPSWICH

15.4

15.4

15.25

15.25

OXFORD

13

10

10

10

WINCHESTER

21

22

22

22

total

164.25

157.85

155.4

156.35

average

16.425

15.785

15.54

15.635

16 Jul 2019, 10:22 a.m. Probate Service: Agency Workers Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many agency staff have been employed by the Probate Service in each of the last six months.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Jan-19

Feb-19

Mar-19

Apr-19

May-19

Jun-19

AGENCY STAFF RESOURCE (Full Time Equivalent)

29.4

27.4

26.4

29

29

29

Our new online service is making probate simpler and more convenient for bereaved people.

Some grants are experiencing delays of between four and six weeks as a result of problems in April but we are now issuing in excess of 1,000 grants a day that is bringing waiting times down further.

16 Jul 2019, 10:18 a.m. Probate Service: Redundancy Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many members of staff have left the Probate Service in each of the last six months.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

6 members of staff have left the Probate Service in the last 6 months.

Our new online service is making probate simpler and more convenient for bereaved people. Staffing is making increased and the digital service further improves to help reduce waiting times.

16 Jul 2019, 10:06 a.m. Employment Tribunals Service: Fees and Charges Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2019 to Question 272279, how many people (a) are entitled to be and (b) have been reimbursed for employment tribunal fees.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The number of people (a) entitled to an employment tribunal fee refund is 64,426 and (b) the number that have been reimbursed is 33,787.

16 Jul 2019, 9:58 a.m. Probate Service: Staff Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many full-time equivalent staff were employed by the Probate Service in each of the last six months.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Jan-19

Feb-19

Mar-19

Apr-19

May-19

Jun-19

AGENCY STAFF RESOURCE

29.4

27.4

26.4

26.4

26.4

26.4

FTE STAFF RESOURCE

124.49

122.94

120.94

120.9

120.9

118

Further to these totals we have arrange additional help from HMCTS and other government departments, these are:

HMRC SURGE TEAM

0

0

0

0

0

21

BRADFORD DSCS

0

0

0

0

0

3

HMCTS LEGAL ADVISERS

0

0

0

0

0

2.5

ADDITIONAL HMCTS RESOURCE

0

0

0

0

5

9

TOTALS (FTE)

153.89

150.34

147.34

147.3

147.3

179.9

In addition to these we also now have 35 staff in the Courts and Tribunals Service Centre who are trained in probate.

15 Jul 2019, 4:26 p.m. Criminal Proceedings: Legal Aid Scheme Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the financial impact on defendants of the introduction of an upper limit on disposable income for people claiming legal aid for Crown Court representation.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

On 7 February 2019, the Government published the Post Implementation Review (PIR) of Part 1 of The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 which included an assessment of the impact of the £37,500 disposable income threshold introduced at the Crown Court: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/post-implementation-review-of-part-1-of-laspo

Alongside the PIR, the Government also published its Legal Support Action Plan in which it announced a comprehensive review of the wider legal aid eligibility regime; this will include the Crown Court thresholds. The review is expected to conclude by Summer 2020 after which we will publish a full consultation paper setting out our future policy proposals in this area. We will seek to implement any final recommendations as soon as practicable following public consultation.

15 Jul 2019, 4:17 p.m. Translation Services Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much HM Courts and Tribunals Service has spent on (a) courts translation services and (b) Capita Translation Services in each of the last 10 financial years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HMCTS was created on the 1 April 2011. We are unable to provide information for financial years prior to that date. This question has been interpreted to mean costs for all language services, both translators, and interpreters provided in a court setting, and for printed materials available in HMCTS buildings.

The contract with Capita commenced on 30th January 2012, and ended on 30th October 2016. The new Language Services Contracts commenced on the 31st October 2016, with services provided by thebigword Group Limited, Clarion Interpreting and The Language Shop.

The spend by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service on courts translations services was as follows, by financial year:

Year

Total Cost (£)

Capita Charges (£)

2011-12 (Commenced from 30th January 2012)

7,080,332

1,440

2012-13

4,955,510

1,083,181

2013-14

7,305,324

6,501,870

2014-15

7,431,045

7,182,866

2015-16

7,111,949

6,548,023

2016-17

9,683,794

4,264,196

Our most recent statistics show language service requests are at their highest since the new contract was introduced in 2016 the clear majority – 97% - were fulfilled. It is vital that victims, witnesses and defendants understand what is happening in court to ensure justice is done, and we will always take steps to ensure a qualified interpreter is provided when needed.

15 Jul 2019, 4:06 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Housing Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of local authority areas that do not have a housing legal aid provider in England and Wales.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The LAA commissions services on a ‘Procurement Area’ basis. Procurement Areas align to one or a number of combined local authority areas and have been developed based on various local factors.

Individuals are not limited to accessing legal advice providers in the Procurement Area where they live and may access services from providers located in neighbouring local authorities, or at other contracted legal advice providers located locally.

The LAA has recently tendered for new face-to-face housing contracts across the 134 housing and debt procurement areas across England and Wales. As of 30 June 2019, there is at least one provider offering housing and debt services in all but 4 procurement areas, and the LAA is considering how to secure provision in these areas and will set out next steps shortly.

Legal advice is still available in these areas through the Civil Legal Advice telephone service and irrespective of a client’s location in England and Wales, legal advice for housing remains available through a telephone service as well.

The following table shows the number of providers in each of the locations enquired about, and the number of procurement areas which fall within each.

The Legal Aid Agency keeps availability of legal support under constant review and takes urgent action whenever it has concerns.

Geographical Location

# of Procurement Areas

# of Providers

London

30

235

Wales

8

35

Other

96

212

This government spent £1.6 billion on legal aid last year and in addition to the Civil Legal Advice Telephone service, we are investing £5m in innovative technologies to help people access legal support wherever they are.

15 Jul 2019, 4:01 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Solicitors Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the reform of legal aid on average annual earnings of legal aid solicitors.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

On 7 February 2019, the Government published the Post Implementation Review (PIR) of Part 1 of The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/post-implementation-review-of-part-1-of-laspo

The review did not look at the earnings of individual solicitors, but reported instead on the impact on legal aid providers, including solicitors firms and individual barristers.

15 Jul 2019, 11:02 a.m. Young Offenders: Restraint Techniques Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date he (a) received and (b) plans to publish Charlie Taylor’s report on the use of pain-inducing restraint on children.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Charlie Taylor undertook to submit his findings and recommendations on the use of pain-inducing techniques in the restraint of children in the secure estate by the Summer, and I expect to receive his report shortly.

The Department will of course need to consider Charlie Taylor’s findings and recommendations carefully and we will publish both the report and the Government response as soon as we have done so.

10 Jul 2019, 4:50 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Staff Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2019 to Question 269807 on HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Staff, if he will publish the information for March 2019.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of agency staff in HMCTS was 2,623 as of March 2019, which was 14.15%. The earliest held comparable data is from 2016 and shows 1,569, which was 8.5% of the staffing numbers. This is an increase of 1,054 over this period (or 5.65% of total staffing numbers). However, this is a 0.45 percentage point decrease from the previous year (March 2018). The following tables show a breakdown by grade as requested.

Mar-16

Employee type

Agency

Agency proportion

SCS

0

0.0%

Band A

0

0.0%

Band B

0

0.0%

Band C

7

0.9%

Band D

19

0.7%

Band E

1247

12.2%

Band F

296

10.5%

Total

1,569

8.5%

Mar-18

Employee type

Agency

Agency proportion

SCS

0

0.0%

Band A

0

0.0%

Band B

2

0.1%

Band C

7

0.8%

Band D

32

1.2%

Band E

2380

22.1%

Band F

316

12.8%

Total

2,737

14.6%

Mar-19

Employee type

Agency

Agency proportion

SCS

0

0.00%

Band A

0

0.00%

Band B

2

0.13%

Band C

6

0.60%

Band D

18

0.70%

Band E

2358

22.34%

Band F

239

10.63%

Total

2,623

14.15%

We were unable to provide data from 2010 as HMCTS did not exist in its current form until 2011. Prior to this there were multiple business units that held their own people data. We are unable to obtain agency data from HR systems prior to 2016. As with any large data system, there are also likely to be some inaccuracies.

Over the period of Reform, we expect the shape and size of the organisation to change. As part of this we are reducing our staffing levels and expect the future skills of our people to change. The HMCTS workforce strategy during this period is to increase the capability of our staff, whilst simultaneously increasing our workforce flexibility through the increased usage of contingent labour. This is in order to reduce redundancy costs and protect the jobs of longer serving, permanent staff. The required staffing level needed across each of our HMCTS sites is monitored closely, and proactive recruitment undertaken to ensure these levels are maintained.

10 Jul 2019, 4:30 p.m. Employment Tribunals Service Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of outstanding employment tribunal cases was by employment tribunal office in each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HM Courts & Tribunals Service can only provide data for the period 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2019.

The number of outstanding employment tribunal cases is a snapshot of data taken at a specific point in time and cannot be re-run retrospectively. While data at a national level can be found in the published statistics retrospective reporting at office level in line with the published statistics are not available prior to 2013.

The number of outstanding employment tribunal cases by employment tribunal office since 2013 are outlined in the table below.

ALL CASES1,2

OFFICE

As at 31 March 2013

As at 31 March 2014

As at 31 March 2015

As at 31 March 2016

As at 31 March 2017

As at 31 March 2018

As at 31 March 2019

Birmingham

44910

48996

39792

38727

37682

39157

38900

Nottingham

4399

5678

4663

4404

3981

4742

4660

Leeds

13302

14090

10260

6679

3101

5332

6830

Manchester

23293

17070

17117

15650

17314

39642

48507

Newcastle

29331

24945

17594

11495

7556

5189

4895

Aberdeen

2954

3112

2958

3396

3046

2890

2524

Dundee

6749

6098

6367

6626

4697

3947

3430

Edinburgh

6063

2273

3302

2993

3055

2905

2599

Glasgow

63651

56561

66814

64128

56176

58236

75053

London Central

12448

13539

13720

22369

30152

36758

39036

London South

349709

259614

13126

4872

5940

7600

9546

East London

4666

3386

2965

3364

3551

3140

3864

Watford

3485

3191

3763

28922

74175

108293

144008

Bristol

1927

3453

5018

14396

14452

14911

15199

Wales

14517

10991

6860

4278

3593

3593

3725

HMCTS has been working with the tribunal's judiciary to support additional judges to increase the capacity and performance of the tribunal. 58 (or 51.5 full time equivalents) salaried employment judges took up positions from April 2019.

1 Single claims are made by a sole employee/worker, relating to alleged breaches of employment rights.

2 Multiple claims are where two or more people bring proceedings arising out of the same facts, usually against a common employer.

All data were taken from the employment tribunal’s central database and as such is management information that is provisional and subject to change.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and are the best data available at the time of publication.

10 Jul 2019, 4:30 p.m. Coroners: Legal Aid Scheme Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the proportion of inquests for which legal aid was provided in each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information would only be available at disproportionate cost.

Legal aid funding is provided when the requisite eligibility criteria are met. Following consideration of claims for payment from the lawyers involved, all payments are made from a central legal aid budget, which is not demarcated according to any particular category of law.

10 Jul 2019, 4:27 p.m. Legal Representation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timeframe is for the testing period of the Litigant in Person portal.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Government is working closely with its key delivery partner (the Motor Insurers’ Bureau) and a broad group of expert stakeholders from across the personal injury sector to develop a new accessible IT Service. This will enable both represented and unrepresented claimants to progress Road Traffic Accident related personal injury claims under £5,000.

Public testing of the IT Service is planned to begin in November 2019 and, in light of user’s experience, the Government will consider making some further modifications to the service before it goes live in April 2020, so that it is easy to understand and navigate.

In addition, the service will provide a significant amount of management information. The Government is committed to reviewing this management information and how the new service is operating to identify any required changes and improvements approximately eighteen months from implementation. This will include a full evaluation of all relevant data relating to the overall customer experience of claimants using the service.

10 Jul 2019, 4:27 p.m. Legal Representation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse to date and; the full cost of introduction of the Litigant in Person portal.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Government is working in partnership with its key delivery partner, the Motor Insurers’ Bureau, in designing and developing a new IT Service to enable injured claimants to progress their own Road Traffic Accident related personal injury claims under the new £5,000 small claims track limit.

The costs associated with this new service will be funded by the insurance industry. As such, there are no costs to the public purse arising from the design, build and annual operation of the new service.

10 Jul 2019, 4:24 p.m. Employment Tribunals Service Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time taken was to complete a single employment tribunal claim by employment tribunal office in each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HM Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) can only provide data for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2019. Data below the level of published statistics are not available prior to 1 April 2014 due to a data reconciliation exercise.

The average time taken (in weeks) to complete a single employment tribunal claim by the employment tribunal in each office since 2014 is outlined in the table below.

Employment Tribunal Office

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Aberdeen

39

24

24

31

29

Birmingham

28

25

21

24

29

Bristol

48

33

29

23

25

Cardiff

29

25

25

31

33

Dundee

56

43

25

25

23

Edinburgh

156

33

34

27

25

Glasgow

37

40

30

29

29

Leeds

47

26

23

22

21

London Central

33

29

28

27

33

London South

35

31

32

35

42

Manchester

51

33

28

24

31

Newcastle

28

22

21

17

23

Nottingham

34

27

26

29

32

Stratford

42

34

34

30

31

Watford

27

27

29

32

37

HMCTS has been working with the tribunal’s judiciary to appoint additional judges to increase the capacity and performance of the tribunal. 58 (or 51.5 full time equivalent) salaried employment judges took up positions from April 2019.

10 Jul 2019, 4:21 p.m. Coroners: Legal Aid Scheme Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for how many inquests was legal aid provided in each year since 2012.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

10 Jul 2019, 4:21 p.m. Coroners: Legal Aid Scheme Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total value of legal aid granted to inquests in each year since 2010 is.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

10 Jul 2019, 3:39 p.m. Fines: Surcharges Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, purusuant to the Answer of to Question 252552, where the difference between the Victims Surcharge collected and the Victims Surcharge contribution to the Victim and Witness Budget is allocated.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Victim and Witness Budget, which is used to fund support service for victims and witnesses, is set each year and includes funding from a number of different sources. This includes a forecasted contribution from the revenue raised by the Victim Surcharge.

The Victim and Witness Budget for funding victim support services increased to £96m in 2018/19 and has near-doubled funding for victim support services since 2013.

Between 2015/16 and 2017/18 the revenue raised from the Surcharge surpassed the forecasted contribution, so the excess was put towards compensating victims of violent crime through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. However, we have now changed our procedures so that from this financial year, all revenue raised will be included in the Surcharge contribution to Victim and Witness Budget.

10 Jul 2019, 3:39 p.m. Fines: Surcharges Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 17 May 2019 to Question 252552, for what reasons the Government is not contributing the full amount raised from the victims surcharge to the victim and witness budget.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Victim and Witness Budget, which is used to fund support service for victims and witnesses, is set each year and includes funding from a number of different sources. This includes a forecasted contribution from the revenue raised by the Victim Surcharge.

The Victim and Witness Budget for funding victim support services increased to £96m in 2018/19 and has near-doubled funding for victim support services since 2013.

Between 2015/16 and 2017/18 the revenue raised from the Surcharge surpassed the forecasted contribution, so the excess was put towards compensating victims of violent crime through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. However, we have now changed our procedures so that from this financial year, all revenue raised will be included in the Surcharge contribution to Victim and Witness Budget.

9 Jul 2019, 4:21 p.m. Courts: Sales Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the sale price was of each (a) magistrates' court building, (b) youth court and (c) Crown court sold in the last two years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Sales of Magistrates’, Youth and Crown court buildings from the 2017/18 financial year onwards are as follows

Property

Receipt (£)

Reform/Pre-reform

Abergavenny Magistrates Court

499,809

Reform

Barnstaple Magistrates' & County Court

95,000

Reform

Bolton Magistrates' Court

750,000

Reform

Brecon Law Court

575,000

Reform

Caerphilly Magistrates Court

445,000

Reform

Chester-le-Street Magistrates Court

100,000

Reform

Cirencester Magistrates' Court

450,000

Pre-reform

Dolgellau Mags & Crown Court

67,509

Reform

Dorking Magistrates' Court

2,125,000

Pre-reform

Greenwich Magistrates Court

12,005,000

Reform

Hammersmith Magistrates’ Court

43,000,000

Reform

Holyhead Magistrates Court (North Anglsey),

112,500

Reform

Keighley (Bingley) Magistrates' Court

254,310

Pre-reform

Liverpool, Dale Street Magistrates

1,000,000

Reform

Lyndhurst Magistrates' Court

900,000

Pre-reform

Northallerton Magistrates' Court

450,000

Reform

Oswestry Magistrates' Court

110,602

Pre-reform

Richmond Upon Thames Magistrates Court

9,850,000

Reform

Solihull Magistrates Court

4,300,000

Reform

Tottenham (Enfield) Magistrates Court

4,570,000

Reform

Towcester Magistrates' Court

50,000

Pre-reform

Waltham Forest Magistrates Court

3,471,040

Reform

Watford Magistrates Court

3,836,000

Reform

The table above excludes transfers of surplus properties to other government departments (such as Homes England) as these are not categorised as a sale transaction, but as an internal transfer within government.

The closure of any court is not taken lightly – it only happens following full public consultation and when communities have reasonable access to alternative courts.

Since the start of the Reform Programme, money raised from the sale of surplus buildings has been reinvested in the reform of HM Courts & Tribunals Service. The table above identifies pre-reform buildings where this is not the case.

9 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Canterbury Rosie Duffield

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps his Department is taking to improve provision of legal aid for housing cases in Canterbury.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

After the latest LAA civil tender the number of offices providing legal aid services has increased by 7% in housing and debt. The LAA reviews the access to services on a regular basis and takes any necessary action to maintain access to those services.

As a result of the 2018 civil contract procurement activity access to providers offering Housing advice in Kent, and specifically the Kent Coast procurement area in which Canterbury falls, has increased.

Following an extensive and open programme of engagement, we recently published our review of LASPO. We announced that we are launching a series of pilots offering early legal advice for an area of social welfare such as housing. These pilots will help us determine the most effective solutions going forward.

9 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Probate: Standards Dr Sarah Wollaston

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the probate system.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Waiting times in the probate service have recently increased. However, following urgent action by the courts service, they are now starting to improve.

The temporary delays were the result of more work coming into the system and the impact of the initial move to a new IT system for managing probate work.

Now that move is complete, and the unusually high workload has been dealt with, we expect waiting times to continue to improve – and be back to normal levels in the coming weeks.

9 Jul 2019, 4:17 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Serco Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many contracts his Department has awarded to Serco since July 2013; and what the value is of those contracts.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice has awarded no contracts to Serco since July 2013.

Serco has however been successful in its bid to be a supplier on the Prison Operator Services Framework which was executed on the 4th July 2019. There is no financial value nor commitment of work to the Framework itself. The first competition on this Framework will be for the contract to provide custodial services at HMP Wellingborough. Serco will be entitled to bid for this contract.

9 Jul 2019, 4:04 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Stephen Metcalfe

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What progress the Government has made on improving training and support for prison officers.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

A delivery review of the Prison Officer Entry Level training (POELT) course has culminated in the development of a Level 3 Custody and Detention Officer Apprenticeship. New learning methodologies will have greater focus on practice of the knowledge, skills and behaviours relevant to the Prison Officer role whilst also recognising the need for continuous training outside of the classroom. Two checkpoints will be included during this time where Apprentices will return to an L&D centre for further learning.

This will give new prison officers the confidence to carry out their role safely. The Apprenticeship will be launched in early adopter sites from October 2019. All training is reviewed regularly to ensure it reflects current organisational policies and practices. New courses are developed based on requests from Stakeholders within the organisation.

9 Jul 2019, 4:03 p.m. Reoffenders: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

If he will review sentencing policy for prolific offenders.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We are looking to take forward reform of short custodial sentences. We know that offenders serving short sentences often have long offending histories, as well as multiple and complex needs. In cases of the most persistent offenders, the evidence shows they are 36% more likely to re-offend where they have received a short custodial sentence rather than a court order. Community penalties can address underlying behaviour, answer mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

9 Jul 2019, 4:01 p.m. Youth Offending Teams: Finance Alex Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

Whether he plans to allocate additional funding to youth offending teams.

Answer (Edward Argar)

We value the vital work Youth Offending Teams do with children who have offended, and the work they do to prevent offending. The Youth Justice Board’s total funding this year for frontline services including Youth Offending Teams is £72.2m. This is greater than last year’s funding, which was £71.6m.

Of the £72.2m, £70.7m has been allocated to the core grant for Youth Offending Teams and £1.5m to frontline service improvement.

9 Jul 2019, 4 p.m. Bristol Prison: Safety Thangam Debbonaire

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps he is taking to help ensure a safe regime for (a) staff and (b) prisoners in Horfield prison in Bristol.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

An Urgent Notification was invoked at HMP Bristol on 13th June 2019. There has been some progress at HMP Bristol under Special Measures to bolster staff to a sufficient level, reduce illicit drug use and improve living conditions by refurbishing a wing and a number of the showers. However, we know more support is needed. The Secretary of State will publish his response and an initial action plan within 28 calendar days (on 11th July) in response to the most serious and urgent concerns raised.

Immediate action has been taken to ensure prisoners can speak to Samaritans on their in-cell phones. In addition, action has been taken to address issues raised regarding the safer custody hotline and prevent issues from recurring, so prisoners’ family and friends can report any concerns about a prisoner’s welfare directly to the prison.

9 Jul 2019, 3:58 p.m. Camp Hill Prison Mr Bob Seely

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What progress he has made on the sale of the Camp Hill prison site to Isle of Wight Council.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We have commissioned a demolition survey of the former prison results should hopefully be available, in late July.

The Camp Hill element of HM Prison Isle of Wight closed on 31 March 2013. In summer 2014, the then Secretary of State decided that the former prison sites at Camp Hill, Reading and Wellingborough would be retained in case they offered a useful contingency option to deal with population pressures. The site was released for disposal on 10 January 2017.

9 Jul 2019, 2:07 p.m. Offenders: Veterans Gareth Thomas

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2019 to Question 267162, whether he has made additional funding available to support new alliances with military charities to help offenders who are veterans of the armed forces.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government has committed £5.7 million to support programmes targeted at former service personnel in the criminal justice system.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service advertise grant opportunities for voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations for innovative projects and pilots, that reflect priorities of the agency. All grant funding to voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations, including those wishing to support former members of the Armed Forces, is competed openly and these opportunities are published on the Government contract finder website.

The Ministry of Justice is committed to ensuring that those who have served in the Armed Forces and who find themselves in the Criminal Justice System are able to access support in custody and the community

9 Jul 2019, 11:28 a.m. Legal Aid Scheme Peter Kyle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timescale is for the review of the financial eligibility thresholds for people seeking legal aid.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The comprehensive review of the legal aid eligibility regime is expected to conclude by Summer 2020 after which we will publish a full consultation paper setting out our future policy proposals in this area. We will seek to implement any final recommendations as soon as practicable following public consultation.

9 Jul 2019, 11:26 a.m. Employment Tribunals Service Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time to complete a single employment tribunal claim was in each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HM Courts & Tribunals Service can only provide data for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2019. Data below the level of published statistics are not available prior to 1 April 2014 due to a data reconciliation exercise.

The average time taken to complete a single Employment Tribunal claim is published in the Tribunal Quarterly Statistics which can be found in Table T_1 of the Main Tables using the following link: www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics. The information is also included below:

2014/15 – 41 weeks

2015/16 – 29 weeks

2016/17 – 28 weeks

2017/18 – 27 weeks

2018/19 – 30 weeks

9 Jul 2019, 11:24 a.m. Family Justice Panel: Public Appointments Tim Loughton

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria was used to appoint the members of the Family Justice panel; and what gender balance requirements were applied.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The members of the panel established to gather evidence on the protections provided by the family courts in cases involving domestic abuse and other serious offences were appointed for their expertise on the issue. The panel includes pre-eminent academics; senior judiciary; Women’s Aid to represent victims; the Chief Social Worker and the Association of Children’s Lawyers to represent practitioners. The panel will launch a public call for evidence open to all individuals and organisations, and is considering other mechanisms for gathering the full range of views on the issues.

8 Jul 2019, 4:45 p.m. Females: Prisoners Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of training for prison officers working with women with a mental health need.

Answer (Edward Argar)

All Prison Officers complete the Prison Officer Entry Level Training which includes sessions on mental heallth, self-harm and suicide and personality disorder. There has very recently been the development of a new course specifically for the female estate called POWER – Positive Outcomes for Women: Empowerment & Rehabilition. This is a two-day programme and is due to be rolled out shortly across the estate. One of the modules specifically refers to mental health in the female estate, with an aim to ensure delegates gain an overview of the mental health needs of female offenders and how this impacts on offending – including understanding the main disorders found in women in prison; the challenges caused by psychosis and schizophrenia; and explores the personality disorder pathway and personality disorder services.

8 Jul 2019, 3:41 p.m. Ministry of Justice: G4S Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many contracts his Department has awarded to G4S since July 2013; and what the value was of each of those contracts.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested is included in the attached annex.

8 Jul 2019, 3:36 p.m. Employment Tribunals Service: Fees and Charges Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, by what year will each person entitled to an employment tribunal fee refund have received one.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The MoJ is committed to allowing every person who is entitled to a refund to apply for one.

We are unable to predict the year in which all of the refunds will have been made. This is because it is dependent on those eligible coming forward to claim a refund.

We have taken a wide range of proactive steps to publicise the refund scheme, including through the gov.uk website, letters to parliamentarians, and information disseminated through partners such as trades unions, the Law Society and the Citizens Advice. From April 2018, we wrote to everyone entitled to a refund and who had not yet applied, as well as interested MPs, to ensure they were aware of the scheme and how to apply. We will continue to monitor the progress of the refund scheme going forward.

4 Jul 2019, 4:32 p.m. Knives: Crime Rosie Cooper

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the penalties incurred for knife crime.

Answer (Edward Argar)

For possession or threatening with an offensive weapon or possession of an article with a blade or point offences, offenders are now more likely to receive an immediate custodial sentence for a knife and offensive weapon offence and to go to prison for longer than at any point over the past 10 years. In the year ending March 2019 over a third (37%) of offences resulted in immediate custody, compared to 22% in the year ending March 2009. The average length of immediate custodial sentences has increased from 5.5 months in the year ending March 2009 to 8.1 months in the year ending March 2019. This is the highest since the series began.

There are a range of offences available to prosecute knife crime and Parliament has set penalties that are proportionate to the nature of these serious offences.

Unlawful possession of a knife or offensive weapon in public is a serious criminal offence with a maximum penalty of four years’ imprisonment. Since 2015, adults convicted of threatening with a knife in public, or for second or subsequent knife possession face a minimum sentence of 6 months’ imprisonment and young people aged 16 or 17 face a minimum sentence of a 4 month Detention and Training Order. Courts can only depart from minimum sentencing if the court considers would be unjust in all the circumstances to impose these terms.

Where someone is physically injured by a knife or offensive weapon there are a range of other offences, such as causing grievous bodily harm, that the person may be charged with. These can result in lengthy determinate sentences or life imprisonment. In England and Wales, all murder convictions for adults must result in a life sentence, and the Criminal Justice Act 2003 sets out a starting point of a minimum term in prison of 25 years for offenders aged 18 and over who bring a knife or another weapon to the scene of a murder with the intention of using it.

It is already the case that for offences where the possession or use of a knife or offensive weapon is not inherent to the offence or charged separately, possession will be treated as an aggravating factor, which increases the seriousness of the offence. This is outlined in several sentencing guidelines produced by the independent Sentencing Council.

4 Jul 2019, 2:49 p.m. Courts: Translation Services Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of court cases rescheduled due to problems with interpreting or translating services and (b) additional cost incurred from that rescheduling in each of the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry does not hold central data for all jurisdictions and hearing types in which interpreters are used and to manually review each case would incur disproportionate costs. However, central information does exist on the number of trials listed in the criminal courts which were adjourned as a result of interpreters being unavailable. This data is published in Criminal Court Statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/criminal-court-statistics

A table detailing such occurrences over the last three years for which data is available is copied below.

Crown Courts

Magistrates’ Courts

Year

Number of trials

Adjourned due to interpreter availability

% of trials adjourned due to interpreter availability

Number of trials

Adjourned due to interpreter availability

% of trials adjourned due to interpreter availability

2016

37,339

30

0.1%

149,423

495

0.3%

2017

34,579

29

0.1%

136,962

423

0.3%

2018

29,583

17

0.1%

123,023

495

0.4%

As the associated costs for HMCTS of rescheduling trial cases will vary, depending on whether other work was able to be heard in that courtroom, this information is not held centrally.

The department continues to monitor its language service contracts closely and work with the suppliers to drive improvements and reduce the cost on the taxpayer. The Language Service contract has achieved a fulfilment rate of 97% over the first quarter of 2019.

4 Jul 2019, 1:58 p.m. Assaults On Police and Prison Officers: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people received a (a) custodial and (b) non-custodial sentence for assault of a (i) police officer and (ii) prison officer in each year since 2007, and what the average custodial sentence was for those offences.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The number of people who received a) custodial and b) non-custodial sentences for assault on a police officer or prison officer in each year since 2007, and the average custodial sentence lengths for these offences can be found in the accompanying table.

4 Jul 2019, 1:50 p.m. Reoffenders: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of previous (a) cautions and (b) convictions offenders had in each year since 2007 before being sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence for (i) possession of a blade or point, (ii) possession of an offensive weapon, (iii) common assault, (iv) assaulting a police officer, (v) sexual assault, (vi) public order, (vii) theft, (viii) robbery, (ix) burglary, (x) drugs, (xi) criminal damage, (xii) breach of anti social behaviour order, (xiii) fraud and (xiv) vehicle taking.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The average number of previous convictions and cautions of offenders who were sentenced to immediate custody for specified offence types.
  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous cautions and convictions who were sentenced to immediate custody for a specified offence.
4 Jul 2019, 1:50 p.m. Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence for (a) possession of a blade or point, (b) possession of an offensive weapon, (c) common assault, (d) assaulting a police officer, (e) sexual assault, (f) public order, (g) theft, (h) robbery, (i) burglary, (j) drugs, (k) criminal damage, (l) breach of and anti-social behaviour order, (m) fraud, (n) vehicle taking in each year since 2007 had (i) no, (ii) between one and four, (iii) between five and nine, (iv) between 10 and 15, (v) between 16 and 25, (vi) between 26 and 50, (vii) between 51 and 75, (viii) between 76 and 100 and (ix) 101 or more convictions and cautions for an offence.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The average number of previous convictions and cautions of offenders who were sentenced to immediate custody for specified offence types.
  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous cautions and convictions who were sentenced to immediate custody for a specified offence.
4 Jul 2019, 1:48 p.m. Offensive Weapons: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were given an immediate custodial sentence for possession of an offensive weapon in each year since 2007; and of those people how many had (a) no, (b) one to four, (c) five to 10 and (d) 11 or more previous cautions or sentences for carrying an offensive weapon.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is provided in the table below.

Please note that 2007 data has not been included as the time series data on the number of possession of offensive weapon offences used in the knife possession bulletin is only available from quarter 4 in 2007, so a full year’s data is not available.

Number of offenders1 given immediate custody for a possession of an offensive weapon offence by year and number of previous2,3 convictions or cautions for the same offence, England and Wales4, 2008 to 2018.

Number of offenders

Year

Number of previous convictions and cautions

Total

0

1 to 4

5 to 10

11 or more

2008

1,660

533

1

0

2,194

2009

1,715

509

5

0

2,229

2010

1,460

421

3

0

1,884

2011

1,552

480

2

0

2,034

2012

1,340

454

2

0

1,796

2013

1,195

349

3

0

1,547

2014

1,193

362

2

0

1,557

2015

1,286

391

1

0

1,678

2016

1,490

478

2

0

1,970

2017

1,543

534

2

0

2,079

2018

1,416

505

0

0

1,921

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer.

Notes:

1) Each offender is counted only once in each year they were given an immediate custodial sentence for possession of an offensive weapon, but may appear in multiple years.

2) Previous occasions on which the offences for which the offender was cautioned or convicted included possession of an offensive weapon, as counted on the last occasion in each year that the offender was given an immediate custodial sentence for offences including possession of an offensive weapon.

3) Previous sentencing occasions may have resulted in an immediate custodial sentence.

4) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police.

3 Jul 2019, 4:57 p.m. Prison Officers: Vaccination Rosie Cooper

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has plans in place to ensure the urgent availability of immunisation against Hepatitis for all prison personnel; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HASAWA), all employers must provide (so far as is reasonably practicable) a safe place of work and safe systems of work. This includes HM Prison and Probation Service for public sector prisons, and G4S/Sodexo/Serco for privately managed prisons.HM Prison and Probation Service offers and provides Hepatitis B vaccinations, followed by all required vaccination courses and/or blood tests, to ensure staff are protected at work. These are administered by our Occupational Health supplier, Optima Health, for Prison Officers, First Aid Officers and Operational Support grade staff across public sector prisons in England and Wales. The majority of public sector prisons have received Hepatitis B immunisation clinics in 2019. The remaining establishments will receive their clinics in the next few months. Human resources arrangements in privately managed prisons, including offering and providing Hepatitis B vaccinations, are the responsibility of providers. There is no preventative vaccine to protect against Hepatitis C. Therefore, post exposure management such as immediate first aid followed by appropriate risk assessment, is essential. Staff in public sector prisons receive education and training on safe systems of work, universal precautions, hand hygiene and use of personal protective equipment in relation to dealing with body fluids at work. Use of blood spillage kits are used by trained individuals only.

Occupational health (OH) intervention in HMPPS includes provision of immediate and clinical advice by specialist nurses following suspected and actual blood to blood exposure incidents for staff at all levels via a HMPPS 24/7 telephone advice line.

3 Jul 2019, 4:41 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Finance Rushanara Ali

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2019 to Question 266835, HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Finance, why the Department for Work and Pensions contributes to the cost of administering the First Tier Tribunal (Social Security & Child Support) for appeals on attendance allowance, disability living allowance and personal independence payments, but is not required to contribute towards the cost of administering appeals against the disallowance of employment support allowance.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Prime responsibility for the funding of the operation of what is now the First Tier Tribunal (Social Security & Child Support) transferred, along with funding from what is now the Department for Work and Pensions to what is now the Ministry of Justice on the creation of the Tribunals Service on 1 April 2006.

The contribution that the Department for Work and Pensions currently makes towards the costs of the First Tier Tribunal (Social Security & Child Support) covers the additional costs of that tribunal as a consequence of the introduction of the Personal Independence Payment benefit, which has led to an increase both in the number of appeals to the tribunal and, due to the increased complexity of the tests involved, their length and cost.

No additional contribution is required towards the administration of Employment Support Allowance appeals as the cost of this tribunal has not been affected by a subsequent policy change.

3 Jul 2019, 4:38 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Finance Rushanara Ali

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2019 to Question 266835, HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Finance, for what reason the figure for the sum paid by the Department for Work and Pensions towards the cost of administering the First Tier Tribunal (Social Security & Child Support) in 2018-19 was not published, and when he plans to make that figure available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The HM Courts & Tribunals Service Annual Report and Accounts for 2018/19 has yet to be audited for publication Figures for 2018/19 were therefore not published or included in the previous response.

The figure for 2018/19 will be provided within the Note 8 (Operating Income) in the 2018/19 HMCTS Annual Report and Accounts and this will be published when the audit has completed and the accounts laid before Parliament. We expect this to happen before the summer recess.

3 Jul 2019, 1:29 p.m. Investigatory Powers Commissioner Stewart Malcolm McDonald

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timetable is for the appointment of the Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The statutory process for appointing a new Investigatory Powers Commissioner under Section 227 of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 is underway. It is expected that the new Commissioner will be in post by the late autumn of 2019.

2 Jul 2019, 2:45 p.m. Working Links: Wales Ian C. Lucas

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will place in the Library a copy of the contract for the Transforming Rehabilitation scheme agreed with Working Links in Wales.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Details for the contract Transforming Rehabilitation contracts with Working Links in Wales are published on Contracts Finder;

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/933013f7-cfc2-4880-8e84-0bdb84d7e94f?p=@FQxUlRRPT0=NjJNT08=U

1 Jul 2019, 4:48 p.m. Television: Licensing Mr Paul Sweeney

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Minister for Justice, what support he plans to provide to the courts service to deal with the potential increase in non-payment prosecution for TV licences by vulnerable defendants over the age of 75 who do not pay for a TV licence from June 2020.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

TV Licensing prosecutions are dealt with via the Single Justice Procedure, which was introduced in 2015 to allow for more efficient resolution of low-level, summary only-non imprisonable offences in which the offender pleads guilty or does not respond. HMCTS has not made any specific arrangements for any potential increase in non-payment prosecutions for TV licences from June 2020. If required, to meet any emerging demand HMCTS will deploy its planning and allocation processes which allow for resource adjustment or reallocation.

1 Jul 2019, 4:48 p.m. Television: Licensing Mr Paul Sweeney

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Minister for Justice, whether he has made an estimate of the potential increase in the number of prosecutions there will be of people over 75 who have not paid for a TV licence from June 2020.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The lead department on TV licencing is the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DDCMS).

The responsibility for TV licence fee concessions will pass from government to the BBC in June 2020, at which time the BBC has taken the decision to end free TV licences for all over 75s.

The Ministry of Justice has reviewed prosecution data between 1992 and 1999 for TV licence fee evasion, prior to the introduction of the concession, and established that there were no prosecutions of defendants over the age of 75 during this period.

27 Jun 2019, 11:04 a.m. Prisons: Standards Paul Farrelly

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the findings of the June 2019 report by the Prison Reform Trust, Prison: the facts, what steps his Department is taking to (a) tackle overcrowding and (b) improve conditions in prisons.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Reducing crowding is a central aim of our modernisation of the prison estate. Our plan for reducing prison crowding is to replace prisons that are operating over their certified normal accommodation levels with new accommodation that is safe, decent, and uncrowded and close current (crowded or partially crowded) capacity. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the opening of 2,100 uncrowded prison places at HMP/YOI Berwyn and 206 uncrowded places in a new houseblock at HMP Stocken. Additionally, we are constructing modern prisons at the former HMP Wellingborough and HMP Glen Parva sites, which are due to open in 2021 and 2023 respectively.

We invested an additional £31m in the last financial year to improve conditions in some of the prisons with the most pressing issues. With this funding we delivered refurbishments of nearly 1,000 cells, over 100 shower blocks and 14 food serveries at a number of prisons including HMPs Liverpool, Bristol, Wandsworth and Wormwood Scrubs, as well as essential fire safety work.

There is also ongoing refurbishment work to improve the condition of cells, showers and communal areas at a number of prisons, along with several projects to enhance fire safety.

27 Jun 2019, 11:03 a.m. Prisons: Overcrowding Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of overcrowded prisons in England and Wales.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) publishes monthly individual prison population and capacity information through the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/prison-population-statistics

As at 31 May 2019, 72 prisons operated with a population above their Certified Normal Accommodation (CNA) but not above their operational capacity. There are no prisons operating above their operational capacity in England and Wales. The operational capacity of a prison is the total number of prisoners that an establishment can hold taking into account control, security and the proper operation of the planned regime. It is determined by the Prison Group Director on the basis of operational judgement and experience.

CNA, or uncrowded capacity, is the Prison Service’s own measure of accommodation. CNA represents the good, decent standard of accommodation that the Service aspires to provide all prisoners.

Where the operational capacity of a prison is higher than the CNA it will be classed as having the potential to be 'crowded', which can mean prisoners share cells. In the financial year 2017/18, 24.2% of the prison population was being held in crowded conditions, down from 24.5% in the previous year.

Reducing crowding is a central aim of our modernisation of the prison estate. Our plan for reducing prison crowding is to replace prisons that are operating over their certified normal accommodation levels with new accommodation that is safe, decent, and uncrowded and close current (crowded or partially crowded) capacity. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the opening of 2,100 uncrowded prison places at HMP/YOI Berwyn; 206 uncrowded places in a houseblock at Stocken; and a commitment to construct modern, decent, uncrowded prisons at the former HMP Wellingborough and HMP Glen Parva sites, which are due to open in 2021 and 2023 respectively.

27 Jun 2019, 11:03 a.m. Prisons: Overcrowding Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to reduce overcrowding in prisons in England and Wales.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) publishes monthly individual prison population and capacity information through the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/prison-population-statistics

As at 31 May 2019, 72 prisons operated with a population above their Certified Normal Accommodation (CNA) but not above their operational capacity. There are no prisons operating above their operational capacity in England and Wales. The operational capacity of a prison is the total number of prisoners that an establishment can hold taking into account control, security and the proper operation of the planned regime. It is determined by the Prison Group Director on the basis of operational judgement and experience.

CNA, or uncrowded capacity, is the Prison Service’s own measure of accommodation. CNA represents the good, decent standard of accommodation that the Service aspires to provide all prisoners.

Where the operational capacity of a prison is higher than the CNA it will be classed as having the potential to be 'crowded', which can mean prisoners share cells. In the financial year 2017/18, 24.2% of the prison population was being held in crowded conditions, down from 24.5% in the previous year.

Reducing crowding is a central aim of our modernisation of the prison estate. Our plan for reducing prison crowding is to replace prisons that are operating over their certified normal accommodation levels with new accommodation that is safe, decent, and uncrowded and close current (crowded or partially crowded) capacity. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the opening of 2,100 uncrowded prison places at HMP/YOI Berwyn; 206 uncrowded places in a houseblock at Stocken; and a commitment to construct modern, decent, uncrowded prisons at the former HMP Wellingborough and HMP Glen Parva sites, which are due to open in 2021 and 2023 respectively.

27 Jun 2019, 11:01 a.m. Television: Licensing Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2019 to Question 264316 on Television Licensing, how many of the people committed to prison since 2014 for non-payment of the fine associated with the use of television equipment without a licence were over the age of 75.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Since 2014 there have been zero prison admissions for those aged over 75 for non-payment of fines associated with the use of television equipment without a licence.

25 Jun 2019, 3:19 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Coroners Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications were granted or part granted on behalf of bereaved families for Exceptional Case Funding for legal representation under the public interest test at inquests in 2017/18.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information could only be retrieved at disproportionate cost.

25 Jun 2019, 1:34 p.m. Employment Tribunals Service Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to reduce the average time taken to conclude a claim before an employment tribunal.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HM Courts & Tribunals Service has been working with the tribunal’s judiciary to appoint additional judges to increase the capacity and performance of the tribunal. 58 (51.5 full time equivalent) salaried employment judges took up positions from April 2019.

25 Jun 2019, 1:27 p.m. CAFCASS Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many family court advisers were employed by Cafcass in each year from 2010 to date.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The number of family court advisers who were employed by Cafcass in each year from 2010 to date:

Month and Year

Number of Family Court Advisors

March 2010

1120

March 2011

1116

March 2012

1163

March 2013

1198

March 2014

1226

March 2015

1200

March 2016

1192

March 2017

1146

March 2018

1295

March 2019

1337

25 Jun 2019, 1:20 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Discrimination Paul Farrelly

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure victims of discrimination are able to access the legal representation they require.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

We have specifically protected legal aid, both for initial advice and representation, subject to the statutory means and merits tests, for civil legal services provided in relation to contravention of the Equality Act 2010.

Publicly funded advice continues to be available for Employment Tribunal discrimination claims, and publicly funded advice and representation is available in the Employment Appeal Tribunal, and the civil courts more generally.

Our Legal Aid Support Action Plan, published in February, has also committed to improving the access victims of discrimination have to state-funded legal representation. This includes reinstating immediate access to face-to-face legal advice in discrimination cases, reviewing legal aid means testing, and improving the Exceptional Case Funding scheme.

25 Jun 2019, 11:46 a.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2019 to Question 248641, for how many applications for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme the Government has covered the cost of providing initial medical evidence in each year since 2012.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

25 Jun 2019, 11:42 a.m. Cremation Thelma Walker

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the average length of time between death and cremation by region in (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017-18 and (c) 2018-19; and what steps he is taking to reduce that time.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information is not held centrally. This is a matter for individual cremation authorities.

25 Jun 2019, 11:42 a.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2019 to Question 248641, what the average cost was of obtaining the medical evidence required for an application for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each of the last two years for which data is available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

24 Jun 2019, 3:48 p.m. Prisoners' Release Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders were released from custody having served their full sentence in each year since 2000.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Offenders serving determinate sentences do not serve the sentence in full in custody but are released at the automatic release date. In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 6 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (CJA 2003) and the previous provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 (now contained in Schedule 20B to the CJA 2003). The automatic release date is generally at the half way point of the sentence. For certain extended sentences (comprising a custodial period and an extended licence period) the automatic release date is at the two thirds point of the custodial period. Once released, offenders continue to serve the sentence on licence in the community.

Those serving indeterminate sentences who are not released by the Parole Board and those given whole life orders will serve the sentence in full.

There are terms of imprisonment for civil committals where there is no provision for early release. In such cases, release is unconditional once the term has been served in full.

24 Jun 2019, 3:46 p.m. Convictions: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of convicted offenders did not receive an immediate custodial sentence for (a) drug offences, (b) possession of weapons, (c) robbery, (d) sexual offences, (e) theft and (f) violence against the person in each year since 2007.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice has published information regarding sentencing outcomes for drug, possession of weapons, robbery, sexual, theft and violence against the person offences in England and Wales from 2008 to 2018, which be found at the following link –

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

In each case, in the ‘Offence group’ field, filter by -

’06: Drug offences’

’07: Possession of weapons’

’03: Robbery’

’02: Sexual offences’

’04: Theft offences’

’01: Violence against the person

to obtain these figures.

In each case, to obtain the number of offenders who received a non-custodial sentence, subtract ‘Total Immediate Custody’ from ‘Sentenced’, both of which can be found in rows 26 and 36 in the pivot table, respectively.

In each case, to obtain the proportion of offenders who received a non-custodial sentence, divide the number of sentenced offenders who did not receive an immediate custodial sentence by ‘Sentenced’.

Note that the figures cover the 2008-2018 decade and all figures and proportions calculated are based on those who were sentenced. To view the figures for 2007, please use the following older version of the data tool –

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx

and repeat the steps quoted above to obtain the required figures.

24 Jun 2019, 2:44 p.m. Offences against Children: Compensation Andrew Griffiths

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of private prosecutions brought for compensation for victims of child sexual abuse in January 2017.

Answer (Edward Argar)

It is not possible to identify private prosecutions in the courts proceedings database; this would require a manual search of court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

20 Jun 2019, 4:12 p.m. Courts Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the frequency with which courts are closed to the public and press without an order having been granted by the judge.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The arrangements for the admission of the public and the press to a court vary by the jurisdiction of that court, and by the nature of the application being considered. Where a court is under a duty to sit in open court, it has an inherent jurisdiction to sit in private but only if ordered by the presiding judge or magistrates. A court, to which the press or public must be admitted, will not sit in private without a judicial direction. The ability of the court to admit the public and the press may be limited by the physical constraints of the courtroom.

20 Jun 2019, 4:11 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Staff Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of HMCTS staff were agency staff by staffing band in (a) 2010 and (b) 2018.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The number of agency staff in HMCTS was 2,737 as of March 2018, which was 14.6%. The earliest held comparable data is from 2016 and shows 1,569, which was 8.5% of the staffing numbers. This shows an increase of 1,168, 6.1 percentage points, over this period. The following table shows a breakdown by grade as requested.

We were unable to provide data from 2010 as HMCTS did not exist in its current form until 2011. Prior to this there were multiple business units that held their own people data. We are unable to obtain agency data from HR systems prior to 2016. As with any large data system, there are also likely to be some inaccuracies.

Over the period of Reform, we expect the shape and size of the organisation to change. As part of this we are reducing our staffing levels and expect the future skills of our people to change. The HMCTS workforce strategy during this period is to increase the capability of our staff, whilst simultaneously increasing our workforce flexibility through the increased usage of contingent labour. This is in order to reduce redundancy costs and protect the jobs of longer serving, permanent staff. The required staffing level needed across each of our HMCTS sites is monitored closely, and proactive recruitment undertaken to ensure these levels are maintained.

20 Jun 2019, 4:10 p.m. Julian Assange Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the procedure was for (a) public and (b) press access to the extradition hearing for Julian Assange; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This was an open hearing, accessible to both the press and public.

Extra chairs were laid out to accommodate as many people as possible in the court room. As is usual in high-profile cases, a ticketing system was in place to allocate seats to the media.

There were, however, more people wishing to observe the hearing than there were seats available, meaning that not everyone could be accommodated on this occasion.

20 Jun 2019, 4:10 p.m. Courts and Probation: ICT Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much money has been recovered from IT systems suppliers since the probation and courts IT systems failures in January 2019.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice is continuing discussions with its Suppliers in relation to the outage. Due to the ongoing nature of these discussions it is not possible to provide any information pertaining to the quantification of costs, at this time.

19 Jun 2019, 4:04 p.m. Race and Ethnicity Board Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people are members of the Race and Ethnicity Board that was established as a result of the Lammy Review; how many hours the members of that Board have worked in the last 12 months; what the budget is of that Board; and whether the Budget has remained the same in each year since that Board was established.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As part of the Government’s response to the Lammy Review, we have set up a Race and Ethnicity Board to oversee progress on the recommendations, and the wider agenda of race disparity. The Board currently has circa 22 members and is chaired by the Ministry of Justice Director General for Policy, Communications and Analysis. Membership of the Board includes senior level representation from departmental policy groups (from Ministry of Justice and other government departments), operational bodies such as HM Prison and Probation Service, HM Courts and Tribunal Service, and the Crown Prosecution Service, and external members. It is not possible to isolate individual time spent on race disparity work, as the board members hold these positions as part of their wider work responsibilities. However, the board was set up in January 2018 and has since met on a quarterly basis. The board does not have a dedicated budget as work is resourced separately by the various organisations responsible for actions to address racial disparities.

19 Jun 2019, 3:57 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Homelessness Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether cases involving the risk of homelessness fall under the scope of legal aid.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Legal aid funding continues to be available for cases where an individual is at immediate risk of homelessness, or where there are disrepairs which seriously threaten the life or health of the individual or their family.

Legal aid also remains available for housing possession cases, including the Housing Possession Court Duty Scheme.

Legal aid may be sought via the Exceptional Case Funding scheme (ECF) in any matter where failure to provide it would breach, or risk breaching, the European Convention on Human Rights or enforceable EU law, subject to the statutory means and merits tests.

19 Jun 2019, 3:51 p.m. Randox Testing Services: Compensation Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on whether damages have been paid to people as a result of manipulation of forensic toxicology results at Randox.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Government is unable to comment on compensation payments relating to the manipulation of forensic toxicology results at Randox until the criminal investigation into this matter is complete.

18 Jun 2019, 4:53 p.m. Television: Licensing Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have received a custodial sentence for failure to pay the television license fee in the last five years.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Failure to pay television licence fees is not an imprisonable offence. However, courts have power to commit to prison for failure to pay criminal fines, which can be imposed for non-payment of television licence fees.

The number of committals to prison imposed in the last five years for failure to pay fines imposed for non-payment of the BBC licence fee can be viewed in the table.

18 Jun 2019, 4:48 p.m. Guardianship (Missing Persons) Act 2017 Kevin Hollinrake

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to bring into force the provisions of the Guardianship (Missing Persons) Act 2017.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Guardianship (Missing Persons) Act 2017 will be implemented in July, and applications to the court for guardianship orders will be able to commence from that date.

18 Jun 2019, 2:38 p.m. Approved Premises Ian Austin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make it his policy not to privatise Approved Premises.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Approved Premises are accommodation approved under section 13 of the Offender Management Act 2007 for the supervision and rehabilitation of persons convicted of offences, or the supervision of persons granted bail in criminal proceedings. Their chief function is to accommodate high-risk offenders on release from custody.

All Approved Premises are funded by the Ministry of Justice. Most are managed by the National Probation Service, and the remainder by independent charitable trusts. We have no plans to change these arrangements.

18 Jun 2019, 2:38 p.m. Offenders: Private Rented Housing Ian Austin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential risk to local communities of the highest risk offenders being housed in the private sector.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Approved Premises are accommodation approved under section 13 of the Offender Management Act 2007 for the supervision and rehabilitation of persons convicted of offences, or the supervision of persons granted bail in criminal proceedings. Their chief function is to accommodate high-risk offenders on release from custody.

All Approved Premises are funded by the Ministry of Justice. Most are managed by the National Probation Service, and the remainder by independent charitable trusts. We have no plans to change these arrangements.

18 Jun 2019, 9:38 a.m. Prisoners' Release: Females Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women have been released on temporary licence in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Data on temporary release by gender is published annually in the Prison Releases tables of the offender management statistics. The available data covers the years 2011 to 2018:

2010*

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2015**

2016

2017

2018

Females

released on temporary licence

-

828

875

819

731

613

613

621

650

643

(*) A new prison database system was introduced mid 2009 (P-NOMIS). The migration of data from the old system (LIDS) to P-NOMIS affected the supply of data for statistical purposes from July 2009 to February 2010. Data for 2009 is taken from Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2009, in which volumes for 2009 were estimated using data from the first half of the year and rounded to the nearest 100. Data for 2010 is unavailable.

(**) Due to improvements in IT systems, the 2015 prison admissions data is now taken from a different source and, for statistical reporting purposes only, are produced using a different method. The 2015 figures from both the old and new systems have been presented to aid comparison.

By providing opportunities to work, learn and build family ties, temporary release from prison helps ensure offenders do not return to crime when they leave prison.

We published a new ROTL policy framework on 28 May, following consultation with practitioners and key stakeholders, such as employers. Governors can now consider ROTL earlier and in more cases, and prisoners can enter the workplace sooner.

18 Jun 2019, 9:36 a.m. Drugs: Rehabilitation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Drug Rehabilitation Requirements have been (a) commenced and (b) completed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on commencements is published in table A4.8 of the document entitled “Probation: 2018” in the Offender Management Statistics Quarterly for October-December 2018. It can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2018

Data on completions are available for the years 2013 onwards and are shown in the table below:

Drug Rehabilitation Requirement (DRR) Completions, 2013-18

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

7160

7333

6619

5671

4751

3897

The purpose of the drug rehabilitation requirement is to reduce or eliminate illicit drug use and associated offending. Offenders are required to attend appointments with the treatment provider and to submit to regular drug testing. They are also required to attend appointments with, or arranged by, their offender manager.

17 Jun 2019, 4:57 p.m. Reoffenders: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of (a) community orders, (b) suspended sentences and (c) previous custodial sentences given to an offender sentenced to immediate custody was in each year since 2007.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Data on the average number of previous specified sentences received by offenders who were sentenced to immediate custody, covering the period 2007 – 2018, can be viewed in the table.

17 Jun 2019, 4:56 p.m. Reoffenders: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders sentenced to immediate custody had (a) zero, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50 and (g) more than 50 previous community orders; and how many and what proportion of offenders sentenced to immediate custody had (i) zero, (ii) between one and four, (iii) between five and nine, (iv) between 10 and 15, (v) between 16 and 25, (vi) between 26 and 50 and (vii) more than 50 suspended sentences, in each year since 2007.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested is provided in the table attached with this answer. The table includes data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous community sentences who were sentenced to immediate custody.
  • The proportion of offenders with a specified number of previous community sentences who were sentenced to immediate custody.
  • The number of offenders with a specified number of suspended sentences who were sentenced to immediate custody.
  • The proportion of offenders with a specified number of suspended sentences who were sentenced to immediate custody.
17 Jun 2019, 4:54 p.m. Prisoners: Rehabilitation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders who received Sentences of Imprisonment for Public Protection have been refused access to at least one offending behaviour course during their sentence in the last five years.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

As with all prisoners, those serving Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences are not refused access to offending behaviour courses based on their sentence type. We use risk, needs and responsivity principles to help us target the right programmes for the right people. This ensures that the level of support provided by a programme matches a person’s risk of reoffending and that the content covers the areas a person needs to address to reduce further offending. All prisoners, including those serving IPP sentences, have their suitability for any accredited programmes considered as part of their wider sentence plan. A wide range of accredited programmes are available in custody and these are refreshed annually based on prisoner needs and demand. IPPs are one of the groups prioritised for participation on suitable programmes. However, completion of accredited programmes is not a mandatory requirement in order for IPP prisoners to secure release. Information related to the number of offenders serving an IPP that have been referred, but not found suitable for courses could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

17 Jun 2019, 4:53 p.m. Reoffenders: Community Orders Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 10 April to Question 239207 on the Answer of 9 May to Question 246971, how many offenders re-offended while being the subject of a community order; and how many offences of each type were committed by those offenders in each year since 2007.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We do not hold reoffending rates based on whether offenders are the subject of a community order but instead hold data based on those who have started a community order in a given period. As such, we cannot tell whether an offender is still subject to a community order at the time of their reoffence. Please see the available data in the table provided. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime. Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

17 Jun 2019, 4:52 p.m. Convictions: Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who previously had (a) no, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more convictions, were convicted in each of the years since 2007, but did not receive an immediate custodial sentence.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions who were convicted of an offence and not sentenced to immediate custody.
  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions who were convicted of an offence and sentenced to immediate custody.
17 Jun 2019, 4:52 p.m. Sentencing Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders sentenced to immediate custody previously had (a) zero, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more convictions in each year since 2007.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions who were convicted of an offence and not sentenced to immediate custody.
  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions who were convicted of an offence and sentenced to immediate custody.
17 Jun 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Representation: Public Interest Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications have been made on behalf of bereaved families for Exceptional Case Funding for legal representation at inquests under the public interest test in each of the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

17 Jun 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Representation: Public Interest Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications made on behalf of bereaved families for Exceptional Case Funding for legal representation at inquests under the public interest test were granted on first application in each of the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

17 Jun 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Representation: Public Interest Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications made on behalf of bereaved families for Exceptional Case Funding for legal representation at inquests under the public interest test were granted on appeal in each of the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

17 Jun 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Representation: Public Interest Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding has been granted to successful applicants for Exceptional Case Funding for legal representation at inquests under the public interest test in each of the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

17 Jun 2019, 4:19 p.m. Children in Care: Police Custody Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many looked-after children were held in custody on 1 January 2019.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Data on looked-after children (LAC) held in custody would require the examination of separate information technology systems to establish and validate appropriate records.

17 Jun 2019, 4:18 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Homelessness Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 10 June 2019 to Question 260071, what estimate his Department has made of the cost of establishing how many children were released from prison into homelessness in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Question 259337 dealt with the release of children into homelessness. In order to answer that question, there would be a need to check the c.20,300 individual records of children released since 2010 to obtain their accommodation status. We estimate that it would take around two minutes to check each record, which equates to a cost of approximately £16,900. This does not include the time required to engage with Local Authorities where necessary.

17 Jun 2019, 4:17 p.m. Young Offenders: Children in Care Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of looked-after children who were released from custody in January 2019 had a resettlement care plan confirmed 10 working days prior to their release from custody.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Data on looked-after children (LAC) released from custody would require the examination of information technology systems to specifically establish and validate appropriate records for resettlement plans within 10 days of release.

17 Jun 2019, 4:15 p.m. Family Courts: Reviews Jessica Morden

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans the Government has to conduct evidence-gathering sessions with domestic abuse survivors and charities as part of its review into family courts.

Answer (Edward Argar)

On 21 May 2019 we announced a public call for evidence led by a panel of experts to gather evidence on how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences.

The inaugural panel meeting took place on Friday 14 June 2019. We will shortly be announcing its planned approach for engaging domestic abuse survivors and other key stakeholders, as well the composition of the panel and agreed objectives for the call for evidence.

The panel members represent key parties to the issue and will provide expertise from across the Family Justice System. Included are representatives from the Judiciary, academia, social care, policy officials and third sector organisations which represent and advocate for survivors of domestic abuse.

It is vital that this call for evidence can contribute to real improvements to the Family Justice System to protect victims and their families. For this reason, the experiences of domestic abuse survivors will be central to the evidence gathered by the panel.

13 Jun 2019, 4:18 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Homelessness Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 June 2019 to Question 257595, what the estimated cost is of establishing how many women were released from prison into homelessness in each year from 2010-11 to 2016-17.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Pursuant to the answer to Question 257595, the cost of establishing how many women were released from prison into homelessness in each year from 2010-11 to 2016-2017 is estimated as £62,500.

13 Jun 2019, 4:01 p.m. Rehabilitation: Offenders Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reason all accredited programmes run by (a) prisons and (b) the Probation Service have not been subject to an impact and outcome evaluation.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Department has undertaken several outcome evaluations of accredited offending behaviour programmes, and further evaluations are currently underway. In 2018 we invested in new resources to address the backlog in evaluations. Impact evaluations may not be suitable for all accredited programmes due to the low volume of participants. In these circumstances other types of evaluations are undertaken, for example studies to assess whether delivery is in line with the evidence.

All accredited programmes are assessed against a set of principles which are drawn from the evidence base about what works and considered against the latest thinking internationally. All programmes are subject to evaluation, but this can take many years due to the sample sizes required to meet academic standards.

It is the Secretary of State’s policy to make accredited offending behaviour programmes available to people convicted of crime. An evaluation plan must be submitted in order to achieve initial accreditation and the evaluation results must be provided to achieve reaccreditation (usually after 5 years). Accreditation also requires that the programme is designed based on the best available evidence, and that robust monitoring of practice is in place.

Research has shown that HMPPS programmes, when properly targeted, can reduce reoffending by 8 percentage points, and up to 17 percentage points for violent offenders.

13 Jun 2019, 4:01 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Procurement Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether it is his policy that future programmes authorised by his Department be subject to an impact evaluation.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Department has undertaken several outcome evaluations of accredited offending behaviour programmes, and further evaluations are currently underway. In 2018 we invested in new resources to address the backlog in evaluations. Impact evaluations may not be suitable for all accredited programmes due to the low volume of participants. In these circumstances other types of evaluations are undertaken, for example studies to assess whether delivery is in line with the evidence.

All accredited programmes are assessed against a set of principles which are drawn from the evidence base about what works and considered against the latest thinking internationally. All programmes are subject to evaluation, but this can take many years due to the sample sizes required to meet academic standards.

It is the Secretary of State’s policy to make accredited offending behaviour programmes available to people convicted of crime. An evaluation plan must be submitted in order to achieve initial accreditation and the evaluation results must be provided to achieve reaccreditation (usually after 5 years). Accreditation also requires that the programme is designed based on the best available evidence, and that robust monitoring of practice is in place.

Research has shown that HMPPS programmes, when properly targeted, can reduce reoffending by 8 percentage points, and up to 17 percentage points for violent offenders.

13 Jun 2019, 3:54 p.m. Prisoners: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria his Department uses to assess the suitability for courses for prisoners.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Every prisoner is subject to rigorous assessment on reception which informs a Personal Learning Plan. This plan is linked to prisoners' sentence plans and helps ensure provision is suitable to address needs. Prison Governors will then be held to account for the progress of each prisoners' in their establishment against that Personal Learning Plan as they progress through their sentence including transition to support through the gate and on release.

Responsibility for education provision in prisons is held by Governors. They control the budget, decide the curriculum, and have helped to choose the main providers. In addition, our prison education Dynamic Purchasing System allows governors to commission specific, short-term education provision to meet specialised learning needs. Governors will also need to be aware of the development needs of their population and commission suitable provision that is linked to local employment needs. This will help prisoners to take full advantage of employment opportunities on release.

13 Jun 2019, 3:53 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the availability of courses for prisoners to demonstrate safety for release.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

A wide range of accredited programmes are available for prisoners to attend where they are identified as suitable. Referrals for courses and volumes delivered are kept under review and suitability for any accredited programmes will be considered as part of a prisoner’s wider sentence plan. We always try to ensure that courses are available to prisoners at a suitable time in their sentence. In particular, we prioritise indeterminate sentence prisoners for courses to ensure that Parole Board recommendations can be implemented as soon as practicable. However, the completion of accredited programmes is not a mandatory requirement to secure release.

It is for the independent Parole Board to review the detention of parole eligible prisoners. The Board will direct the release of these prisoners only if it is satisfied that the levels of risk posed to the general public are reduced enough that the National Probation Service and its partner agencies can safely manage them in the community under supervision. Prisoners are managed using a sentence plan which contains interventions that have been identified to help them to address the risks that they pose. Management of the sentence plan is a matter for HMPPS and not the Parole Board. The Parole Board will consider how interventions identified by HMPPS, and undertaken by prisoners, have impacted on the levels of risk posed by individuals.

Information relating to Parole Board recommendations is not held centrally and could not be obtained without incurring disproportionate costs.

While HMPPS is focused on giving all prisoners opportunities to progress towards release, public protection must remain our priority.

13 Jun 2019, 3:53 p.m. Prisoners: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what data his Department holds on the (a) number and (b) type of parole board recommendations for courses to be undertaken by prisoners.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

A wide range of accredited programmes are available for prisoners to attend where they are identified as suitable. Referrals for courses and volumes delivered are kept under review and suitability for any accredited programmes will be considered as part of a prisoner’s wider sentence plan. We always try to ensure that courses are available to prisoners at a suitable time in their sentence. In particular, we prioritise indeterminate sentence prisoners for courses to ensure that Parole Board recommendations can be implemented as soon as practicable. However, the completion of accredited programmes is not a mandatory requirement to secure release.

It is for the independent Parole Board to review the detention of parole eligible prisoners. The Board will direct the release of these prisoners only if it is satisfied that the levels of risk posed to the general public are reduced enough that the National Probation Service and its partner agencies can safely manage them in the community under supervision. Prisoners are managed using a sentence plan which contains interventions that have been identified to help them to address the risks that they pose. Management of the sentence plan is a matter for HMPPS and not the Parole Board. The Parole Board will consider how interventions identified by HMPPS, and undertaken by prisoners, have impacted on the levels of risk posed by individuals.

Information relating to Parole Board recommendations is not held centrally and could not be obtained without incurring disproportionate costs.

While HMPPS is focused on giving all prisoners opportunities to progress towards release, public protection must remain our priority.

13 Jun 2019, 11:42 a.m. Julian Assange Catherine West

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of reports on the health of Julian Assange while in custody in the UK.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service is responsible for ensuring access to NHS services for people detained in prison. We must protect the medical confidentiality of all NHS patients in prison and therefore cannot comment on the health of individual prisoners. Prison Governors work closely with NHS healthcare commissioners and the providers of healthcare services to support the health and welfare of people in custody.

13 Jun 2019, 8:16 a.m. Family Courts: Domestic Abuse Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Ministry of Justice press release of 21 May 2019 entitled Spotlight on child protection in family courts (a) if he will list the panel of experts assembled and (b) whether any survivors or victims of domestic abuse will sit on the panel.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

On 21 May 2019 we announced a public call for evidence led by a panel of experts to gather evidence on how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences.

The inaugural panel meeting is due to take place Friday 14 June 2019, after which we will publicly announce the panel members and agreed objectives for the call for evidence.

The panel members represent key parties to the issue and will provide expertise from across the Family Justice System. Included are representatives from the Judiciary, academia, social care, policy officials and third sector organisations which represent and advocate for victims of domestic abuse.

It is vital that this call for evidence can contribute to real improvements to the Family Justice System to protect victims and their families. For this reason, the experiences of victims will be central to the evidence gathered by the panel.

12 Jun 2019, 1:03 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the overall budget of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme was for covering the costs of acquiring medical evidence for applicants in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is not available.

The Ministry of Justice does not provide the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority with a specific budget for the purpose of costs associated with acquiring medical evidence for applicants.

10 Jun 2019, 4:44 p.m. Offences Against Children: Compensation Andrew Griffiths

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 220844 on Offences Against Children: Compensation, (a) what the conviction was for and (b) how much was awarded in compensation in each of the 26 cases where a criminal compensation order was issued.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The amount of compensation awarded for child sexual abuse offences where a criminal compensation order was issued in 2017 can be viewed in the table attached.

Compensation rarely appears as a primary disposal, it is almost exclusively a secondary disposal and will usually be accompanied by another sentencing outcome such as immediate custody. Data presented in this PQ response is from administrative court records and needs to be considered in the context it is collected. In some court cases especially for the most serious offences, courts may prioritise recording of the primary disposals (such as custody, community sentences etc.).

10 Jun 2019, 4:21 p.m. Offences Against Children: Compensation Andrew Griffiths

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of private prosecutions brought for compensation for the victims of child sexual abuse in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

It is not possible to identify private prosecutions in the courts proceedings database; this would require a manual search of court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

10 Jun 2019, 10:13 a.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria his Department uses to determine eligibility for compensation awards to victims of terrorism from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Applications from victims of terrorism in Great Britain are determined by reference to the eligibility rules contained within the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 2012.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/criminal-injuries-compensation-scheme-2012

6 Jun 2019, 5:14 p.m. National Probation Service: Staff Ellie Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of staffing levels in the London division of the National Probation Service.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We are currently recruiting more staff into the National Probation Service (NPS). Changes to the recruitment process and eligibility criteria for probation officers have been made resulting in increases in both the volume and diversity of probation officer applicants. A national campaign to recruit probation officers took place recently and successful candidates will start in July 2019, however, it is of note that these campaigns have been consistent.

NPS London have prioritised the recruitment of Probation Officers to fill all current and projected vacancies. As of March 2019, approximately 1,325 full time equivalent staff are employed; a net increase of 57 from March 2018. We are recruiting across London, with 211 new staff joining over the past year. NPS London are closely monitoring the caseload capacity for staff and take proportionate and appropriate action to manage workloads across the division.

6 Jun 2019, 4:49 p.m. Prisoners: Self-harm Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what data his Department holds on the frequency of self-harm incidents among (a) the general prison population and (b) IPP sentenced prisoners.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Government publishes quarterly statistics on self-harm in prison, and a more detailed annual breakdown, and both are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018

Information about self-harm incidents up to December 2018 for the general prison population, and broken down by type of custody, including those serving IPP sentences, can be found in table 2.6 of the document entitled Self-harm in prison custody 2004-2018.

The Government is taking unprecedented action to improve safety in prisons, including redoubling our efforts to address the record levels of self-harm. We have recruited over 4,700 more prison officers since October 2016, and we now have the greatest number in post since early 2012. This is allowing us to implement the key worker role, allowing staff dedicated time to provide support to individual prisoners. We are improving support for prisoners in their early days in custody and working to improve the multi-disciplinary ACCT case management process for those at risk of suicide or self-harm.

We have rolled out a revised and improved Introduction to Suicide and Self-harm Prevention course. This is being completed by all new staff and is being delivered as refresher training to all existing staff. 25,000 staff have already begun this training and over 14,000 have completed all six modules.

6 Jun 2019, 4:45 p.m. Probation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what research his Department conducted or commissioned before the decision to introduce 11 new probation regions.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Proposals for a consolidation of probation regions in England and Wales were included in the public consultation Strengthening Probation, Building Confidence. Feedback on these proposals formed part of the Department’s considerations in addition to further consultation with Police and Crime Commissioners, Local Authorities and other key stakeholders to ensure the proposed regional structure effectively facilitates joint working between probation providers and key partners at a regional and local level .

6 Jun 2019, 4:42 p.m. Courts: Prisons Lord Beith

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government what provision, if any, Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service has made for courts to sit in prisons when a prisoner refuses either to attend court or to take part in a video link between a prison and a court.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

A decision that a court should sit within a prison when a defendant refuses to attend court in person or by video link is for the judiciary. If such a decision is made HMCTS , in conjunction with HMPPS Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service makes the necessary arrangements.

The Court has no legal power to direct a prison officer (including a Governor) to use force or to compel a prisoner to attend court.

6 Jun 2019, 4:40 p.m. Offences Against Children: Mental Health Services Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding his Department has allocated to the provision of therapy services for victims of child sexual abuse under the age of 13 in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government is committed to ensuring victims of sexual abuse feel that they can come forward to report abuse, and that they can get the support they need, whether they are a child or an adult. That is why we provide grant funding for victim support services across the country, which victims can access throughout their lifetime.

The nature of this funding has evolved over time to reflect changes in demand and the changing nature of crime; hence we are unable to provide a consistent breakdown of funding since 2010.

Since 2016/17, the Ministry of Justice have provided around £7m per year of ring-fenced funding specifically for provision of support to victims of recent and non-recent child sexual abuse (CSA). In 2018/19, this included £4.7m provided to the Police and Crime Commissioners to locally commission or deliver such services, £1.74m allocated directly to rape support centres and £0.58m allocated to a fund maintained by the Home Office for national and regional organisations supporting victims of recent and non-recent CSA. This funding is not age-restricted; hence we are unable to provide information around how much has been allocated to support individuals under 13.

Victims and survivors of child sexual abuse are also supported by the NHS England-funded Sexual Assault Referral Centres (SARCs), which are open to all victims of sexual violence regardless of age and provide a range of services including crisis worker support and psychological therapy sessions to address any of victims’ immediate needs. This funding has increased significantly from £23m in 2016/17 to £35m in 2019/20, and supports work to improve the therapy offer for both children and adults.

6 Jun 2019, 4:13 p.m. Prisoners: GCSE Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of prisoners with fewer than five GCSEs at grade A* to C in the latest period for which figures are available.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Department for Education publishes data on English & Maths assessments undertaken when someone is received into prison. This can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-education-and-training

Tables for English and maths assessments: participation 2017 to 2018, can be accessed by the following link;

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765593/201718_OLASS_English_maths_assessments_participation_demographic_tool.xlsx

6 Jun 2019, 4:13 p.m. Prisoners: Literacy Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of prisoners with literacy levels below that defined by the 2011 Skills for Life survey as (a) Entry Level 3 and (b) Level 1.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Department for Education publishes data on English & Maths assessments undertaken when someone is received into prison. This can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-education-and-training

Tables for English and maths assessments: participation 2017 to 2018, can be accessed by the following link;

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/765593/201718_OLASS_English_maths_assessments_participation_demographic_tool.xlsx

6 Jun 2019, 4:08 p.m. Prisons: Childbirth Carolyn Harris

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what statistics his Department holds on the number of (a) perinatal women in custody and (b) babies born on prison estates.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Information relating to births and pregnancy is recorded locally. Work is currently underway to look at what information related to pregnancy and birth can be collected centrally.

6 Jun 2019, 4:02 p.m. Family Courts: Domestic Abuse Chris Williamson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's press release of 21 May 2019, Spotlight on child protection in family courts: A panel of experts will review how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences, whether that panel of experts plan to include a review of the status of parental alienation as child abuse in that review.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The expert panel announced on 21 May has a specific remit, first, to gather evidence on how the family courts are responding to alleged or admitted domestic abuse, including the operation of Practice Direction 12J, and the operation of this Practice Direction with the risk of harm exception to the presumption of parental involvement. Second, the panel will consider the adequacy of protections in relation to a range of other serious offences. Third, the panel will consider the handling of repeat applications in the family courts, which may be used to re-victimise or control children and victim parents, including the operation of section 91(14) of the Children Act 1989.

The Government is committed to ensuring that the family justice system can robustly address instances of parental alienation. Where Cafcass practitioners prepare a report into the child’s welfare, they are aware of the potential for children to be influenced or alienated by parental views. The Child Impact Assessment Framework launched last year provides further support for Cafcass practitioners in relation to alienating behaviour by a parent.

6 Jun 2019, 3:55 p.m. Child Sexual Abuse Independent Panel Inquiry Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which of the 18 recommendations contained in the Independent Inquiry Child Sexual Abuse Interim Report his Department has implemented.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, published its Interim Report on 25 April 2018, and made eighteen recommendations for Government, of which five are directed to the Ministry of Justice, and one to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, an Executive Agency of the department.

Her Majesty’s Government published its response to the IICSA’s recommendations on 19 December, indicating that it will be taking forward the vast majority of the interim report’s recommendations. It can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-inquiry-into-child-sexual-abuse-interim-report

6 Jun 2019, 3:55 p.m. Child Sexual Abuse Independent Panel Inquiry Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which of the 18 recommendations in the Independent Inquiry Child Sexual Abuse Interim Report his Department plans to implement.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, published its Interim Report on 25 April 2018, and made eighteen recommendations for Government, of which five are directed to the Ministry of Justice, and one to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, an Executive Agency of the department.

Her Majesty’s Government published its response to the IICSA’s recommendations on 19 December, indicating that it will be taking forward the vast majority of the interim report’s recommendations. It can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-inquiry-into-child-sexual-abuse-interim-report

6 Jun 2019, 3:53 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Baroness Thomas of Winchester

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to decrease waiting times for Personal Independence Payment tribunal appeals.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

It is important that appeals are heard as quickly as possible. The Ministry of Justice recognises that there are delays in the system and is in the process of recruiting more judicial office holders in order to increase capacity and help to reduce waiting times for appellants. In the Social Security and Child Support (SSCS) jurisdiction, 225 new medical members and 119 disability-qualified members have recently been appointed and are now hearing cases. The SSCS jurisdiction will also benefit from the fact that 250 fee-paid judges and 100 salaried judges are being recruited across tribunals more widely. In addition, we have recently launched a new digital service with a view to enabling speedier processing of appeals and providing a better service for all parties to the proceedings.

6 Jun 2019, 3:30 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Children Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children were released from custody into homelessness in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost, as there would be a need to check individual records of all young people released from custody since 2010.

6 Jun 2019, 3:23 p.m. Courts: Domestic Abuse Lord Beecham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 21 May (HL Deb, col 1863), what consideration they have given to providing (1) separate waiting facilities for the parties, and (2) facilities to enable the giving of evidence by screen or video link, for court cases relating to domestic abuse.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

From context we have assumed the honourable member is asking about the family courts.

(1) In family courts, vulnerable parties and witnesses may request the use of a separate entrance and waiting area. Where dedicated separate entrances or waiting areas are not available, court staff will make alternative arrangements wherever possible.

(2) In the family court over 300 protective screens have been provided over the last two years to ensure that vulnerable parties and witnesses can be shielded from an alleged abuser in the courtroom. Video links may also be used either from a secure location within the court building or from a remote location. Use of these facilities must be approved by the Judge. Use of telephone hearings for without notice Family Law Act injunction hearings is being encouraged to avoid the need for victims of domestic abuse to attend court.

We are determined that the family courts should never be used to further or perpetrate abuse. The Government announced on 21 May 2019 the establishment of an expert panel to gather evidence of how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences. Once formed, it is intended that the panel will report within three months.

6 Jun 2019, 2:33 p.m. Prisoners: Health Services Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many IPP sentenced prisoners have been refused access to a therapeutic community in each year since 2010.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

No prisoners are refused access to a Therapeutic Community based on their sentence type, with each individual case having been assessed on the basis of their readiness and suitability to engage in therapy. Referral and assessment processes for Therapeutic Communities include a structured clinical assessment to determine a prisoner’s suitability to participate in a therapeutic programme. This assessment considers levels of risk and complexity, readiness, motivation to engage, security status and appropriate medical information such as current mental state.

6 Jun 2019, 2:28 p.m. National Probation Service for England and Wales Ellie Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of whether the National Probation Service has adequate resources to protect (a) children, (b) victims of crime and (c) potential victims of crime in the London Division.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

As I said in my previous response to PQ 257583, the National Probation Service (NPS) is currently recruiting more staff into the organisation. We have seen an increase in both the volume and diversity of probation officer applicants following a change in the recruitment process and eligibility criteria. A national campaign to recruit probation officers took place recently and successful candidates will start in July 2019.

NPS London have prioritised the recruitment of Probation Officers to fill all current and projected vacancies and have had 211 new staff joining over the past year. As of March 2019, approximately 1,325 full time equivalent staff are employed; a net increase of 57 from March 2018. They have also introduced new victim-specific training for staff.

NPS London are closely monitoring the caseload capacity for staff and would take proportionate and appropriate action to manage workloads across the division.

6 Jun 2019, 2:28 p.m. National Probation Service for England and Wales: Greater London Ellie Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of whether the National Probation Service has adequate resources to undertake work effectively in the London Division.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

As I said in my previous response to PQ 257583, the National Probation Service (NPS) is currently recruiting more staff into the organisation. We have seen an increase in both the volume and diversity of probation officer applicants following a change in the recruitment process and eligibility criteria. A national campaign to recruit probation officers took place recently and successful candidates will start in July 2019.

NPS London have prioritised the recruitment of Probation Officers to fill all current and projected vacancies and have had 211 new staff joining over the past year. As of March 2019, approximately 1,325 full time equivalent staff are employed; a net increase of 57 from March 2018. They have also introduced new victim-specific training for staff.

NPS London are closely monitoring the caseload capacity for staff and would take proportionate and appropriate action to manage workloads across the division.

6 Jun 2019, 2:16 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Disclosure of Information Jeremy Lefroy

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of subject access requests made to the Subject Access Team of the Ministry of Justice have been responded to within the correct timescale since the General Data Protection Regulation came into force; and what steps she is taking to reduce the volume of those requests.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

I can confirm that the proportion of subject access requests made to the Ministry of Justice since June 2018 that were responded to within time is 75%. This figure includes requests received up to and including March 2019, representing the latest available performance results.

The Ministry of Justice takes its data protection responsibilities seriously. We have seen a significant increase in the numbers of subject access requests received since the General Data Protection Regulation came into force. We have developed plans to address this increase and taken steps to achieve the desired level of performance. We have:

  • Reviewed and improved working practices and streamlined staff training
  • Increased staffing levels
  • Invested in technology and we are conducting a trial to release more information to offenders in prison.

The volume of subject access requests received by the department is beyond its control. Since the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation and the accompanying Data Protection Act 2018 on the 25 May 2018, the number of SARs have increased by 160% from offenders and 55% from MoJ staff and members of the public.

6 Jun 2019, 2:13 p.m. Family Courts: Domestic Abuse Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the proportion of cases where domestic abuse was alleged or proven in initial safeguarding where (a) a Cafcass Early Intervention Team phone call did not take place before a First Hearing and Dispute Resolution Appointment, (b) children were not interviewed and (c) a risk assessment was not completed in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Cafcass undertakes safeguarding checks in every case where an application is made to the court for a child arrangements order and reports relevant information to the court in a safeguarding letter prior to the first hearing. As part of that process, Cafcass will attempt to contact each party separately by telephone to elicit any concerns about any risks of harm, either to the child or to an adult party. Cafcass conducts checks of police records and makes enquiries of the local authority and will include in its safeguarding letter any relevant convictions or cautions or prior local authority involvement.

Cafcass undertakes direct work with the child when directed to do so by the court, in cases that continue after the first hearing. This includes interviewing children in order to ascertain their wishes and feelings to produce a section 7 welfare report into the child’s welfare needs. Any information disclosed by the child about domestic or other abuse will be reported to the court. In 2018-19 Cafcass produced 19,236 s7 welfare reports.

Cafcass does not record data on the contents of individual safeguarding letters. However, a file analysis of 216 private law cases undertaken in 2017 found that domestic abuse was alleged in 62% of cases. Practice Direction 12J sets out the factors the court must consider when domestic abuse is raised within the proceedings, including whether a fact-finding hearing should be held. Data is not collected centrally on the number of fact finding hearings and could only be obtained through an analysis of case files at disproportionate cost. Whether or not domestic abuse is alleged or admitted by either party, Cafcass has a statutory duty to report to the court at any stage in the proceedings any concerns it has about the risk of harm to the child.

Data is not available on specific recommendations made by Cafcass to the court about child arrangements in individual cases nor on the detailed content of any child arrangements order subsequently made by the court. Such information could only be obtained from a case file analysis at disproportionate cost.

Data is not collected on the use by the court of its power under section 91(14) of the Children Act 1989 to prevent a named person from applying from a specified kind of order without its permission. Such provision may form part of a child arrangements or other order under made under the 1989 Act.

The Government is determined to improve the family justice response to vulnerable people, including victims of domestic abuse. We are committed to giving the family courts the power to stop unrepresented perpetrators of abuse from cross-examining their victims in person in family proceedings, and we have included measures to prevent this in the draft Domestic Abuse Bill.

On 21 May we also announced the establishment of a panel of experts to consider how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences.

6 Jun 2019, 2:13 p.m. Family Courts: Domestic Abuse Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the proportion of cases where domestic abuse was alleged or proven in family court proceedings where (a) a Finding of Fact hearing was not part of proceeding, (b) contact was not recommended but was ordered, (c) Cafcass vetoed a court order on safeguarding grounds, (d) no contact was ordered, (e) domestic abuse was found and some form of contact was ordered in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Cafcass undertakes safeguarding checks in every case where an application is made to the court for a child arrangements order and reports relevant information to the court in a safeguarding letter prior to the first hearing. As part of that process, Cafcass will attempt to contact each party separately by telephone to elicit any concerns about any risks of harm, either to the child or to an adult party. Cafcass conducts checks of police records and makes enquiries of the local authority and will include in its safeguarding letter any relevant convictions or cautions or prior local authority involvement.

Cafcass undertakes direct work with the child when directed to do so by the court, in cases that continue after the first hearing. This includes interviewing children in order to ascertain their wishes and feelings to produce a section 7 welfare report into the child’s welfare needs. Any information disclosed by the child about domestic or other abuse will be reported to the court. In 2018-19 Cafcass produced 19,236 s7 welfare reports.

Cafcass does not record data on the contents of individual safeguarding letters. However, a file analysis of 216 private law cases undertaken in 2017 found that domestic abuse was alleged in 62% of cases. Practice Direction 12J sets out the factors the court must consider when domestic abuse is raised within the proceedings, including whether a fact-finding hearing should be held. Data is not collected centrally on the number of fact finding hearings and could only be obtained through an analysis of case files at disproportionate cost. Whether or not domestic abuse is alleged or admitted by either party, Cafcass has a statutory duty to report to the court at any stage in the proceedings any concerns it has about the risk of harm to the child.

Data is not available on specific recommendations made by Cafcass to the court about child arrangements in individual cases nor on the detailed content of any child arrangements order subsequently made by the court. Such information could only be obtained from a case file analysis at disproportionate cost.

Data is not collected on the use by the court of its power under section 91(14) of the Children Act 1989 to prevent a named person from applying from a specified kind of order without its permission. Such provision may form part of a child arrangements or other order under made under the 1989 Act.

The Government is determined to improve the family justice response to vulnerable people, including victims of domestic abuse. We are committed to giving the family courts the power to stop unrepresented perpetrators of abuse from cross-examining their victims in person in family proceedings, and we have included measures to prevent this in the draft Domestic Abuse Bill.

On 21 May we also announced the establishment of a panel of experts to consider how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences.

6 Jun 2019, 2:13 p.m. Family Courts: Domestic Abuse Louise Haigh

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on cases where domestic abuse was alleged or proven in return hearings in the family court on the proportion of cases (a) returning on safeguarding grounds and (b) judges used their powers to prevent a party bringing the case back to court to prevent abuse in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Cafcass undertakes safeguarding checks in every case where an application is made to the court for a child arrangements order and reports relevant information to the court in a safeguarding letter prior to the first hearing. As part of that process, Cafcass will attempt to contact each party separately by telephone to elicit any concerns about any risks of harm, either to the child or to an adult party. Cafcass conducts checks of police records and makes enquiries of the local authority and will include in its safeguarding letter any relevant convictions or cautions or prior local authority involvement.

Cafcass undertakes direct work with the child when directed to do so by the court, in cases that continue after the first hearing. This includes interviewing children in order to ascertain their wishes and feelings to produce a section 7 welfare report into the child’s welfare needs. Any information disclosed by the child about domestic or other abuse will be reported to the court. In 2018-19 Cafcass produced 19,236 s7 welfare reports.

Cafcass does not record data on the contents of individual safeguarding letters. However, a file analysis of 216 private law cases undertaken in 2017 found that domestic abuse was alleged in 62% of cases. Practice Direction 12J sets out the factors the court must consider when domestic abuse is raised within the proceedings, including whether a fact-finding hearing should be held. Data is not collected centrally on the number of fact finding hearings and could only be obtained through an analysis of case files at disproportionate cost. Whether or not domestic abuse is alleged or admitted by either party, Cafcass has a statutory duty to report to the court at any stage in the proceedings any concerns it has about the risk of harm to the child.

Data is not available on specific recommendations made by Cafcass to the court about child arrangements in individual cases nor on the detailed content of any child arrangements order subsequently made by the court. Such information could only be obtained from a case file analysis at disproportionate cost.

Data is not collected on the use by the court of its power under section 91(14) of the Children Act 1989 to prevent a named person from applying from a specified kind of order without its permission. Such provision may form part of a child arrangements or other order under made under the 1989 Act.

The Government is determined to improve the family justice response to vulnerable people, including victims of domestic abuse. We are committed to giving the family courts the power to stop unrepresented perpetrators of abuse from cross-examining their victims in person in family proceedings, and we have included measures to prevent this in the draft Domestic Abuse Bill.

On 21 May we also announced the establishment of a panel of experts to consider how the family courts protect children and parents in cases of domestic abuse and other serious offences.

6 Jun 2019, 2:07 p.m. Family Courts: Autism Peter Kyle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to improve support for people with autism in the family courts.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Part 3A of the Family Procedure Rules (FPR) clearly sets out the court’s duty to consider the vulnerability of a party or witness in relation to their participation in court proceedings, including when giving evidence.

The court must consider whether a party’s participation in the proceedings is likely to be diminished by reason of vulnerability and, if so, whether it is necessary to make one or more participation directions to assist that party. The court must consider a number of factors, including whether a party or witness suffers from mental disorder or otherwise has a significant impairment of intelligence or social functioning. Practice Direction 3AA provides further guidance to the court.

Specific training on autism is also available to members of the judiciary through the Judicial College, which provides training and support to members of the judiciary in England and Wales.

6 Jun 2019, 2:04 p.m. Probate: Standards Julian Knight

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to speed up the issuance of (a) grant of probate and (b) letters of administration; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Urgent action has been taken to address the delays which have been experienced in the probate service. Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service is increasing staffing levels and further improving the digital service to help reduce waiting times.

6 Jun 2019, 11:03 a.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the average cost of a personal independent payment appeal at the first-tier tribunal in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The information requested is not held centrally. The cost of Personal Independence Payment and Employment and Support Allowance hearings is included in the overall cost of the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support Appeal).

6 Jun 2019, 11:01 a.m. Legal Aid Scheme Peter Kyle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will exempt back payments of employment support allowance from the capital means test for legal aid eligibility.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

As part of its review of the legal aid eligibility regime, the Government will study the income and capital thresholds for legal aid entitlement, including the range of exemptions and disregards which apply to both the civil and criminal legal aid means assessments.

The review of the legal aid eligibility regime will bring together data, evidence and expertise from both within and outside of government, liaising with experts from across the field to explore improvements to the system

6 Jun 2019, 10:43 a.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Autism Peter Kyle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if the Government will include people with autism as part of its review of the thresholds for legal aid entitlement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The review of the legal aid eligibility regime will study the thresholds for legal aid entitlement and assess the effectiveness with which the means testing arrangements appropriately protect access to justice, particularly with respect to those who are vulnerable.

As part of the review, we will evaluate a wide range of evidence from both within and outside of government, liaising with experts from across the field to explore improvements to the system.

6 Jun 2019, 10:42 a.m. Ministry of Justice: Secondment Ellie Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 256353, Ministry of Justice: Brexit, how many officials in his Department have been seconded to work in the Department for Exiting the European Union in each of the last 18 months.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of staff seconded to the Department for Exiting the European in the last 18 months is 1.

6 Jun 2019, 10:41 a.m. Legal Aid Scheme Peter Kyle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timescale is for the Government review of the thresholds for legal aid entitlement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The comprehensive review of the legal aid eligibility regime is expected to conclude by Summer 2020 after which we will publish a full consultation paper setting out our future policy proposals in this area. We will seek to implement any final recommendations as soon as practicable following public consultation.

5 Jun 2019, 4:50 p.m. Prisoners: Homelessness Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners were recorded as being of No Fixed Abode on their arrival in custody in each prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Everyone should have a safe and suitable home to live; having somewhere to live gives people a stable platform from which to access health services, hold down a job and reduces the likelihood of them reoffending.

The Government published its Rough Sleeping Strategy in August 2018, launching a £100 million

initiative to reduce and ultimately eliminate rough sleeping across England. As part of this

strategy, Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government

(MHCLG), will be investing approximately £6m in a pilot scheme to support ex-offenders secure

suitable accommodation upon release; the pilots will operate in HMPs Pentonville, Bristol and

Staff in both National Probation Service and Community Rehabilitation Companies work together with local authorities and other providers of accommodation with the aim of ensuring all offenders under our supervision have accommodation especially when they are released from prison.

The table below provides data on the number of prisoners that declared their accommodation status as of ‘No Fixed Abode’ on their reception into custody in each prison in each year since 2010. The data for 2014 is not held.

PRISONS

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

Altcourse

489

601

859

1047

Bedford

549

537

197

373

Belmarsh

266

334

328

245

Birmingham

696

1062

1056

1036

Brinsford

95

87

90

126

Bristol

347

490

572

557

Bronzefield

338

736

1006

1022

Bullingdon

500

635

725

904

Cardiff

800

838

845

838

Chelmsford

523

520

508

484

Doncaster

701

605

623

683

Dovegate

192

292

525

560

Drake Hall

3

~

~

~

Durham

490

541

926

943

Eastwood Park

323

454

532

514

Elmley

606

880

1082

1115

Exeter

660

694

723

695

Forest Bank

878

1008

898

1252

Foston Hall

139

162

197

297

Glen Parva

57

65

12

Hewell

655

873

873

1027

High Down

631

531

283

333

Hollesley Bay

~

1

~

~

Holloway

336

60

~

~

Holme

248

291

128

~

Hull

620

642

670

661

Isle of Wight

21

42

32

31

Kirkham

~

~

~

1

Leeds

758

619

571

764

Leicester

179

226

253

348

Lewes

449

411

480

625

Lincoln

299

338

514

437

Liverpool

444

526

555

467

Low Newton

103

100

103

173

Manchester

547

687

580

449

New Hall

176

205

233

259

Norwich

451

561

647

553

Nottingham

759

988

923

1226

Parc

33

40

20

30

Pentonville

768

808

908

811

Peterborough

349

472

764

544

Peterborough Female

205

339

496

558

Preston

343

439

465

630

Stoke Heath

5

3

2

5

Swansea

314

316

365

346

Thameside

1229

1188

1463

1611

Wandsworth

1421

1682

1541

1423

Winchester

576

572

628

540

Woodhill

406

499

554

474

Wormwood Scrubs

1165

1103

1063

1096

Notes

1) The Basic Custody Screening Tool (BCS) is completed on entry to custody for all prisoners for each calendar year 2015-2018. It therefore will include a mix of those received into custody on remand and those sentenced from court. Using just the BCS, there is no way to determine which of those received into custody on remand were released un-convicted, therefore it is important to stress that this data covers prisoners, and can’t be used to describe offenders, as some of those counted will ultimately not have been found guilty of any offence.

2) NFA on reception is determined where the answer to question B3.1 OR B3.4 on the BCS has been answered as ‘NFA’. If B3.1 is answered NFA then B3.4 isn’t made available to be answered, so it is not possible to double count NFA within the same BCS.

3) The two questions are: B3.1 – What was your accommodation status before prison & B3.4 – What type of housing did you live in before you came to prison

4) These questions from the BCS Part 1 are recorded as per the prisoner’s answers and are not assessed.

5) The total number of prisoners shown is for the number of fully completed BCS Part 1s for each year, based on the Reception Date for each prisoner.

6) A proportion of prisoners will enter custody multiple times each year and for this PQ all responses have been included as a prisoner may provide different answers to these questions over time.

The figures have not been checked by statistician

5 Jun 2019, 4:19 p.m. Probation Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which areas the eleven new probation regions will be coterminous with.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Government set out its plans for the future of probation in the response to the public consultation Strengthening Probation, Building Confidence, published on 16 May 2019. We are now working with stakeholders and partners to develop more detailed plans for the future model.

Our intention is that probation regions to be created as part of future arrangements in England and Wales will be coterminous with police force areas.

5 Jun 2019, 4:13 p.m. Coroners: Legal Representation Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent from the public purse on legal representation for the Government at Inquests for each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The sums my Department has spent on legal representation for the Government at inquests in each of the last ten calendar years are set out below.

2009 £2,742,878.88

2010 £2,454,272.31

2011 £2,573,967.95

2012 £2,292,076.76

2013 £2,861,681.67

2014 £2,806,249.30

2015 £2,947,851.78

2016 £3,568,044.30

2017 £4,198,893.32

2018 £3,720,373.41

These are the costs of representation for the Ministry of Justice, Her Majesty's Prison & Probation Service and the Youth Justice Board, and for their staff. In the vast majority of cases the legal representatives are acting for both the body and all members of its staff called as witnesses, and the respective costs cannot therefore be separated. In a very small number of cases separate representation is provided for one or more members of staff.

The costs of representation for contracted prisons and their staff are met by the provider. Before the National Probation Service was created in April 2014 each Probation Trust met its own representation costs, and since then each Community Rehabilitation Company has done likewise. In addition, in 2009 and 2010 £17,770.07 was incurred on representation for prison Independent Monitoring Boards.

5 Jun 2019, 4:04 p.m. Companies: Civil Proceedings Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if his Department will publish the titles of the (a) court cases or (b) arbitration hearings that involved government owned companies that were held in private in commercial courts in the last three years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold a list of Government-owned companies that would be required to conduct any such search, nor does the Ministry centrally hold information on hearings held in private.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jun 2019, 4:03 p.m. Companies: Civil Proceedings Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) court cases and (b) enforcement hearings are currently being brought against Government-owned companies.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold a list of court cases and enforcement hearings that are currently being brought against Government-owned companies, nor does the Ministry hold a list of Government-owned companies that would be required to conduct any such search.

5 Jun 2019, 4:02 p.m. Companies: Civil Proceedings Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the amount of public money at risk in (a) active court proceedings and (b) enforcement hearings which have been brought against Government-owned companies.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold any central detail on the amount of public money at risk in active court proceedings or enforcement hearings which have been brought against Government-owned companies, nor does the Ministry hold a list of Government-owned companies that would be required to conduct any such search.

5 Jun 2019, 4 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Lord Alton of Liverpool

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the reasons for the number of prison officers resigning within 12 months of taking up their posts; and whether those reasons include the level of violence in UK prisons.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

The huge number of officers we have recently recruited inevitably means there are more staff - and more leavers with less than one years' experience. Attached is a table containing reason for leaving and grade. (Table i)

We are working hard to retain staff, giving staff the biggest pay increase in a decade last year and by providing additional training.

5 Jun 2019, 3:57 p.m. Probate: Reform Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department's reform of probate regulations.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The 2018 amendments to the non-contentious probate rules enabled personal applications to be submitted online. This service is assessed through a range of measures, such as user feedback and user satisfaction. Of 4,995 responses from users who submitted their application online 93% indicated from five feedback options that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the online application service provided. The online system is being continually improved and developed as a result of the feedback provided.

5 Jun 2019, 3:55 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Homelessness Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were released from prison into homelessness in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Making sure that we address female offenders’ housing and support needs is an absolute priority, at national and local level.

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) and the National Probation Service (NPS) are required to facilitate access to housing and support services for the female offenders that they are managing. This includes working together with local partners to help women find accommodation and supporting them to maintain their accommodation as part of a package of support tailored to meet their individual needs.

Our reforms to probation are designed to encourage long-term rehabilitation and ultimately reduce reoffending – and the first step in this is ensuring that everyone leaving prison has access to secure and stable accommodation. We are improving support for offenders leaving prison with a £22 million investment in through-the-gate services which will help to strengthen ties with key partners, including the third sector, local authorities and the police.

We recognise that improvements need to be made to current probation services and are working with providers to consider further action that we might take.

The data for the years before 2017-2018 could obtained only at disproportionate cost.

There is published data for the period 2017-2018. You can access this data here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/729062/accommodation-cirumstances-tables-2018.xlsx

Accommodation at Release from Custody: Accommodation Circumstances by Gender, 2017-18, England and Wales

Gender

Settled accommodation

Bail/probation accommodation

Rough sleeping

Other homeless

Other unsettled accommodation

Unknown

Total

Female

3,368

403

240

831

778

413

6,033

5 Jun 2019, 3:44 p.m. Prisoners: Health Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of prisoners with long-term health conditions in the latest period for which figures are available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold information on the number of prisoners with long-term health conditions. NHS England commission health services in prison and include questions on long-term health conditions in the reception and secondary health screen which all prisoners receive.

5 Jun 2019, 3:43 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether compensation awarded to victims of terrorism by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme is ring-fenced from the wider budget for compensation for victims of violent crime.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Compensation awarded to victims of terrorism in Great Britain, under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 2012, is made from the overall compensation budget available to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

5 Jun 2019, 3:43 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time taken is by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme to pay compensation to victims of terrorism following a successful application in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information can only be provided for financial years 2017/18 & 2018/19. Information from previous financial years has been archived in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority’s (CICA) data retention policy.

Terrorism is not defined for the purposes of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. Victims are compensated for the injuries they have sustained rather than the nature of the incident (with the exception of sexual assault or abuse).

To support consistent decision-making, CICA does record the nature of the incident where it identifies the potential for multiple applications in relation to the same circumstances. The data below relates to applicants who have been identified as victims of terrorism for this purpose.

Period

Average time taken to pay compensation to victims of terrorism following a successful application

2017-18

14 days from receipt of acceptance of award

2018-19

5 days from receipt of acceptance of award

5 Jun 2019, 3:42 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of applications for compensation as a result of being the victim of terrorism were granted by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information can only be provided for financial years 2017/18 & 2018/19. Information from previous financial years has been archived in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority’s (CICA) data retention policy.

Terrorism is not defined for the purposes of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. Victims are compensated for the injuries they have sustained rather than the nature of the incident (with the exception of sexual assault or abuse).

To support consistent decision-making, CICA does record the nature of the incident where it identifies the potential for multiple applications in relation to the same circumstances. The data below relates to applicants who have been identified as victims of terrorism for this purpose.

The table below shows the proportion of applications from victims of terrorism which were granted by the CICA, expressed as a percentage of the applications from victims of terrorism which were resolved in the same year.

Period

Proportion

2017-18

87%

2018-19

69%

5 Jun 2019, 3:38 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total amount of compensation awarded by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme to victims of terrorism was in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information can only be provided for financial years 2017/18 & 2018/19. Information from previous financial years has been archived in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority’s (CICA) data retention policy.

Terrorism is not defined for the purposes of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. Victims are compensated for the injuries they have sustained rather than the nature of the incident (with the exception of sexual assault or abuse).

To support consistent decision-making, CICA does record the nature of the incident where it identifies the potential for multiple applications in relation to the same circumstances. The data below relates to applicants who have been identified as victims of terrorism for this purpose and is calculated on the basis of the first compensation award made on an application.

Period

Average amount of compensation awarded

Number of compensation awards made

Total amount of compensation awarded

2017-18

£9,075

75

£680,643

2018-19

£4,317

220

£949,687

5 Jun 2019, 3:38 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average amount of compensation awarded by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme to victims of terrorism was in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information can only be provided for financial years 2017/18 & 2018/19. Information from previous financial years has been archived in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority’s (CICA) data retention policy.

Terrorism is not defined for the purposes of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. Victims are compensated for the injuries they have sustained rather than the nature of the incident (with the exception of sexual assault or abuse).

To support consistent decision-making, CICA does record the nature of the incident where it identifies the potential for multiple applications in relation to the same circumstances. The data below relates to applicants who have been identified as victims of terrorism for this purpose and is calculated on the basis of the first compensation award made on an application.

Period

Average amount of compensation awarded

Number of compensation awards made

Total amount of compensation awarded

2017-18

£9,075

75

£680,643

2018-19

£4,317

220

£949,687

5 Jun 2019, 3:38 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme: Terrorism Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many compensation awards have been made to victims of terrorism by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information can only be provided for financial years 2017/18 & 2018/19. Information from previous financial years has been archived in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority’s (CICA) data retention policy.

Terrorism is not defined for the purposes of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. Victims are compensated for the injuries they have sustained rather than the nature of the incident (with the exception of sexual assault or abuse).

To support consistent decision-making, CICA does record the nature of the incident where it identifies the potential for multiple applications in relation to the same circumstances. The data below relates to applicants who have been identified as victims of terrorism for this purpose and is calculated on the basis of the first compensation award made on an application.

Period

Average amount of compensation awarded

Number of compensation awards made

Total amount of compensation awarded

2017-18

£9,075

75

£680,643

2018-19

£4,317

220

£949,687

4 Jun 2019, 4:52 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Conor McGinn

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of tribunal hearings that challenge a personal independence payment decision have been awarded in favour of the claimant in each year since 2014 in (a) St Helens (b) Merseyside (c) nationally.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

Latest figures for PIP (to December 2018) indicate that since it was introduced, 3.9 million decisions have been made. Of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

Information about outcomes to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) appeals to the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) (SSCS) is published at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

SSCS appeals are listed into the hearing venue nearest to the appellant’s home address. The published data (which can be viewed at the link above) provide information about outcomes to PIP appeals in (a) St Helens (b) Merseyside and (c) nationally from 2015/16; data for the preceding year are provided below.

Proportion of Personal Independence Payment 1 hearings in favour of the appellant (National data can be found in the main tables of the published stats. Venue data can be found in the published stats from 2015/2016)

St Helens 2

Merseyside3

National

Financial Year4

2014-2015

42%

44%

50%


1 Personal Independence Payment (New Claim Appeals) which replaces Disability Living Allowance was introduced on 8 April 2013, also includes Personal Independence Claims (Reassessments).

2 Data includes data for the St Helens venue. The Warrington & Runcorn venues closed in 2016 when the majority of postcodes for these areas were assigned to the St Helens venue.

3 Data includes data for Liverpool, Birkenhead, St Helens venue. The Warrington & Runcorn venues closed in 2016 when the majority of postcodes for these areas were assigned to the St Helens venue.

4 Jun 2019, 4:51 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Rachel Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many claimants (a) nationally, (b) in Leeds and (c) in Leeds West who are appealing against the refusal of their personal independence payment application have been waiting more than (i) three, (ii) six and (iii) 12 months for a tribunal hearing.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information is not held centrally.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) records numbers, waiting times and outcomes of appeals by benefit type, but will not necessarily identify Personal Independence Payment (PIP) appeals made specifically because the application for that benefit was refused. PIP consists of a daily living and a mobility component, both or either of which can be paid at standard or enhanced rate. Therefore, claimants for PIP may have claimed for both components, and only been awarded one, or sought the enhanced rate and only been awarded the standard rate. A claim may be successful, but may not have been at the level sought. HMCTS is unable to isolate such appeals.

Information about the volumes and clearance times of PIP appeals to the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) (SSCS) is published at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Latest figures for PIP (to December 2018) indicate that since it was introduced, 3.9 million decisions have been made. Of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

4 Jun 2019, 4:49 p.m. Debt Collection Emma Reynolds

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 13 May 2019 to Question 252114, how many bailiffs have been removed from the certificated bailiff register following a judgment that they are not a fit and proper person to hold a certificate in each year since 2014.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Certificated Bailiff Register held centrally by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service does not record the reasons for why a certified enforcement agent has been removed from the register. Pursuant to the answer to Question 252114, reasons for cancelling a certificate include an agent leaving his or her employer, ceasing to work as an enforcement agent or a judicial order that they were not a fit and proper person to hold a certificate.

4 Jun 2019, 4:46 p.m. Landlord and Tenant Emma Reynolds

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 14 May 2019 to Question 252630 on Landlord and Tenant; whether the Government plans to make an estimate of the number of annual evictions using Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988; and what statistics the Government holds on the number of evictions in the private rented sector in a given year and the reasons for those evictions.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Government recently announced that it will put an end to ‘no-fault’ evictions by repealing section 21 of the Housing Act 1988. MHCLG Ministers will launch a consultation on the details of a better system that will work for landlords and tenants. The Government will collaborate with and listen to landlords, tenants and others in the private rented sector to develop a new deal for renting.

Whilst we hold data on the number of evictions in the private rented sector using section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, we do not have the reasons for those evictions.

Number of private landlord repossessions by county court bailiffs in England and wales, 2005-2018

Year

Private landlord repossessions

2005

3,979

2006

4,101

2007

4,342

2008

4,435

2009

4,618

2010

5,279

2011

5,852

2012

6,097

2013

6,049

2014

6,321

2015

6,061

2016

6,011

2017

6,260

2018

6,913

Source: Mortgage and Landlord Possession Statistics Quarterly

4 Jun 2019, 4:39 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Conor McGinn

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) average waiting time is and (b) range of waiting times are for a tribunal hearing for personal independence payment from the date of the case being received by the tribunal service until the date of the hearing in each year since 2014 in (i) St Helens, (ii) Merseyside and (iii) nationally.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This information is not held centrally.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) statistics are not calculated from receipt of the appeal to the hearing, but from receipt of the appeal to the disposal of the case. An appeal is not necessarily disposed of at its first hearing. The final disposal decision on the appeal may be reached after an earlier hearing had been adjourned (which may be directed by the judge for a variety of reasons, such as to seek further evidence), or after an earlier hearing date had been postponed (again, for a variety of reasons, often at the request of the appellant). An appeal may also have been decided at an earlier date by the First-tier Tribunal, only for the case to have gone on to the Upper Tribunal, to be returned once again to the First-tier, for its final disposal.

Information about waiting times for PIP appeals to the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) (SSCS) is published at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Latest figures for PIP (to December 2018) indicate that since it was introduced, 3.9 million decisions have been made. Of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

4 Jun 2019, 4:25 p.m. Civil Proceedings Stephen McPartland

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps he is taking to improve access to the judicial system for litigants bringing civil money claims.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

This Government is investing over £1bn to modernise our courts and tribunals, including investment to improve the civil justice system.

The Online Civil Money Claims pilot, is a new service which went live in March 2018, and allows people to resolve money disputes online, for claims of up to £10,000. The digital service allows the public to simply and swiftly make their claim and the system is designed to be clear and easy to use. To date, the overall user satisfaction rate is 87% with over 68,000 claims made.

4 Jun 2019, 3:29 p.m. Prisoners Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) average prison population and (b) average in-use certified normal accommodation was in each prison in the 12 months to September 2018.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Certified Normal Accommodation (CNA), or uncrowded capacity, is the Prison Service’s own measure of accommodation. CNA represents the good, decent standard of accommodation that the Service aspires to provide all prisoners. CNA differs to the operational capacity of a prison which is the total number of prisoners that an establishment can hold taking into account control, security and the proper operation of the planned regime. It is determined by the Prison Group Directors on the basis of operational judgement and experience.

Where the operational capacity of a prison is higher than the CNA it will be classed as having the potential to be 'crowded', which can mean prisoners share cells. In the financial year 2017-18, 24.2% of the prison population was being held in crowded conditions, down from 24.5% in the previous year.

As part of prison reform, the long-term goal is to reduce crowding, while maintaining sufficient capacity in the prison estate to manage the demands of the courts and the sentenced population as efficiently as possible. This level is kept under constant review, considering fluctuations in the prison population and useable capacity across the estate

The average population and in-use certified normal accommodation for each prison in England and Wales in the 12 months to September 2018 is set out in the attached table.

*The Verne ceased operating as an Immigration Removal Centre in December 2017. It then reopened as a prison in July 2018 and monthly in-use CNA and population data from July 2018 has been included in the answer.

Individual prison population and capacity information (including in-use certified normal accommodation) for every prison in England and Wales is published monthly on the Ministry of Justice website at

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-population-figures-2019

4 Jun 2019, 1:12 p.m. Offenders: Employment Kevin Hollinrake

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to increase employment opportunities for prisoners after release.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

One year ago, our Education and Employment Strategy set out plans to transform the way prisoners develop the skills they need to secure employment on release.

Since then, we have overhauled the prison education system through implementing new contracts and a Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS). These allow governors to commission skills-based training and education that meets the needs of the local labour market.

We have also introduced the New Futures Network (NFN), which brokers partnerships between prisons and employers in England and Wales, and a new ROTL framework to increase the opportunities available for prisoners to gain experience in real workplaces.

30 May 2019, 4 p.m. Prison Service: Corruption Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department's budget has adequate resources to fund the prison anti-corruption taskforce without decreasing spending on other departmental responsibilities.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Counter Corruption Unit was launched in April this year. It monitors prison and probation services across England and Wales, with 29 specialist staff split into one national and five regional teams. The new unit will help protect prison and probation staff raising awareness amongst staff of the threat from corruption, encouraging staff to report any suspicions of wrongdoing and working closely with the police to pursue cases of suspected corruption. Funding for the unit has been met in full within existing budgets and without a decrease in spend on other areas of prison and probation services.

30 May 2019, 3:58 p.m. Prisons: Private Sector Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the expiry date is of the contract for each private sector prison.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The expiry date for each private prison is listed in the table below.

Prison

End Date

HMP Thameside

31/12/2036

HMP Bronzefield

16/06/2029

HMP Altcourse

31/05/2023

HMP Ashfield

31/10/2024

HMP Forest Bank

19/01/2025

HMP Peterborough

13/02/2028

HMP Dovegate

08/07/2026

HMP Parc

14/12/2022

HMP Rye Hill

20/01/2026

HMP Lowdham Grange

15/02/2023

HMP Birmingham

1/07/2019

HMP Oakwood

23/04/2027

HMP/YOI Doncaster

30/09/2026

HMP Northumberland.

01/12/2028

30 May 2019, 3:55 p.m. Prisoners: Death Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department imposes penalties on private prison operators following deaths in prison.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) does not impose penalties for deaths in custody. We do, however, monitor and assure the use of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) case management procedures for prisoners identified as being at risk of self-harm or suicide.

All prisons are required to comply with chapter 12 of PSI 64/2011, which sets out the required action following a death in custody. All such deaths are independently investigated by the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) and subject to an inquest. All prisons, including those that are privately managed, are required to respond to PPO recommendations and any Prevention of Future Deaths (PFD) reports issued by Coroners.

Privately managed prison performance is closely monitored by robust contract management processes. Each privately managed prison has an on-site controller, employed by HMPPS. Controllers, together with regional contract managers review performance against indicators set out in the contract. Any improvement action identified may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions. The controller will monitor the provider’s actions when there is a death in custody and the provider’s compliance with any actions set out in responses to PPO reports and/or PFD reports from Coroners. In the event there were serious failings highlighted at the prison, the Authority would look to manage the Contractor’s poor performance through utilising the appropriate contractual levers.

30 May 2019, 3:55 p.m. Prisoners: Death Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what oversight process is in place for private prison operators following deaths in prison.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) does not impose penalties for deaths in custody. We do, however, monitor and assure the use of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) case management procedures for prisoners identified as being at risk of self-harm or suicide.

All prisons are required to comply with chapter 12 of PSI 64/2011, which sets out the required action following a death in custody. All such deaths are independently investigated by the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) and subject to an inquest. All prisons, including those that are privately managed, are required to respond to PPO recommendations and any Prevention of Future Deaths (PFD) reports issued by Coroners.

Privately managed prison performance is closely monitored by robust contract management processes. Each privately managed prison has an on-site controller, employed by HMPPS. Controllers, together with regional contract managers review performance against indicators set out in the contract. Any improvement action identified may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions. The controller will monitor the provider’s actions when there is a death in custody and the provider’s compliance with any actions set out in responses to PPO reports and/or PFD reports from Coroners. In the event there were serious failings highlighted at the prison, the Authority would look to manage the Contractor’s poor performance through utilising the appropriate contractual levers.

30 May 2019, 3:53 p.m. Prisons: Radicalism Andrew Rosindell

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to tackle the spread of far-right extremism in prisons.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) works closely with a range of partners to tackle extremism of all ideologies in prisons, including ideologies held by far-right offenders. An HMPPS and Home Office Joint Extremism Unit (JEXU) was established in April 2017 to be the strategic centre for all counter terrorism work in prison and probation and have oversight of delivery across the end-to-end offender management process.

The number of far-right offenders in prison and being managed by probation has grown in recent years. Our dedicated, specialist teams manage the risks presented by all terrorists and extremists, including Right Wing Terrorists and far-right offenders, in prison and the community. We are working across Government to review and develop our capability to manage this cohort and safeguard the wider offender population.

Prisoners identified as being of extremist concern, or who have shown signs of being vulnerable to extremism, are managed actively as part of a comprehensive case management process. Over 22,000 prison staff have received specialist extremism awareness training, to enable them to identify, report and challenge extremist views.

HMPPS uses a wide range of interventions as part of its management of extremist offenders in prison. These range from assessment tools, such as the Extremism Risk Guidance 22+ and Extremism Risk Screening, to rehabilitative measures such as the Healthy Identity Intervention, Developing Dialogues, and the Desistance and Disengagement Programme. Interventions play an important role in helping to encourage and facilitate desistance and disengagement from extremism, support reintegration into society, and reduce the risk of further offending. All of these interventions are available to far-right offenders, if required.

30 May 2019, 3:51 p.m. Prisoners: Mental Illness Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department centrally collects figures on how many prisoners are prescribed medication for mental health issues.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold information on how many prisoners are prescribed medication for mental health issues.

NHS England has statutory and financial responsibility for providing health care in English prisons, including prescribing medication.

29 May 2019, 5 p.m. Nottingham Prison: Prisoners' Release Ben Bradley

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners were released from HMP Nottingham into homelessness in each month since June 2017.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Data from October 2017 until March 2018, based on published statistics, are provided on the attached table. Please note that data for April 2018 onwards is due for publication in July.

Figures for January to September 2017 are not included as this would require assuring unpublished statistics which could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe, stable and secure to live. Having somewhere stable to live acts as a platform for ex-offenders to be able to access the services and support needed to turn their back on crime for good. Overcoming the many barriers offenders face to securing suitable accommodation is something that Ministry of Justice cannot do in isolation.

The Secretary of State for Justice and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government are both members of the cross-Government Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce and the Reducing Reoffending Board. Homelessness of ex-offenders is a key issue that is discussed at these meetings.

We are investing up to £6.4m in a joint pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons, namely Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville. We have now launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

29 May 2019, 4:52 p.m. Social Services: Prosecutions Mrs Madeleine Moon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions of social care workers there have been for abusing older adults in care in each of the last five years.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

It is not possible to identify the number of social care workers that were prosecuted for abusing older adults in care in each of the last 5 years from the broader offences:

  • Care provider ill-treat / wilfully neglect an individual or breach duty of care
  • Ill-treatment or neglect of a person lacking capacity by anyone responsible for that person’s care

The offences do not specify whether or not the defendant was a social worker nor do they specify the age of the victim. Detailed information may be held on individual court records but to be able to identify these cases we would have to access these individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

29 May 2019, 4:30 p.m. Prisoners: Crimes of Violence Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been (a) charged and (b) convicted of an offence under Section 24 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 for throwing excreta at prison staff in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

In 2017 the Crown Prosecution Service issued guidance that potting offences (throwing of excreta) to the face or head should be prosecuted under Section 24 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861.

It is not possible to identify court proceedings made for the specific offence of throwing excreta at prison staff from within the broader offence of “Cause administer poison/noxious things with intent to injure/aggrieve/annoy” (nor is it possible to distinguish who was the victim of the offence). Detailed information may be held on court record but to be able to identify these cases we would have to access individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

29 May 2019, 4:21 p.m. Prisoners: Radicalism Caroline Flint

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what interventions his Department is making to tackle the ideologies of far-right offenders within the prison system.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) works closely with a range of partners to tackle extremism of all ideologies in prisons, including ideologies held by far-right offenders. An HMPPS and Home Office Joint Extremism Unit (JEXU) was established in April 2017 to be the strategic centre for all counter terrorism work in prison and probation and have oversight of delivery across the end-to-end offender management process.

Prisoners identified as being of extremist concern, or who have shown signs of being vulnerable to extremism, are managed actively as part of a comprehensive case management process. Over 22,000 prison staff have received specialist extremism awareness training, to enable them to identify, report and challenge extremist views.

HMPPS uses a wide range of interventions as part of its management of extremist offenders in prison. These range from assessment tools, such as the Extremism Risk Guidance 22+ and Extremism Risk Screening, to rehabilitative measures such as the Healthy Identity Intervention, Developing Dialogues, and the Desistance and Disengagement Programme. Interventions play an important role in helping to encourage and facilitate desistance and disengagement from extremism, support reintegration into society, and reduce the risk of further offending. All of these interventions are available to far-right offenders, if required.

29 May 2019, 4:17 p.m. Birmingham Prison: G4S Shabana Mahmood

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what changes he has implemented at HMP Birmingham following the cancellation of the G4S contract at that site.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) exercised its right under the contract with G4S to ‘step-in’ in August 2018 and took over the running of HMP Birmingham. The ‘step-in’ meant that HMPPS could provide additional resources and support to directly address the areas of failure identified. The additional cost of the ‘step-in’ action, including additional HMPPS staff has been recovered from G4S in accordance with the terms of the contract.

There has been good progress since the ‘step-in’ however, the department and G4S have mutually agreed to formally return the prison to HMPPS in July 2019. G4S staff at Birmingham will transfer to HMPPS contracts on 1 July and they are being supported through the transition.

This change will continue to drive the long-term improvements that are required at the prison.

We have made no changes since G4S remain contractually responsible for the prison until 1st of July 2019.

28 May 2019, 4:19 p.m. Personal Injury: Compensation Joseph Johnson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to establish an ombudsman with legal powers to enforce decisions on third party personal injury claims before court proceedings are initiated.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Government has no plans to bring forward such proposals.

It is for parties to personal injury claims to resolve their differences in the first instance, making use of pre-action protocols which put in place procedures designed to encourage earlier resolution of disputes.

Currently there is a portal for lower value road traffic accident (RTA), public liability and employer liability claims which assists in achieving settlement of disputes. In addition, the Government is introducing a new IT Platform, in April 2020, which will enable RTA claimants to communicate effectively with the at-fault insurer to progress and settle their claim during the pre-action stage.

Where disputes cannot be resolved by these means, the claimant has the option to pursue court proceedings.

28 May 2019, 4:14 p.m. Insurance Companies: Civil Proceedings Joseph Johnson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that greater numbers of insurance cases are resolved before they reach court proceedings.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The vast majority of claims against insurers in the civil justice system settle before court proceedings stage, as reflected in the statistics published by the Compensation Recovery Unit.

Settlements are a matter for the parties to an individual dispute to reach agreement on, but the Government seeks to promote pre-court settlement – for example by the development of pre-action protocols.

In terms of road traffic accident related personal injury claims under £5,000, the Government is introducing a new IT Platform, in April 2020, which will enable such claimants to communicate effectively with the at-fault insurer to efficiently progress and settle their claim during the pre-action stage without the need for court proceedings.

28 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Cremation Act 1902 Shabana Mahmood

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to make an assessment of the effectiveness of the provisions in the Cremation Act 1902; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice is defending an application for permission in judicial review by the owners of a proposed crematorium, challenging our decision not to appoint a medical referee to the crematorium while it remains in breach of the provisions of section 5 of the Cremation Act 1902. It would be inappropriate for Ministers to comment on issues relating to this matter during the course of litigation.

28 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Cremation Act 1902 Shabana Mahmood

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the merits of the Cremation Act (1902).

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice is defending an application for permission in judicial review by the owners of a proposed crematorium, challenging our decision not to appoint a medical referee to the crematorium while it remains in breach of the provisions of section 5 of the Cremation Act 1902. It would be inappropriate for Ministers to comment on issues relating to this matter during the course of litigation.

28 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Cremation: Planning Permission Shabana Mahmood

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of whether crematoriums are being constructed (a) less than two hundred yards from a dwelling house, (b) within fifty yards of a public highway and (c) in the consecrated part of a local authority burial ground.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice is defending an application for permission in judicial review by the owners of a proposed crematorium, challenging our decision not to appoint a medical referee to the crematorium while it remains in breach of the provisions of section 5 of the Cremation Act 1902. It would be inappropriate for Ministers to comment on issues relating to this matter during the course of litigation.

28 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Cremation: Planning Permission Shabana Mahmood

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times Section 5 of the Cremation Act (1902) has been invoked to reject a planning application in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The Ministry of Justice is defending an application for permission in judicial review by the owners of a proposed crematorium, challenging our decision not to appoint a medical referee to the crematorium while it remains in breach of the provisions of section 5 of the Cremation Act 1902. It would be inappropriate for Ministers to comment on issues relating to this matter during the course of litigation.

28 May 2019, 11:29 a.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Mr David Lammy

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officials in his Department have been seconded away from their normal duties to work on the UK's withdrawal from the EU; and what effect that secondment of staff has had on the effectiveness of his Department.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Departments continually review workforce plans, reprioritise and assess changing needs, which includes identification and cessation of non-priority work where appropriate. We have accelerated our plans, and at the same time, the Civil Service as a whole is working to ensure that EU Exit Implementation is carried out to high quality without impacting public service delivery across the whole of government.

39 Ministry of Justice staff were seconded to work in other departments from December 2018 as part of the no-deal preparations co-ordinated by Cabinet Office. 34 staff have since returned, with extensions agreed for the remaining 5 staff.

Between January and April 2019, 62 Ministry of Justice staff volunteered to work in the MoJ Departmental Operations Centre (DOC) to assist with no deal preparations. These volunteers worked a small number of shifts in the DOC and were chosen from different teams across the department to minimise any disruption to business as usual work.

24 May 2019, 12:54 p.m. Dogs: Meat Bill Wiggin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions he has had with the Foreign Secretary on the potential effect of banning the consumption of dog meat in the UK on animal welfare abroad.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The consumption of dog meat, animal welfare and amendments to the Agriculture Bill are matters for the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The Secretary of State for Justice has not therefore discussed these issues with the Foreign Secretary.

The Ministry of Justice is responsible for general criminal law issues and has frequent discussions on these matters with other Government departments, including the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

24 May 2019, 12:54 p.m. Dogs: Animal Welfare Bill Wiggin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of New Clause 23 to the Agriculture Bill which proposes a penalty for eating dogs of imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The consumption of dog meat, animal welfare and amendments to the Agriculture Bill are matters for the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The Secretary of State for Justice has not therefore discussed these issues with the Foreign Secretary.

The Ministry of Justice is responsible for general criminal law issues and has frequent discussions on these matters with other Government departments, including the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

24 May 2019, 12:54 p.m. Dogs: Animal Welfare Bill Wiggin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the effect of legislative proposals to prohibit the human consumption of dog meat in (a) the UK and (b) abroad.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The consumption of dog meat, animal welfare and amendments to the Agriculture Bill are matters for the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The Secretary of State for Justice has not therefore discussed these issues with the Foreign Secretary.

The Ministry of Justice is responsible for general criminal law issues and has frequent discussions on these matters with other Government departments, including the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

24 May 2019, 12:37 p.m. Prisons: Ministers of Religion Crispin Blunt

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prisoners and (b) chaplains employed within prisons there are of each religion or belief.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Prison Act 1952 enshrines in law the statutory duties of a prison chaplain. These tasks, which must be undertaken daily, are incorporated into Prison Rules and Young Offender Rules. They are explained in detail in Prison Service Instruction 05/2016 Faith and Pastoral Care for Prisoners.

We recognise and respect the right of prisoners to register and practice their faith while serving their prison sentence. Chaplaincy plays a critical and unique role in the work of prisons and life of prisoners. It provides not only faith advice but pastoral care in support of HM Prison and Probation Service’s commitments to decency, safety and rehabilitation.

A breakdown of prisoner population by religion is provided in the quarterly Offender Management statistics publication on GOV.UK. The latest publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2018. The relevant extract of those statistics is provided in the following table:

Table 1.5: Prison population by religion and sex

31-Mar-18

30-Jun-18

30-Sep-18

31-Dec-18

31-Mar-19

Percentage change March 2018 to 2019

Males and Females

83,263

82,773

83,005

82,236

82,634

-1%

All Christian

39,839

39,541

39,784

39,293

39,515

-1%

Anglican

13,971

13,808

13,755

13,496

13,480

-4%

Free Church

776

764

782

758

737

-5%

Roman Catholic

14,334

14,277

14,246

14,094

14,160

-1%

Other Christian

10,758

10,692

11,001

10,945

11,138

4%

Muslim

12,847

12,894

12,868

12,894

13,008

1%

Hindu

379

354

350

361

343

-9%

Sikh

625

632

634

638

611

-2%

Buddhist

1,517

1,518

1,569

1,575

1,619

7%

Jewish

480

488

477

482

477

-1%

Other religious group

1,724

1,777

1,782

1,838

1,876

9%

Non recognised

10

11

12

6

7

**

No religion

25,711

25,393

25,413

25,053

25,034

-3%

Not recorded

131

165

116

96

144

10%

Chaplains may work on a full-time, part-time, sessional or voluntary basis. A breakdown of Chaplains in employed in prisons and by faith, is provided below.

Number of chaplains (headcount) employed by HM Prison and Probation Service1, as at 31 March 2019.

Headcount

Prison Service establishments

Religion

Number of chaplains

Christian

242

Muslim

118

Sikh

12

Hindu

3

Unknown2

99

Total

474

Notes to Table

  1. A substantial amount of Chaplaincy services within the public sector Prison Service are provided by non-employed staff on a sessional basis, which are not included in the figures presented in this table. Chaplains fill roles in bands 5 and 7 or above under the Fair and Sustainable structures.
  2. These are mostly managing Chaplains where the religion of the post is not specified.
  3. Only includes chaplains working in prisons and therefore will not match published data which includes Chaplains who work in other areas of HMPPS, such as at Headquarters.

Information on the private estate is not held centrally. The total number of chaplain staff since 2010 can be found in the HMPPS Workforce Statistics Bulletin. The latest publication on the number of Chaplains can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hm-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-march-2019 Information on the religious affiliation of chaplains is not published.

24 May 2019, 12:34 p.m. Prison Sentences Neil O'Brien

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of people convicted in each of the last twelve years who previously had (a) no, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more convictions received (i) an immediate custodial sentence, (ii) a suspended sentence and (iii) a community sentence.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Data on the percentage of occasions on which an offender was convicted with a specified number of previous convictions and received a specified sentence, covering the period 2006 – 2018, can be viewed in the attached table.

23 May 2019, 4:32 p.m. Prisons: Disclosure of Information Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, at which private prisons have directors shared data on staffing levels with on-site controllers in each of the last three years.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

As we have previously stated all staffing matters lies with Contractors. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree staffing levels with the Ministry of Justice.

The HMPPS Controller at each privately managed prison has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Any concerns in relation to these performance indicators including staff numbers are discussed at these meetings. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract.

Private providers continue to play an important role in the prison estate and I can assure you that performance of all providers is closely monitored and we will not hesitate to take action where standards fall short.

23 May 2019, 4:31 p.m. Probation: Finance Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average expected spend on commissioning for each of the 11 areas under the new probation model is.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We have set out our plans for the future of probation services. We are now working out how these plans will be implemented. It is not possible to provide these figures as details of the future commercial framework are not yet finalised.

23 May 2019, 4:30 p.m. Prisons: Crimes of Violence Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for the purpose of recording the number of assaults in prison, whether his Department records information on the number of (a) incidents, which could involve multiple people, in which at least one assault takes place or (b) each individual assault by each person involved.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Her Majesty's Prison & Probation Service records the number of assault incidents, involving multiple people, in which at least one assault takes place. Where the evidence allows, we also record whether anyone involved is an assailant, a suspected assailant, or a victim. Others may be involved an incident without taking part in the assault, such as prisoners trying to help staff. Where it is not possible clearly to identify an aggressor or a victim, the incident is recorded as a fight and those involved as fighters.

Full details of the methods used for collating these data can be found in the ‘Guide to Safety in Custody Statistics’, available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/797079/safety-custody-statistics-guide.pdf

23 May 2019, 4:29 p.m. Prisons: Sexual Offences Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many sexual assaults have been committed in prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Government publishes quarterly statistics on assaults in prison, and a more detailed annual breakdown, and both are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018.

Details of sexual assaults can be found in Assaults in prison custody 2000 to 2018 at table 3.9.

The Government is taking unprecedented action to improve safety in prisons. We have recruited over 4,700 more prison officers since October 2016, and we now have the greatest number in post since early 2012. The Challenge, Support and Intervention Plan case management process for prisoners at risk of violence has been mandated for all prisons to help staff to manage violent prisoners and those identified as posing a raised risk of being violent.

We are committed to reducing violence in prison and we encourage prisoners to report assaults, so that we can take action against perpetrators and support victims. The most important support that we can provide is to ensure that all allegations are taken seriously and investigated thoroughly, and that appropriate action is taken if they are proven. Other support can include: ensuring that there is no contact between alleged perpetrator and victim; increased supervision of the person who reported the assault, to build their sense of security and confidence; and referral to other forms of help such as peer supporters, health staff, and specialist external services.

23 May 2019, 4:28 p.m. Taxis: Assistance Animals Alex Norris

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 2 May 2019 to Question 248758, how many people were convicted under sections (a) 168 and (b) 170 of the Equality Act 2010 for refusing to take an assistance dog in a taxi or private hire vehicle in 2018.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

3 offenders were found guilty at all courts of refusing to take an assistance dog in a taxi in England and Wales in 2018.

23 offenders were found guilty at all courts of refusing to take an assistance dog in a private hire vehicle in England and Wales in 2018

23 May 2019, 4:25 p.m. Courts: Staff Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the cumulative number of years of experience held by all courts staff in (a) 2010 and (b) 2018.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The cumulative experience of all HMCTS staff was 197,800.2 years in 2018. The earliest held comparable data is from 2012 and shows 165,282.7 years. Variable case loads and the adoption of new technologies play a part in setting HMCTS workforce requirements and, as such, overall experience can be more accurately measured by the average length of service of our staff. This shows an increase in the average length of service from 11.2 in 2012 to 12.5 in 2018.

23 May 2019, 4:23 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of applicants were refused legal aid in 2018.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

In the 2018 calendar year, a total of 20,862 applications for legal aid did not proceed to be granted, for any reason. This represents 4.8% of the total applications made during this period.

These figures cover applications for legal representation at either the Magistrates or Crown Court, or for a civil legal aid certificate.

23 May 2019, 2:09 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) less than and (ii) more than six months for each offence classification in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of women given a custodial sentence of less than and more than six months, at Magistrates and Crown courts, by offence and police force area in 2018 is published in the Court Outcomes by Police Force Area data tool at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802045/court-outcomes-by-PFA-2018.xlsx

The requested data can be gathered by:

  • Select the relevant court in the ‘Court Type’ field (Magistrates/Crown)
  • Select ‘2018’ in the ‘Year of Appearance’ field
  • Select ’02: Female’ in the ‘Sex’ field
  • Drag the ‘Offence’ field into Rows
  • Select the relevant sentence lengths in the ‘Custodial Sentence Length’ field (six months or less/ greater than six months)
  • Select the relevant police force area in the ‘Police Force Area’ field

The number of women given a custodial sentence less than and more than six months from each magistrates and Crown court in North Wales in 2018, with corresponding offence, is available in the attached tables.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

23 May 2019, 2:09 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women sentenced to (a) less than and (b) more than six months were taken into immediate custody from each (i) magistrates and (ii) Crown court in North Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of women given a custodial sentence of less than and more than six months, at Magistrates and Crown courts, by offence and police force area in 2018 is published in the Court Outcomes by Police Force Area data tool at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802045/court-outcomes-by-PFA-2018.xlsx

The requested data can be gathered by:

  • Select the relevant court in the ‘Court Type’ field (Magistrates/Crown)
  • Select ‘2018’ in the ‘Year of Appearance’ field
  • Select ’02: Female’ in the ‘Sex’ field
  • Drag the ‘Offence’ field into Rows
  • Select the relevant sentence lengths in the ‘Custodial Sentence Length’ field (six months or less/ greater than six months)
  • Select the relevant police force area in the ‘Police Force Area’ field

The number of women given a custodial sentence less than and more than six months from each magistrates and Crown court in North Wales in 2018, with corresponding offence, is available in the attached tables.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

23 May 2019, 2:06 p.m. Prisoners: Males David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult men with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned.

Number of adult1 female offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

1

144

4

2

Sexual offences

0

25

0

0

Robbery

0

17

0

0

Theft Offences

3

67

67

5

Criminal damage and arson

0

20

0

0

Drug offences

7

80

0

2

Possession of weapons

3

18

7

1

Public order offences

0

8

3

0

Miscellaneous crimes against society

28

145

4

0

Fraud offences

3

91

2

1

Summary offences excluding motoring

2

1

14

1

Summary motoring offences

0

0

10

0

All offences

47

616

111

12

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Number of adult1 male offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

15

946

34

28

Sexual offences

16

1,420

24

20

Robbery

0

161

0

4

Theft Offences

16

321

141

23

Criminal damage and arson

1

52

6

0

Drug offences

35

1,304

14

40

Possession of weapons

28

152

107

16

Public order offences

10

117

10

3

Miscellaneous crimes against society

124

833

67

28

Fraud offences

13

252

11

2

Summary offences excluding motoring

27

2

262

12

Summary motoring offences

2

1

76

0

All offences

287

5,561

752

176

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

23 May 2019, 2:06 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult women with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned.

Number of adult1 female offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

1

144

4

2

Sexual offences

0

25

0

0

Robbery

0

17

0

0

Theft Offences

3

67

67

5

Criminal damage and arson

0

20

0

0

Drug offences

7

80

0

2

Possession of weapons

3

18

7

1

Public order offences

0

8

3

0

Miscellaneous crimes against society

28

145

4

0

Fraud offences

3

91

2

1

Summary offences excluding motoring

2

1

14

1

Summary motoring offences

0

0

10

0

All offences

47

616

111

12

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Number of adult1 male offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

15

946

34

28

Sexual offences

16

1,420

24

20

Robbery

0

161

0

4

Theft Offences

16

321

141

23

Criminal damage and arson

1

52

6

0

Drug offences

35

1,304

14

40

Possession of weapons

28

152

107

16

Public order offences

10

117

10

3

Miscellaneous crimes against society

124

833

67

28

Fraud offences

13

252

11

2

Summary offences excluding motoring

27

2

262

12

Summary motoring offences

2

1

76

0

All offences

287

5,561

752

176

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

23 May 2019, 1:27 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Secondment Ellie Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officials in his Department have been seconded to work in other Government Departments; and in which Department were they seconded to, in each of the last 18 months.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information you have requested is not held centrally by the Department at this time.

23 May 2019, 1:26 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Welsh Language Hywel Williams

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Welsh language speakers are able to correspond with Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service in England through the medium of the Welsh language.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

HM Courts and Tribunal’s Service supports the provision of its Welsh Language Scheme as applicable in both Wales and England. HMCTS service centres that provide a national service welcome correspondence in Welsh, which will be dealt with within the same time frame and to the same standards as English language correspondence.

21 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Prisoners: Death and Self-harm Chi Onwurah

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce levels of self-harm and deaths in custody among the prison population.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Prisons should be places of safety and reform. We recognise that the current level of suicide and self-harm is too high. With this in mind, the Government is taking unprecedented action, including:

  • investing in over 4,700 additional staff since October 2015;
  • introducing new suicide and self-harm prevention training, which has already reached over 24,000 staff;
  • improving support for prisoners in their early days and weeks and rolling out a ‘key worker’ scheme which ensures each prisoner has dedicated support from a particular prison officer;
  • funding the Samaritans to provide their valuable Listeners Scheme for a further three years; and
  • improving the ACCT case management process for those identified as at risk of self-harm or suicide.

We are also committed to taking action to improve prisoners’ health. Since April 2018, a new National Partnership Agreement has been in place, marking an even stronger level of co-operation and cohesiveness between agencies that influence the policy, commissioning and delivery of prison health services. The agreement sets out how the partnership (DHSC, NHS England, MoJ, HMPPS and Public Health England) will work together to deliver its three core objectives. It agrees ten key priority areas for 2018-2021, including reducing incidents of self-harm and self-inflicted deaths in the adult secure estate.

In addition, NHS England has published a new Service Specification for Integrated Substance Misuse Treatment Services in Prisons in England, which brings greater focus to the treatment of users of psychoactive substances and makes stronger links to mental health.

21 May 2019, 3:40 p.m. Prisons: Mental Health Services Chi Onwurah

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of prison officers have received training on when to refer a person for mental health support.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Over 14,000 staff have already received the new suicide and self-harm reduction training which includes a module on Mental Health Awareness, in addition to the safer custody training already provided across the estate.

Prison Officer Entry Level Training (POELT) is a mandatory 12 week programme for all new entrant officers to give them the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their role. There are a number of sessions on Mental Health within this training, including: ‘Introduction to Mental Health’, ‘Introduction to Suicide and Self Harm (SASH) Prevention’ and ‘Personality Disorders.’ This training will enable staff to identify any concerns and submit the appropriate referral to healthcare professionals.

The following e-learning training is also available on Civil Service Learning for all staff working in Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service:

  • Mental Health Conditions and Dementia: Support for Customers
  • Mental Health at Work
  • Wellbeing, Resilience and Stress

21 May 2019, 10:40 a.m. Extortion: Prosecutions Toby Perkins

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many successful prosecutions have been brought for the offence of blackmail against people that demanded money to leave sites which they are occupying illegally in each year since 2010.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Information regarding prosecutions and convictions for blackmail offences from 2010 to 2018 can be found at the following link –

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

Filter the ‘Offence’ field to ’35 Blackmail’ to obtain these figures. The total number of defendants proceeded against as well as those convicted of blackmail for the 2008-2018 decade will appear in the pivot table.

However, specific information regarding blackmail offences, such as the offence of blackmail against people that demanded money to leave sites which they were occupying illegally, may be held on court record. But to be able to identify these cases, as they are not held centrally, we would have to access individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

14 May 2019, 4:53 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time taken in days from application submission to decision for compensation applications from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme was in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below shows the average time taken in days from the date an application for compensation was submitted to the date a first decision was made in each year since 2010-11.

Period

Average time taken in days from the date an application was submitted to the date a first decision was made

2010-11

250

2011-12

269

2012-13

305

2013-14

329

2014-15

397

2015-16

425

2016-17

305

2017-18

192

14 May 2019, 4:52 p.m. Funerals: Children Chris Ruane

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues, (b) Welsh Government ministers and (c) Scottish Government ministers on the implementation of the children's funeral fund in England.

Answer (Edward Argar)


I have had discussions on implementation of the Children’s Funeral Fund with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Family Support, Housing and Child Maintenance and the Minister of State for Immigration. I have not had discussions with Welsh or Scottish Government ministers. However, Ministry of Justice officials have had detailed discussions with officials in these Administrations.

14 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Prisons: Education Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which prisons had issued Dynamic Purchasing System contracts for education provision by (a) 1 April 2019, and (b) 1 May 2019.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We want prisons to be places of hope and aspiration that propel offenders into employment, and ultimately help to reduce the number of victims of crime in the future. Our new education programme will improve the quality of prison education by ensuring that it meets the needs of prisoners, making it more likely to lead them to a positive employment outcome on release, and break the cycle of reoffending.

We issued the Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS) contracts to the following prisons below.

(a) HM Prisons DPS Contracts by 1st April 2019

(b) HM Prisons DPS Contracts by 1st May 2019

Gartree

Gartree

Chelmsford

Chelmsford

Highpoint

Highpoint

Hollesley Bay

Hollesley Bay

The Mount

The Mount

Warren Hill

Warren Hill

Stoke Heath

Stoke Heath

Bedford

Bedford

Littlehey

Littlehey

Eastwood Park

Eastwood Park

Ford

Ford

Frankland

Frankland

Garth

Garth

Long Lartin

Long Lartin

WhattonLong Lartin

Whatton

Liverpool

Liverpool

Buckley Hall

Buckley Hall

Hindley

Hindley

Risley

Risley

Thorn Cross

Thorn Cross

Full Sutton

Erlestoke

Northumberland

Rochester

Woodhill

North Sea Camp

Bristol

Bure

Norwich

Wayland

Stoke Heath

The total value of all DPS contracts for prison education issued from 1 January to 10 May 2019 is £3,731,294.

14 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Prisons: Education Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total value is of all Dynamic Purchasing System contracts for prison education issued in 2019.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

We want prisons to be places of hope and aspiration that propel offenders into employment, and ultimately help to reduce the number of victims of crime in the future. Our new education programme will improve the quality of prison education by ensuring that it meets the needs of prisoners, making it more likely to lead them to a positive employment outcome on release, and break the cycle of reoffending.

We issued the Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS) contracts to the following prisons below.

(a) HM Prisons DPS Contracts by 1st April 2019

(b) HM Prisons DPS Contracts by 1st May 2019

Gartree

Gartree

Chelmsford

Chelmsford

Highpoint

Highpoint

Hollesley Bay

Hollesley Bay

The Mount

The Mount

Warren Hill

Warren Hill

Stoke Heath

Stoke Heath

Bedford

Bedford

Littlehey

Littlehey

Eastwood Park

Eastwood Park

Ford

Ford

Frankland

Frankland

Garth

Garth

Long Lartin

Long Lartin

WhattonLong Lartin

Whatton

Liverpool

Liverpool

Buckley Hall

Buckley Hall

Hindley

Hindley

Risley

Risley

Thorn Cross

Thorn Cross

Full Sutton

Erlestoke

Northumberland

Rochester

Woodhill

North Sea Camp

Bristol

Bure

Norwich

Wayland

Stoke Heath

The total value of all DPS contracts for prison education issued from 1 January to 10 May 2019 is £3,731,294.

14 May 2019, 4:03 p.m. Prisons: Education Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many education staff have been placed at risk of redundancy at each prison since the introduction of new commissioning arrangements on 1 April 2019.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

It is for the new education providers to determine how many staff they need to deliver the requirements of the contracts let under the Prison Education Framework and the Dynamic Purchasing System.

14 May 2019, 4 p.m. Prisons: Education Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the educational courses on offer to offenders at each prison (a) before and (b) after 1 April 2019.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Department for Education publishes data on prison education participation and completion rates and details on the academic years 2010/11 to 2017/18 can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/761349/201718_Nov_MAIN_OLASS_Particpation_FINALv1.xlsx

14 May 2019, 3:58 p.m. Prisons: Education Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect of new prison education commissioning arrangements on the effectiveness of Through The Gate services; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The new prison education commissioning arrangements are at a very early stage. It is not possible to provide an assessment of progress at this point.

14 May 2019, 3:27 p.m. Landlord and Tenant Emma Reynolds

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many notices were granted by the courts under Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 in each year since 2010.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

14 May 2019, 3:02 p.m. Magistrates: Recruitment Grant Shapps

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to encourage more young people to become magistrates.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

We are taking a number of steps to encourage younger people to join the magistracy, including through the use of social media to advertise recruitment campaigns and collaborative work with Universities and employers, providing talks and information to raise the profile of the role amongst a younger audience.

13 May 2019, 4:28 p.m. Police Cautions Hilary Benn

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what guidance is provided to police forces on the procedure for administering cautions to ensure that the person involved understands the legal consequences of accepting that caution.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

Out of Court Disposals (OOCDs) are measures which allow police to deal quickly and proportionately with low-level offending without recourse to the courts. Simple and Conditional Cautions exist currently for adult offenders.

Ministry of Justice published guidance on Simple Cautions for Adult Offenders, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/simple-cautions-guidance-for-police-and-prosecutors

Section 3 of the guidance states police officers must ensure the offender understands the implications of accepting a simple caution, and consents to receiving the disposal before it can be administered. The implications which must be explained are set out in paragraphs 62-76 of the guidance. This includes the significance of the admission of guilt and the retention and disclosure of criminal record information for future legal proceedings or criminal record checks. Guidance also states police officers should ensure offenders are given the opportunity to receive free and independent legal advice before accepting a simple caution.

Similar points are made in the Ministry of Justice Guidance for Conditional Cautions for Adult Offenders (also in Section 3 of the guidance) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/code-of-practice-for-adult-conditional-cautions

9 May 2019, 6:45 p.m. Judiciary Mr Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to help ensure that the judiciary is more representative of society.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We recognise the importance of achieving a more diverse judiciary that is representative of our society and have recently made progress in this area. For example, as at 1 April 2018, BAME judges made up 7% of court judges in England and Wales and 11% of tribunal judges - an increase of 1 and 2 percentage points respectively since 2014. For tribunal judges, BAME representation is higher than the general population in each age band. Despite the progress made, we acknowledge that there is still more to do.

The Ministry of Justice has jointly developed and is funding the pre-application judicial education programme (PAJE), which launched on 24 April 2019. This is a Judicial Diversity Forum initiative, which will support and encourage lawyers interested in a judicial career and target underrepresented groups including those with a BAME background, women, those with disabilities and those from a non-litigation background, to help them prepare for a judicial career.

The MoJ is continuing to work closely with the Lord Chief Justice, Chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission and other members of the Judicial Diversity Forum, including the three legal professions, to increase the diversity of our world-renowned judiciary.

9 May 2019, 5:24 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officers in bands three to five in each prison left the prison service after less than a year in (a) 2010 and (b) 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of band 3-5 prison officers who left the prison service with less than a year’s service, by prison, can be found in the accompanying excel table.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

9 May 2019, 5:18 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many band three to five prison officers with less than three years’ experience left the prison service by each prison in each quarter from 2010 to 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of band 3-5 prison officers who left the prison service with less than three years’ experience, by prison, can be found in the accompanying excel table.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. The huge number of officers we’ve recently recruited inevitably means there are more staff – and more leavers - with less than three years’ experience. But we are working hard to retain staff, including by giving them the biggest

pay award in a decade last year and by providing additional training. We’ve also improved induction processes to ease new officers’ transition into the job, and all staff can make use of services including 24/7 counselling, trauma support and occupational health assessments.

These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

9 May 2019, 5:11 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Question 230697 on prison sentences, how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Answer of 19 March 2019 to Question 230697 provided data, broken down by males and females, on the highest number of previous offences committed by an offender who received their first immediate custodial sentences between year ending September 2014 and year ending September 2018. Pursuant to this answer data on how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison can be viewed in the table.

This analysis relates to a small number of offenders and so the information provided can be volatile and change significantly depending on the offender selected for each year. It should be noted that figures looking at the highest number of previous offences or disposal types are not representative of the majority of the offending population.

Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all the circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.

However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

9 May 2019, 5:10 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Consultants Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service has spent from the public purse on consultancies in each financial year between 2008 and 2016.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

HMCTS has published the value of consultant expenditure annually in its Annual Report and Accounts since it was formed on 1 April 2011.

We are therefore only able to provide comparable data for HMCTS since its formation (along with the restated comparative figures from 2010-11).

2011-12

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-service-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-to-2012

2012-13

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2012-to-2013

2013-14

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2013-to-2014

2014-15

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2014-to-2015

2015-16

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2015-to-2016

2016-17

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

9 May 2019, 5:08 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Procurement Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service spent on third-party suppliers in each financial year between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2015.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

HMCTS has published the value of ‘purchases of goods and services’ annually in its Annual Report and Accounts since it was formed on 1 April 2011.

We are therefore only able to provide comparable data for HMCTS since its formation (along with the restated comparative figures from 2010-11). HMCTS’ purchases of goods and services are shown in the table below:

2011-12

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-service-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-to-2012

2012-13

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2012-to-2013

2013-14

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2013-to-2014

2014-15

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-and-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2014-to-2015

2015-16

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-courts-tribunals-service-annual-report-and-accounts-2015-to-2016

9 May 2019, 5:07 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Secondment Chris Ruane

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil servants in his Department have been seconded to (a) the Department for Exiting the European Union and (b) the Department for International Trade in each of the last three years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of staff seconded to either a) the Department for Exiting the European Union and b) the Department for International Trade in each of the last 3 years is as follows:

Department for Exiting the European Union

2019 – 1

2018 – 0

2017 – 0

Department for International Trade

2019 – 0

2018 – 0

2017 - 0

9 May 2019, 5:06 p.m. Reoffenders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 10 April to Question 239207 on Reoffenders: Community Orders, how many offences of each type were committed by those offenders.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of reoffences for each reoffence type committed by offenders who had started a community order in January to December 2016 and reoffended can be found in the attached table.

The time period covered is the calendar year rather than the financial year as was previously provided in response to Question 239207.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

9 May 2019, 4:43 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies: Contracts Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's timescale is for tendering for community rehabilitation company contracts in advance of the end of existing contracts in 2020.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Last year, we announced our decision to end current Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts early. Following this, we launched a consultation, Strengthening Probation, Building Confidence, and engaged with stakeholders and the market on the future of the probation system.

We will set out detailed plans for the future of probation services shortly.

9 May 2019, 4:41 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department spent on training prison officers in 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service central accounting system does not separate out specific costs, in respect of costs related to training prison officers, from other overall training costs. The information requested could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

9 May 2019, 4:40 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Yorkshire and the Humber Lord Scriven

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in the Yorkshire Region are waiting for an appeal hearing for their Personal Independence Payment claims.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

The information requested is set out in the table below.

Number of Outstanding cases with a status of Ready to List1 - Yorkshire Region2

Date

Personal Independence Payment3

31 December 20184

4637

1 Ready to list includes cases waiting to be listed to a Tribunal hearing, these cases may already have had an initial hearing and be awaiting a subsequent hearing. The data in the answer are the number of cases ready to list. The actual number of live PIP appeals in the Yorkshire region as at 31 December 2018 is 7421. This figure includes those cases which are not yet ready to list as they are awaiting, for example, further evidence or a response from the DWP.

2Social Security & Child Support (SSCS) appeals are usually registered to the venue nearest to the appellant’s home address. We cannot retrieve data based on an appellant’s actual home address but can produce reports detailing the number of cases that are dealt with at one of our Regional centres or heard at a specific venue. Cases relating to the Yorkshire Region are attributed to the following SSCS venues: Leeds, Barnsley, Doncaster, Bradford, Huddersfield, Hull, Scarborough, Sheffield, Wakefield and York.

3PIP (which replaced Disability Living Allowance) was introduced on 8 April 2013, and also includes Personal Independence Claims (reassessments).

4Latest data, which are available, in line with published statistics.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale management system and are the best data available.

These data may differ slightly to that of the published statistics as they were run on a different date.

9 May 2019, 4:37 p.m. Prisons: Contracts Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many bids his Department has received to operate (a) HMP Wellingborough and (b) HMP Glen Parva.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The individual competitions for Wellingborough and Glen Parva have yet to commence – it is therefore not yet possible to submit bids to operate these prisons.

9 May 2019, 4:36 p.m. Offenders: Education Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders leaving prison entered (a) further and (b) higher education in the last financial year.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We will be publishing data in July 2019 on the number of offenders who entered employment on release from custody for the period 2018/19 as part of the Community performance release. It can be accessed using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-march-2018

The data will not include information on the numbers of offenders leaving prison who entered further and higher education, which could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

9 May 2019, 4:36 p.m. Offenders: Employment Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders leaving prison secured employment within four weeks of release in the last financial year.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We will be publishing data in July 2019 on the number of offenders who entered employment on release from custody for the period 2018/19 as part of the Community performance release. It can be accessed using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-march-2018

The data will not include information on the numbers of offenders leaving prison who entered further and higher education, which could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

9 May 2019, 4:35 p.m. Prison Sentences Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners sentenced under an imprisonment for public protection sentence remain in custody.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information you ask for is available in the public domain; however, I have provided it below for ease of reference.

As of 31 March 2019, there were 2,403 unreleased prisoners in custody serving Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences. In addition, a further 1,063 prisoners were serving an IPP sentence following recall from the community.

The table below shows the tariff-expired, unreleased population of prisoners serving IPP sentences by original tariff length and time over tariff, as at 31 March 2019.

Time over tariff

Original Tariff length

Total

Less than 2 years

2 years to less than or equal to 4 years

Greater than 4 years to less than or equal to 6 years

Greater than 6 years to less than or equal to 10 years

Greater than 10 years

Less than 1 year

0

0

18

97

3

118

From 1 year to less than 2 years

0

0

58

80

1

139

From 2 years to less than 3 years

0

12

86

49

1

148

From 3 years to less than 4 years

0

61

82

38

0

181

From 4 years to less than 5 years

10

103

66

26

0

205

From 5 years to less than 6 years

31

131

70

13

0

245

From 6 years to less than 7 years

28

134

59

8

0

229

From 7 years to less than 8 years

32

145

54

1

0

232

From 8 years to less than 9 years

53

185

33

0

0

271

From 9 years to less than 10 years

53

136

1

0

0

190

10 years or more

168

71

0

0

1

240

Total

375

978

527

312

6

2,198

As with any large-scale recording system, administrative IT systems are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

It is for the independent Parole Board to review the detention of those prisoners serving an IPP sentence who have completed their tariff period. The Board will direct the release of these prisoners only if it is satisfied that the levels of risk posed to the general public are reduced enough that the National Probation Service and its partner agencies can safely manage them in the community under supervision.

Whilst HM Prison and Probation Service is focused on giving all prisoners serving IPP sentences opportunities to progress towards release, public protection must remain our priority.

9 May 2019, 4:35 p.m. Prison Sentences Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many IPP prisoners sentenced under an imprisonment for public protection sentence have been in prison over their tariff for more than (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five, (f) six, (g) seven and (h) eight or more years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information you ask for is available in the public domain; however, I have provided it below for ease of reference.

As of 31 March 2019, there were 2,403 unreleased prisoners in custody serving Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences. In addition, a further 1,063 prisoners were serving an IPP sentence following recall from the community.

The table below shows the tariff-expired, unreleased population of prisoners serving IPP sentences by original tariff length and time over tariff, as at 31 March 2019.

Time over tariff

Original Tariff length

Total

Less than 2 years

2 years to less than or equal to 4 years

Greater than 4 years to less than or equal to 6 years

Greater than 6 years to less than or equal to 10 years

Greater than 10 years

Less than 1 year

0

0

18

97

3

118

From 1 year to less than 2 years

0

0

58

80

1

139

From 2 years to less than 3 years

0

12

86

49

1

148

From 3 years to less than 4 years

0

61

82

38

0

181

From 4 years to less than 5 years

10

103

66

26

0

205

From 5 years to less than 6 years

31

131

70

13

0

245

From 6 years to less than 7 years

28

134

59

8

0

229

From 7 years to less than 8 years

32

145

54

1

0

232

From 8 years to less than 9 years

53

185

33

0

0

271

From 9 years to less than 10 years

53

136

1

0

0

190

10 years or more

168

71

0

0

1

240

Total

375

978

527

312

6

2,198

As with any large-scale recording system, administrative IT systems are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

It is for the independent Parole Board to review the detention of those prisoners serving an IPP sentence who have completed their tariff period. The Board will direct the release of these prisoners only if it is satisfied that the levels of risk posed to the general public are reduced enough that the National Probation Service and its partner agencies can safely manage them in the community under supervision.

Whilst HM Prison and Probation Service is focused on giving all prisoners serving IPP sentences opportunities to progress towards release, public protection must remain our priority.

9 May 2019, 4:33 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Telephone Services Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 29 March 2019 to Question 235313 on Courts: Telephone Services, if he will publish a list of (a) every helpline operated by his Department and (b) the prefix of each such helpline.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

During 2014 extensive work was undertaken to transfer MoJ’s higher rate customer service lines into local rate numbers. Since that time the responsibility for these lines has been devolved to the ALBs and MOJ does not hold all this information centrally. Below include helplines operated by MoJ and its Executive Agencies including average call times where available.

Ministry of Justice

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Mar 19)

- Public Enquiry Line

0203

00:02:191

HMCTS

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Apr 2019)

- Divorce

0300

00:16:36

- Employment and Tax Tribunals

0300

00:05:42

- Family and Civil

0300

00:24:50

- Immigration and Asylum

0300

00:12:09

- London Magistrates

0300

00:10:06

- Money Claims

0300

00:09:05

- Probate

0300

00:05:29

- Single Justice System

0300

00:11:17

- Social Security Child Support

0300

00:15:19

- Video Hearings

0300

00:04:22

HMPPS

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Mar 19)

- Public Enquiry Line

01633

00:01:591

Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

Prefix

Ave Call Time (2018/19)

- Customer Service Centre

0300

00:12:29

Office of the Public Guardian

Prefix

Ave Call Time

- Call Centre Helpline

0300

Not available

Legal Aid Agency

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Apr 2019)

- Crime Contact Centre

0300

00:07:47

- Civil Contact Centre

0300

00:08:02

- Civil Legal Advice

0345 / 08452

00:11:52

1 These do not include waiting times as this information is not held.

2 There is a recorded message on the 0845-number explaining the 0345 option for callers.

9 May 2019, 4:33 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Telephone Services Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what is the average time spent by callers on each of helplines run by his Department.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

During 2014 extensive work was undertaken to transfer MoJ’s higher rate customer service lines into local rate numbers. Since that time the responsibility for these lines has been devolved to the ALBs and MOJ does not hold all this information centrally. Below include helplines operated by MoJ and its Executive Agencies including average call times where available.

Ministry of Justice

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Mar 19)

- Public Enquiry Line

0203

00:02:191

HMCTS

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Apr 2019)

- Divorce

0300

00:16:36

- Employment and Tax Tribunals

0300

00:05:42

- Family and Civil

0300

00:24:50

- Immigration and Asylum

0300

00:12:09

- London Magistrates

0300

00:10:06

- Money Claims

0300

00:09:05

- Probate

0300

00:05:29

- Single Justice System

0300

00:11:17

- Social Security Child Support

0300

00:15:19

- Video Hearings

0300

00:04:22

HMPPS

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Mar 19)

- Public Enquiry Line

01633

00:01:591

Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

Prefix

Ave Call Time (2018/19)

- Customer Service Centre

0300

00:12:29

Office of the Public Guardian

Prefix

Ave Call Time

- Call Centre Helpline

0300

Not available

Legal Aid Agency

Prefix

Ave Call Time (Apr 2019)

- Crime Contact Centre

0300

00:07:47

- Civil Contact Centre

0300

00:08:02

- Civil Legal Advice

0345 / 08452

00:11:52

1 These do not include waiting times as this information is not held.

2 There is a recorded message on the 0845-number explaining the 0345 option for callers.

9 May 2019, 4:32 p.m. Prison Officers: Riot Control Weapons Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what training his Department has provided to prison officers on the use of PAVA spray in prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Comprehensive training has been provided to those staff permitted to carry PAVA which covers the following;

Legislation and organisational policies specific to the carrying and use of PAVA

The physical effects of PAVA and aftercare for those who have been sprayed or exposed to PAVA.

Guidance on when PAVA could be used, also when it is not appropriate to use PAVA.

Practical training which includes the drawing, grip and discharge of PAVA.

9 May 2019, 4:31 p.m. Young Offenders: Speech Therapy Geraint Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to develop a consistent pathway for (a) prison staff and (b) Departmental officials to refer young people in the justice system to speech and language therapy.

Answer (Edward Argar)

To ensure consistent referral pathways throughout the youth justice system, the Youth Justice Board have developed a screening tool which provides a holistic assessment and intervention plan that can be used in a variety of settings. In custody, NHS England screen and assess every child for neurodisabilities using the Comprehensive Health Assessment Tool (CHAT) and put in place an individual care plan.

9 May 2019, 4:31 p.m. Young Offenders: Speech Therapy Geraint Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to develop a consistent pathway for justice professionals to be able to refer a young person to speech and language therapy.

Answer (Edward Argar)

To ensure consistent referral pathways throughout the youth justice system, the Youth Justice Board have developed a screening tool which provides a holistic assessment and intervention plan that can be used in a variety of settings. In custody, NHS England screen and assess every child for neurodisabilities using the Comprehensive Health Assessment Tool (CHAT) and put in place an individual care plan.

9 May 2019, 4:28 p.m. Offenders: Mental Illness Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what representations he has received from Prison Governors on mental health screening for offenders at sentencing.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Governors are rightly focussed on the safety and well-being of the people placed into custody and are very aware of the levels of mental health needs among prison populations. Governors work closely with partner agencies and stakeholders to ensure that suitable regimes and support are in place to ensure those in our custody receive the right care. At MoJ Ministers frequently visit prisons, where governors can highlight matters of concern to them. However, most issues relating to screening are discussed with health and justice partners through normal governance structures at official level.

Providing the right intervention at the right time is vital to improving outcomes for people with mental health issues and there is ongoing work to divert offenders away from custody where appropriate, though it is important to remember that sentencing decisions are a matter for our independent judiciary. We welcome the Sentencing Council’s development of an Overarching Principles guideline on Mental Health, which has been recently published for consultation. The guideline aims to assist the court in sentencing offenders with mental health needs.

We continue to support NHS England’s roll out of Liaison and Diversion services, which support efforts to intervene early for vulnerable offenders and divert them into services that address the underlying causes of offending. They do so by placing clinical staff at police stations and courts to provide assessments and referrals to treatment and support. Services are currently operating across 92% of the country, with full rollout expected by 2020/21.

We are also working with the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England on a programme to support the greater use of community sentences with treatment requirements (CSTRs) in courts, including mental health treatment requirements. The programme facilitates processes and pathways for clinical staff in courts to screen and assess offenders for mental health (and substance misuse) issues. This provides the judiciary with effective community sentencing options as an alternative to custody. Wherever possible, screening and assessments are completed on the day of sentence by CSTR providers for mental health and substance misuse.

For individuals who are sentenced to custody, it is crucial that MoJ and HMPPS work to create healthy, supportive prison environments. We already know that prisoners are more likely to have poor physical and mental health than the general population and that being in prison can exacerbate these issues. That is why we have ensured that over 4,000 new staff are in post to enable us to implement initiatives like the key worker role, allowing staff dedicated time to provide support to individual prisoners. These initiatives and others mean that we will be able to better support individuals with mental health needs in prison.

9 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Dangerous Driving: Sentencing Paul Blomfield

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent estimate he has made of the extent of the use of the exceptional hardship exception for the sentencing of drivers who would otherwise be disqualified from driving.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information about drivers who have not been disqualified from driving as a result of a court accepting that disqualification would lead to exceptional hardship is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), an executive agency of the Department for Transport, holds a database relating to all GB driving licence holders, including licence type, current offences, associated points and disqualifications.

9 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies: Agency Workers Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of staff in each community rehabilitation company are agency workers.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department does not hold the information requested in relation to the proportion of agency staff and their minimum training requirements.

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts require each CRC to maintain a sufficient level of staff and ensure that its workforce is competent and adequately trained. CRCs have the authority to manage staff numbers as per their business and operating models. Robust assurance of performance is provided through operational contract management backed up by regular Operational Assurance audits.

9 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies: Agency Workers Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many weeks it takes agency staff to complete the minimum training required to work in community rehabilitation companies.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department does not hold the information requested in relation to the proportion of agency staff and their minimum training requirements.

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts require each CRC to maintain a sufficient level of staff and ensure that its workforce is competent and adequately trained. CRCs have the authority to manage staff numbers as per their business and operating models. Robust assurance of performance is provided through operational contract management backed up by regular Operational Assurance audits.

9 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies: Agency Workers Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total spend was on agency staff by each community rehabilitation company in 2018.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department does not hold the information requested in relation to the proportion of agency staff and their minimum training requirements.

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts require each CRC to maintain a sufficient level of staff and ensure that its workforce is competent and adequately trained. CRCs have the authority to manage staff numbers as per their business and operating models. Robust assurance of performance is provided through operational contract management backed up by regular Operational Assurance audits.

9 May 2019, 4:26 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent each year since 2010-11 on ensuring that Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme claimaints have been able to obtain the evidence required for their claim.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (the Scheme), the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) will meet the reasonable cost of obtaining medical evidence incurred in connection with an application when certain criteria are satisfied.

The table shows the CICA’s expenditure on medical evidence per financial year. Medical evidence includes doctor reports, dental reports, and special reports commissioned on behalf of CICA.

In 2017/18, CICA directly employed a number of clinical psychologists which contributed to a reduction in expenditure on special reports and reduced the need for some victims to attend face-to-face medical examinations.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (CICS) 2008 was superseded by the CICS 2012 from 27 November 2012. The new Scheme changed the eligibility criteria to receive an award of compensation. Under this Scheme, applicants are expected to meet the costs of providing initial medical evidence up to a maximum cost of £50, unless they cannot afford to do so.

The data is unavailable for 2011-12 due a change in how this type of expenditure was recorded in CICA’s annual report and accounts.

Financial Year

Spend

2010/11

£2,917,000

2011/12

Not available

2012/13

£3,003,441.76

2013/14

£2,517,233.31

2014/15

£1,630,262.63

2015/16

£1,379,128.99

2016/17

£1,644,390.88

2017/18

£660,907.80

8 May 2019, 4:46 p.m. Children: Protection Tim Loughton

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to extend the position of trust law to sports coaches and youth justice workers with positions of influence over children.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Any sexual activity with a child under 16 is a criminal offence, regardless of whether consent is given. Any non-consensual sexual activity is also a crime, whatever the age of the victim and whatever the relationship between the victim and perpetrator.

I recognise that there are concerns about those who might abuse their position of power over a 16 or 17-year-old to pressure them into engaging in a sexual relationship. Such behaviour is very likely to be caught by the robust laws we already have in place,

However, we remain absolutely committed to protecting children and young people from sexual abuse and we want to ensure that existing offences are being used effectively to tackle this behaviour, and that those working with young people understand their responsibilities and act appropriately.

My department, working closely with colleagues across government, is taking forward a review of the existing law, to check that that it is working effectively and ensuring young people are protected.

8 May 2019, 4:40 p.m. Rape: British Nationals Abroad Mr Jim Cunningham

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to enable allegations of rape committed abroad by UK citizens to be investigated and prosecuted in the UK.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Existing law already provides for a UK national or a UK resident accused of raping a person under the age of 18 abroad to be brought to trial in the UK.

The draft Domestic Abuse Bill includes provision to extend the jurisdiction of our courts to offences of rape committed abroad against a victim aged 18 or over as required by the Istanbul Convention.

8 May 2019, 4:37 p.m. Prisons: Discipline Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many days prisoners were locked in cells for 22 hours or more in each prison in each month of (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, and (d) 2019.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested is not held.

Prison officer numbers are at their highest since March 2012, which is vital to ensuring prisons are safe, secure and decent. We have recruited over 4,700 new prison officers across the country since October 2016 to improve safety and help turn offenders’ lives around. The recruitment drive will continue until we reach required levels across the prison estate, ensuring prisons can fulfil their purpose - protecting the public, reducing reoffending and crucially, rehabilitating offenders.

As part of the Offender Management in Custody model (OMiC), Key Worker roles are being introduced to support the rehabilitative culture and relationship between Prison Officers and prisoners.

8 May 2019, 4:32 p.m. Segregation of Prisoners Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners serving Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences are currently held in segregation units.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost.

The welfare of those in our care is our priority: prison governors have authority to arrange that a prisoner is to be segregated where it appears desirable for the maintenance of good order or discipline or it is in his or her own interest. Segregation is used only as a last resort, however.

Her Majesty’s Prison & Probation Service and the Parole Board have a joint action plan to provide opportunities for prisoners serving sentences of Imprisonment for Public Protection to progress to safe release.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were sent to immediate custody from the (a) Crown Court and (b) Magistrates' Courts for sentences of (i) less than and (ii) more than six months for each offence classification in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women with no previous convictions were sent to immediate custody from the (a) the Crown Court and (b) Magistrates' Courts for sentences of (i) below 6 months and (ii) 6 months and above in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women in the North Wales police force area received an immediate custodial sentence of (a) less than and (b) more than six months for each category of offence from the (i) Crown Courts and (ii) Magistrates Courts in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

8 May 2019, 3:47 p.m. Prisons: Education Jim Shannon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 March 2019 to Question 225506 on Prisons: Education, how many offenders were engaged in learning that falls outside of core prison education provision in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department for Education publishes data on prison education participation and completion rates. Details for the academic years 2010-11 to 2017-18 can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/761349/201718_Nov_MAIN_OLASS_Particpation_FINALv1.xlsx

This data is published using total numbers, not by proportion of the population which would be disproportionate costs for us to calculate. We do not hold data centrally for unaccredited learning.

8 May 2019, 3:47 p.m. Prisons: Education Jim Shannon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 March 2019 to Question 225506 on Prisons: Education, what proportion of the prison population was engaged in offender learning and skills in prisons in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department for Education publishes data on prison education participation and completion rates. Details for the academic years 2010-11 to 2017-18 can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/761349/201718_Nov_MAIN_OLASS_Particpation_FINALv1.xlsx

This data is published using total numbers, not by proportion of the population which would be disproportionate costs for us to calculate. We do not hold data centrally for unaccredited learning.

8 May 2019, 3:43 p.m. Prisons: Education Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the availability of courses for prisoners serving Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences to prepare to demonstrate their suitability for release to the Parole Board.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and the Parole Board work closely to improve the progression of prisoners serving sentences of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP). Consequently, there is a joint action plan in place, co-owned by HMPPS and the Parole Board, with the specific aim of providing opportunities for prisoners serving IPP sentences to progress to safe release. We are prioritising post-tariff prisoners in accessing rehabilitative interventions, including psychology service-led reviews in cases where there has not been satisfactory progression, and enhanced case management for those prisoners sentenced with a complex set of risks and needs. We have also developed progression regimes at four prisons across the country, which are dedicated to progressing indeterminate prisoners struggling to achieve release via the usual routes.

It is important to note that accredited programmes are offered to prisoners based on risk, need and responsivity for a particular programme. For IPP prisoners, suitability for any accredited programmes will be considered as part of their wider sentence plan. A wide range of accredited programmes are available and IPP prisoners are one of the groups prioritised for participation on accredited programmes where they are identified as suitable. However, the completion of accredited programmes is not a mandatory requirement for IPP prisoners to secure release.

While HMPPS is focused on giving all prisoners serving IPP sentences opportunities to progress towards release, public protection must remain our priority.

8 May 2019, 3:40 p.m. Stalking Jo Stevens

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been cautioned for stalking in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of people cautioned for stalking in each of the last five years can be found in the Outcomes by Offence data tool available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx

Select 8.Q Stalking from the Offence drop down list

Court proceedings and convictions data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019

8 May 2019, 3:38 p.m. Parole Sir Christopher Chope

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps are being taken to ensure that the probation reports required for the parole hearing of Liam Vare A9035AH scheduled for 10 May 2019 are available in time for that hearing.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The independent Parole Board had listed an oral hearing for the purposes of Mr Vare’s case on 10 May. However, on learning that a new offender manager had been appointed for Mr Vare, the Parole Board decided on 27 April to defer the oral hearing to allow the offender manager time to meet Mr Vare and to produce a report on him. The hearing has now been listed for the first available date after 24 June. The Board has directed that all outstanding reports be provided by 3 June. The Public Protection Casework Section, which oversees the delivery of the Secretary of State’s obligations in relation to the parole process, is liaising with the offender manager and others to ensure that the reports are indeed provided by 3 June.

8 May 2019, 3:32 p.m. Offenders: EU Nationals Preet Kaur Gill

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many non-UK EU nationals received a (a) caution, (b) community order and (c) another court disposal in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the nationality of the offenders sentenced is not held centrally by MoJ and would only be obtainable at disproportionate cost. Therefore, it not possible to provide this information.

8 May 2019, 3:25 p.m. Drugs: Crime David Simpson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted for selling drugs in the last two years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Available data show the number of offenders found guilty of supplying drugs in England and Wales. This can be found in the Experimental statistics: Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence data tool in the annual criminal justice statistics publication, linked below. From the Offence drop down box, select 92A.09, 92A.10, 92A.11 and 92A.12, then drag the Detailed offence filter into the row box for the pivot table. The table will display figures for possession, production and supply of drugs including intent to supply drugs offences separately.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/738814/HO-Code-Tool-2017.xlsx

Court proceedings and convictions data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019

8 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. Coroners Sir Christopher Chope

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many notices were issued by coroners in England and Wales under Schedule 5 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 requiring the production of documents in each of the last three years for which information is available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Coroners are independent judicial office holders. As such it would not be appropriate for Ministers to comment on or seek to influence the conduct of their investigations.

The Ministry of Justice does not hold information on the number of notices issued by coroners under schedule 5 to the Coroners and Justice Act 2009.

8 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. Coroners: Dorset Sir Christopher Chope

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will direct the Coroner for Dorset conducting the investigation into the death of the late Gordon Munday who died on 11 October 2017 to issue a notice under Schedule 5 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to require Dr Borek to produce the documents in her possession relevant to that investigation; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Coroners are independent judicial office holders. As such it would not be appropriate for Ministers to comment on or seek to influence the conduct of their investigations.

The Ministry of Justice does not hold information on the number of notices issued by coroners under schedule 5 to the Coroners and Justice Act 2009.

7 May 2019, 4:45 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers in bands three to five in each prison have less than three years' experience.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of HMPPS band 3-5 prison officers in post, as at 31 December 2018, with less than three years’ experience in each prison can be found in the accompanying excel table.

The Ministry of Justice does not hold staffing numbers for privately managed prisons and, as such, their workforce statistics are not published. Every privately contracted prison is robustly scrutinised by an on-site Prison Service Controller who monitors their performance, including staffing levels. Some privately run prisons are among the best across the estate, and we are able to take rapid action if standards drop.

We commend our hard-working prison officers who do a vital job in protecting the public every day, often in challenging and difficult circumstances.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

7 May 2019, 4:37 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers in bands three to five in each prison have three or more years' experience.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of HMPPS band 3-5 prison officers in post, as at 31 December 2018, with three or more years’ experience in each prison can be found in the accompanying excel table.

The Ministry of Justice does not hold staffing numbers for privately managed prisons and, as such, their workforce statistics are not published. Every privately contracted prison is robustly scrutinised by an on-site Prison Service Controller who monitors their performance, including staffing levels. Some privately run prisons are among the best across the estate, and we are able to take rapid action if standards drop.

We commend our hard-working prison officers who do a vital job in protecting the public every day, often in challenging and difficult circumstances.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

7 May 2019, 3:48 p.m. Birmingham Prison Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Written Statement of 2 April 2019, Official Report HCWS1475 on HMP Birmingham, what the costs to the public purse would be of the public sector providing the quality of service referred to in the Statement; and where that explanation has been published.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information referred to in the Written Statement relates to the competition to operate the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva, Her Majesty’s Prison & Probation Service has provided a ‘public sector benchmark’, against which potential operators’ bids will be rigorously assessed. For the Wellingborough competition, this work has already been undertaken and has informed the specification and affordability threshold for this competition. We are clear that where bids do not meet sufficient quality or value-for-money thresholds, the public sector will act as the provider.

The Government remains committed to a diverse market of prison operators and competition for custodial services remains an important way of achieving that and driving quality of operations and innovation across the system.

7 May 2019, 3:46 p.m. Young Offenders: Protection Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to paragraph 211 of the IICSA report Sexual Abuse of Children in Custodial Institutions: 2009–2017, published February 2019, what the terms of reference are of the safeguarding review being carried out on the children’s secure estate; what date the review was established; and what the timetable is for the report from that review to be published.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Youth Custody Service’s internal safeguarding review was established in April 2018, under the following Terms of Reference:

  1. Review, and where appropriate revise, the current operational policies for Safeguarding within the Youth Secure Estate;
  2. Review the processes for handling allegations and complaints, including but not limited to, access, response, investigation and the support offered to children and young people
  3. Review the corporate governance structures for safeguarding given the transfer of functions from the Youth Justice Board (YJB) to the Youth Custody Service (YCS)
  4. Review the staff recruitment and vetting procedures in place and systems for referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service.
  5. Review the safeguarding training offer and arrangements for all staff
  6. Review information sharing arrangements between different departments within establishments, for example between Safeguarding and Security teams.
  7. Ensure the YCS is compliant with and executing its duties in relation to the Working Together guidance issued by the Department for Education, and any other relevant statutory requirements
  8. Scope and establish working relationships with relevant external stakeholders. For example, the chairs of Local Safeguarding Children Boards on the custodial care of children; Association of Directors of Children’s Services; YJB etc.
  9. Make recommendations on policies, processes and procedures, as deemed necessary to improve safeguarding measures for children and young people
  10. Share and disseminate good practice with staff across the youth secure estate, in line with the YCS’s emerging continuous improvement model.

The YCS safeguarding report is in the process of being finalised and I will write to you when the report has been submitted to me.

7 May 2019, 3:45 p.m. Prisons: Standards Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which prisons are currently in special measures.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The following prisons are in special measures as of 01 May 2019:

Aylesbury, Bedford, Birmingham, Bristol, Chelmsford, Elmley, Exeter, Guys Marsh, Hewell, Lewes, Liverpool, Nottingham, The Mount, Wandsworth, Winchester, and Wormwood Scrubs.

Special measures are put in place where an assessment of performance based on a combination of data, management information, judgement from senior operational management and external scrutiny determines that a prison needs additional specialist support to improve to an acceptable level.

3 May 2019, 1:56 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officers in bands three to five in each prison operated by HMPPS have three or more years' experience.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of HMPPS band 3-5 prison officers in post, as at 31 December 2018, with three or more years’ experience in each prison can be found in the accompanying excel table.

We commend our hard-working prison officers who do a vital job in protecting the public every day, often in challenging and difficult circumstances.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

3 May 2019, 1:54 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officers in bands three to five in each prison operated by HMPPS have less than three years' experience.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of HMPPS band 3-5 prison officers in post, as at 31 December 2018, with less than three years’ experience in each prison can be found in the accompanying excel table.

We commend our hard-working prison officers who do a vital job in protecting the public every day, often in challenging and difficult circumstances.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

3 May 2019, 1:52 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Questions 230698-230707 and 231412-231416 on prison sentences, how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Answer of 19 March 2019 to Questions 230698-230707 and 231412-231416 was on the highest number of previous offences committed, for different offence items, before being given an immediate custodial sentence in each of the last three years. Pursuant to this, the answer regarding how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison can be found in the table attached. As benefit fraud offences are not prosecuted by the police, it is not possible to answer Question 230707.

Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.

However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

3 May 2019, 1:50 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders who were given a community order in each of the last three years breached their order and (a) the order was allowed to continue, (b) were re-sentenced to immediate custody, (c) were re-sentenced to a suspended sentence and (d) were re-sentenced to a different disposal.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number and proportion of offenders who were given a community order in each of the last three years who breached their order and (a) the order was allowed to continue, (b) were re-sentenced to immediate custody, (c) were re-sentenced to a suspended sentence and (d) were re-sentenced to a new community order can be found in the table attached.

3 May 2019, 1:45 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to introduce tougher community sentences.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The sentencing framework already gives courts the flexibility to select community order requirements which are a robust alternative to custody, and are tailored to address the specific issues that contribute to reoffending. Community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective in reducing reoffending, and therefore keeping the public safe. We must ensure the public and judiciary have confidence in effective community orders, including those which address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and substance misuse needs and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

We are rolling out GPS enabled location monitoring in addition to the existing curfew monitoring technology, which will provide the courts with an additional option when imposing community sentences.

Some requirements aim to reduce reoffending by addressing the issues that contribute to the underlying causes of offending. We are working with the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England, in addition to the relevant local authorities, on protocol to support the greater use of community sentences with treatment requirements in courts in five testbed sites across the UK. The Community Sentence Treatment Requirement protocol sets out what is expected from all relevant agencies to ensure improved access to treatment for offenders who need it

We are taking action to improve probation delivery and enforcement of community requirements. We recently consulted on a range of reforms to probation and we will set out detailed plans shortly. As part of those reforms we want to make sure that judges and magistrates get the right information on what probation services are available locally.

3 May 2019, 1:41 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2019 to Question 236498 on Prison Officers: Training, how many prison officers and prison custody officers have received the Offender Manager Key Worker skills training in each (a) publicly and (b) privately operated prison.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Offender management in custody is a vital part of our work to make prisons safer. It will develop more rehabilitative prisons to deliver supportive environment for both prisoners and staff.

Since March 2017, we have offered 13,260 training places for Offender Manager Key Worker Skills to the closed male estate, of which 9,361 places have been taken.

Of the 78 prisons in the closed male estate, we have completed our planned training dates into 66 prisons and the remaining 12 are ongoing. In addition, we have offered additional dates to the establishments which have finished their bulk of training but have staff returning from long-term sick or maternity leave.

In our privately managed prisons, 1,296 prison custody officers have completed the offender Manager Key Worker skills training.

The women’s estate has only recently introduced key worker role and this data is not yet held centrally.

3 May 2019, 1:40 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2019 to Question 236498 on Prison Officers: Training, how many e-learning completions there have been in (a) core concepts and key skills, (b) risk assessment, planning and management, (c) child safeguarding and domestic abuse, and (d) adult safeguarding.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As previously stated in Parliamentary Question 236498, there is an extensive training programme for Prison Offender Managers which is a blended delivery approach of workbooks, e-learning and face to face learning.

Since April 2017 the total number of e-learning completed alongside face to face training on the below topics are as follows:

  • Child safeguarding and domestic abuse – 2661
  • Adult safeguarding – 2686

The below two topics are not delivered by e-learning, these are delivered face to face including a workbook:

  • Core concepts and key skills
  • Risk assessment, planning and management

3 May 2019, 1:34 p.m. Knives: Crime Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will conduct a review of the existing protections for victims of serious violent crime which specifically consults those affected or bereaved by knife crime attacks.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Serious violence devastates families and communities and we are taking action on a number of fronts to tackle it.

With regard specifically to victims we are reviewing the Victims’ Code, including the enhanced entitlements in the Code for victims of the most serious violence and bereaved family members, and we will consult on the proposals shortly.

However, we recognise more needs to be done. That’s why the Prime Minister hosted a Serious Youth Violence Summit last month. Following the Summit, the Justice Secretary announced:

  • that the emotional, practical and specialist support of the Ministry of Justice funded national Homicide Service would be available to witnesses of murder and manslaughter in London from 4 April and be considered for wider roll out;
  • the review of the Victims’ Code will include making it clearer that those psychologically affected after witnessing acts of serious violence are entitled to support just as are physical victims; and
  • a pilot programme will introduce staff training and guidance in young offender institutions to help identify children in custody who may have been victims of crime and allow for referral to support in custody and the community to help them cope and recover.
3 May 2019, 1:22 p.m. Sexual Offences: Victim Support Schemes Robert Halfon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what support is available to victims of attempted rape during the process of bringing their case to the police.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

In accordance with the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime (Victims’ Code), a person is entitled to support if they have suffered harm, including physical, mental or emotional harm or economic loss, which was directly caused by a criminal offence. They are entitled to access victim support services at any time, whether they have reported a crime or not.

This year, the Government allocated £24m over the next three years to specialist sexual violence and abuse support services across England and Wales to provide advice, support and counselling to victims of these appalling crimes to help them cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the effects of crime. Part of this funding will go towards Independent Sexual Violence Advisors to provide impartial advocacy for victims of sexual violence and abuse who have reported to the police or are considering reporting to the police.

In addition, in the cross-government Victims Strategy, which we published on 10 September 2018, we made a commitment to improve support for victims of crime, including by increasing the number of Registered Intermediaries, communication experts helping vulnerable victims and witnesses give their best evidence at police interview and at court.

3 May 2019, 1:20 p.m. Sexual Offences Robert Halfon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to encourage victims of attempted rape to report that crime to the police.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Victims of sexual violence and abuse show immense bravery in coming forward, and we want them to have the confidence to report incidents knowing they will get the support they need and that everything will be done to bring offenders to justice.

That is why we have nearly doubled funding for victim support services since 2013, as well as increasing the funding available to specialist rape and sexual abuse services by 10% - up to £24m over the next three years – to help provide advice, support and counselling to victims of these appalling crimes.

We are also taking action through the Government’s Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy, backed by £100 million of funding, to support victims and prevent these crimes from happening in the first place. As part of this work we will undertake a review of the criminal justice system’s response to rape and sexual offences to ensure we support survivors through every stage of this process.

3 May 2019, 1:16 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to implement Baroness Newlove's recommendations for the overhaul of Criminal Injuries Compensation Law.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We welcome the Victims’ Commissioner’s review which provided important insight into the experiences and difficulties faced by victims when applying for compensation.

We will be carefully considering the findings and recommendations within her report (Compensation without re-traumatisation), as part of the review of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. As previously stated, we will launch a public consultation on the proposals later this year.

3 May 2019, 1:10 p.m. Criminal Proceedings Nigel Dodds

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether an impact assessment was carried out in respect of the removal of the preliminary inquiry stage of court proceedings in serious crime cases in England and Wales; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Section 6(1) of the Magistrates’ Courts Act 1980 originally contained provisions which obliged a magistrates’ court inquiring into an offence as examining justices to commit a defendant charged with an indictable offence to the Crown Court for trial, if, after consideration of the evidence (including oral evidence), it was of the opinion that there was sufficient evidence to put the defendant on trial by jury. If the court was not of that opinion (and the defendant was in custody for no other reason than that offence), it was obliged to discharge the defendant. Pursuant to a recommendation from the Royal Commission on Criminal Justice in 1993, the Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 amended the committal provisions (with effect from March 1997) to exclude the possibility of oral evidence. The effect was therefore that magistrates' courts could consider only documentary evidence tendered by the prosecution when determining whether there the defendant should be committed for trial. The resulting paper-based committal proceedings were subsequently replaced by the present procedure in May 2013 when section 6 was repealed, with the result that there is no preliminary examination of the evidence in the magistrates’ court and cases are sent to the Crown Court when it appears to the magistrates’ court that the case is more suitable to be tried there. There was no impact assessment.

3 May 2019, 1:05 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme Andrew Rosindell

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of former UK citizens that are able to access to the Legal Aid Scheme.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Legal Aid Agency does not record the citizenship of legal aid applicants, and as such we cannot comment on trends relating to the access to legal aid by former UK citizens.

3 May 2019, 1 p.m. Tim Parker Mr Kevan Jones

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department made of any potential conflicts of interest arising from his chairmanship of Post Office Limited.prior to the appointment of Tim Parker as Chairman of the Board of HM Courts & Tribunals Service.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Tim Parker was appointed Chairman of the HMCTS Board in April 2018 following an open and transparent recruitment process. As required under the terms of the HMCTS Framework Document, Tim’s appointment was made by the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice and the Senior President of Tribunals, following the unanimous recommendation made by the recruitment panel. All of those involved in the appointment were aware of the fact that Mr. Parker is also Chairman of the Board of Post Office Limited, which they concluded did not present any conflict. HMCTS manages the administration of courts and tribunals; it has no influence on the outcome of hearings, which are decisions entirely for the independent judiciary.

3 May 2019, 12:41 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of steps taken to tackle breaches and non-compliance of community orders.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Protection of the public is our key priority. This includes taking effective action to ensure that court orders are properly enforced. In the event of two unreasonable failures to comply with the requirements of a community order or suspended sentence order, Probation Instruction 06/2014 (Enforcement of Community Orders and Suspended Sentence Orders) requires both the National Probation Service and the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to return the offender to court. Where offenders are not complying with their sentences, probation providers must take swift and robust action, with offenders returned to court for breach proceedings where appropriate.

We have robust systems in place to manage the effectiveness of our enforcement practices. NPS managers are required to monitor the timely enforcement of cases and to take appropriate action when necessary. Our contract management team closely monitors CRCs to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce re-offending, protect the public and provide value for money to taxpayers. This includes enforcing orders where offenders fail to comply. Our internal assurance mechanisms are reviewed regularly to ensure there is adequate oversight of probation performance.

3 May 2019, 12:41 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to ensure offenders who breach their community orders are returned to court to face breach proceedings.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Protection of the public is our key priority. This includes taking effective action to ensure that court orders are properly enforced. In the event of two unreasonable failures to comply with the requirements of a community order or suspended sentence order, Probation Instruction 06/2014 (Enforcement of Community Orders and Suspended Sentence Orders) requires both the National Probation Service and the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to return the offender to court. Where offenders are not complying with their sentences, probation providers must take swift and robust action, with offenders returned to court for breach proceedings where appropriate.

We have robust systems in place to manage the effectiveness of our enforcement practices. NPS managers are required to monitor the timely enforcement of cases and to take appropriate action when necessary. Our contract management team closely monitors CRCs to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce re-offending, protect the public and provide value for money to taxpayers. This includes enforcing orders where offenders fail to comply. Our internal assurance mechanisms are reviewed regularly to ensure there is adequate oversight of probation performance.

3 May 2019, 12:41 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what testing his Department does to ensure that systems to deal with breaches of community orders are working correctly.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Protection of the public is our key priority. This includes taking effective action to ensure that court orders are properly enforced. In the event of two unreasonable failures to comply with the requirements of a community order or suspended sentence order, Probation Instruction 06/2014 (Enforcement of Community Orders and Suspended Sentence Orders) requires both the National Probation Service and the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to return the offender to court. Where offenders are not complying with their sentences, probation providers must take swift and robust action, with offenders returned to court for breach proceedings where appropriate.

We have robust systems in place to manage the effectiveness of our enforcement practices. NPS managers are required to monitor the timely enforcement of cases and to take appropriate action when necessary. Our contract management team closely monitors CRCs to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce re-offending, protect the public and provide value for money to taxpayers. This includes enforcing orders where offenders fail to comply. Our internal assurance mechanisms are reviewed regularly to ensure there is adequate oversight of probation performance.

3 May 2019, 12:24 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many band three to five prison officers with three or more years’ experience left the prison service by each prison in each quarter from 2010 to 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of band 3-5 prison officers who left the prison service with less than three years’ experience, by prison, can be found in the accompanying excel table.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We are working hard to retain staff, including by giving them the biggest pay award in a decade last year and by providing additional training. We’ve also improved induction processes to ease new officers’ transition into the job, and all staff can make use of services including 24/7 counselling, trauma support and occupational health assessments.

These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

2 May 2019, 4:28 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of payments provided by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme were (a) child, (b) dependency, (c) funeral and (d) bereavement compensation payments in each year since 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below shows the proportion of cases in which a relevant payment was made in each financial year. This is expressed as a percentage of the volume of resolved cases in which an award was made. More than one type of payment may have been made to each eligible applicant.

Financial Year

Bereavement Award

Child Payment

Dependency Payment

Funeral Payment

2010/11

2.8%

0.6%

0.1%

1.1%

2011/12

3.0%

0.7%

0.1%

1.1%

2012/13

4.6%

1.1%

0.1%

1.8%

2013/14

5.7%

1.5%

0.3%

2.2%

2014/15

6.2%

1.4%

0.5%

2.3%

2015/16

4.7%

1.1%

0.3%

1.9%

2016/17

4.9%

1.1%

0.1%

2.0%

2017/18

7.5%

1.8%

0.6%

3.0%

2 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Mr Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce the rate of attrition of prison officers.

Answer (Edward Argar)

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

HMPPS heavily invests in a comprehensive range of Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) interventions which help staff feel valued and supported. The current EAP has been significantly enhanced and now includes access to specialist Trauma Support and a dedicated manager’s helpline.

2 May 2019, 4:27 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Tom Brake

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Edward Argar)

HM Treasury has allocated over £4.2 billion of additional funding to departments and the Devolved Administrations for EU exit preparations so far. This breaks down as:

This funding is to cover all exit scenarios, and is in addition to departmental efforts to reprioritise from business as usual toward preparations for the UK’s departure from the EU.

Work on no-deal exit preparations cannot be readily separated from other EU exit work. The Department is preparing for all eventualities and the resources available to support preparations are kept under constant review.

2 May 2019, 4:16 p.m. Prison Governors Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisons have had (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five and (f) more than five governors or acting governors in post since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below provides the information requested in relation to substantive Governing governors. Deputy governors providing temporary cover are not included. Figures for acting governors could not be obtained without incurring disproportionate cost.

Number of prisons by number of governors in post, over the period January 2010 to December 2018

Number of Governing Governors1 in post since 2010

Number of prisons2

One

9

Two

24

Three

43

Four

35

Five

14

More than five

3

Notes

1. Prison governors are H M Prison & Probation Service employees, at band 10 and 11.

2. The data include all prisons operational within HMPPS since 2010. This includes prisons that have since closed and those that have transferred to or from the private sector within this period.

2 May 2019, 4:15 p.m. Prisons: Digital Technology Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost has been to date of creating facilities for cases to be heard digitally at (a) Pentonville prison, (b) Wormwood Scrubs prison and (c) HM Prison Manchester.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Each of the prisons mentioned has a number of Prison Court Video link end points which enable prisoners to take part in court hearings digitally. The cost of installing these end points to the respective prisons was approximately (a) £165,000, (b) £135,000 and (c) £135,000.

2 May 2019, 4:14 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation: Next of Kin Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many qualifying relatives have been awarded compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

A relative of a person who has died as a direct result of sustaining a criminal injury may be eligible for a payment under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme if they are defined as a ‘qualifying relative’. The following types of payment may only be made to ‘qualifying relatives’: (a) a bereavement payment; (b) a child’s payment; or (c) a dependency payment.

A number of ‘qualifying relatives’ may also receive other payments under the Scheme which are not directly connected to their status as ‘qualifying relatives’.

The table below shows the number of resolved cases per financial year in which one or more payments were made to qualifying relatives. Some qualifying relatives may have received more than one payment.

Financial Year

Bereavement Award

Child Payment

Dependency Payment

2010/11

910

213

34

2011/12

872

203

15

2012/13

873

203

25

2013/14

886

242

49

2014/15

824

185

68

2015/16

651

151

46

2016/17

818

177

9

2017/18

1129

279

87

2 May 2019, 4:13 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) child, (b) dependency, (c) funeral and (d) bereavement compensation payments were made by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below shows the number of resolved cases per financial year in which one or more of the following payments were made. There may be overlap in the numbers for each type of payment because some applicants may have received more than one payment.

Financial Year

Child Payment

Dependency Payment

Funeral Expenses

Bereavement Award

2010/11

213

34

354

910

2011/12

203

15

335

872

2012/13

203

25

338

873

2013/14

242

49

341

886

2014/15

185

68

307

824

2015/16

151

46

259

651

2016/17

177

9

341

818

2017/18

279

87

454

1129

2 May 2019, 4:13 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of claims under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme were rejected as a result of the injury not qualifying for compensation in each year since 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

This information is shown in the table below.

The first column shows the number of resolved cases in which an award was refused because the injury did not qualify for an award. As more than one reason for refusal may be provided in any case, the figures below may include cases which were also refused on other grounds.

The second column expresses this number as a proportion of all cases resolved per year.

Financial Year

1. Number

2. Proportion

2010/11

8862

14%

2011/12

7839

14%

2012/13

7406

14%

2013/14

8444

20%

2014/15

7584

21%

2015/16

5451

19%

2016/17

4282

13%

2017/18

6630

16%

2 May 2019, 4:12 p.m. Reoffenders Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of reoffending.

Answer (Edward Argar)

A reduction in reoffending rates can only be achieved by a concerted effort across government on the drivers of reoffending such as homelessness, unemployment, addiction, health, care and social exclusion. This is why the MoJ is working with other departments to tackle the main causes of reoffending. We are committed to tackling reoffending by investing in community provision, strengthening alternatives to short custodial sentences and boosting rehabilitation, so that it keeps the public safe and ultimately reforms and rehabilitates offenders.

The current estimate of the economic and social cost of reoffending is approximately £15bn per annum, including the cost to victims, and the cost to the Government of detecting, prosecuting, and punishing the crime. This was based on a report published by the National Audit Office (NAO), which estimated in 2007/08 that reoffending by recent ex-prisoners cost between £9.5billion and £13billion; this report can be found here:

https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/0910431.pdf

This estimate was calculated by taking the figure of £13bn and increasing it by inflation, to bring it into present-day costs at the time of calculation (2016/17). This was done by applying GDP deflators in line with standard Green Book guidance.

2 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Knives: Sentencing Tulip Siddiq

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made recent representations to the Sentencing Council to ensure that (a) repeat weapons offenders who are found guilty of murder or manslaughter serve their full sentence and (b) sentencing guidelines in respect of knife crimes are kept under regular review; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Sentencing Council is an independent body, and not responsible for the release of offenders from prison. As such, no representations have been made to the Council regarding the release of offenders serving sentences for murder and manslaughter.

The Bladed Articles and Offensive Weapons sentencing guideline came into force on 1 June 2018 and the Council will review these guidelines, in accordance with its statutory duty to do so.

2 May 2019, 4:11 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many band three to five prison officers who left the prison service in each year from 2010 to 2018 had been assaulted (a) zero to four weeks, (b) four to eight weeks and (c) eight to 12 weeks before their departure.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government publishes quarterly statistics on violence in prison, and a more detailed annual breakdown, and both are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018

I regret that the specific figures that you seek could be obtained only at disproportionate cost, as staff who were the victims of assaults and subsequently departed from HMPPS could only be identified by reading every individual incident report (of which there are nearly 50,000 in the period in which you are interested) and matching the names of those involved with HR records.

The Government is taking unprecedented action to improve safety in prisons. We have recruited over 4,700 more prison officers since October 2016, and we now have the greatest number in post since early 2012. The Challenge, Support and Intervention Plan case management process for prisoners at risk of violence has been mandated for all prisons to help staff to manage violent prisoners and those identified as posing a raised risk of being violent.

We are investing an extra £70 million to improve safety, security and decency, and equipping officers with PAVA incapacitant spray and body-worn cameras to help prevent serious harm to staff and prisoners when dealing with violent incidents. We are improving perimeter security and introducing new x-ray scanners, drug-detection dogs and dedicated search teams to address the supply of drugs that we know are fuelling much of the violence in custody.

2 May 2019, 4:08 p.m. Prisons Mary Glindon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what comparative assessment he has made of (a) employment terms and conditions, (b) levels of violence, (c) overcrowding and (d) staffing levels at private and public prisons.

Answer (Edward Argar)

There is no single comparative assessment of public versus private prisons. However, all public sector and privately managed prisons are subject to the same performance framework, which assesses data against a range of measures. These are augmented by inspection scores, business intelligence and management information, including from management visits and assurance activities. Following an end of year moderation process, each establishment is assigned a place on a four-point rating scale, which runs from serious concern (1) to exceptional (4). The ratings for 2017/18 are published on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-performance-ratings-2017-to-2018. Ratings for 2018/19 will be published in July this year.

All prisons are also independently scrutinised by Independent Monitoring Boards, HM Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) and the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman.

The operational capacity of all prisons in England and Wales is provided monthly as part of the regularly published prison population statistics. This information can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/prison-population-statistics. The rate of crowding is published in the Annual HMPPS Digest at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/annual-hm-prison-and-probation-service-digest-2017-to-2018. The average percentage of prisoners in crowded accommodation was 24.2% in 2017/18, a reduction of 0.3% from 2016/17.

The level of violence across both public sector and privately managed prisons is also closely monitored, and statistics are published routinely on gov.uk. The latest safety in custody statistics can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018.

Prison officer numbers are at their highest in five years, which is vital to ensuring prisons are safe, secure and decent. We have recruited over 4,700 new prison officers across the country since October 2016 to improve safety and help turn offenders’ lives around. The recruitment drive will continue until we reach required levels across the prison estate, ensuring prisons can fulfil their purpose – protecting the public, reducing reoffending and, crucially, rehabilitating offenders. A breakdown of staffing at various grades by public sector prison establishment is provided as part of the HMPPS workforce statistics, which are published quarterly at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-offender-management-service-workforce-statistics

The Ministry of Justice does not hold staffing numbers for privately managed prisons and, as such, their workforce statistics are not published. It is the responsibility of the contractor to determine and maintain the number of staff necessary to discharge the requirements of the contract and ensure that staff are sufficiently trained to undertake their duties.

Privately managed prisons have different grading systems from public sector establishments. Terms and conditions for staff, however, remain comparative.

2 May 2019, 3:59 p.m. Prisoners: Education Jim Shannon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 5 March 2019 to Question 225506 on Prisons: Education, how many offenders were engaged in learning and skills in prisons in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department for Education publishes data on prison education participation and completion rates. Details for the academic years 2010-11 to 2017-18 can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/761349/201718_Nov_MAIN_OLASS_Particpation_FINALv1.xlsx

2 May 2019, 3:55 p.m. Judicial Review Rushanara Ali

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average timescale is for the conclusion of a judicial review.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

From January to December 2018 the average clearance time for a Judicial Review in the Administrative Court, from lodgement to a final hearing decision was 167 days. The published data is available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-justice-statistics-october-to-december-2018

2 May 2019, 3:51 p.m. Taxis: Assistance Animals Alex Norris

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted under section (a) 168 and (b) 170 of the Equality Act 2010 for refusing to take an assistance dog in a taxi or private hire vehicle in (i) 2017 and (ii) 2018.

Answer (Edward Argar)

15 offenders were found guilty at all courts of refusing to take an assistance dog in a taxi in England and Wales in 2017.

22 offenders were found guilty at all courts of refusing to take an assistance dog in a private hire vehicle in England and Wales in 2017

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019.

These figures relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Every effort is made to ensure that these figures are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

2 May 2019, 3:48 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Enforcement Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2018 to Question 198912 on HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Enforcement, what the cost to the public purse has been of the Approved Enforcement Agency procurement exercise.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The total cost for the Approved Enforcement Agencies AEA procurement exercise from 1st April 2017 up to the end of April 2019 is £593,142

In July 2018 HMCTS announced its intention to award new contracts for Approved Enforcement Agency contracts. These contracts will save the tax payer £46 million over five years.

2 May 2019, 3:47 p.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation: Sexual Offences Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases involving sexual assault were granted compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2010-11.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

2 May 2019, 3:45 p.m. Funerals: Fees and Charges Sir Mark Hendrick

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what procedures are in place to (a) monitor and (b) prevent local authorities charging burial and cremation fees that above inflation rates.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Ministry of Justice does not have procedures in place for these purposes.

2 May 2019, 11:06 a.m. Vagrancy Act 1824 Lord Roberts of Llandudno

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were serving a period of imprisonment under the provisions of the Vagrancy Act 1824 in (1) 1989, (2) 2000, (3) 2010, (4) 2015, and (5) 2017.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

Data for the number of people serving prison sentences under the provisions of the Vagrancy Act 1824 as at 30 June in each year can be seen in the table below:

2000

2010

2015

2017

Total

14

7

6

6

The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide data for 1989, for to do so would have meant providing the information at disproportionate costs.

1 May 2019, 6:56 p.m. Prison Officers: Resignations Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers in bands three to five left the prison service in 2018 to join (a) the police, (b) Border Force, (c) the military and (d) another profession.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Information on where staff go after ending their employment with HMPPS is not held.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

1 May 2019, 6:55 p.m. Community Orders Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which individuals have the power to alter a curfew that is the subject of a community order.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Only Courts have the power to vary a curfew that has been imposed as part of a community order.

Curfew is one of the range of community requirements which can be imposed as part of a community order, so the offender is required to be in a particular place at certain times. If the court makes a community order that includes a curfew requirement, it must also impose an electronic monitoring requirement (unless there are particular reasons for not doing so), the purpose of which is to promote and monitor compliance. A curfew can be imposed for a daily maximum of 16 hours per day and for the maximum requirement duration of 12 months.

The National Probation Service can commence enforcement proceedings for alleged violations of a curfew. If enforcement proceedings are commenced and the court finds that the offender has breached their curfew, one of the sanctions the court can apply is to make the order more onerous which could include varying the curfew by extending the daily curfew hours or the overall length of the curfew requirement.

1 May 2019, 4:40 p.m. Crime: Victims Nigel Dodds

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he will take to uphold rights currently afforded to victims in the UK under the EU Victims Rights Directive after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Edward Argar)

In England and Wales, transposition of the EU Victims’ Directive was evidenced through pre-existing legislation and through the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime (the Victims’ Code), which is issued by the Secretary of State for Justice under section 32 of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004. The legislation and Victims’ Code exist independently of EU law and as such leaving the EU will not affect the services provided to victims.

We committed in the Victims Strategy, published in September 2018, to amend the Victims’ Code to address its complexity, accessibility and update the entitlements so that they are more reflective of victims’ needs. We intend to consult on these changes shortly.

1 May 2019, 3:45 p.m. Immigration: Appeals Rushanara Ali

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average timescale is for an immigration case to be heard at the First Tier Tribunal in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The average waiting time from the receipt of an appeal to the hearing in the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) October 2018 to December 2018 was 39 weeks, 11 weeks shorter compared to the same period a year ago.

Between October 2018 and December 2018 34% of the 1,153 appeals determined by the Upper Tribunal were successful. This figure includes appeals brought by both individual appellants and the Home Office on a point of law.

1 May 2019, 3:45 p.m. Immigration: Appeals Rushanara Ali

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many appeals to the Upper Tribunal have been successful in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The average waiting time from the receipt of an appeal to the hearing in the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) October 2018 to December 2018 was 39 weeks, 11 weeks shorter compared to the same period a year ago.

Between October 2018 and December 2018 34% of the 1,153 appeals determined by the Upper Tribunal were successful. This figure includes appeals brought by both individual appellants and the Home Office on a point of law.

1 May 2019, 1:50 p.m. Rents: Non-payment Dr Matthew Offord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many county court judgements were issued for non-payment of (a) commercial and (b) residential rents in the last 12 months for which information is available.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold centrally information on the number of county court judgments made in the last 12 months specifically in relation to non-payment of commercial and residential rents. This information can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

1 May 2019, 1:47 p.m. Homicide: Ethnic Groups Philip Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, from which ethnic group each offender convicted of murder came from in the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Data on convictions for murder, up to 31 December 2017, can be found in the principle offence proceedings and outcomes by offence code data tool, available at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/738814/HO-Code-Tool-2017.xlsx

In the pivot table, select ‘Ethnicity’ from the ‘Ethnicity filter and select ‘1 Murder’ from the ‘Offence’ filter: The number of murder convictions for each year can be found in the `Convicted’ row (row 30).

Court proceedings data, including findings of guilt for the offence of murder for 2018, are planned for publication on 16 May 2019.

1 May 2019, 1:26 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officers in bands three to five or equivalent in each prison operated by private operators have less than three years' experience.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Providers are not contractually obliged to supply data relating to the length of service of their employees. Responsibility for all staffing matters, including ensuring provision of sufficiently-trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with the contractors. Regular recruitment and training of staff takes place across privately-managed prisons and we continue to monitor the performance of all providers closely.

.

1 May 2019, 1:26 p.m. Prison Officers Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officers in bands three to five or equivalent in each prison operated by private operators have three or more years' experience.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Providers are not contractually obliged to supply data relating to the length of service of their employees. Responsibility for all staffing matters, including ensuring provision of sufficiently-trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with the contractors. Regular recruitment and training of staff takes place across privately-managed prisons and we continue to monitor the performance of all providers closely.

.

1 May 2019, 1:10 p.m. Patrick MacKay Gareth Johnson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Patrick Mackay has had his case considered by the Parole Board on or after 22 May 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Patrick Mackay was convicted of three counts of manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility and sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 20 years in 1975. He became eligible for release at the end of that minimum term in March 1995. As a Life Sentenced Prisoner, Mr Mackay will only be released on direction from the Independent Parole Board when it is satisfied that the risk he poses can be managed safely in the community.

The Parole Board has reviewed Mr Mackay’s detention on 10 occasions since 1995. On each occasion the Parole Board has decided that his risk is too high to be safely managed in the community.

Mr Mackay’s case was most recently referred to the Parole Board in August 2018. His parole review is ongoing.

1 May 2019, 1:10 p.m. Patrick MacKay Gareth Johnson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Patrick Mackay has ever been deemed eligible for release from prison since he was sentenced for manslaughter in 1975.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Patrick Mackay was convicted of three counts of manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility and sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 20 years in 1975. He became eligible for release at the end of that minimum term in March 1995. As a Life Sentenced Prisoner, Mr Mackay will only be released on direction from the Independent Parole Board when it is satisfied that the risk he poses can be managed safely in the community.

The Parole Board has reviewed Mr Mackay’s detention on 10 occasions since 1995. On each occasion the Parole Board has decided that his risk is too high to be safely managed in the community.

Mr Mackay’s case was most recently referred to the Parole Board in August 2018. His parole review is ongoing.

1 May 2019, 1:10 p.m. Patrick MacKay Gareth Johnson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on how many occasions the Parole Board has considered Patrick Mackay for release from prison; and what the outcome has been of those hearings.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Patrick Mackay was convicted of three counts of manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility and sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 20 years in 1975. He became eligible for release at the end of that minimum term in March 1995. As a Life Sentenced Prisoner, Mr Mackay will only be released on direction from the Independent Parole Board when it is satisfied that the risk he poses can be managed safely in the community.

The Parole Board has reviewed Mr Mackay’s detention on 10 occasions since 1995. On each occasion the Parole Board has decided that his risk is too high to be safely managed in the community.

Mr Mackay’s case was most recently referred to the Parole Board in August 2018. His parole review is ongoing.

1 May 2019, 1:02 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much it costs the Ministry of Justice to train a new prison officer.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) central accounting system does not separate specific costs in respect of new entry Prison Officers from other overall training costs. The information requested could only be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

1 May 2019, 10:15 a.m. Child Sexual Abuse Independent Panel Inquiry Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking in response to the findings and recommendations of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse’s investigation into child custodial institutions.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The findings in the Inquiry’s report are shocking. The safety and welfare of children across all aspects of the youth justice system is a priority for government. We are already conducting an urgent review into safeguarding in the youth custodial estate and we have commissioned an independent review of pain inducing restraint techniques. We are also rolling out new specialist training and a specific qualification for staff working in the secure estate as part of a wide programme of reform, but we recognise further action is needed. We will carefully consider all the report’s recommendations and respond in due course.

1 May 2019, 10:04 a.m. Prisons: Security Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 3 April 2019 to Question 237103 on Prisons: Security, what the timetable is for the installation of X-ray body scanners at the remaining nine prisons in the 10 Prisons Project and the long-term and high-security estate.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The X-ray body scanner installation programme for the remaining establishments, including the 10 Prisons Project and High Security Estate, is underway, having commenced in early April 2019. All of the prisons included in the programme will have their scanners installed by the end of June 2019.

The prisons included in this programme have specifically been selected as having an identified need for the detection technology to help address their current threats to prison safety and security. Following an operational trial in HMP Belmarsh, the decision was taken to provide the remaining prisons within the High Security Estate with a scanner to help mitigate the risk of contraband being trafficked into the prisons, by prisoners, via internal secretion. HMP Holme House has also been allocated a scanner given their status as drug-recovery prison and their role in exploring new technologies which may benefit prison safety and security more widely.

The 10 prisons in the 10 Prisons Project were selected across three regions in the prison estate as some of our most challenging establishments, particularly in respect of drugs and violence. We are working closely with them to understand how adaptable different approaches, including x-ray scanners, are to types of different prison environment so that we can share best practice and seek to replicate elsewhere what works.

1 May 2019, 10:04 a.m. Prisons: Security Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 3 April 2019 to Question 237103 on Prisons: Security, what selection criteria was used by his Department when deciding which prisons would be the first to be funded to install X-ray body scanners.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The X-ray body scanner installation programme for the remaining establishments, including the 10 Prisons Project and High Security Estate, is underway, having commenced in early April 2019. All of the prisons included in the programme will have their scanners installed by the end of June 2019.

The prisons included in this programme have specifically been selected as having an identified need for the detection technology to help address their current threats to prison safety and security. Following an operational trial in HMP Belmarsh, the decision was taken to provide the remaining prisons within the High Security Estate with a scanner to help mitigate the risk of contraband being trafficked into the prisons, by prisoners, via internal secretion. HMP Holme House has also been allocated a scanner given their status as drug-recovery prison and their role in exploring new technologies which may benefit prison safety and security more widely.

The 10 prisons in the 10 Prisons Project were selected across three regions in the prison estate as some of our most challenging establishments, particularly in respect of drugs and violence. We are working closely with them to understand how adaptable different approaches, including x-ray scanners, are to types of different prison environment so that we can share best practice and seek to replicate elsewhere what works.

1 May 2019, 9:54 a.m. Prisons: Security Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 3 April 2019 to Question 237103 on Prisons: Security, (a) what the cost was and (b) who funded the installation of the X-ray body scanners at (i) Altcourse, (ii) Belmarsh, (iii) Doncaster, (iv) Forest Bank, (v) Holme House, (vi) Leeds, (vii) Northumberland, and (viii) Peterborough prisons.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I am unfortunately unable to disclose any financial information in relation to the provision of these scanners within the prison estate as it is commercially sensitive. The Ministry of Justice is currently engaged in a procurement exercise to enable future purchase of this equipment and any declaration of cost and values may prejudice the outcome of this exercise.

I am able to confirm, however, that the Ministry of Justice funded the purchase and installation of the scanners for all public sector prisons but did not contribute to the cost of purchase or install of the equipment for any of the privately-managed prisons.

1 May 2019, 9:54 a.m. Prisons: Security Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 3 April 2019 to Question 237103 on Prisons: Security, what financial contribution was made by (a) G4S, (b) Serco and (c) Sodexo to support the installation of X-ray body scanners at each of the establishments they operate.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I am unfortunately unable to disclose any financial information in relation to the provision of these scanners within the prison estate as it is commercially sensitive. The Ministry of Justice is currently engaged in a procurement exercise to enable future purchase of this equipment and any declaration of cost and values may prejudice the outcome of this exercise.

I am able to confirm, however, that the Ministry of Justice funded the purchase and installation of the scanners for all public sector prisons but did not contribute to the cost of purchase or install of the equipment for any of the privately-managed prisons.

30 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme Dr Matthew Offord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make it his policy to establish separate legal aid funds for (a) increasing access to justice for people in civil, criminal and legal aid cases and (b) political and human rights cases.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Access to justice is a fundamental right and last year the government spent £1.6bn on legal aid.

Legal aid is available in a wide range of cases across different jurisdictions. This includes crime, family, housing, immigration, and areas where human rights may have been breached. In most of these areas, applicants have to satisfy statutory means and merits tests.

The legal aid fund is administered by the independent Legal Aid Agency, acting according to their statutory duty under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. Decisions on legal aid funding are made by the Director of Legal Aid Casework, who acts independently of Ministers.

We recently published the post-implementation review of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO). Alongside this we published the Legal Support Action Plan which outlines the steps the Government will be taking over the next two years to enhance the breadth of support to people experiencing legal problems. This includes delivering £5m in innovation funding to drive change across the sector, and doubling our funding to support litigants in person to £3m for each of the next two years.

30 Apr 2019, 4:27 p.m. Divorce Mr Ranil Jayawardena

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Government response to the consultation on reform of the legal requirements for divorce, what steps he took to consult with the public before proposing change to the divorce laws.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government’s consultation was predicated on the clear need for reform to reduce hostility and conflict between divorcing parents, which leave their mark on children and damage their life chances. We therefore sought views on how best to achieve this, not on the case for reform.

We held a full public consultation over twelve weeks last year to test our detailed proposals in light of the widest possible range of views and insights. We have reflected on the points raised in the consultation from all perspectives, not just from the many individuals and organisations who were supportive. A YouGov poll on the day we set out our proposals suggested 73% support for removing blame from the legal process. We have detailed the final results of the consultation in our response and outlined people’s views on all sides, and we remain grateful to everyone who responded.

30 Apr 2019, 4:15 p.m. Convictions David Hanson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether time spent in court cells as a disposal to a conviction in lieu of a fine is categorised as a custodial sentence for the purposes of determining that the conviction cannot be filtered from a standard or enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service certificate.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Police Act 1997 sets out the circumstances for the disclosure of certain convictions and cautions on a standard or enhanced criminal record certificate issued by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). In particular, the Act provides for the disclosure of any conviction receiving a custodial sentence. The DBS relies on information recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC) that determines whether a conviction should be disclosed under the Act.

Time spent in court cells as a disposal to a conviction in lieu of a fine is not categorised as a custodial sentence. The sentence is treated as a fine and any time spent in custody is a committal in default of payment of the fine.

30 Apr 2019, 4:11 p.m. Prisoners: Rehabilitation Julian Knight

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to introduce new technology into prisons to assist with rehabilitation.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Digital Prisons Programme was established to pilot technology in prisons so that an assessment could be made as to whether technology could lead to safer and more effective prisons.

Although this programme has now closed, the In-Cell Telephony Project will continue rollout of in-cell telephones and offender self-service kiosks. By March 2020, 50 prisons will have in-cell phones and 11 prisons will have self-service kiosks. In-cell telephones will provide a crucial means of allowing prisoners to build and maintain family relationships, something we know is fundamental to their rehabilitation.

Work is also currently underway to look at forming the future strategy for technology in prisons and the Ministry of Justice is conducting research to evaluate the benefits of the technology already deployed. The evaluation report is intended for publication in 2019.

30 Apr 2019, 4:07 p.m. Prisons: Crime Julian Knight

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to tackle criminal activity and drug abuse in prisons.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Our prisons face a range of security challenges stemming from criminal activity, including the availability of drugs and mobile phones in prison. We must strengthen security and searching to make it much more difficult for anyone to get contraband into prisons. As part of the Ten Prison Project we are using technology to search letters, bags and people on entry to the estate. More widely, we are closing down other routes, such as by using netting to prevent drone flights and throw-overs. We are also using dedicated search teams and phone-detection technology to locate contraband that does get in.

Assisted by our investment in intelligence teams, a new Financial Investigations Unit, a new Serious Organised Crime Unit and the changes we have made to our dedicated counter-corruption unit, we work with law enforcement partners to disrupt criminal activity pro-actively and help obtain convictions. As a result, prisoners who break the law in prison should expect to be sanctioned according to the severity of the crime, with serious crimes being referred to the police for investigation. The revisions that we are making, together with the Crown Prosecution Service and the police, to our cross-agency protocol on how crimes in prison should be handled will further assist our efforts in this area.

The steps we are taking to reduce drug misuse are set out in the Prison Drug Strategy published on 3 April. This sets out the co-ordinated response needed to deal with the scourge of drugs which are fuelling record levels of violence. In common with the Government’s Drug Strategy, the Prison Drug Strategy is centred around three objectives – restricting supply, reducing demand and building recovery. This coordinated approach will better protect staff and prisoners and create conditions for offenders to get the help they need to turn their lives around.

30 Apr 2019, 3:59 p.m. Prisons: Suicide Paul Farrelly

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the number of suicide prevention practitioners in prisons.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Suicide prevention is the responsibility of all staff in prisons who have contact with prisoners. This includes prison staff and those employed by partner organisations, including healthcare providers. All staff with prisoner contact are trained in suicide and self-harm prevention, and we have delivered improved training to nearly 25,000 staff since April 2017.

The Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork (ACCT) case management process for prisoners identified as being at risk includes specialist roles for assessors and case managers, and we provide additional training for staff taking on these roles. ACCT relies for its effectiveness on multi-disciplinary working, and contributions from a range of specialist staff, from prison chaplains and psychologists to mental health nurses working for healthcare providers, who bring their specific training and skills to the review teams responsible for managing each individual who is at risk.

30 Apr 2019, 3:58 p.m. Criminal Proceedings: Recovery of Costs Ben Lake

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that acquitted defendants in criminal cases who were deemed ineligible for legal aid are able to recover costs to cover their legal fees.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

If a defendant is acquitted at the magistrates’ court and did not apply for criminal legal aid or applied and was financially ineligible, he/she can recover their legal costs at legal aid rates; at the Crown Court, an acquitted defendant can only recover their legal costs at legal aid rates if he/she first applied for and was refused criminal legal aid.

On 7 February 2019, the Government announced a review of the legal aid means tests. The review will consider the thresholds for legal aid entitlement and their interaction with the wider criteria, as well as assessing the effectiveness with which the means testing arrangements appropriately protect access to justice, particularly for the vulnerable.

Upon conclusion of the review, expected by Summer 2020, we will publish a full public consultation paper setting out our future policy proposals in this area.

30 Apr 2019, 3:57 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Domestic Abuse Sandy Martin

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will bring forward legislative proposals for the provision of legal aid for expatriates that have returned to the UK with their children after fleeing domestic abuse from their partners while abroad.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government is absolutely clear that victims of domestic abuse must have access to the help that they need, including access to legal aid.

Legal aid remains available for some private family proceedings where there is evidence of domestic abuse. To qualify for legal aid in a private family matter, applicants must provide evidence that they are a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic violence or child abuse as well as meet the means and merits criteria.

The availability of legal aid is dependent on the type of legal proceedings and expatriates are not excluded.

30 Apr 2019, 3:55 p.m. Civil Proceedings Julian Knight

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to make it easier for litigants to bring civil money claims through the courts.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

This Government is investing over £1bn to modernise courts and tribunals, and this includes investments to improve the civil justice system.

The Online Civil Money Claims pilot, is a new service which went live in March 2018, and allows people to resolve money disputes online, for claims of up to £10,000. The digital service allows the public to easily and swiftly make their claim. The system is designed to be clear and intuitive. To date, the overall user satisfaction rate is 87% with over 62,000 claims made.

30 Apr 2019, 3:54 p.m. Courts: Modernisation Julian Knight

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to modernise the court system.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government is committed to investing over £1bn to modernise the courts and tribunals system. The modernisation programme has already started improving the experience of those who use and need our courts.

The public can now apply for uncontested divorce online, apply for probate online, make pleas online for low-level offences (such as traffic offences or evading bus fare), respond to jury summonses, track social security appeals online, and issue and respond to civil money claims.

More than 150,000 people used online justice services in 2018, taking the total number to over 300,000 in the past four years. Public feedback has been extremely positive with 82% user satisfaction rates for the online divorce service, 87% for civil money claims, 93% for make a plea and 92% for probate.

30 Apr 2019, 3:53 p.m. Offenders: EU Nationals Preet Kaur Gill

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many non-UK EU nationals received a prison sentence of (a) less than 12 months, (b) between 12 months and four years and (c) over four years in each of the last five years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Any foreign national who comes to our country and abuses our hospitality by breaking the law should be in no doubt of our determination to punish and deport them. More than 47,000 Foreign National Offenders have been removed from the UK since 2010, and in the financial year 2017/18 almost 6,000 were removed from prisons, immigration removal centres, and the community.

The table below shows the prison sentences for non-UK EU nationals, for the period 2014/18.

Sentenced prison admissions of non-UK EU nationals, by sentence length band for 2014 to 2018

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total

5,779

5,246

4,912

4,163

3,946

Determinate sentences

Less than 12 months

3,467

3,362

2,975

2,404

2,245

12 months to less than 4 years

1,337

1,292

1,296

1,164

1,130

4 years or more

502

487

532

495

469

Indeterminate sentences

27

24

30

18

35

Other / Not Recorded

446

81

79

82

67

Data sources and quality The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The data for 2015 onwards has been taken from a new data source; and this change has significantly reduced the number of 'other / not recorded' sentenced admissions.

30 Apr 2019, 2:26 p.m. Prisons: Crimes of Violence Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many assaults on staff took place in each prison in each quarter from 2010 to 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Government publishes quarterly statistics on violence in prison, and a more detailed annual breakdown, and both are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018

The relevant link is ‘Assaults in prison custody 2000 to 2018’ and the information can be found in

table 3.15: Assaults on staff by establishment, England and Wales, 2000-2018 and table 3.18: Serious assaults on staff by establishment, England and Wales, 2000-2018

The tables have a breakdown by month and you will need to use + and - , to be able to view these figures.

The Government is taking unprecedented action to improve safety in prisons. We have recruited over 4,700 more prison officers since October 2016, and we now have the greatest number in post since early 2012. The Challenge, Support and Intervention Plan case management process for prisoners at risk of violence has been mandated for all prisons to help staff to manage violent prisoners and those identified as posing a raised risk of being violent.

We are investing an extra £70 million to improve safety, security and decency, and equipping officers with PAVA incapacitant spray and body-worn cameras to help prevent serious harm to staff and prisoners when dealing with violent incidents. We are improving perimeter security and introducing new x-ray scanners, drug-detection dogs and dedicated search teams to address the supply of drugs that we know are fuelling much of the violence in custody. We are confident that these initiatives, together with the many other measures that we are taking to protect our staff, will reduce the level of violence in prisons.

30 Apr 2019, 2:26 p.m. Prisons: Crimes of Violence Imran Hussain

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many serious assaults on staff took place in each prison in each quarter from 2010 to 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Government publishes quarterly statistics on violence in prison, and a more detailed annual breakdown, and both are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2018

The relevant link is ‘Assaults in prison custody 2000 to 2018’ and the information can be found in

table 3.15: Assaults on staff by establishment, England and Wales, 2000-2018 and table 3.18: Serious assaults on staff by establishment, England and Wales, 2000-2018

The tables have a breakdown by month and you will need to use + and - , to be able to view these figures.

The Government is taking unprecedented action to improve safety in prisons. We have recruited over 4,700 more prison officers since October 2016, and we now have the greatest number in post since early 2012. The Challenge, Support and Intervention Plan case management process for prisoners at risk of violence has been mandated for all prisons to help staff to manage violent prisoners and those identified as posing a raised risk of being violent.

We are investing an extra £70 million to improve safety, security and decency, and equipping officers with PAVA incapacitant spray and body-worn cameras to help prevent serious harm to staff and prisoners when dealing with violent incidents. We are improving perimeter security and introducing new x-ray scanners, drug-detection dogs and dedicated search teams to address the supply of drugs that we know are fuelling much of the violence in custody. We are confident that these initiatives, together with the many other measures that we are taking to protect our staff, will reduce the level of violence in prisons.

30 Apr 2019, 2:18 p.m. Probation: Contracts Mr Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the new probation contracts will include break clauses to ensure that those contracts can be terminated at no cost to the public purse in the event that private companies fail to reduce re-offending rates.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

All major Government contracts have standard clauses to allow for termination for poor performance. This will not differ for any future contracts we let as part of future probation arrangements.

29 Apr 2019, 4:47 p.m. Prison Sentences Mr Kevan Jones

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people since 2016, who have been given a sentence of six months or less, have previously served (a) 20 short sentences of six months or less, (b) 50 short sentences six months or less and (c) 100 short sentences of 6 months or less.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

For those offenders sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence of six months or less between 1st January 2017 and 30th September 2018, 339 offenders had 20 previous custodial sentences of six months or less, 20 offenders had 50 previous custodial sentences of six months or less and 1 offender had 100 previous custodial sentences of six months or less.

There is a strong case to abolish sentences of six months or less, with some exceptions. We are exploring options to restrict the use of short custodial sentences, but we have not at this stage reached any conclusions.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

29 Apr 2019, 4:45 p.m. Council Tax: Non-payment Chris Ruane

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have served custodial sentences due to non-payment of council tax in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of people admitted to prison for non-payment of council tax to December 2018 can be viewed in Table A2.12 at the link below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/796916/receptions-2018.ods

29 Apr 2019, 4:39 p.m. Offenders: Electronic Tagging Mary Glindon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234706 on Offenders: Electronic Tagging, how many offenders have taken part in each of the GPS electronic tagging pilots in each month since the pilots started.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The tables below provide information on the number of individuals on a GPS tag per month during the Ministry of Justice GPS pilot. The Pilot ran in two regional police force clusters: the Midlands (Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Staffordshire and West Midlands) and BeNCH (Bedfordshire, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire). The learning from the Pilot has been incorporated into the new national location monitoring service announced by the Secretary of State on 16 February. This will help strengthen supervision, enforce exclusion zones and give victims greater peace of mind. More detail about the Pilot, including the cohorts involved, can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/process-evaluation-of-the-global-positioning-system-gps-electronic-monitoring-pilot

The numbers of new starts in the Pilot dropped to zero a few months before the end of the Pilot. This was because the Pilot was scheduled to last for 18 months, ending on 31 March 2018. As most electronic monitoring orders last several months, the MoJ imposed a cut-off date for fitting new tags three months before the Pilot was due to end. This ensured that decision makers were not, for example, ordering new tags to be fitted only a few weeks before they would have to be removed.

Table 1 shows the total number of individuals wearing a GPS tag at the end of every month.

Table 2 shows the number of new GPS starts each month.

29 Apr 2019, 4:35 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2019 to Question 236498 on Prison Officers: Training, how many Offender Manager Key Worker Champions there are in each (a) publicly operated and (b) privately operated prison.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Key Worker Champion training has been in place since 2017 and as of 26th April we have trained 671 Key Worker Champions overall, 524 of those are from public sector prisons and 147 are from the contracted out estate.

29 Apr 2019, 11:14 a.m. Rape: Drugs Dr Matthew Offord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many convictions there have been for administering date rape drugs in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of offenders found guilty of “administering a substance with intent” in England and Wales, from 2013 to 2017 can be found in the Experimental statistics: Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence data tool in the annual criminal justice statistics publication, linked below.

From the detailed offence drop down box, select ‘Administer substance with intent to stupefy or overpower to engage in sexual activity’:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/738814/HO-Code-Tool-2017.xlsx

The total number of prosecutions and convictions may be higher as the data only shows the principle offence.

Court proceedings data, including findings of guilt for this offence, for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019.

29 Apr 2019, 11:11 a.m. Debt Collection Robert Halfon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the number of people who have experienced problems with bailiffs.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice is currently reviewing the implementation of reforms, contained in the Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007 and introduced in 2014, which cover how enforcement agents (formerly known as bailiffs) operate.

We recently held a Call for Evidence to inform our review. We asked for information to help us to assess the number of people who have experienced problems with enforcement agents. The Call for Evidence closed on 17 February 2019. We are considering the responses received and plan to publish the government response in the summer.

29 Apr 2019, 11:05 a.m. Criminal Cases Review Commission: Public Appointments Mr Barry Sheerman

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timeframe is for the appointment of new Commissioners to the Criminal Cases Review Commission.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government believes that the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) is sufficiently funded for the valuable work that it undertakes.

We hope to announce - in the near future - the appointment of six new Commissioners who we expect to take up their appointments during May. These appointments will enable the Commission to continue its vital work in investigating possible miscarriages of justice.

29 Apr 2019, 11:05 a.m. Criminal Cases Review Commission: Finance Mr Barry Sheerman

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the (a) budget and (b) resources available to the Criminal Cases Review Commission on its ability to (i) investigate and (ii) refer miscarriages of justice.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government believes that the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) is sufficiently funded for the valuable work that it undertakes.

We hope to announce - in the near future - the appointment of six new Commissioners who we expect to take up their appointments during May. These appointments will enable the Commission to continue its vital work in investigating possible miscarriages of justice.

29 Apr 2019, 10:56 a.m. Criminal Cases Review Commission Mr Barry Sheerman

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will place the minutes of the meeting between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State and the Criminal Cases Review Commission on 25 March 2019 in the Library.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Minutes of Ministerial meetings are not routinely published in order to ensure participants can exchange views in confidence and with trust. There are no plans to publish the minutes of this meeting.

29 Apr 2019, 10:04 a.m. Disasters Maria Eagle

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress has been made on implementing the commitment in the Queen's Speech 2017 to introduce an independent public advocate who will act for bereaved families after a public disaster and support them at public inquests; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Government conducted a consultation on our proposals for an Independent Public Advocate (IPA) which concluded on the 3rd December 2018. We are considering the response to those proposals and will be publishing our plans for establishing the IPA in due course.

29 Apr 2019, 10:02 a.m. Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme Review Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timetable is for the launch of the consultation on the review of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme to ensure the right compensation for victims of violent crime.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme review was announced in September 2018. Work on the review is currently ongoing and we are committed to consulting this year on proposals.

29 Apr 2019, 9:59 a.m. Debts: Judgements Darren Jones

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many judgments in cases related to debt courts have made in each of the last 10 years broken down by (a) the age group of defendants and (b) the specific debt-related offence.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested about the number of court judgments related to debt in each of the last 10 years, broken down by the age group of defendants, is not held centrally.

The information requested about the number of court judgments related to debt in each of the last 10 years, broken down by the specific debt, could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

25 Apr 2019, 9:37 a.m. Debt Collection Rachel Reeves

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to publish its response to the call for evidence on the Review of enforcement agent (bailiff) reforms.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Call for Evidence on the review of the enforcement agent (bailiff) reforms closed on 17 February 2019. The Ministry of Justice is considering the responses that we received to it and the recommendations that the Justice Committee made in its recent report about enforcement agents. We will respond to the Call for Evidence in the summer.

24 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Offenders: Electronic Tagging Mary Glindon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders have been given electronic tagging orders in each month since January 2013.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Electronic Monitoring is an effective criminal justice tool. It gives those on a tag a chance to maintain family ties and remain in work or education while providing additional safeguards.

The table below provides details of the average number of individuals on electronic tagging orders from January 2013 to March 2018. This is Management Information, is not published and has not had the level of scrutiny and quality assurance as for Official Statistics data.

The table below also provides information on how many notifications for new orders were issued every month from April 2014 to March 2018. The table from where the data is drawn can be found in Table 12.4 at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/annual-hm-prison-and-probation-service-digest-2017-to-2018. Data for 2014 is of poor quality and not available. Data from April 2018 to March 2019 will be published in July 2019.

Average number of offenders on electronic tagging orders in England and Wales, in each month January 2013 - March 2018 (1)(2)(3)

Monthly new electronic monitoring order notifications in England and Wales, in each month from April 2014 to March 2018 (1)(4)(5)

Month

Average number of offenders on EM order

Total notifications

July 2013

14,555

August 2013

14,384

September 2013

14,185

October 2013

14,284

November 2013

14,551

December 2013

14,585

January 2014

14,042

February 2014

14,096

March 2014

14,267

April 2014

14,224

5,975

May 2014

13,987

5,753

June 2014

13,879

5,564

July 2014

13,940

5,982

August 2014

13,912

5,635

September 2014

13,843

5,817

October 2014

13,973

6,353

November 2014

14,294

6,135

December 2014

14,446

6,236

January 2015

13,907

6,316

February 2015

13,902

5,872

March 2015

13,925

6,292

April 2015

13,803

5,804

May 2015

13,589

5,797

June 2015

13,516

6,218

July 2015

13,393

6,150

August 2015

13,389

5,310

September 2015

13,119

5,937

October 2015

13,197

5,802

November 2015

13,329

5,814

December 2015

13,415

5,647

January 2016

12,914

5,597

February 2016

12,781

5,585

March 2016

12,684

5,543

April 2016

12,614

5,458

May 2016

12,432

5,239

June 2016

12,223

5,373

July 2016

11,896

5,152

August 2016

11,628

5,237

September 2016

11,168

5,079

October 2016

11,222

5,029

November 2016

11,443

5,545

December 2016

11,743

5,149

January 2017

11,395

5,606

February 2017

11,559

4,982

March 2017

11,363

5,606

April 2017

11,350

4,576

May 2017

11,052

5,204

June 2017

10,843

4,968

July 2017

10,851

4,761

August 2017

10,713

4,803

September 2017

10,620

4,767

October 2017

10,781

4,771

November 2017

10,865

5,012

December 2017

10,961

4,197

January 2018

10,566

5,397

February 2018

10,925

4,718

March 2018

11,064

4,954

(1) These figures are drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

(2) Monitored subjects are unique subjects with a live EM order and with a tag fitted and Home Monitoring Unit (HMU) installed.

(3) Note that from the 12/07/2016 the Manchester caseload definition changed to include subjects with an active EM order. Previously it only included subjects with an active EM service. This means that subjects on a break in their service are included in the Manchester figures. This was done to align the Manchester and Norwich caseload definitions.

(4) One subject may be given multiple orders over the course of the year. In these figures each is counted individually. i.e. one person with four orders counts as four.

(5) Comprises notifications of new electronic monitoring orders received by the EM contractor that started between April 2014 and March 2018. In some cases the monitoring equipment may never have been installed, e.g. if the subject is taken into custody prior to installation. These cases are included in the total.

24 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Offenders: Electronic Tagging Mary Glindon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of offenders on electronic tagging orders has been in each month since January 2013.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Electronic Monitoring is an effective criminal justice tool. It gives those on a tag a chance to maintain family ties and remain in work or education while providing additional safeguards.

The table below provides details of the average number of individuals on electronic tagging orders from January 2013 to March 2018. This is Management Information, is not published and has not had the level of scrutiny and quality assurance as for Official Statistics data.

The table below also provides information on how many notifications for new orders were issued every month from April 2014 to March 2018. The table from where the data is drawn can be found in Table 12.4 at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/annual-hm-prison-and-probation-service-digest-2017-to-2018. Data for 2014 is of poor quality and not available. Data from April 2018 to March 2019 will be published in July 2019.

Average number of offenders on electronic tagging orders in England and Wales, in each month January 2013 - March 2018 (1)(2)(3)

Monthly new electronic monitoring order notifications in England and Wales, in each month from April 2014 to March 2018 (1)(4)(5)

Month

Average number of offenders on EM order

Total notifications

July 2013

14,555

August 2013

14,384

September 2013

14,185

October 2013

14,284

November 2013

14,551

December 2013

14,585

January 2014

14,042

February 2014

14,096

March 2014

14,267

April 2014

14,224

5,975

May 2014

13,987

5,753

June 2014

13,879

5,564

July 2014

13,940

5,982

August 2014

13,912

5,635

September 2014

13,843

5,817

October 2014

13,973

6,353

November 2014

14,294

6,135

December 2014

14,446

6,236

January 2015

13,907

6,316

February 2015

13,902

5,872

March 2015

13,925

6,292

April 2015

13,803

5,804

May 2015

13,589

5,797

June 2015

13,516

6,218

July 2015

13,393

6,150

August 2015

13,389

5,310

September 2015

13,119

5,937

October 2015

13,197

5,802

November 2015

13,329

5,814

December 2015

13,415

5,647

January 2016

12,914

5,597

February 2016

12,781

5,585

March 2016

12,684

5,543

April 2016

12,614

5,458

May 2016

12,432

5,239

June 2016

12,223

5,373

July 2016

11,896

5,152

August 2016

11,628

5,237

September 2016

11,168

5,079

October 2016

11,222

5,029

November 2016

11,443

5,545

December 2016

11,743

5,149

January 2017

11,395

5,606

February 2017

11,559

4,982

March 2017

11,363

5,606

April 2017

11,350

4,576

May 2017

11,052

5,204

June 2017

10,843

4,968

July 2017

10,851

4,761

August 2017

10,713

4,803

September 2017

10,620

4,767

October 2017

10,781

4,771

November 2017

10,865

5,012

December 2017

10,961

4,197

January 2018

10,566

5,397

February 2018

10,925

4,718

March 2018

11,064

4,954

(1) These figures are drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

(2) Monitored subjects are unique subjects with a live EM order and with a tag fitted and Home Monitoring Unit (HMU) installed.

(3) Note that from the 12/07/2016 the Manchester caseload definition changed to include subjects with an active EM order. Previously it only included subjects with an active EM service. This means that subjects on a break in their service are included in the Manchester figures. This was done to align the Manchester and Norwich caseload definitions.

(4) One subject may be given multiple orders over the course of the year. In these figures each is counted individually. i.e. one person with four orders counts as four.

(5) Comprises notifications of new electronic monitoring orders received by the EM contractor that started between April 2014 and March 2018. In some cases the monitoring equipment may never have been installed, e.g. if the subject is taken into custody prior to installation. These cases are included in the total.

23 Apr 2019, 4:42 p.m. Reoffenders Alison Thewliss

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps the Government is taking to reduce reoffending rates for violent crimes.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Reoffending is costing society approximately £15bn per year. It is only through a concerted effort across Government that we will be able to reduce reoffending.

That is why we set up the Reducing Reoffending Board to identify how the Government can work more collaboratively in addressing the drivers of reoffending, and to consider innovative ways of addressing these drivers.

We are looking particularly closely at what we can do to strengthen probation, which is responsible for managing and supporting offenders in the community to turn away from crime. I want to see a wider range of rehabilitative programmes on offer, so that offenders can be directed towards programmes that are targeted to their behaviour.

For instance, we have found that our general offending behaviour programme can reduce violent reoffending by 17 percentage points.

23 Apr 2019, 4:39 p.m. Prison Officers: Recruitment Kirstene Hair

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What progress his Department has made on recruiting 2,500 new prison officers.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We have met our target to recruit an additional 2,500 prison officers ahead of schedule; at the end of December 2018 we had a net increase of 4,767 FTE Band 3 to 5 prison officers since we began at the end of October 2016.

It is the highest number of officers in post since 31 March 2012.

23 Apr 2019, 4:37 p.m. Probation: Private Sector Stephanie Peacock

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the private probation system.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Transforming Rehabilitation opened up probation to a diverse range of providers and extended support and supervision to an additional 40,000 offenders leaving prison.

The NPS is performing well in supervising higher-risk offenders. But I have been clear that the performance of CRCs needs to improve.

That is why we are ending contracts early, investing more money in Through the Gate services and continuing to consult partners and experts on how to achieve the right balance between public, private and voluntary delivery of services.

23 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Prisons: Mobile Phones Maria Caulfield

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What progress his Department has made on tackling mobile phone use in prisons.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Our strategy to tackling the security threat posed by mobile phones is threefold:

  • we must prevent them from getting into our prisons in the first place by expanding airport-style security, including metal detectors and X-ray scanners;
  • we must find and stop those phones from working through using portable detection poles and the latest detection and signal-blocking technologies;
  • we must also exploit the data held on those phones. We have delivered new kits at 30 prisons to allow staff to download data from illicit phones quickly.
23 Apr 2019, 4:35 p.m. Administration of Justice Liz McInnes

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What assessment he has made of the effect of recent changes in courts staffing and courts closures on access to justice.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Any decision to close a court is not taken lightly, but in circumstances where 41% of our courts operated in 2016-17 at half their available capacity and where we are investing £1 billion in courts and bringing them up to date, the Ministry of Justice has to think carefully about where our court resources are most effectively and efficiently spent.

23 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Divorce Fiona Bruce

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What steps he is taking to consider the views of the public before proposing changes to divorce laws.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Hostility and conflict between parents leave their mark on children and damage their life chances.

That is why we intend to remove the need for blame when people divorce. A YouGov poll published the same day as our response to the consultation indicated 73% support for doing so.

We held a full public consultation last year to test our detailed proposals. We have reflected on the experience and insight that people brought from all perspectives.

23 Apr 2019, 4:28 p.m. Coroners Emma Dent Coad

Question to the Ministry of Justice

What his policy is on the provision of legal aid for inquests.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We published our review of legal aid for inquests on 7 February. The evidence confirmed the inquest process should remain about fact finding and establishing the truth rather than apportioning blame.

We are working on raising the awareness of legal aid for representation at inquests by publishing new guidance for bereaved people. Legal aid for inquests is available through the Exceptional Case Funding scheme, and we are working to simplify the application process for this.

We are committed to ensuring bereaved families are properly supported and able to participate in the inquest process. We believe families should be at the heart of the coronial process.

23 Apr 2019, 4:02 p.m. Asylum: Children Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timeline is for tabling an amendment to the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 which would grant legal aid to unaccompanied and separated children.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We have committed to lay legislation to bring non-asylum immigration matters into the scope of legal aid for separated migrant children. Subject to parliamentary time allowing we will be laying this legislation in the coming months.

23 Apr 2019, 3:39 p.m. Care Proceedings Lucy Powell

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the average cost of a care proceeding before the family courts in each of the last 3 years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government’s latest estimates of the average cost (rounded to the nearest £10) of a public law case before the family courts, covering both the issue and hearing stages, are:

2017/18 £4,180

2016/17 £3,790

2015/16 £4,270

23 Apr 2019, 3:38 p.m. Care Proceedings Lucy Powell

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and proportion of cases before the family courts in England involve women who have been subject to previous care proceedings involving another child in each of the last three years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold data on cases before the family courts that involve women who have been the subject of previous care proceedings involving another child.

9 Apr 2019, 2:50 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total amount of spending commitments was that his Department made in its post-implementation LASPO review.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Alongside the post-implementation review of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO), we published the Legal Support Action Plan which outlines the steps the Government will be taking over the next two years to enhance the breadth of support to people experiencing legal problems.

We are funding a number of changes to legal aid, including; improving the exceptional case funding scheme, removing the mandatory element of the CLA telephone gateway and expanding the scope of legal aid to include Special Guardianship Orders in private family law.

Alongside this, we are delivering £5m in innovation funding to drive change across the sector and doubling our funding to support litigants in person to £3m for each of the next two years. We will be funding a series of pilots to build a robust evidence base, testing methods of delivering support to make sure that people can access the right type of support at the right time, in the right way for them.

The outcomes and evidence base that we will build up through the projects announced in the Legal Support Action Plan will inform future decisions on how we deliver that support.

8 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Reoffenders: Community Orders Andrew Gwynne

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of commencing section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to allow courts to deal with low-level offences by repeat offenders through the use of community orders; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

There are no current plans to commence Section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003, which allows courts, in certain circumstances, to use community orders for repeat offenders who might otherwise expect to receive fines.

Section 143(2) of that Act requires courts to treat previous convictions as an aggravating factor when sentencing. For shop theft offences, the Sentencing Council’s guideline on theft offences came into force in 2016. This guideline allows for the imposition of community sentences for shop theft in a wide range of circumstances. In cases involving significant persistent offending, the community and custodial thresholds may be crossed even though the offence otherwise warrants a lesser sentence.

8 Apr 2019, 4:34 p.m. Alternatives to Prosecution Andrew Gwynne

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he is taking steps to implement simplified out of court disposals following the 2014 pilot on adult out of court disposals; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Out of Court Disposals (OOCDs) allow police to deal quickly and proportionately with low-level offending without recourse to the courts.

We are committed to ensuring the most vulnerable offenders can access community-based support, and recognise the benefits of early intervention. So, where an OOCD is appropriate, we encourage the use of disposals which have a condition attached (be that rehabilitative, reparative, punitive or restrictive), which can achieve rapid compensation for victims and/or divert offenders into rehabilitative services to address the root causes of their offending behaviour.

We are working in partnership with the National Police Chief’s Council (NPCC) whose Charging and Out of Court Disposals strategy supports forces moving to the simplified two-tier framework when it is operationally and financially viable.

8 Apr 2019, 4:32 p.m. Alternatives to Prosecution: Shoplifting Andrew Gwynne

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he is taking steps to make an assessment of the effectiveness of out of court disposals for shop theft; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We recognise that shoplifting is not a victimless crime. It causes cost and disruption to businesses, as well as damage to communities and consumers. We encourage all victims, including shop workers, to report these crimes to the police so that they can be recorded and dealt with accordingly.

A report by the Centre for Social Justice issued last year concluded that people addicted to heroin and crack cocaine account for 70% of shop thefts. We are committed to ensuring the most vulnerable offenders, including those with drug addictions, are able to access support at the right time. This includes diverting offenders away from custody where appropriate.

Out of Court Disposals are one important tool available in addressing shop theft – they allow the police to deal quickly and proportionately with low-level offending. Where an Out of Court Disposal is appropriate, we encourage the use of disposals which have a condition attached (be that rehabilitative, reparative, punitive or restrictive). This can achieve rapid compensation and/or divert vulnerable offenders with substance misuse or mental health issues into rehabilitative services to address the root causes of their offending behaviour.

We pay attention to trends and changes in the use of Out of Court Disposals on an ongoing basis.

8 Apr 2019, 4:08 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Shops Andrew Gwynne

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward stronger sanctions on people who attack shopworkers; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop-workers are unacceptable.

There are a range of offences someone can be convicted of if they assault a shop-worker. Maximum penalties for offences are set by Parliament and include five years’ custody for assault occasioning actual bodily harm and life imprisonment for the most serious cases of causing grievous bodily harm. There are no plans to increase sentences for assault offences.

When making sentencing decisions the courts must follow the relevant sentencing guidelines, produced by the independent Sentencing Council. The Overarching Principles: Seriousness Guideline and Assault Guideline require the court to treat the fact that an offence was committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public as an aggravating factor, making the offence more serious. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and a consultation on a revised guideline is anticipated later this year.

On 21 January the Home Office announced the launch of a call for evidence on violence and abuse towards shop workers. The aim of this work is to strengthen our understanding of the issue, including how existing legislation is being applied. The National Retail Crime Steering Group will continue to provide input on tackling this issue.

5 Apr 2019, 1:54 p.m. Paedophilia: Sentencing Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice , what steps he will take to strengthen sentences given to convicted paedophiles.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Sexual offences perpetrated against children are horrific crimes and the impact of these can have a lasting impact on victims and their families.

Sentencing decisions are taken by our independent courts. They will take such decisions based on the full circumstances of the offence and offender, and consider the relevant sentencing guidelines. The independent Sentencing Council has produced definitive guidelines on sexual offences.

There are a range of offences someone can be convicted of if they abuse a child. Life imprisonment is available for the most serious offences, such as the rape of a child under the age of 13. For certain child sexual abuse offences, extended determinate sentences can be imposed for the purposes of public protection. There are no plans to increase maximum penalties available for child sexual abuse offences.

Average custodial sentences for sexual offences overall are increasing, and have gone up from 43 months in 2007 to just under 60 months in 2017. The number of prisoners serving a custodial sentence for a sexual offence has nearly trebled, from 4,795 (in June 1998) to 13,580 (in 2018).

5 Apr 2019, 1:47 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Atos and Microsoft Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the value is of all current contracts agreed by his Department and (a) Microsoft Corporation and (b) Atos.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The total value of all current contracts with Microsoft is £52,312,423.

The total value of all current contracts with Atos is £182,226,526.

5 Apr 2019, 1:43 p.m. Judiciary: Ethnic Groups Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to achieve a representative judiciary; and how many judges are (a) BAME, (b) women and (c) BAME women.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

In recent years, there has been progress in achieving a more representative judiciary but we acknowledge there is more to do. As at 1 April 2018, BAME judges made up 7% of judges in the courts in England and Wales and 11% in UK tribunals. Women made up 29% of judges in the courts in England and Wales and 46% in UK tribunals. In courts in England and Wales, as at 1 April 2018, 8% of female judges were BAME, and in UK tribunals 13% of female judges were BAME.

The Ministry of Justice is continuing to work closely with the Lord Chief Justice, Chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission and other members of the Judicial Diversity Forum, including the legal professions, to increase the diversity of our world-renowned judiciary. MoJ is funding the pre-application judicial education programme (PAJE), which will launch later this month. This is a Judicial Diversity Forum initiative, to support and encourage lawyers interested in a judicial career and will target lawyers from underrepresented groups including BAME and women lawyers, to help them prepare for a judicial career.

5 Apr 2019, 1:41 p.m. Magistrates: Ethnic Groups Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to achieve a representative magistracy; and how many magistrates are (a) BAME, (b) women and (c) BAME women.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Magistrates play a vital role in our justice system and the latest statistics show there has been progress in achieving a more representative magistracy. As at 1 April 2018, 12% of serving magistrates declared themselves as BAME, broadly in line with the general population, and 55% of magistrates were women. Of the female magistrates appointed as at 1 April 2018, 11% were BAME.

We remain committed to increasing diversity even further and are working closely with Judicial Office and HMCTS to review the attraction, recruitment and retention of magistrates.

We have been building working relationships with a number of organisations, such as Operation Black Vote, with the aim of launching targeted campaigns for more BAME magistrates. Working groups have also been established and promotional materials developed to raise the profile of the magistracy particularly amongst employers.

We are also implementing a national end-to-end recruitment process that will ensure every applicant to the magistracy is treated equally.

5 Apr 2019, 1:39 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Procurement Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service spent on third-party suppliers (a) in total and (b) per supplier in the financial year 2015-16.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested in point A of each question is listed below.

HMCTS has spent the following on third party suppliers:

  • 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016: £415,684,106
  • 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017: £528,626,816
  • 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018: £679,957,077
  • 1 April 2018 – 28 February 2019: £667,349,522

The information requested within point B of each question could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

HMCTS use third party suppliers to provide a wide range of goods and services across the court estate, including security, fines enforcement, court interpreters and IT software.

As part of the governance process, approvals are sought from finance business partners, HR business partners and the director general to ensure that project outcomes and budget are validated and to seek confirmation that internal resource is not available to deliver either due to the specialist nature of the project or due to capacity issues enabling delivery within the project timescales. By using third parties the department can save on salary, national insurance and pension costs associated with permanently employing individuals whose skills may not be needed after a set period.

Spending has increased as HMCTS delivers its £1 billion Reform programme, bringing new ways of working to the justice system.

5 Apr 2019, 1:39 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Procurement Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service spent on third-party suppliers (a) in total and (b) per supplier in the financial year 2016-17.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested in point A of each question is listed below.

HMCTS has spent the following on third party suppliers:

  • 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016: £415,684,106
  • 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017: £528,626,816
  • 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018: £679,957,077
  • 1 April 2018 – 28 February 2019: £667,349,522

The information requested within point B of each question could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

HMCTS use third party suppliers to provide a wide range of goods and services across the court estate, including security, fines enforcement, court interpreters and IT software.

As part of the governance process, approvals are sought from finance business partners, HR business partners and the director general to ensure that project outcomes and budget are validated and to seek confirmation that internal resource is not available to deliver either due to the specialist nature of the project or due to capacity issues enabling delivery within the project timescales. By using third parties the department can save on salary, national insurance and pension costs associated with permanently employing individuals whose skills may not be needed after a set period.

Spending has increased as HMCTS delivers its £1 billion Reform programme, bringing new ways of working to the justice system.

5 Apr 2019, 1:39 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Procurement Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service spent on third-party suppliers (a) in total and (b) per supplier in the financial year 2017-18.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested in point A of each question is listed below.

HMCTS has spent the following on third party suppliers:

  • 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016: £415,684,106
  • 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017: £528,626,816
  • 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018: £679,957,077
  • 1 April 2018 – 28 February 2019: £667,349,522

The information requested within point B of each question could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

HMCTS use third party suppliers to provide a wide range of goods and services across the court estate, including security, fines enforcement, court interpreters and IT software.

As part of the governance process, approvals are sought from finance business partners, HR business partners and the director general to ensure that project outcomes and budget are validated and to seek confirmation that internal resource is not available to deliver either due to the specialist nature of the project or due to capacity issues enabling delivery within the project timescales. By using third parties the department can save on salary, national insurance and pension costs associated with permanently employing individuals whose skills may not be needed after a set period.

Spending has increased as HMCTS delivers its £1 billion Reform programme, bringing new ways of working to the justice system.

5 Apr 2019, 1:39 p.m. HM Courts and Tribunals Service: Procurement Yasmin Qureshi

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunal Service is projected to spend on third-party suppliers (a) in total and (b) per supplier in the financial year 2018-19.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested in point A of each question is listed below.

HMCTS has spent the following on third party suppliers:

  • 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016: £415,684,106
  • 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2017: £528,626,816
  • 1 April 2017 – 31 March 2018: £679,957,077
  • 1 April 2018 – 28 February 2019: £667,349,522

The information requested within point B of each question could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

HMCTS use third party suppliers to provide a wide range of goods and services across the court estate, including security, fines enforcement, court interpreters and IT software.

As part of the governance process, approvals are sought from finance business partners, HR business partners and the director general to ensure that project outcomes and budget are validated and to seek confirmation that internal resource is not available to deliver either due to the specialist nature of the project or due to capacity issues enabling delivery within the project timescales. By using third parties the department can save on salary, national insurance and pension costs associated with permanently employing individuals whose skills may not be needed after a set period.

Spending has increased as HMCTS delivers its £1 billion Reform programme, bringing new ways of working to the justice system.

5 Apr 2019, 1:29 p.m. Domestic Abuse Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the proportion of child contact cases which involved allegations of domestic abuse in each year since 2010.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold the requested data. A revised version of Practice Direction 12J, which sets out a framework for judges to use in child arrangements cases where there is a context of domestic abuse, was introduced in October 2017. This makes clear that judges must take appropriate steps to explore any allegations of domestic abuse and give full regard to the impact of any abuse when making a child arrangement order.

5 Apr 2019, 1:29 p.m. Domestic Abuse Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of child contact cases which involved allegations of domestic abuse in each year since 2010.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold the requested data. A revised version of Practice Direction 12J, which sets out a framework for judges to use in child arrangements cases where there is a context of domestic abuse, was introduced in October 2017. This makes clear that judges must take appropriate steps to explore any allegations of domestic abuse and give full regard to the impact of any abuse when making a child arrangement order.

5 Apr 2019, 1:14 p.m. Paedophilia: Prosecutions Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people in the UK were charged with offences in relation to paedophilia in the last year.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information on charges is not held by the Ministry of Justice, responsibility for charges brought by the police lies with the Home Office.

There were 8,901 defendants proceeded against for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

There were 7,099 people convicted and 6,861 sentenced for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on court outcomes relating to child sexual abuse in England and Wales up to December 2017, data up to December 2018 will be published on 16 May 2019.

5 Apr 2019, 1:14 p.m. Paedophilia: Convictions Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people charged with paedophilia-related offences were (a) convicted and (b) sentenced last year.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information on charges is not held by the Ministry of Justice, responsibility for charges brought by the police lies with the Home Office.

There were 8,901 defendants proceeded against for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

There were 7,099 people convicted and 6,861 sentenced for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on court outcomes relating to child sexual abuse in England and Wales up to December 2017, data up to December 2018 will be published on 16 May 2019.

5 Apr 2019, 1:14 p.m. Offences against Children: Sentencing Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average sentence was for an individual charged with (a) child sexual offences and (b) each category of child sexual offence in 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information on charges is not held by the Ministry of Justice, responsibility for charges brought by the police lies with the Home Office.

There were 8,901 defendants proceeded against for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

There were 7,099 people convicted and 6,861 sentenced for child sexual abuse offences in 2017.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on court outcomes relating to child sexual abuse in England and Wales up to December 2017, data up to December 2018 will be published on 16 May 2019.

4 Apr 2019, 4:43 p.m. High Court Enforcement: Standards Thangam Debbonaire

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to monitor the timeliness with which High Court Enforcement Ltd reclaim moneys awarded through a court judgment.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

While the Ministry of Justice collects statistics about the number of writs that are received and enforced, either in full or in part, by High Court Enforcement Officers, it does not monitor the timeliness with which a High Court Enforcement Officer or company reclaims moneys awarded through a court judgment.

Complaints about a High Court Enforcement Officer can be made to the company employing the High Court Enforcement Officer or to the High Court Enforcement Officers’ Association. Unfortunately, the court cannot guarantee that a creditor will reclaim the payment of a civil judgment, particularly where a debtor goes to great lengths to evade payment or simply does not have the means to pay.

4 Apr 2019, 4:43 p.m. Judgements: Enforcement Thangam Debbonaire

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what guidance his Department issued to claimants who wish to make a complaint in the event that moneys owed to them through a court judgment are not reclaimed in full by high court enforcement companies.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

While the Ministry of Justice collects statistics about the number of writs that are received and enforced, either in full or in part, by High Court Enforcement Officers, it does not monitor the timeliness with which a High Court Enforcement Officer or company reclaims moneys awarded through a court judgment.

Complaints about a High Court Enforcement Officer can be made to the company employing the High Court Enforcement Officer or to the High Court Enforcement Officers’ Association. Unfortunately, the court cannot guarantee that a creditor will reclaim the payment of a civil judgment, particularly where a debtor goes to great lengths to evade payment or simply does not have the means to pay.

4 Apr 2019, 4:39 p.m. Probation: Private Sector Chris Ruane

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department spent on contracts with private probation service providers in each (a) nation and (b) region of the UK in each year for which data is available.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The spend data below is the total spend by HM Probation and Prison Services to the Community Rehabilitation Companies in England and Wales for the years shown.

2015/16

£528,700,000*

2016/17

£394,100,000*

2017/18

£373,300,000*

Figures for 2018/19 have not been ratified and as such are not currently available.

*Figures rounded up to the nearest £100,000

The MoJ does not hold this information for Scotland or Northern Ireland as probation services are devolved.

4 Apr 2019, 4:37 p.m. Theft: Prosecutions Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to review the use of Out Of Court Disposals for shop theft; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We recognise that shoplifting is not a victimless crime. It causes cost and disruption to businesses, as well as damage to communities and consumers. We encourage all victims, including shop workers, to report these crimes to the police so that they can be recorded and dealt with accordingly.

A report by the Centre for Social Justice issued last year concluded that people addicted to heroin and crack cocaine account for 70% of shop thefts. We are committed to ensuring the most vulnerable offenders, including those with drug addictions, are able to access support at the right time. This includes diverting offenders away from custody where appropriate.

Out of Court Disposals are one important tool available in addressing shop theft – they allow the police to deal quickly and proportionately with low-level offending. Where an Out of Court Disposal is appropriate, we encourage the use of disposals which have a condition attached (be that rehabilitative, reparative, punitive or restrictive). This can achieve rapid compensation and/or divert offenders into rehabilitative services to address the root causes of their offending behaviour.

We pay attention to trends and changes in the use of Out of Court Disposals on an ongoing basis.

3 Apr 2019, 5 p.m. Family Courts Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many family court centres have been operating in each region of the UK in each year since 2010.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Her Majesty’s Court and Tribunal Service is responsible for the administration of the family courts in England and Wales only. Detailed information on which courts dealt with family work prior to 2014 and the creation of the Single Family Court is not available. Information from 2014 is below:

Location

2014 (from 22nd April)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019 to date

London

12

12

12

12

12

12

Midlands

17

17

17

17

17

17

North East

39

39

39

39

39

39

North West

20

20

20

19

19

19

South East

36

36

36

36

36

35

South West

21

21

21

20

20

20

Wales

17

17

17

17

17

17

National

162

162

162

160

160

159

3 Apr 2019, 5 p.m. Family Courts Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many family courts centres are operating in the UK.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Her Majesty’s Court and Tribunal Service is responsible for the administration of the family courts in England and Wales only. Detailed information on which courts dealt with family work prior to 2014 and the creation of the Single Family Court is not available. Information from 2014 is below:

Location

2014 (from 22nd April)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019 to date

London

12

12

12

12

12

12

Midlands

17

17

17

17

17

17

North East

39

39

39

39

39

39

North West

20

20

20

19

19

19

South East

36

36

36

36

36

35

South West

21

21

21

20

20

20

Wales

17

17

17

17

17

17

National

162

162

162

160

160

159

3 Apr 2019, 5 p.m. Family Courts Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many family courts centres have been operating in the UK in each year since 2010.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Her Majesty’s Court and Tribunal Service is responsible for the administration of the family courts in England and Wales only. Detailed information on which courts dealt with family work prior to 2014 and the creation of the Single Family Court is not available. Information from 2014 is below:

Location

2014 (from 22nd April)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019 to date

London

12

12

12

12

12

12

Midlands

17

17

17

17

17

17

North East

39

39

39

39

39

39

North West

20

20

20

19

19

19

South East

36

36

36

36

36

35

South West

21

21

21

20

20

20

Wales

17

17

17

17

17

17

National

162

162

162

160

160

159

3 Apr 2019, 4:59 p.m. Antisocial Behaviour: Young People David Simpson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding his Department allocates to measures designed to prevent and tackle antisocial behaviour among young people.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) play an important role in preventing offending and reoffending by children, which encompasses anti-social behaviour. The Ministry of Justice provided £71.6 million to YOTs through the Youth Justice Board’s (YJB) annual grant in 2018/2019.

3 Apr 2019, 4:53 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Females Kate Green

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women in prison have been Released on Temporary Licence in the last 12 months; and how many women are currently on Release on Temporary Licence.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The latest data available shows that there were 649 women released on temporary licence from 1 October 2017 to 30 September 2018, the latest 12-month period for which data is available.

The number released on temporary licence varies each day. A snapshot of the data taken on 29th March 2019 shows that there were 138 women released on temporary licence on that day.

3 Apr 2019, 4:53 p.m. Family Law: Advisory Services Gloria De Piero

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many family law centres are operating in the UK.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

There are 1,722 solicitor offices throughout England and Wales who are contracted to provide legal services in family law. Of these, 5 are Law Centres. Offices may hold contracts for multiple types of cases, a complete list is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/directory-of-legal-aid-providers.

3 Apr 2019, 4:46 p.m. Reoffenders: Community Orders Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential benefits of commencing section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to allow courts to issue community orders rather than fines for minor offences by repeat offenders; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

There are no current plans to commence Section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003, which allows courts, in certain circumstances, to use community orders for repeat offenders who would normally receive fines.

Section 143(2) of that Act requires courts to treat previous convictions as an aggravating factor when sentencing. With reference to shop theft offences, the Sentencing Council’s guideline on theft offences came into force in 2016. This guideline allows for the imposition of community sentences for shop theft in a wide range of circumstances. In cases involving significant persistent offending, the community and custodial thresholds may be crossed even though the offence otherwise warrants a lesser sentence.

3 Apr 2019, 4:45 p.m. Prisons: Security Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which prisons in England and Wales have body scanners installed; and whether his Department plans to introduce body scanners in further prisons.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We are taking urgent and decisive action to stop contraband, such as drugs and mobile telephones, from entering our prisons. These items pose a significant threat to safety and security.

X-ray body scanners allow prison staff to detect items hidden inside prisoners’ bodies. The following prisons in England and Wales already have such body scanners installed: HMP Altcourse, Belmarsh, Doncaster, Forest Bank, Holme House, Leeds, Northumberland and Peterborough.

As part of the Government’s £70 million investment in safety, security and decency, we have commenced an installation programme in a number of additional prisons, including the 10 Prisons Project and the long-term and high security estate. These are some of our most challenging prisons and are more likely to face attempts by prisoners to hide contraband inside their bodies in light of other security measures already in place.

We will consider whether to introduce additional X-ray body scanners once they have been installed and used in the 10 Prisons Project and long-term and high security estate. In the meantime, we are going out to tender for a new contract that will give the Prison Service the means to purchase further scanners in future.

3 Apr 2019, 4:44 p.m. Prosecutions Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to implement simplified Out of Court Disposals following the 2014 pilot on Adult Out of Court Disposals; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Out of Court Disposals (OOCDs) allow police to deal quickly and proportionately with low-level offending without recourse to the courts.

We are committed to ensuring the most vulnerable offenders can access community-based support, and recognise the benefits of early intervention. So, where an OOCD is appropriate, we encourage the use of disposals which have a condition attached (be that rehabilitative, reparative, punitive or restrictive), which can achieve rapid compensation for victims and/or divert offenders into rehabilitative services to address the root causes of their offending behaviour.

We are working in partnership with the National Police Chief’s Council (NPCC) whose Charging and Out of Court Disposals strategy supports forces moving to the simplified two-tier framework when it is operationally and financially viable.

3 Apr 2019, 4:43 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Appeals Caroline Lucas

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on the (a) trends in the number of and (b) proportion of personal independence payment appeals that were successful in (a) Brighton and Hove and (b) the UK in the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

I have had two meetings with the Minister for Disabled People at the Department for Work and Pensions on the importance of getting decisions right first time. Our two Departments are working together on how to bring about improvements, including using feedback from the tribunal judiciary.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service is developing a new digital system which enables speedier processing of appeals and a better service for all parties to the proceedings. Case-management “triage” sessions are also being conducted, with the aim of reducing the number of cases that progress to an oral hearing.

3 Apr 2019, 4:40 p.m. Reoffenders: Community Orders Bob Blackman

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of commencing Section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to allow courts to deal more appropriately with low-level offences by repeat offenders through the use of community orders rather than fines.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

There are no current plans to commence Section 151 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003, which allows courts, in certain circumstances, to use community orders for repeat offenders who might otherwise expect to receive fines.

Section 143(2) of that Act requires courts to treat previous convictions as an aggravating factor when sentencing. For shop theft offences, the Sentencing Council’s guideline on theft offences came into force in 2016. This guideline allows for the imposition of community sentences for shop theft in a wide range of circumstances. In cases involving significant persistent offending, the community and custodial thresholds may be crossed even though the offence otherwise warrants a lesser sentence.

3 Apr 2019, 4:39 p.m. Offenders: Employment Kate Green

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish updated statistics on employment outcomes for women and men previously published in the Ministry of Justice (2013) National Offender Management Service Offender Equalities Annual Report 2012-13.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Employment outcomes were published until 2014-15 in the NOMS Management Information Addendum to the Annual Report. Users can get a broad male / female split based on the prison type. They are available via the link below:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/449925/mi-addendum.pdf_-_Adobe_Acrobat_Pro.pdf

Later this year, subject to data quality, we are intending to publish employment outcomes for 2018-19 as an Annex to the HMPPS Community Performance publication.

In addition, in line with the commitments in the Prison Safety and Reform White Paper, we are developing employment measures to assess the performance of prison and probation in supporting prison leavers into employment.

From April 2019-20, one such measure will hold governors to account, through the HMPPS Prison Performance Framework, on securing employment for offenders after release.

3 Apr 2019, 4:32 p.m. Offenders: Veterans Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of former armed services personnel in (a) custody, (b) under probation supervision and (c) on parole in (i) Wales and (ii) England.

Answer (Edward Argar)

In October 2018, the Department published Experimental Statistics on ex-service personnel in the prison population. This new analysis estimates as of 30 June 2018 in prison custody in Wales, out of 2,836 prisoners who were asked and an answer was recorded, 141 (5%) stated they had been a member of the armed forced. In prison custody in England, out of 48,147 prisoners who were asked and an answer was recorded, 1,891 (4%) stated they had been a member of the armed forces. Details of custodial statistics of the report and tables can be found at:

a) https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/750708/ex-service-personnel-prison-population-2018.pdf

b) https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/750710/ex-service-personnel-2018.ods

As of 30 June 2018, the Department estimates that 2,453 individuals under probation supervision declared they had been members of the armed forces of which, (i) 221 were in Wales and (ii) 2,232 were in England. Of this group, 800 individuals were on some form of post-sentence supervision following custody; (i) 96 were in Wales and (ii) 704 in England.

Armed forces status is determined by self-declaration and the Department is committed to increasing declaration rates. These figures record location of custody or supervision and not nationality. They include service in the reserves and Territorial Army, and those who have foreign and dual nationality who has served in UK or non-UK armed services.

Prisoners who choose to identify as veterans are given access to specialist support, this includes support for issues such as PTSD, that may affect them following their service and additional support can be offered by military service charities working with prisons and rehabilitation services.

3 Apr 2019, 4:21 p.m. Administration of Justice: Females Frank Field

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure the adequacy of funding for a national network of support services for women in the criminal justice system.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Female Offender Strategy sets out our vision of fewer women entering the justice system and serving short custodial sentences, and better conditions for those women in custody. Support for women to help them address the often complex needs that underlie their offending is essential to delivering the vision of the female offender strategy. This is why, across government, we are investing £5 million of funding over two years in community provision for women. This funding will help to sustain and enhance existing services, and will create new services where there is currently a gap.

Services such as women’s centres receive funding from a range of sources. We will look at the scope to increase the sustainability of the sector as we take forward implementation of our strategy.

3 Apr 2019, 4:15 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Shops Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing tougher sanctions for people attacking shop-workers; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop-workers are unacceptable.

There are a range of offences someone can be convicted of if they assault a shop-worker. Maximum penalties for offences are set by Parliament and include five years’ custody for assault occasioning actual bodily harm and life imprisonment for the most serious cases of causing grievous bodily harm. There are no plans to increase sentences for assault offences.

When making sentencing decisions the courts must follow the relevant sentencing guidelines, produced by the independent Sentencing Council. The Overarching principles: seriousness Guideline and Assault Guideline include an aggravating factor where ‘an offence is committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public’. Where applied, this would merit an increased sentence within the maximum available. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and a consultation on a revised guideline is anticipated later this year.

On 21 January the Home Office announced the launch of a call for evidence on violence and abuse towards shop workers. The aim of this work is to strengthen our understanding of the issue, including how existing legislation is being applied. The National Retail Crime Steering Group will continue to provide input on tackling this issue.

2 Apr 2019, 4:52 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As at 27th March 2019 there are (a) 33 contingent labour, (b) supplier resource we cannot provide a response to this because our Suppliers provide services in a number of ways and as we are contracting for outcomes, the Supplier is responsible for assessing how they resource up to deliver this and (c) 356 civil servants currently working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform.

There is no allocation of workforce specific to Reform Re-provisioning unless by Re-provisioning the reference is to the Reform Programme as a whole in which case the above answers apply.

2 Apr 2019, 4:52 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform Re-provisioning are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As at 27th March 2019 there are (a) 33 contingent labour, (b) supplier resource we cannot provide a response to this because our Suppliers provide services in a number of ways and as we are contracting for outcomes, the Supplier is responsible for assessing how they resource up to deliver this and (c) 356 civil servants currently working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform.

There is no allocation of workforce specific to Reform Re-provisioning unless by Re-provisioning the reference is to the Reform Programme as a whole in which case the above answers apply.

2 Apr 2019, 4:32 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Complaints Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many complaints relating to housing cases the Legal Aid Agency has received in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

2 Apr 2019, 4:32 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Complaints Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many complaints relating to discrimination cases the Legal Aid Agency has received in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

These questions could only be answered at disproportionate cost.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Discrimination Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications for legal aid in cases involving discrimination have been unsuccessful in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Complaints Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many complaints the Legal Aid Agency has received in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Standards Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times in each of the last five years the Legal Aid Agency has not met its target of processing 85 per cent of applications for civil legal aid in 20 working days.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Housing Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in what proportion of applications for housing-related Legal Aid the Legal Aid Agency has not met its processing target of 20 working days in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Discrimination Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in what proportion of applications for Legal Aid in discrimination cases the Legal Aid Agency has not met its processing target of 20 working days in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Discrimination Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of legal aid applications in discrimination cases were referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team, in the most recent period for which data is available.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Housing Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of legal aid applications in housing cases were successful in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Discrimination Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of legal aid applications in discrimination cases were successful in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 4:31 p.m. Legal Aid Scheme: Housing Liz Saville Roberts

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications for legal aid in housing related cases have been unsuccessful in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

236582: The Legal Aid Agency’s (LAA) complaints procedure is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/legal-aid-agency/about/complaints-procedure. Complaints may be made by an applicant for funding, their legal representative, their MP, or anyone else involved in the case. Complaints are counted separately as they pass through the stages of the process. Data for the most recent five completed financial years is shown below.

Financial Year

Number responded to

2013/14

3,887

2014/15

2,785

2015/16

3,446

2016/17

3,727

2017/18

3,234

236585,236586 & 236587: The Legal Aid Agency measures and monitors its performance via a number of key performance indicators and corporate targets. For the processing of civil legal aid applications, this target has changed within the last five years. It is therefore not possible to answer these questions in precisely the format requested.

The LAA remained within the target for each reporting month between April 2014 and December 2018. Details of how these targets changed within the requested time period, and a breakdown by the categories of law enquired about, are included within the table below.

Financial year

Target - % within working days

Proportion out of target - Housing

Proportion out of target - Discrimination

Annual performance across all civil legal aid applications

2014-15

85%

7%

0%

Target met

2015-16

85%

8%

25%

Target met

2016-17

85%

4%

17%

Target met

2017-18

90%

4%

23%

Target met

2018-19*

80%

13%

56%

Target met

*(to Dec 2018)

The target for 2018-19 (onwards) also includes the amount of time taken by providers, as well as LAA caseworkers, thus referring to an “end-to-end” process. This is reflected in the figures for this financial year shown above. Previous targets referred to LAA caseworker time-taken only.

236588: the LAA’s published statistics are separated into quarters for each financial year. The most recent period available is July-September 2018. During that time, four applications for a legal aid certificate in the Discrimination category of law were received. Of those, one application was referred to the Exceptional and Complex Case Team for a determination.

236589, 236590, 236591, 236592: Case volumes for the LAA are published on a quarterly basis at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics. These show the number of matters started at the ‘Legal Help’ stage, where the application process is devolved to the provider, and applications and grants for a legal aid certificate, where this is determined by the LAA. Therefore it is not possible to comment on the grant rate of Legal Help matters as only successful applications are referred to us.

Table 6.1 of the aforesaid published statistics shows the number of applications for a legal aid certificate which were made in each period, and of those the volume which were granted. Please note that an application may not proceed to being granted for a variety of reasons, for example being withdrawn, abandoned, rejected for administrative reasons, or refused where the relevant funding criteria were not met.

Table 5.1 of the published statistics show the number of matters opened at the Legal Help level by category of law during the period enquired about.

2 Apr 2019, 1:12 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing the Future IT Sourcing Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Technology Transformation Programme, formerly known as Future IT Sourcing Programme, closed in November 2018 and thus has no staff attached to it. The programme delivered updated hardware and software to approximately 40,000 users within the MoJ.

2 Apr 2019, 12:59 p.m. Speech Therapy: Codes of Pratice Geraint Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what speech and language therapy representation there is on the group working on revision of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 Code of Practice.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Review Working Group is made up of professionals with expertise on mental capacity from across Government, the health, social care, legal and charity sectors. While there is no specialist expertise on speech and language therapy within the group, the Review has received responses from the profession as part of a Call for Evidence. These views are being fully considered as we begin to update the Code of Practice.

There will be further opportunities for all those with an interest in the Code of Practice to provide feedback when we consult on the updated Code of Practice.

2 Apr 2019, 12:57 p.m. Drugs: Rehabilitation Ben Bradley

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Drug Rehabilitation Requirements have been granted by courts in England in each of the last two years for which figures are available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The table below shows the number of Drug Rehabilitation Requirements (DRRs) commenced under community orders and suspended sentence orders in England and Wales in 2016 and 2017.

There is no available published data with a separation of figures for the two countries.

Year

Number of DRRs commenced

2016

9,698

2017

8,719

We are working with the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England on a protocol to support the greater use of community sentences with treatment requirements in courts, including DRRs.

The Community Sentence Treatment Requirement (CSTR) protocol sets out what is expected from all relevant agencies to ensure improved access to treatment for offenders who need it. It focuses on reducing reoffending by addressing the health needs of offenders that may be contributing to their offending behaviour.

The protocol is operating across five courts within England (as health is devolved in Wales). These sites are Milton Keynes, Northampton, Birmingham, Sefton and Plymouth. The NHS Long Term Plan, published in January 2019 includes a commitment by NHS England to build on these pilots. Decisions on how the use of the protocol could be extended will be made in due course, based on the evaluation of the test bed sites.

1 Apr 2019, 10:29 p.m. Community Orders David Simpson

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential benefits of increasing the use of community service rather than short term prison sentences for minor offences.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

There is a strong case to abolish sentences of six months or less, with some exceptions. We are therefore exploring options to restrict the use of short custodial sentences, but we have not at this stage reached any conclusions.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

1 Apr 2019, 10:17 p.m. Prison Officers: Training Richard Burgon

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what revised training is being provided to existing prison officers to ensure that they are equipped to support a rehabilitative approach for offenders in custody; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Newly recruited prison officers are required to complete a 12 week Prison Officer Entry Level Training (POELT) course which is reviewed every 6 months. This training provides new officers with a foundation level of training in all core skill areas of which rehabilitation is a continued theme throughout. Key topics include:

  • Introduction to Rehabilitation and Building a Rehabilitate Culture
  • Five Minute Intervention
  • Procedural Justice Perceptions
  • Prisoner Education
  • Key Worker

Offender Manager Key Worker Champions deliver a training package locally within their own establishments to all operational Bands 3-5. This training is then further supported by the delivery of an ‘Offender Manager Key Worker’ skills training, which seeks to utilise the 10 skills from the ‘Five minute intervention’ training that all operational staff receive.

Additionally there is an extensive training programme for Prison Offender Managers which is a blended delivery approach of workbooks, e-learning and face to face learning of the below key topics:

  • Core concepts and key skills
  • Risk assessment, planning and management
  • Child safeguarding and domestic abuse
  • Adult safeguarding

All Prison and Probation staff have access to myLearning which provides ongoing e-learning training for staff where they are able to complete essential learning for their specific role.

1 Apr 2019, 10:06 p.m. Victims and Witnesses Geraint Davies

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress has he made on implementing the recommendations contained in A Voice for the Voiceless: The Victims’ Commissioner’s Review into the Provision of Registered Intermediaries for Children and Vulnerable Victims and Witnesses, published in January 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice responded to the Victims’ Commissioner’s comprehensive review of the provision of Registered Intermediaries, making these commitments: to review governance of the Witness Intermediary Scheme; to consider whether to appoint a National Lead Registered Intermediary; to publish an annual report; and to promote the role of Registered Intermediaries.

The department have delivered on these commitments and introduced improvements to governance, including the introduction of Regional Coordinator roles for exceptional Registered Intermediaries – which are more appropriate for the scheme than a National Lead. An annual report is due to be published in the summer, the scheme now has a page on Gov.uk and work is ongoing to promote the role of Registered Intermediaries.

1 Apr 2019, 4:59 p.m. Prisons: Riot Control Weapons Lord Bradley

Question to the Ministry of Justice

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many times PAVA spray was deployed in each (1) month, and (2) prison in England and Wales since its authorisation in December 2017.

Answer (Lord Keen of Elie)

PAVA spray is being trialled in 4 prisons, HMPs Preston, Hull, Risley and Wealstun. The table below shows drawings and/or use of PAVA since December 2017 to March 2019. Prison Officers are given training in the lawful and appropriate Use of Force, including PAVA. PAVA must only be used for personal protection, the protection of others or to facilitate the safe withdrawal of staff.

<

Month

Hull

Preston

Risley

Wealstun

Total

Dec-17

1

0

0

0

1

Jan-18

0

0

1

4

5

Feb-18

0

4

1

1

6

Mar-18

0

2

5

5

12

Apr-18

0

3

1

4

8

May-18

2

8

7

3

20

Jun-18

5

11

7

1

24

Jul-18

0

6

3

0

9

Aug-18

2

3

10

4

19

Sep-18

2

10

9

1

22

Oct-18

0

4

3

0

7

Nov-18

2

8

8