Earl of Caithness Portrait

Earl of Caithness

Conservative - Excepted Hereditary

Became Member: 2nd December 1969


Food, Poverty, Health and Environment Committee
13th Jun 2019 - 23rd Jun 2020
Rural Economy Committee
17th May 2018 - 26th Mar 2019
Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 13th Mar 2018
Communications and Digital Committee
25th May 2016 - 27th Apr 2017
European Union Committee
12th Jun 2014 - 12th May 2016
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
12th Jun 2015 - 12th May 2016
Procedure and Privileges Committee
9th Jun 1997 - 18th Nov 2004
Procedure and Privileges Committee
19th Nov 2002 - 18th Nov 2004
House of Lords Offices Committee
5th Jun 1997 - 30th Nov 2000
Minister of State (Transport) (Railways and Roads)
14th Apr 1992 - 11th Jan 1994
Procedure and Privileges Committee
7th Jul 1987 - 22nd Oct 1991
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 1985 - 10th Sep 1986
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
14th Jun 1979 - 31st Oct 1984


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Earl of Caithness has voted in 425 divisions, and 17 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 260
15 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 269
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 261
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 198 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 57 Noes - 234
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
20 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 218 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 158 Noes - 260
20 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 183 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 200
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 249 Noes - 200
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 145 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 159
17 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 201 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 218
15 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 182 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 208
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 114 Noes - 207
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Conservative Aye votes vs 161 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 172
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 207 Noes - 172
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 59 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 60
6 Dec 2021 - Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 70 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 25 Noes - 74
8 Dec 2021 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative No votes vs 128 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 82
View All Earl of Caithness Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(31 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Agriculture Act 2020
(16,991 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(15,255 words contributed)
Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023
(7,489 words contributed)
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Act 2022
(6,104 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Earl of Caithness's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Earl of Caithness, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Earl of Caithness has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Earl of Caithness has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 19 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
23rd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what percentage of Grade 1 and 2 lowland peat is let on annual farm business tenancies; and what steps they are taking to ensure this land is not being farmed in a manner that is accelerating its degradation and threatening future food security.

Peat policy is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Defra does not have any data on the percentage of Grade 1 and 2 lowland peat let on annual farm business tenancies.

In the Environmental Improvement Plan, we said that we are committed to halting the degradation of our lowland peat soils which causes such significant harm to the environment.

We have also agreed to take forward action on all recommendations of the Lowland Agricultural Peat Task Force Chair's report, recognising the vital role that lowland peat soils play in producing food for our nation and supporting our rural economies.

We are currently funding approximately £12.5million on projects on paludiculture, local collaboration, and water management, as first steps towards a more sustainable future for lowland agricultural peat.

We are also developing a new England Peat Map that will help us identify areas for future intervention.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure there are no delays by the Animal and Plant Health Agency in processing applications for new seed varieties; and when they will determine the causes of the current backlog of applications so that in future new varieties are made available to UK growers in a timely manner.

The backlog of applications for variety listing following EU exit has now largely been resolved.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency and Defra are working closely with stakeholders to monitor the processes involved in variety listing and are currently instigating improvements and resilience in the system.

The UK authorities are working together to develop the first UK Plant Variety and Seeds strategy. Following a Call for Ideas and further industry engagement, additional improvements in the plant variety listing process are anticipated.

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards their national deer management strategy and their updated Grey Squirrel Action Plan, as committed to in the England Trees Action Plan 2021–2024, and when is the publication date.

We held a public consultation on key proposals for the English deer management strategy in 2022. Consultation responses have been collated, analysed and fed into the development of the deer management strategy. We are also working to refresh the Grey Squirrel Action Plan.

It is our intention to publish them as soon as we are in a position to do so.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what advice they are giving to those who wish to feed birds in the coming winter and spring seasons to minimise the risk of transmission of avian influenza from bird feeders.

We encourage anyone feeding wild birds to do so responsibly and not feed them in the vicinity or on the same premises as poultry or other captive birds and to be aware of the risk of carrying contamination back to their poultry or other captive birds, for example on their footwear.

The feeding of wild garden birds is not prohibited by the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures or other avian influenza disease control legislation. Where an AIPZ has been declared wild gamebirds should not be fed within 500m of a premises where more than 500 poultry or other captive birds are kept (where this area is under the control of the keeper).

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has said that avian influenza is primarily a disease of birds and the risk to the general public’s health is very low. However, members of the public should not touch, pick up or transport dead or sick birds and should keep away from bird droppings if possible, and wash their hands thoroughly if they accidentally come into contact with any bird faeces, feathers or other potentially contaminated material. The NHS website [https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/bird-flu/prevention] has further information.

Wild birds are susceptible to a range of different pathogens. The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) provides advice about keeping bird feeders and water baths clean to prevent transmission between wild birds, this guidance will also help minimise the risk of transmission of avian influenza.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 24 March (HL6855), in which he said that stakeholder engagement on the outline of Soil Health Action Plan for England (SHAPE) would start in the spring, and that stakeholder engagement not yet having commenced, when they will announce the timeline for that engagement.

The Government recognises the importance of stakeholder engagement for the development of a strategic and coherent plan for soil health measures. Further details regarding planned engagement with stakeholders on the importance of soil and the actions needed to ensure it remains a healthy and sustainable resource, will be published soon.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to announce further plans to improve soil quality and structure in England.

A Soil Health Action Plan for England (SHAPE) is currently being developed. Stakeholder engagement on the outline of SHAPE is planned for this spring ahead of publication, which is anticipated for 2023. As part of the Soil Structure Measuring and Monitoring Scheme, methodology and guidance for arable and grassland soils is being developed and will be tested with practitioners this spring.

15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether issues related to the fishing of non-quota species will be included in their assessment of the operation of the UK–EU Trade and Co-operation Agreement.

Non-quota species (NQS) fisheries in English waters are of significant interest to both UK and EU vessels, given the high value of NQS, and their importance to local communities. Despite this, NQS are in many cases data limited, and improving the robust scientific evidence base underpinning management of NQS is a priority area. Doing so will allow for improved assessments of stock status to take place.

The Fisheries Act also commits the Government to publish Fisheries Management Plans to help deliver our ambition for sustainable fisheries. These plans will set out how we can manage fishing activity to achieve our ambition for stocks to recover and be maintained within sustainable limits, while reducing the impact of fishing on the wider environment. The Joint Fisheries Statement will set out a list of proposed Fisheries Management Plans that will be published over the next five years.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement outlines provisions for the management of shared non-quota species. Working with the EU, through the Specialised Committee on Fisheries, we will develop multi-year strategies for the sustainable management of shared NQS which will be key to improved data collection.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what further steps they are taking to avoid crops having to be ploughed in due to a lack of seasonal farm workers.

The Government recognises the importance of labour to bringing home the harvest.

Defra continues to work closely with industry and other Government departments to understand labour supply and demand, and to ensure there is a long-term strategy for the food and farming workforce beyond 2021.

The expanded Seasonal Workers Pilot has provided a solution to the unskilled labour needs of the edible horticulture sector through 2021, supporting farmers growing UK fruit and vegetables. This sector of agriculture has the highest dependency on seasonal labour.

The Government has announced that the seasonal worker visa route will be extended to 2024 to allow overseas workers to come to the UK for up to six months to harvest both edible and ornamental crops. 30,000 visas will be available. This will be kept under review with the potential to increase by 10,000 visas if necessary.

In addition, food and farming businesses can continue to rely on EU nationals living in the UK with settled or pre-settled status. Over 5.5 million EU citizens and their families have been granted status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

The Government encourages all sectors to make employment more attractive to UK domestic workers through offering training, careers options, wage increases and to invest in automation technology. To support these efforts, Defra is working with industry and the Department for Work and Pensions to raise awareness of career opportunities in the food and farming sectors among UK workers.

Defra is also leading a Government review of automation in horticulture to improve our understanding of what is required to accelerate the development and uptake of automation technologies in both the edible and ornamental sectors, in England, with the view to reducing the sector’s long-term dependency on seasonal migrant labour. The review’s final report will be published shortly and will inform a range of policy decisions regarding automation and seasonal labour from 2022 onwards.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 15 November (HL Deb, col 49GC), what are the reasons for the minister's view that the Earl of Caithness has argued that "the choice is between food production and ecological restoration".

My remark referred to comments made by my noble Friend during the passage of the Environment Bill, where he implied a focus on the environment could conflict with the need to produce food. The remark did not refer to the speech delivered by my noble Friend during the Beyond Brexit Debate (15 November 2021). The Government is committed to rewarding farmers and land managers for their role as environmental stewards and investing in productivity, through our future environmental land management schemes and current schemes like the recently launched Farming Investment Fund. A healthy environment is crucial to providing the ecosystem services which underpin a thriving agricultural sector, through fertile soils, clean water and pollination.

19th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 8 September (HL Deb, col. 867) regarding the publication of a soil health action plan for England, whether the contract put out to tender by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee in March for the provision of technical assistance in developing a method for producing soil health indicators in England has been awarded to a company; and if so, whether soil health indicators have been published.

The Joint Nature Conservation Committee has awarded Cranfield University the tender to provide technical assistance in its project to develop a soil health indicator for England.

Work is currently underway to establish this indicator based on a conceptual framework that links understanding of our soil systems with an approach that can interpret soil data and provide a foundation to indicate soil health in a number of scenarios. We plan to consult on the draft indicator in due course.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much staff resource from the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs in each financial year since 2015 has been used to support the development and implementation of (1) the Convention on Biological Diversity, (2) the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, (3) the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, (4) the Ramsar Convention, (5) the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, (6) the African–Eurasian Waterbird Agreement, (7) the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, (8) the Berne Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats, and (9) the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) strategies, and (2) resources, they have (a) put, or (b) are putting, in place to ensure that the UK continues (i) to benefit from, and (ii) to engage with, biodiversity-related multilateral environmental agreements following the UK's departure from the EU.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they have spent in each financial year since 2015 to support the development and implementation of (1) the Convention on Biological Diversity, (2) the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, (3) the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, (4) the Ramsar Convention, (5) the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, (6) the African–Eurasian Waterbird Agreement, (7) the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, (8) the Berne Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats, and (9) the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services; and for each such agreement and body, how much of that money was (a) a voluntary, and (b) a mandatory, contribution.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reduce the amount of timber imported annually; and what plans they have to enable England to become a net exporter of timber.

This spring we will consult on an English Tree Strategy, including measures to support our domestic timber industry.

We are working to understand the scope for increasing UK-sourced timber in buildings, and our commitment to increase tree planting will increase the supply of domestically grown timber, reducing current reliance on imports.

Increasing the use of domestically grown timber in construction is a goal of the Clean Growth Strategy and 25 Year Plan for the Environment. This can lock up carbon in the long term and create a market for domestic timber.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ability of landowners and foresters to be able to plant and grow strands of commercial broadleaved trees which may be affected by pests and diseases.

The latest Woodland Natural Capital Accounts were published by the Office for National Statistics in February 2020. These classify 85% of woodlands in Great Britain as in a favourable condition for tree health. They also provide information on the number of sites and felling areas under Statutory Plant Health Notices.

The UK Plant Health Risk Register contains the details of over 1,000 plant pests and pathogens which have been assessed for their potential to be damaging to the UK. 350 of these are forest pests, 17 of which are considered high priority and are tracked in an annual corporate performance indicator published by the Forestry Commission.

Deer, grey squirrels and rabbits can also prevent trees and woodlands establishing and realising their full potential.

This information is used by the Forestry Commission to assess applications for new woodlands (for timber production and other purposes). Landowners who do not include a mixture of tree species, suited to site conditions, adequately protected and resilient to known pests and disease threats, will not receive grant aid for woodland creation. In England, grants are available to help owners restock woodlands after felling due to a tree health issue, including where disease has killed ash, a broadleaf species planted for timber production in the past. The Government also works in partnership with others to reduce the negative impacts of squirrels and deer on trees.

15th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following the publication of the UK Health Security Agency report Health Effects of Climate Change (HECC) in the UK: State of the evidence 2023 in January, what steps they are taking to inform health professionals of the heightened risk to public health of (1) Lyme disease, and (2) emerging tick-borne diseases, including tick-borne encephalitis, from an increase in the UK distribution of tick species as a result of a warming climate; and what advice are they providing to those exposed to this risk through work or leisure.

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has an active programme to promote awareness of tick-borne diseases among local authorities, health professionals and the public by 2025 in line with the Third National Adaptation Programme. This includes Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis. UKHSA has worked to develop a toolkit for local authorities and key stakeholders to raise awareness of the potential risks created by ticks and tick-borne disease, a copy of which is attached. UKHSA also publishes Lyme disease data on Fingertips, which is an open access public health data platform which allows the public, health professionals, and local authorities to view trends, compare indicators and understand the incidence of Lyme disease in their area.

Clinicians are also engaged via teaching sessions for General Practitioners, seminars for infection specialists, and briefing notes to notify clinicians of the possibility of tick-borne diseases, with detail of compatible signs and symptoms. Disease messaging is shared through media, social, and stakeholder channels at a national and regional level, such as the #BeTickAware campaign which aims to raise awareness in the population, including those at risk of exposure through work or leisure.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following their policy of achieving net zero emissions by 2050, what plans they have to instruct local authorities to refuse planning applications for demolition and rebuilding properties when an existing building can be refurbished to modern standards.

Planning permission may be required to demolish a building, but if not required, the applicant may still be required to seek prior approval from the local planning authority before demolition. Where the demolition of one or more buildings is required as part of a redevelopment, details of the demolition can be included in the planning application. This will give the local planning authority the opportunity to consider demolition alongside other aspects of the development including energy efficiency. Where appropriate, the local planning authority may impose conditions on demolition if planning permission is granted.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
14th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the price per litre of petrol when the Ministry of Justice set the car travel allowance for jurors at 45 pence per mile; and what plans they have to increase that allowance.

The car travel allowance for jurors is 31.4 pence per mile, with additional allowances available if the car contains other jurors as passengers. It was set at 31.4 pence per mile by the Ministry of Justice when the price of fuel was 121 pence per litre.

There is an additional rate for jurors of 4.2 pence per mile if one other juror is a passenger, with further juror passengers having a rate of 3.2 pence. With 4 juror passengers (additional to the driver), 45.2 pence per mile could be claimed.

The government values jury service as an important civic duty, that should be representative of society. In addition to the car travel allowance, there are other expenses that can be claimed. Information on what can be claimed is available on the gov.uk website and this information is also provided to jurors when they are summoned.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)