Earl of Clancarty Portrait

Earl of Clancarty

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

Became Member: 28th June 2010


Earl of Clancarty has no previous appointments


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Earl of Clancarty has voted in 384 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(68 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(30 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(23 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(28 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(25 debate contributions)
Home Office
(23 debate contributions)
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Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Earl of Clancarty, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Earl of Clancarty has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Earl of Clancarty has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 22 February (HL13057), when they expect to announce the first meetings of the committees established under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and what representations the UK has made to the EU to establish these meetings.

The dates of the first meetings of the committees established under the UK - EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement have not yet been agreed with the EU. These bodies, including the Partnership Council, will begin their work formally once the Agreement has been ratified - unless there are essential decisions which cannot be deferred. We look forward to a positive and constructive relationship with the EU, allowing businesses and citizens on both sides of the channel to prosper.

8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discuss concerns over reciprocal arrangements for touring musicians at the next meeting of the EU–UK Joint Committee.

The arrangements for touring musicians between the UK and the EU relate to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and so would not be raised at the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee.

The date of the first meetings of the committees set up under the Trade and Cooperation Agreement will be announced in due course, when we have agreed with the EU.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord True on 21 October (HL Deb, col 1538), whether their offer on mode 4 includes expanding the list of permitted activities to enable musicians' performing and touring activities.

The Government is currently negotiating commitments with EU member states on ‘Mode 4’. A reciprocal agreement based on best precedence would mean that UK citizens will be able to undertake some business activities in EU member states without a work permit, on a short-term basis. The precise details, including range of activities, documentation needed, and the time limit, are under negotiation.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for UK musicians and appreciates the significant contribution of the UK music industry.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that a future agreement with the EU on mode 4 (temporary entry for business purposes) is extended under a free trade agreement to enable touring musicians, their crew, technical staff and entourage to travel between the UK and the EU for short periods of time.

I refer the Noble Lord to the answer given to HL5418 on 22 June 2020.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
25th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when the voluntary code of practice on copyright and AI will be introduced.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on artists and creatives of the use of temporary copying exemptions by companies to ingest copyrighted materials into their AI systems.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether in their forthcoming voluntary code of practice on copyright and AI, originating performers' rights will be protected by live and simulated performers being treated in the same way.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to introduce legislation to clarify and ensure the rights of originating performers of simulated performances generated by AI.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Kamall on 20 October (HL Deb col 1167), when they intend to report on their three-month review of the energy bill relief scheme in determining what further support is required for arts and cultural organisations; and which department or organisation will make that report.

The results of this Treasury-led review will be published by the end of the year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support the just-in-time nature of the fashion creative business model.

The Government recognises fashion businesses rely on smooth and efficient supply chains and we are taking action through industry engagement, including through a new Cabinet Committee on logistics. At present the position for UK freight is more positive than other locations globally who have experienced continued severe difficulties. We are continuing to work with the freight sector, including ports such as Felixstowe, to manage the impacts of a surge in container demand and HGV driver shortages.

My Hon. Friend the Minister for Small Business, Labour Markets and Consumers holds regular roundtables with the consumer goods manufacturing sector, including the UK Fashion and Textiles Association and British Footwear Association, and Lord frost has chaired the Brexit Business Taskforce on fashion and textiles in May to fully understand the sector’s concerns.

On 1 October, the Government launched the Export Support Service (ESS) - a single telephone helpline and digital enquiry service that will help British businesses export to Europe. It brings together information from across Government, making it easier for exporters to find what they need in one place. ESS will simplify and improve access to guidance for businesses, especially small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs).

High Value Manufacturing Catapult UK provides support for both SMEs to help develop, de-risk and support the journey of bringing new innovations to market and improve productivity; and large businesses who seek to investigate innovative technologies or scale-up new products or processes. From April 2021 until the end of March 2023, manufacturing companies can claim 130% capital allowances on qualifying plant and machinery investments. Under the super-deduction, for every pound a manufacturer invests, their taxes are cut by up to 25p.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the ability of UK creative professionals to undertake work in Europe was discussed under the agenda item ‘Entry and temporary stay of natural persons for business purposes: implementation, transparency and sharing best practice’ at the Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade under the EU–UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement meeting held on 11 October.

At the meeting of the Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade on 11 October, the UK referred to touring artists in the context of the agenda item ‘Entry and temporary stay of natural persons for business purposes: implementation, transparency and sharing best practice’. The EU took note of the UK’s concerns. The minutes of the Committee meeting will be published in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the minutes of the Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement held on 11 October will be published.

The minutes of the Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement held on 11 October will be published in due course, on a date to be agreed with the EU Commission.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they are planning to hold, if any, with the EU on mobility issues affecting UK industries undertaking activities in the EU; whether these discussions will incorporate (1) the service sector, and (2) the creative industries; and, if so, what is the timetable for any such discussions.

The UK and EU are committed to supporting all industries on mobility issues, including services sectors and the creative industries.

With respect to the creative industries in particular, the Government has established that some touring activities are possible without needing visas or work permits in at least 17 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport are speaking to their ministerial counterparts in a number of key Member States. They have already spoken to Portugal and Austria, and will shortly speak to other Member States including Spain and Italy. These conversations are covering the reopening of our respective cultural and creative industries post Covid, and the importance of touring.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement restricts service provision to a maximum of 12 months.

The UK-EU Trade & Co-operation Agreement (TCA) is based on best precedent set by the EU’s trade deals with Japan and Canada. The TCA ensures that both Parties offer a minimum standard of treatment for business travellers, such as guaranteed lengths of stay of up to 12 months for contractual service suppliers and independent (self-employed) professionals, subject to Member State reservations. This is in line with EU-Japan and CETA precedent, reflects the domestic immigration systems of most of the signatories of the agreement, and is more generous than the typical range of WTO commitments for this category of service suppliers.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their understanding of the term 'agency' as it appears in the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement in the context of the employment of 'contractual service suppliers' under Article SERVIN.4.1: Scope and definitions 5(b); and whether this definition includes recruitment or language services.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) uses the United Nations’ Central Production Classification (CPC) (prov., 1991) to identify individual sectors and sub-sectors. Where the TCA says ‘other than through an agency for placement and supply services of personnel’, it is referring to CPC 872.

CPC 872 includes, but is not limited to, executive search services (87201) (‘services consisting in the search for, selection and referral of executive personnel for employment by others’); placement services of office support personnel and other workers (87202) (‘services consisting in selecting, referring and placing applicants in employment by others on a permanent or temporary basis, except executive search services’); and supply services of office support personnel (87203) (‘services consisting in supplying on a fee or contract basis to the clients, whether on a temporary or long-term basis, office support personnel hired by the supplier, who pays their emoluments’).

Her Majesty’s Government understands the term ‘agency’ to mean a business or organisation providing a particular service on behalf of another business. Her Majesty’s Government understands ‘an agency for placement and supply services of personnel’ to include recruitment services, of the kind described under CPC 872, but not language services. Language services may be better categorised under the subsector ‘translation and interpretation services’ (see Annex 19 (previously Annex SERVIN-4)).

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, under the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, contract brokers are to be treated as service providers in a business-to-business relationship with the contracted services provider, or as recruitment agencies.

Under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) the classification of the activities carried out by each UK and EU firm will depend on the specific services it provides, which may vary over time or as between different contracts. It would be possible for a single firm to carry out multiple activities at the same or different times (for example, to act both as a contract broker and as a recruitment agency).

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish any transcripts of the negotiations between the UK and the EU on reciprocal arrangements for the mobility of musicians.

This Government recognises the importance of the UK’s thriving cultural industries, and that is why it pushed for ambitious arrangements to make it easier for performers and artists to perform across Europe as part of the negotiations on our future relationship with the EU.

This Government proposed to the EU that musicians, and their technical staff, be added to the list of permitted activities for short-term business visitors in the entry and temporary stay chapter of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. This would have allowed musicians and their staff to travel and perform in the EU more easily, without needing work-permits.

As with legal text shared in confidence with trading partners, publishing transcripts of negotiations on trade agreements would not be appropriate as both parties exchanged information in confidence.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Bounce Back Loan Scheme is a replacement for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and, if so, whether the latter will be phased out; and what assessment they have made of how many applications they expect to be made to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, and how many of these they expect to be successful.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme will operate alongside the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS). Both are temporary schemes supporting small and medium-sized businesses during these unprecedented times.

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme provides businesses with annual turnover of under £45m with access to working capital of up to £5m. It supports a wide range of business finance products, including term loans, overdrafts, invoice finance and asset finance facilities.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme supports the smallest SMEs by providing loans from £2,000 up to 25% of the business’ turnover, with a maximum loan size of £50,000. This Scheme launched on 4 May and requires businesses to complete a short, simple, online application form, meaning that applications can be processed rapidly.

A business is not able to take out a Bounce Back Loan Scheme facility if they have been approved for a CBILS facility, and vice versa. However, all accredited lenders who have approved CBILS loans so far will allow customers to refinance their loan into the Bounce Back Loan Scheme where appropriate.

More than 69,000 Bounce Back Loans worth over £2 billion have been approved during the first 24 hours of the scheme.

The Government continues to work with the British Business Bank, HM Treasury and lenders to assess how effectively these schemes are working.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by the Lord Privy Seal on 3 February (HLWS83), whether "short-term business trips to supply services" will apply to (1) the creative industries, and (2) IT services.

We are ending free movement of people. However, we still want to support our businesses in moving their talented people to provide services in both the UK and the EU, as quickly and as easily as possible.

The UK’s creative and digital industries comprise around 20% of the UK’s total exports in services and have grown rapidly in recent years. DCMS has engaged extensively with union bodies, artists and cultural organisations to help understand the needs of the creative and cultural sector, including freelancers who make up a significant proportion of people in these sectors.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provisions on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are seeking to negotiate with the EU a visa-waiving treaty for UK workers in the creative industries, resident in the UK, seeking to market their services in the EU.

We are ending free movement of people. However, we still want to support our businesses in moving their talented people to provide services in both the UK and the EU, as quickly and easily as possible.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provision on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

4th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by the Lord Privy Seal on 3 February (HLWS83), whether the "measures to minimise barriers to the cross-border supply of services and investment" will include provisions for the free onward movement of (1) personnel, and (2) equipment, between EU countries.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the EU and the UK will aim to provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits, and agree provision on temporary entry and stay of natural persons, allowing businesses to move their talented employees and provide services.

The temporary movement of goods and equipment is a priority for cultural, creative and sport sectors - this includes instruments used by touring musicians, objects and collections loaned between museums, and sporting equipment taken to competitive events.

Cultural, creative and sporting organisations from all over the world regularly bring their goods and equipment into the UK on a temporary basis, and UK organisations do the same all over the world too.

Arrangements for moving goods and equipment between the UK and EU will not change before the end of the Transition period in December 2020. During the Transition period, until the end of 2020, there will also be no changes to rules to provide services or work temporarily in the EU and UK Nationals can continue to travel to the EU as now.

The scope and detail of this will be subject to negotiations with the EU.

19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to reconvene the Touring Working Group; and, if not, why.

His Majesty’s Government is committed to supporting touring artists, and the music industry more widely, to adapt to new arrangements following our departure from the EU, and we have worked with the sector and directly with Member States to provide clarity and support.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are more generous than those in many EU Member States. The vast majority of Member States — 23 out of 27 so far — have clarified arrangements to confirm that they allow visa- and work-permit-free routes for UK performers for some short-term touring. This includes the UK’s biggest touring markets such as France, Germany, and also Spain, which we are very pleased changed its position following engagement from HM Government and the UK music industry. We continue to work closely with the sector and to engage with the few remaining Member States to improve arrangements or clarify guidance. It is, of course, up to them if they want to replicate the UK’s generous approach, but we encourage them to do so.

We have worked across Government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries to support artists to work and tour with confidence in the European Union. Ongoing industry engagement continues at ministerial and official level. This includes several recent events with the sector focused on touring and export support, hosted in partnership with the Department for Business and Trade. These events help to provide tailored guidance to people and organisations in the sector, alongside an opportunity for the sector to discuss with Ministers and officials challenges and opportunities.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether there is any single individual body responsible for overseeing and addressing any problems encountered by musicians touring in Europe as a result of the UK's decision to leave the EU.

His Majesty’s Government is committed to supporting touring artists, and the music industry more widely, to adapt to new arrangements following our departure from the EU, and we have worked with the sector and directly with Member States to provide clarity and support.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are more generous than those in many EU Member States. The vast majority of Member States — 23 out of 27 so far — have clarified arrangements to confirm that they allow visa- and work-permit-free routes for UK performers for some short-term touring. This includes the UK’s biggest touring markets such as France, Germany, and also Spain, which we are very pleased changed its position following engagement from HM Government and the UK music industry. We continue to work closely with the sector and to engage with the few remaining Member States to improve arrangements or clarify guidance. It is, of course, up to them if they want to replicate the UK’s generous approach, but we encourage them to do so.

We have worked across Government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries to support artists to work and tour with confidence in the European Union. Ongoing industry engagement continues at ministerial and official level. This includes several recent events with the sector focused on touring and export support, hosted in partnership with the Department for Business and Trade. These events help to provide tailored guidance to people and organisations in the sector, alongside an opportunity for the sector to discuss with Ministers and officials challenges and opportunities.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of any barriers faced by musicians touring in Europe following the UK's decision to leave the EU; and what steps they are taking to help musicians overcome these barriers.

His Majesty’s Government is committed to supporting touring artists, and the music industry more widely, to adapt to new arrangements following our departure from the EU, and we have worked with the sector and directly with Member States to provide clarity and support.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are more generous than those in many EU Member States. The vast majority of Member States — 23 out of 27 so far — have clarified arrangements to confirm that they allow visa- and work-permit-free routes for UK performers for some short-term touring. This includes the UK’s biggest touring markets such as France, Germany, and also Spain, which we are very pleased changed its position following engagement from HM Government and the UK music industry. We continue to work closely with the sector and to engage with the few remaining Member States to improve arrangements or clarify guidance. It is, of course, up to them if they want to replicate the UK’s generous approach, but we encourage them to do so.

We have worked across Government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries to support artists to work and tour with confidence in the European Union. Ongoing industry engagement continues at ministerial and official level. This includes several recent events with the sector focused on touring and export support, hosted in partnership with the Department for Business and Trade. These events help to provide tailored guidance to people and organisations in the sector, alongside an opportunity for the sector to discuss with Ministers and officials challenges and opportunities.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, for each year since 2013, what number of people were working in each of the nine sub-sectors of the creative industries, and what contribution each sub-sector has made to the economy.

The UK’s creative industries are worth more than the life sciences, automotive manufacturing, aerospace, and oil and gas sectors put together, generating £126 billion annually and employing over 2.4 million people across the country.

As set out in the Government’s Creative Industries Sector Vision, our ambition is to grow this sector by a further £50 billion gross value added and to support one million more jobs by 2030, delivering a creative careers promise which builds a pipeline of talent.

Each sub-sector of the creative industries makes a distinct contribution to the UK economy. The information requested is shown in the following tables:

Number of people working in each creative industries sub-sector (000s):

Advertising and marketing

Architecture

Crafts

Design and designer fashion

Film, TV, radio and photography

IT, software and computer services

Publishing

Museums, Galleries and Libraries

Music, performing and visual arts

2013

155

94

8

124

232

574

198

85

244

2014

167

101

8

136

228

607

193

84

284

2015

182

90

7

132

231

640

200

97

286

2016

198

98

7

160

246

674

193

92

291

2017

190

104

10

160

261

712

192

96

283

2018

195

111

9

163

245

733

199

89

296

2019

190

112

9

171

239

775

196

95

315

2020

201

115

8

151

279

872

197

104

294

2021

226

106

7

160

290

963

199

94

294

2022

241

110

5

139

280

1,035

209

96

283

Source: Economic Estimates: Employment in DCMS sectors and Digital sector, January 2022 to December 2022. - GOV.UK

Contribution to economy of each creative industries sub-sector, as measured by gross value added (GVA) (£ billions):

Advertising and marketing

Architecture

Crafts

Design and designer fashion

Film, TV, radio and photography

IT, software and computer services

Publishing

Museums, Galleries and Libraries

Music, performing and visual arts

2013

13.2

2.6

0.2

2.3

18.2

29.9

11.4

1

9.7

2014

13.3

3

0.4

2.3

18.1

32.6

11.4

0.8

8.6

2015

17

3.4

0.4

2.6

19.4

33.5

11.1

0.9

9.6

2016

15.7

3.4

0.3

3

20

37.6

11.4

0.9

9.3

2017

16.8

3.7

0.3

2.7

19.7

38.2

10.6

1

9.6

2018

16.4

3.5

0.3

3.3

19.2

40

10.4

0.9

10.2

2019

15.8

3.4

0.4

3

20.2

41.3

10.7

1

10.1

2020

15.9

3.2

0.1

2.4

17.8

42.9

10.1

0.6

7.4

2021*

18.2

3.5

0.4

3.1

19.9

48.8

11.3

1

8.9

2022*

18.8

3.7

0.4

3.2

20.8

55.4

11.6

1

11.2

*Figures for 2021 and 2022 are summed monthly GVA estimates as annual GVA estimates are not yet available. These figures are subject to revision and not directly comparable to the annual GVA estimates for 2013-2020 due to being calculated via a different method.

Source: Economic Estimates: GVA for DCMS Sectors and the Digital Sector, 2020 - GOV.UK (Annual GVA 2013-2020); DCMS and Digital Economic Estimates: Monthly GVA (to Sept 2023) - GOV.UK (Summed monthly GVA 2021-2022)

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they are giving to ratifying the UNESCO 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.

His Majesty’s Government is fully committed to the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage in the UK.

As with any international treaty, UK ratification of UNESCO Conventions should be considered fully, taking into account value for money to the UK taxpayer and the interests of the Devolved Administrations and our Overseas Territories. This process is making good progress, and Ministers expect to take a decision on the merits of ratification soon.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they are taking steps to make up for in full the loss of funding from Creative Europe.

The Government decided not to seek continued participation in the Creative Europe programme, but to look at other ways of supporting the UK’s cultural and creative sectors.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund is a domestic successor to the European Regional Development Fund and European Social Fund, and is not intended to be a replacement for Creative Europe. The UK Shared Prosperity Fund is focused on building pride in place and increasing life chances, and delivered through three investment priorities: communities and place, local businesses, and people and skills.

To support independent screen content – including film – to grow internationally, the Government launched the UK Global Screen Fund in April 2021 with initial funding of £7 million. We have committed a further £21 million to this Fund over the period 2022–25 to develop, distribute, and promote independent UK screen content in international markets.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to help enable (1) museums, and (2) libraries, to act as warm hubs during the coming winter.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has announced an Energy Bill Relief Scheme to support non-domestic energy users (including museums and libraries) with increased energy prices. The support provides a discount on gas and electricity unit prices, applied to energy usage initially between 1 October 2022 and 31 March 2023. That will support museums and libraries to provide heating to people who visit this winter, but no separate support is being provided specifically to enable the sectors to act as warm hubs.

Public libraries are run by local authorities, as are some museums. In these cases it will be for each local authority to identify the needs of local residents and to make decisions about the use of these community assets to meet those needs, including the provision of warm hubs.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish an independent expert panel to (1) deliberate, and (2) make recommendations, on (a) restitution, and (b) repatriation, claims on cultural objects (excepting Nazi-looted objects) held in public collections.

HM Government has no plans to establish such a panel.

Museums and galleries in the UK operate independently of HM Government. Decisions relating to their collections are a matter for the trustees of each museum.

National museums are prevented by law from “deaccessioning” objects in their collections unless, broadly, they are duplicates or unfit for retention. The two exceptions to this are when the objects are human remains that are less than 1,000 years old, and objects that were spoliated during the Nazi era.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to the use of a levy on streaming services to help fund a continuation of the Young Audiences Content Fund.

The full evaluation of the three-year pilot Young Audiences Content Fund will begin following the final determination of Year Three award funding; a timetable for the evaluation’s conclusion has not been set at this stage. The potential of further investment will be assessed following the conclusion of the evaluation and against future public service broadcasting needs.

HM Government has no current plans to put additional taxes on video-on-demand services or to introduce levies.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 17 March (HL Deb col 450), how long the evaluation of the Young Audiences Content Fund will take; and when they will decide whether to extend that fund.

The full evaluation of the three-year pilot Young Audiences Content Fund will begin following the final determination of Year Three award funding; a timetable for the evaluation’s conclusion has not been set at this stage. The potential of further investment will be assessed following the conclusion of the evaluation and against future public service broadcasting needs.

HM Government has no current plans to put additional taxes on video-on-demand services or to introduce levies.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to engage directly with creative freelancers in a similar manner to their engagement with creative industries through regular meetings with the Creative Industries Council.

The Government is well aware of the great contribution freelancers make to the creative industries, and to our society and economy more widely. We are reviewing the scope of the Creative Industries Council to ensure it has appropriate representation, and so that it can be a voice for the full range of people working in the creative industries. We will be gathering views from a wide range of relevant parties to inform this work, including creative freelancers. In addition, we are consulting freelancers on the challenges they face through the Independent Review on Job Quality in the Creative Industries.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential to support authors by increasing the Public Lending Right Fund.

There has been no assessment of an increase of the Public Lending Right (PLR) central fund. The PLR central fund is part of the overall funding for the British Library, which is set for each Spending Review period.

The PLR Scheme is a valued right for authors and other contributors to receive payment when their books are borrowed from public libraries. My department conducts an assessment of the rate per loan annually following a recommendation by the British Library. The PLR rate per loan calculation is based on the annual number of ‘notional loans’ of books from public libraries in the UK.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have measured the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on (1) creative freelancers, and (2) other creative workers; and if so, by what means.

We recognise the significant challenge the pandemic poses to our arts and creative sectors and to the many individuals and freelancers working across these industries.

DCMS officials have been engaging with HMRC, the Creative Industries Federation (CIF), Arts Council England, and leading organisations such as ‘What’s Next’ and individual freelancers within the sector to better understand the level of impact the pandemic has had on the sector and those working in it.

We have supported freelancers through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) which was extended at Budget to September 2021. Freelancers are also supported through the unprecedented Culture Recovery Fund support package, which has helped ensure the venues and organisations which support them have survived the pandemic. We were also pleased to announce Government funding via Arts Council England last December of an immediate £1.5 million emergency support for freelancers affected by the pandemic, alongside a further £1.35 million contribution from the theatre sector.

We will continue to work closely with freelancers and organisations across the sectors to see how we can best provide support to those affected.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will use the Cultural Recovery Fund to support businesses implementing COVID-19 certification.

The Government’s unprecedented £2 billion Culture Recovery Fund has now given out £1.5 billion of support to around 5,000 organisations and venues in grants and loans, ensuring the survival of organisations facing financial challenges. The Culture Recovery Fund has supported successful applicants with costs associated with operating in a manner compliant with Covid regulations.

The £300 million third round of the Fund is still open for applications, providing vital ongoing support for the cultural, heritage, and creative sectors. We will keep the delivery of the programme under active review and consider how best to adapt it in line with the needs of the sector.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to widen the representation of the fashion industry on the DCMS-led working group on touring.

The Touring Working Group was set up at the beginning of 2021 to help the creative and cultural sectors understand and adapt to new requirements following the UK's exit from the EU.

Membership of the Working Group includes the British Fashion Council, and we encourage all members of the working group to reach out to others to ensure that it hears and understands the views from across all the sectors it represents.

We have published a specific page on gov.uk to help the fashion sector navigate the guidance available online, and provide clarity regarding the practical steps that need to be taken by UK fashion professionals working in the EU.

The Government has also engaged with representatives of the fashion industry specifically on EU customs and export issues, through the Brexit Business Taskforce on Fashion and Textiles, chaired by Lord Frost in May, two of DIT’s Trade Advisory Groups, and a seminar jointly organised with the British Fashion Council.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement on 11 October by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport regarding "visa-free short-term touring allowed in 20 member states", how many days per year a creative professional can work for without a (1) visa, or (2) work permit, in each of these 20 countries.

Many of the 20 Member States offer visa and work permit free routes for up to 90 days, including some of the biggest touring markets such as France, Germany and Italy. All 20 Member States have confirmed they offer visa and work permit free routes for at least 30 days, aside from Sweden (up to 14 days a year), Latvia (up to 14 days), Estonia (up to 5 days in a 30 day period) and the Czech Republic (up to 7 consecutive days, or 30 days over a year). Austria offers visa and work permit free routes for up to four weeks, although artists may take up several chronologically linked employments for a longer overall duration.

Durations, precise definitions and requirements can vary from Member State to Member State. Travellers should therefore check what requirements they need to fulfill with the Member State to which they are travelling. To support this, we have published general business traveller summaries for all Member States on gov.uk, and we are engaging with Member States to encourage clear and accessible guidance. We are also sharing information with the industry on an ongoing basis, and working with sector organisations to help clarify areas of uncertainty in their own guidance.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State for Digital and Culture on 29 June (21802) that "some touring activities are possible without needing visas or work permits in at least 17 out of 25 Member States", what assessment they have made of the varying time limits placed on such activities.

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State.

We have established some touring activities are possible in at least 18 out of 27 Member States without needing visas or work permits. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more.

The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to each Member State to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now engaging with those Member States that do not have any visa or permit free touring to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach in line with the UK’s own rules, which allow creative professionals to tour easily here.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether amateur choirs will be treated in the same way as professional choirs in the event of renewed restrictions on singing due to COVID-19.

The government’s Roadmap set out four steps out of lockdown in England.

As of today, there are no limits on the number of people who can sing indoors or outdoors. This includes amateur and professional choirs, and congregational singing.

From Step 4, The government has removed outstanding legal restrictions on social contact and life events, and opened the remaining closed settings.

The Events and Attractions guidance sets out how those organising events can operate at step 4, including in the Performing Arts. The guidance will apply to workplaces and therefore is intended for those who are undertaking activities as part of their work, or who organise events in those venues. Organisers will need to assess whether this guidance is relevant when they plan activities that also involve amateur groups.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of providing a government-backed insurance indemnity package against the risk of cancellation for festivals in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

This Government recognises the importance of the UK’s live events sector and has provided significant financial support including an additional £300M to the Culture Recovery Fund details of which were announced on Friday 25th June.

The DCMS Secretary of State made clear at the DCMS Select Committee in May, the government is aware of the wider concerns around securing indemnity for live events and we continue to assess options to provide further support to the sector within the public health context.

The Secretary of State also underlined that the government’s first priority is to remove remaining barriers (such as social distancing) by reaching Step 4 of the Roadmap. Once that point is reached, if events still cannot go ahead because of a failure of the commercial insurance market, the Government will look at intervening as was done for the TV/Film sectors.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made of providing an indemnity for live music events following the Step 4 lifting of COVID-19 restrictions; and whether they will place the results of any such assessment in the Library of the House.

This Government recognises the importance of the UK’s live events sector and has provided significant financial support to cultural organisations, particularly through the Culture Recovery Fund.

As the Secretary of State made clear at the DCMS Select Committee on Thursday 13th May, the government is aware of the wider concerns around securing indemnity for live events and we continue to assess options to provide further support to the sector within the public health context, engaging with relevant stakeholders as necessary.

We need to be confident that any intervention would lead to an increase in activity, and that insurance represents the last barrier to events reopening. The government’s first priority is to remove remaining barriers (such as social distancing) by reaching Stage 4 of the Roadmap.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish (1) the results, and (2) any arising guidance, from the Events Research Programme.

Research findings from the Events Research Programme’s first phase of pilots will be published on GOV.UK shortly.

The Government has committed to taking a cautious approach to easing restrictions, guided by data instead of dates, to avoid another surge in infections that could put unsustainable pressure on the NHS. The roadmap sets out indicative, “no earlier than” dates for each step which are five weeks apart. Each full step of our roadmap will be informed by the latest available science and data and will be five weeks apart in order to provide time to assess the data, providing one week’s notice to businesses and individuals.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure UK workers have the necessary skills to work in the UK music sector.

This Government understands the importance of ensuring that workers in the music sector have the necessary skills, demonstrated through its commitment to music education. It was made clear in December 2018 that the existing National Plan for Music Education, originally co-published by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Department for Education (DfE), would be refreshed. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the refresh of the National Plan is currently on hold, but the Government remains committed to publishing a refresh in due course, to support the next generation of music sector workers.

DCMS is also working closely with the music sector, including UK Music, to put in place programmes to aid music education and skills development. The Music Academic Partnership (MAP), which involves UK educational institutions and UK Music members, sees industry working with academics and educators to give colleges and university students a better chance of finding a job in the music industry. UK Music is also part of the Creative Industries Advisory Group which is working with DfE on developing reforms to the apprenticeship levy.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to establish a transitional support fund for UK musicians intending to tour in the EU.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

As the Prime Minister has said, we're working flat out with the industry, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. Through our bilateral discussions with EU Member States, we have established that in at least 17 out of 27 Member States some touring activities are possible without visas or work-permits. The UK has significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals than many Member States, and should they be willing to change their rules to match ours we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

We are considering a number of options to ensure performers, musicians and artists have the support they need to tour and work in countries across the EU. We have produced new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and are looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to negotiate with the EU to reduce barriers faced by musicians intending to tour EU countries; whether they have produced a timetable for those negotiations; and if so, whether they will place a copy of the timetable in the Library of the House.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

As the Prime Minister has said, we're working flat out with the industry, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. Through our bilateral discussions with EU Member States, we have established that in at least 17 out of 27 Member States some touring activities are possible without visas or work-permits. The UK has significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals than many Member States, and should they be willing to change their rules to match ours we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

We are considering a number of options to ensure performers, musicians and artists have the support they need to tour and work in countries across the EU. We have produced new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and are looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish guidance for (1) musicians, and (2) other live performers, operating after the Step 4 lifting of COVID-19 restrictions.

The Government appreciates that organisations require as much time and detail as possible to enable them to plan their reopening activities. However, proceeding to the next Steps of the government's Roadmap is subject to the review of data gained from relaxation of restrictions in previous steps, and the outcomes of the Events Research Programme and Social Distancing reviews. We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ratify the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The Government values the profound contribution of the UK’s craft workers, artisans and artists to the preservation of our unique intangible heritage. We are exploring the merits of ratifying the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, as a potential addition to the broad range of support measures which already exist for this vital aspect of our nation’s life.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter from the Minister of State for Digital and Culture to the Chair of the House of Commons Petitions Committee on 4 March, how the EU’s proposals on visa-free travel for touring professionals and artists was "not consistent with our manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders".

The EU tabled text regarding the paid activities that could be allowed as part of visa-free visits. However, these proposals would not have addressed the creative and cultural sectors’ concerns. The proposals were non-binding, did not include touring but only ‘ad-hoc performances’, did not include technical staff, and did not address work permits.

The EU’s proposals were also part of a wider package, including a visa-waiver for all EU citizens that was not consistent with the manifesto commitment to take back control of our borders. The Trade and Cooperation Agreement allows the UK to determine whether short-term visits from the EU should be subject to visa requirements or not, and ensures that the provision will not apply to future Member States unless the UK agrees to apply these provisions to do so.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are significantly more generous than in many EU Member States. We have said our door is open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)