Lord Johnson of Marylebone Portrait

Lord Johnson of Marylebone

Conservative - Life peer

Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Jointly with the Department for Education)
25th Jul 2019 - 5th Sep 2019
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Jan 2018 - 9th Nov 2018
Minister of State (London)
9th Jan 2018 - 9th Nov 2018
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Universities and Science) (Joint with the Department for Education)
15th Jul 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Minister of State (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) (Universities and Science)
8th May 2015 - 15th Jul 2016
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Head of the Number 10 Policy Unit)
15th Jul 2014 - 8th May 2015
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
6th Sep 2012 - 15th Jul 2014
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office) (Head of the Number 10 Policy Unit)
25th Apr 2013 - 15th Jul 2014
Public Accounts Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Feb 2012


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 27th April 2022
Elections Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 195 Conservative No votes vs 1 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 150 Noes - 208
Speeches
Thursday 7th April 2022
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
My Lords, as at previous stages, I draw attention to my interests in the register.

I echo the noble Lord, …
Written Answers
Monday 11th April 2022
Overseas Students: Sponsorship
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) allocations function as a de facto cap …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Johnson of Marylebone has voted in 130 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(2 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(1 debate interactions)
Lord Shipley (Liberal Democrat)
(1 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for Education
(3 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(2 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(1 debate contributions)
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View all Lord Johnson of Marylebone's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Johnson of Marylebone, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Johnson of Marylebone has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Johnson of Marylebone has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Johnson of Marylebone has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Johnson of Marylebone has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


37 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken, if any, to fulfil commitments made by the Office for Students to review the state of competition in the market for validation services.

The Office for Students (OfS) published 'Consultation on quality and standards conditions - Analysis of responses to consultation and decision' on 2 March 2022, in response to its consultation on quality and standards conditions. This publication acknowledges that several issues were raised during the consultation about validation.

The OfS has signalled that it will consider further the operation of the validation system in England, including the extent to which OfS should use the commissioning power given to the OfS by section 50 of the Higher Education Act 2017.

We are expecting the OfS to consider a review of the validation system in the coming financial year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the representations by Independent Higher Education that the market for validation services is “dysfunctional, opaque, unreliable and anti-competitive”.

The Office for Students (OfS) published 'Consultation on quality and standards conditions - Analysis of responses to consultation and decision' on 2 March 2022, in response to its consultation on quality and standards conditions. This publication acknowledges that several issues were raised during the consultation about validation.

The OfS has signalled that it will consider further the operation of the validation system in England, including the extent to which OfS should use the commissioning power given to the OfS by section 50 of the Higher Education Act 2017.

We are expecting the OfS to consider a review of the validation system in the coming financial year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the extent to which the requirement that institutions seeking Degree Awarding Powers (DAPs) should have more than 50 per cent of their students studying at Level 6 or above is holding back the development of higher technical qualifications at Level 4 and Level 5.

The Office for Students (OfS) published its response to its consultation on the quality and standards conditions on 2 March. This publication acknowledges that several issues were raised during the consultation about requirements on institutions seeking Degree Awarding Powers (DAPs).

We are expecting the OfS to consider a review of DAPs in the coming financial year and expect that review to consider the case for intervention in the DAPs to increase the availability of high-quality courses across England.

In addition, it is a key government priority to grow level 4 and 5 provision. We are doing more to support level 4 and 5 provision by raising the profile and prestige of level 4 and 5 courses through improved communications and information, advice, and guidance, including through the launch of a new national communications campaign in January 2022. We will also Introduce the Lifelong Learning Entitlement from 2025 to support a more accessible, flexible system.

The department will be continuing to roll out reforms to higher technical education to ensure that, over time, Higher Technical Qualifications (qualifications approved to deliver the skills employers need) are established as a flagship offer at level 4 and 5, including improving student finance to support learners in accessing these qualifications. Providing further funding to support providers with the upfront investments required to roll out Higher Technical Qualifications and strategic priorities grant funding to encourage and support level 4 and 5 provision.

Through the higher education reform consultation we are also seeking views on the role of the fees and funding system in growing provision and uptake of level 4 and 5 courses.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of appointing an SME Champion within the governance structures of the Office for Students.

The Higher Education and Research Act 2017 specifies that the Office for Students’ (OfS) board consists of the following members appointed by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education: a chair, the Chief Executive Officer, the Director for Fair Access and Participation, and between 7 and 12 ordinary members.

In appointing the chair and the ordinary members, the Secretary of State must also have regard to the desirability of the OfS’s members having a range of experience. The current board is therefore made up of members with a range of experience and expertise including Monisha Shah, the former chair of Rose Bruford College of Theatre and Performance, Monisha brings expertise and experience from a small provider perspective to the OfS board.

The OfS also works closely with Independent HE, along with other higher education sector mission groups, to understand how regulation impacts higher education providers, including the challenges for small and specialist providers.

Finally, the OfS Director for Fair Access and Participation, John Blake, for example, recognised in his speech on 8 February that smaller providers found the access and participation plan process more challenging and that the OfS will work closely with them to ensure that regulation of them is proportionate, effective and fair, John Blake's speech is available to view at: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/news-blog-and-events/press-and-media/next-steps-in-access-and-participation/.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to compel the Office for Students to increase transparency through the publication of a Register of Validating Providers.

The Office for Students (OfS) Register provides information on which registered providers offer validated provision, and which registered providers offer validating services.

We are expecting the OfS to consider a review of the validation system in the coming financial year and expect that review to consider the case for intervention in the validation system in order to increase the availability of high-quality courses across England.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of potential benefits in enabling Indian Institutes of Technology and other accredited international providers to offer higher education in England.

The government’s update to the International Education Strategy, published in February 2021, sets out the importance of education partnerships and of identifying key opportunities for foreign direct investment into the United Kingdom. India is set out as a priority country for education engagement in this strategy. It is a key focus for the UK’s International Education Champion, Sir Steve Smith.

The 2030 Roadmap for India-UK future relations explicitly references education and research, and commits the department to expanding cooperation between its higher education institutions.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have to set out clear and accessible guidance on the regulatory process for foreign institutions to register to provide higher education in England.

The Higher Education and Research Act 2017 sets out that the Office for Students (OfS) must establish and maintain a register of English higher education (HE) providers. New providers wishing to register with the OfS must be, or intend to become, an English HE provider. The OfS publishes advice and application documents for providers seeking to register on its website. This is available at: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/regulation/how-to-register/.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps, if any, they have taken to ensure that the Office for Students’ regulatory approach is supportive of start-up and scale-up businesses and offers a stable environment for long-term investment.

The Office for Students (OfS) considers financial sustainability and business plans when assessing providers during registration.

The OfS is planning further work on minimising regulatory burden on all providers, including those who are new and/or small, to support them to focus on high quality teaching and research. More detail on this, together with its regulatory approach, will be published later this month in the OfS’s new strategy for 2022 to 2025.

The OfS also currently minimises the impact of its regulatory approach on micro and new providers by limiting its registration fees for those providers.

The Higher Education (HE) (Registration Fees) (England) Regulations 2021 continue to contain a micro-entity exemption. This exemption protects the very smallest HE providers (employing up to 50 people) by providing a 100% registration fee exemption.

These most recent regulations also retain protections for new providers in relation to registration fees: the regulations continue to allow for the OfS to charge reduced fees to those new institutions who decide to register with it.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) what was the average cost of validation per student, and (2) what assessment they have made of any increase in this cost, in each of the last five years.

Validation agreements are confidential commercial contractual arrangements between two parties and so neither the Department for Education, nor the Office for Students, holds this information.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps, if any, the Office for Students has taken to encourage new providers to seek New Degree Awarding Powers (NDAPs) as an alternative to a market for validation services.

The Office for Students has offered the new degree awarding power’s (DAPs) application route since 2018. Full information on this is available here: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/regulation/degree-awarding-powers/.

Information about the new DAPs option for providers is also included in the regulatory framework, which was published in 2018.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the additional cost to the Office for Students of collecting information on the progression of international students to (1) graduate employment, or (2) further study, by telephone, when responses have not been received by email.

Action 6 of the International Education Strategy 2021 update focuses on the employability of international students. Sector representatives are collaborating to build an understanding of the UK’s skills needs, international labour markets, and barriers to international graduate employability. They will also share examples of best practice across the sector.

The department supports these efforts by expanding data resources available in relation to international student graduate outcomes. My noble Friend will be aware from recent answers to Questions HL5793 and HL5795 that the department now publishes employment and study outcomes one, three, five, and ten years after graduation for all international students who remain in the UK after study and contribute to the UK economy.

Graduate outcomes surveys are carried out by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). This includes international graduates surveys. In response to my right hon. Friend, the Minister for Higher and Further Education’s announcements on reducing bureaucracy for the higher education sector in September 2020 and lowering the cost to providers of participating in HESA data collections, there has been some scaling back of HESA’s graduate outcomes survey methodology. This impacts 2020/21 academic year graduates. The survey will be published in spring 2023.

Non-EU international graduates will continue to participate in the survey. The process of contacting international graduates by telephone, if they have not already participated online, is discontinued. This has resulted in a lowering of the subscription cost of graduate outcomes to higher education providers by approximately £350,000. HESA continues to explore and implement strategies aimed at increasing online response rates.

The value of the HESA graduate outcomes survey data is not solely determined by its response rates. The current response rate target for the survey of international graduates is at 20%. This is high for social surveys. Over the last three years, the survey has achieved on average a 30% response rate for this group. This is 5 percentage points above the previous target. Around half of these responses were collected over the telephone.

Conclusions drawn on the international graduate outcomes will be driven by how representative the students who respond to the survey are of the overall student population. The Office for Students intends to undertake research looking at the outcomes for international students. It will re-introduce telephone contact, should it significantly impact the conclusions that can be drawn from the data.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Office for Students is taking to improve survey response rates to questions relating to the destinations of international students graduating from higher education institutions in England.

Action 6 of the International Education Strategy 2021 update focuses on the employability of international students. Sector representatives are collaborating to build an understanding of the UK’s skills needs, international labour markets, and barriers to international graduate employability. They will also share examples of best practice across the sector.

The department supports these efforts by expanding data resources available in relation to international student graduate outcomes. My noble Friend will be aware from recent answers to Questions HL5793 and HL5795 that the department now publishes employment and study outcomes one, three, five, and ten years after graduation for all international students who remain in the UK after study and contribute to the UK economy.

Graduate outcomes surveys are carried out by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). This includes international graduates surveys. In response to my right hon. Friend, the Minister for Higher and Further Education’s announcements on reducing bureaucracy for the higher education sector in September 2020 and lowering the cost to providers of participating in HESA data collections, there has been some scaling back of HESA’s graduate outcomes survey methodology. This impacts 2020/21 academic year graduates. The survey will be published in spring 2023.

Non-EU international graduates will continue to participate in the survey. The process of contacting international graduates by telephone, if they have not already participated online, is discontinued. This has resulted in a lowering of the subscription cost of graduate outcomes to higher education providers by approximately £350,000. HESA continues to explore and implement strategies aimed at increasing online response rates.

The value of the HESA graduate outcomes survey data is not solely determined by its response rates. The current response rate target for the survey of international graduates is at 20%. This is high for social surveys. Over the last three years, the survey has achieved on average a 30% response rate for this group. This is 5 percentage points above the previous target. Around half of these responses were collected over the telephone.

Conclusions drawn on the international graduate outcomes will be driven by how representative the students who respond to the survey are of the overall student population. The Office for Students intends to undertake research looking at the outcomes for international students. It will re-introduce telephone contact, should it significantly impact the conclusions that can be drawn from the data.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of students undertaking T-Levels are gaining at least 315 hours of ‘on-the-job’ experience during an industry placement.

We are committed to ensuring every T Level student completes a high-quality industry placement, which involves genuine and meaningful experience working with employers.

We are monitoring the delivery of T Level industry placements to make sure that the first two cohorts of T Level students have a full placement secured but we are currently not collecting, nor planning to collect, data on what proportion of placement hours students are spending in a workplace setting. We have introduced some temporary industry placement flexibilities for the first two cohorts of T Level students in direct response to the delivery challenges caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. This will ensure that students can successfully complete their industry placement and therefore pass their T Level. This includes allowing some of the placement hours to be delivered remotely. We have been clear that these flexibilities are to be used by exception only, that they are temporary and that the provision of in-person placements remains the expectation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) quality, and (2) accessibility, of industry placements offered by T-Levels providers.

The department is committed to ensuring students have access to high quality industry placements and have provided an extensive programme of employer and provider support to help with the delivery and scale up of placements. We have invested £200 million over the past four years to help providers build their capacity and networks with employers to deliver high quality placements and we have published practical industry placement delivery guidance for both education providers and employers. We also have comprehensive packages of support in place for both providers and employers, which offer them tailored advice and hands-on support to deliver high-quality placements.

To ensure access to placements, we have implemented several different delivery models to ensure placements are accessible and meaningful for all students, across all industries and locations. We are also engaging directly with employers through the department’s employer engagement teams to provide a strong pipeline of employers for the future, across all sectors and across the country, ready to offer placements. We have established a T Level employer ambassador network to engage with others in their industries on T Levels and placements, and our communications campaigns are continuing to raise the profile of T Levels and industry placements to an employer audience.

We will continue to monitor placement provision and work closely with providers and employers to identify any potential barriers to the delivery of placements for each of the T Levels, including access, and identify appropriate mitigations.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to build confidence in the (1) longevity, and (2) value, of applied general qualifications.

The department will continue to fund a range of qualifications similar to current applied general qualifications. These can be taken alongside and as alternatives to A levels where they are necessary, high-quality and support progression to higher education. Through the post-16 qualifications review, these qualifications will need to meet new quality criteria to ensure they are well-designed and have strong progression value to be funded in future. This means that students, employers, and universities can have confidence in their value.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many qualifications have been (1) received, and (2) approved, since 1 September 2020 under Exemption type 3: Qualifications in response to economic need.

The moratorium on approving new qualifications at level 3 and below for public funding for students aged 16 and over in England was introduced in September 2020. It was introduced for a period of three years, subject to annual review, and is intended to stabilise the publicly funded qualifications offer before wider reform is implemented. There are two exemptions to the moratorium. These are for qualifications developed in response to economic need and where qualification content has been updated to keep it relevant.

Qualifications which meet these two exemption criteria continue to be approved for funding. The Education, Skills and Funding Agency is due to confirm ongoing arrangements linked to the moratorium in March 2022.

The current moratorium is not intended to constrain the design or delivery of new qualifications where they meet the exemption criteria. The moratorium exemption criteria allow awarding organisations to design qualifications in response to two situations. The first is employer need, for instance in response to regional skills need or a new job role. The second is to meet learner need, for instance ensuring the content of the qualification the student is undertaking remains relevant and current.

These criteria should not prohibit awarding organisations in being innovative in how they design qualifications to meet new skills needs or update their qualifications to ensure students are undertaking relevant content. The current moratorium allows awarding organisations to submit a new qualification for funding approval where it has been designed in response to economic need (this is known as a type 3 exemption). Qualifications submitted under this exemption may be approved where appropriate evidence of economic need is submitted, and the qualification meets all other approval criteria.

Since the start of the moratorium, 40 qualifications have been submitted under the exemption type 3 criteria and 16 have been approved.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of effect of the moratorium on the consideration of new qualifications for funding approval on (1) innovation in the provision of (a) technical, and (b) vocational qualifications, and (2) the ability of awarding organisations to adapt to the needs of (i) learners, and (ii) employers.

The moratorium on approving new qualifications at level 3 and below for public funding for students aged 16 and over in England was introduced in September 2020. It was introduced for a period of three years, subject to annual review, and is intended to stabilise the publicly funded qualifications offer before wider reform is implemented. There are two exemptions to the moratorium. These are for qualifications developed in response to economic need and where qualification content has been updated to keep it relevant.

Qualifications which meet these two exemption criteria continue to be approved for funding. The Education, Skills and Funding Agency is due to confirm ongoing arrangements linked to the moratorium in March 2022.

The current moratorium is not intended to constrain the design or delivery of new qualifications where they meet the exemption criteria. The moratorium exemption criteria allow awarding organisations to design qualifications in response to two situations. The first is employer need, for instance in response to regional skills need or a new job role. The second is to meet learner need, for instance ensuring the content of the qualification the student is undertaking remains relevant and current.

These criteria should not prohibit awarding organisations in being innovative in how they design qualifications to meet new skills needs or update their qualifications to ensure students are undertaking relevant content. The current moratorium allows awarding organisations to submit a new qualification for funding approval where it has been designed in response to economic need (this is known as a type 3 exemption). Qualifications submitted under this exemption may be approved where appropriate evidence of economic need is submitted, and the qualification meets all other approval criteria.

Since the start of the moratorium, 40 qualifications have been submitted under the exemption type 3 criteria and 16 have been approved.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to end the moratorium on the consideration of new qualifications for funding approval; and if so, when.

The moratorium on approving new qualifications at level 3 and below for public funding for students aged 16 and over in England was introduced in September 2020. It was introduced for a period of three years, subject to annual review, and is intended to stabilise the publicly funded qualifications offer before wider reform is implemented. There are two exemptions to the moratorium. These are for qualifications developed in response to economic need and where qualification content has been updated to keep it relevant.

Qualifications which meet these two exemption criteria continue to be approved for funding. The Education, Skills and Funding Agency is due to confirm ongoing arrangements linked to the moratorium in March 2022.

The current moratorium is not intended to constrain the design or delivery of new qualifications where they meet the exemption criteria. The moratorium exemption criteria allow awarding organisations to design qualifications in response to two situations. The first is employer need, for instance in response to regional skills need or a new job role. The second is to meet learner need, for instance ensuring the content of the qualification the student is undertaking remains relevant and current.

These criteria should not prohibit awarding organisations in being innovative in how they design qualifications to meet new skills needs or update their qualifications to ensure students are undertaking relevant content. The current moratorium allows awarding organisations to submit a new qualification for funding approval where it has been designed in response to economic need (this is known as a type 3 exemption). Qualifications submitted under this exemption may be approved where appropriate evidence of economic need is submitted, and the qualification meets all other approval criteria.

Since the start of the moratorium, 40 qualifications have been submitted under the exemption type 3 criteria and 16 have been approved.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which requiring the Office for Students (1) to publish a code of practice governing universities’ use of recruitment agents and sub-agents, and (2) to enforce the code on a ‘comply or explain’ basis as a condition of registration with the Office for Students, would help drive out fraud in international student recruitment and uphold the reputation of higher education in England.

The government does not currently have plans to request the Office for Students (OfS) to publish a code of practice governing universities’ use of recruitment agents and sub-agents.

As set out in the International Education Strategy, the government is committed to working with the sector to enhance international student experience with specific actions that aim to make the application process clearer with more accessible information for potential students.

A range of resources are available to higher education (HE) providers working with agents, such as the British Council good practice guidance and the London statement. Both are available here: https://www.britishcouncil.org/education/education-agents/good-practice-guidance-uk-information. The British Universities’ International Liaison Association also supports the professional and personal development of HE staff members with training events, including on the topic of working with agents. This information is available at: https://www.buila.ac.uk/training.

The department is working closely with partners including the OfS and UCAS to prevent, detect and deter fraud within the HE sector.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the average (1) earnings, and (2) economic contribution, of international students who have stayed in the UK post-study in each of the last 10 years.

The department publishes information about the earnings of international graduates from English higher education (HE) providers and colleges who remain in the UK for employment one, three, five and ten years after graduating from a first degree in its annual Graduate Outcomes (LEO)[1] publication. Latest available data refers to outcomes in the 2018-19 financial year and are published in Table 45 at the following link: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo/2018-19.

Table 1 in the attached spreadsheet summarises the earnings outcomes of international first degree graduates from English HE providers and colleges one year after graduation for the past five tax years. Data is only published for the 2014-15 financial year onwards.

The department also publishes employment outcomes and earnings for international postgraduates from English HE institutions in the Graduate Outcomes (LEO): Postgraduate outcomes[2] publication. Table 2 in the attached spreadsheet summarises the outcomes of international level 7 (taught and research) and level 8 postgraduates of English HE institutions, one year after graduation for the past five tax years. Data is only published for the 2014/15 financial year onwards.

The government values the positive, significant economic contribution international students make during and post study. No official numerical estimate is held by the department.

The graduate route provides greater incentives for international students to work in the UK post-study. The linked graduate route’s impact assessment, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/966659/Graduate_Route_Impact_Assessment.pdf, shows that while on the graduate route, graduates will be able to work and look for work, which is expected to generate income to the Exchequer from direct and indirect tax contributions. This is estimated to lead to a benefit to public finances of between £6.7 and £15.2 billion with a central estimate of £10.7 billion (10-year present value, 2021/22 financial year prices).

[1] https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo/2018-19

[2] https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo-postgraduate-outcomes

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the sectoral breakdown of employment of international students who have stayed in the UK post-study in each of the last 10 years by (1) nationality, and (2) sector of employment.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes data on the outcomes of graduates 15 months after qualifying from higher education in the Graduate Outcomes (GO) survey. This survey is unique in that it collects detailed information from the individual about their employment or further study, which allows HESA to determine the industry and occupation of employment. Further information about the survey is available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/graduates.

The survey results include information on the outcomes of graduates who were domiciled overseas prior to study. For those remaining in the UK, the industry and occupation of employment is available in the GO Open Data here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/graduates/table-19 and https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/graduates/table-22.

Information is available for graduates in academic years 2017/18 and 2018/19. Counts in the tables are of survey respondents rather than all members of graduating cohorts. In 2018/19, the response rate, including partial survey responses, was 51% and 34% for EU and non-EU domiciled graduates respectively. Further statistics can be found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb260/figure-3. Breakdowns by country of nationality are not published.

Prior to 2017/18, HESA collected data on the outcomes of graduates 6 months after qualifying from higher education in the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey. Data from this survey series are available in HESA’s publication archive, found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/publications#destinations-leavers-higher-education.

Though non-EU international graduates were invited to take part in the survey, the level of response was not considered suitable for publication.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to work with the education sector "to enhance the evidence base on international graduate outcomes and to monitor the UK’s comparative position with respect to international student recruitment and the international student experience", further to Action 5 of their International Education Strategy.

As set out in government’s International Education Strategy (IES), we are committed to growing the value of education exports with two key ambitions to achieve by 2030: increasing education exports to £35 billion per year, and hosting at least 600,000 international higher education students in the UK per year.

We are making good progress against these ambitions. For example, the international students ambition was met for the first time in the academic year 2020/21 with 605,130 international students studying in the UK.

The government continues to work with the sector to enhance international student experience, from application to employment, as well as promoting and sustaining the growth of education exports and international student numbers. The actions set out in strategy include items relating to the student application process, graduate outcomes and employability, academic experience for international students and alternative student finance opportunities. We have committed to review progress regularly against the IES and its ambitions.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what regulatory measures the Office for Students is taking to encourage universities to focus as much on the completion, attainment and progression outcomes of international students, as those of domestic students.

The Office for Students (OfS) published consultations on improving the quality of higher education (HE) in England on 20 January and set out in detail the numerical thresholds which will underpin minimum acceptable student outcomes.

International students studying at English HE providers are included in the proposed student outcome measures on continuation and completion rates. If the proposals are adopted, the performance of international students studying at registered higher education providers in England will be considered as part of the OfS’ regulatory assessments. The OfS is not proposing at this stage to include international students in the measures on progression to graduate employment or further study owing to the continuing difficulty in securing a high response rate in surveys for this subset of graduates.

Our HE sector is world class but, in line with the government’s manifesto commitment, we are taking serious steps with the OfS to drive up the quality of HE across the sector and to tackle the unacceptable pockets of poor-quality provision which do not offer value for money for the taxpayer or students.

Universities and colleges not meeting these minimum expectations will face investigation and consideration of whether they are in breach of their registration conditions, which could lead to sanctions, including fines and reduced access to student finance. These minimum levels are just one factor the OfS will consider. As is currently the case, and as described in the consultation document, the OfS will continue to consider a provider’s wider context, including its student characteristics, before making any final decisions on compliance with registration conditions.

This government believes that every student, regardless of background, deserves quality and transparency from their university or provider about their course. These measures are about tackling low quality, and, through the revised Teaching and Excellence Framework, rewarding high quality, and ensuring transparency which, overall, will maintain confidence in our HE sector.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what proportion, of international students have chosen to stay in the UK after their studies in each of the last 10 years; and what was the breakdown of students by nationality for each year.

The department publishes data about international graduates from English higher education (HE) providers and colleges who remain in the UK for employment or study one, three, five and ten years after graduating from a first degree in its annual Graduate Outcomes (LEO)[1] publication. Latest available data for international first degree graduates refer to outcomes in the 2018-19 financial year and are published in Table 45 here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo/2018-19.

Table 1 in the attached spreadsheet summarises the outcomes of international first degree graduates from English HE providers and colleges one year after graduation for the past five tax years. Data is only published for financial year 2014-15 onwards.

The department also publishes employment outcomes and earnings for international postgraduates from English HE institutions in the LEO: Postgraduate outcomes[2] publication. Table 2 in the attached spreadsheet summarises the outcomes of international level 7 (taught and research) and level 8 postgraduates of English HE institutions, one year after graduation for the past five tax years. Data is only published for financial year 2014-15 onwards.

In the attachment, minor methodological adjustments were made to the published LEO percentage outcome calculations so that graduates in sustained employment, further study or both in the UK are given as a proportion of all graduates (published LEO calculations exclude those identified by the Department for Work and Pensions records as overseas from the denominator).

The publications also include breakdowns of graduates by country but focus on the 20 countries with the highest number of graduates in the 2016/17 academic year. These are available in Table 53 and Table 25 of the respective publications.

Another important data source that measures the outcomes of graduates from the UK HE system is the Higher Education Statistics Agency’s Graduate Outcomes survey. This includes supplementary information about graduate outcomes, such as details of their employment destinations. Further information about the survey is available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/graduates.

[1] https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo/2018-19.

[2] https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo-postgraduate-outcomes.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the employment outcomes of international students who have completed their higher education studies at UK institutions.

The department publishes data about international graduates from English higher education providers and colleges who remain in the UK for employment or study one, three, five and ten years after graduating from a first degree in its annual Graduate Outcomes (LEO) publication. Latest available data refer to outcomes in the 2018-19 tax year and are published here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo/2018-19.

The department also publishes employment outcomes and earnings for international postgraduates from English higher education institutions in the Graduate Outcomes (LEO): Postgraduate outcomes publication. Latest available data refer to outcomes in the 2018-19 tax year and are published here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/graduate-outcomes-leo-postgraduate-outcomes.

Another important data source that measures the outcomes of graduates from the UK higher education system is the Higher Education Statistics Agency’s Graduate Outcomes survey. This data gives a more rounded picture of graduate destinations than LEO data as it includes those employed or studying overseas. Further information about that survey is available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/graduates.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to update their target of hosting at least 600,000 international students in the UK, and (2) to increase the value of education exports to £35 billion per year by 2030.

As set out in the government’s International Education Strategy, we are committed to growing the value of education exports with two key ambitions to achieve by 2030: increasing education exports to £35 billion per year, and hosting at least 600,000 international higher education students in the UK per year.

We are making good progress against these ambitions. In 2019, total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity was estimated to be £25.2 billion, an increase of 8.1% since 2018 in current prices. The ambition for international students was met for the first time in the academic year 2020/21 with 605,130 international students studying in the UK.

Promoting and sustaining the growth of education exports and international student numbers remains a priority for this government. We have committed to review progress regularly against the strategy and we will keep the strategy and its ambitions under review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Higher Education Statistics Agency data published on 25 January showing that their International Education Strategy target to increase the number of international higher education students in the UK to 600,000 per year has been met a decade ahead of schedule, what assessment they have made of the level of their global ambitions for the UK education sector.

As set out in the government’s International Education Strategy, we are committed to growing the value of education exports with two key ambitions to achieve by 2030: increasing education exports to £35 billion per year, and hosting at least 600,000 international higher education students in the UK per year.

We are making good progress against these ambitions. In 2019, total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity was estimated to be £25.2 billion, an increase of 8.1% since 2018 in current prices. The ambition for international students was met for the first time in the academic year 2020/21 with 605,130 international students studying in the UK.

Promoting and sustaining the growth of education exports and international student numbers remains a priority for this government. We have committed to review progress regularly against the strategy and we will keep the strategy and its ambitions under review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what their planned allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) will be for (1) the next year they can be sought, and (2) each of the next five years.

The Home Office continues to welcome international students and we place no limit on their numbers.

In February 2021, the UK Government published an update to the International Education Strategy, recommitting to the ambitions to sustainably increase international students in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

New sponsors can apply for an allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) of up to 50 percent of their current student body. Subsequent annual requests can be made for up to a 50 percent increase on a CAS allocation for sponsors who have assigned more than 50 CAS in the previous year.

There is no upper limit on the number of CAS which can be allocated across the system, or the number of providers able to gain a sponsor licence. Sponsors are able to submit additional in-year requests on an exceptional basis and there are no limits on the total number of CAS to be allocated in any given year. These requirements are set out in the published Student Sponsor guidance.

In the case of R (on the application of New London College Limited) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) the Supreme Court found the general principle of mandatory requirements for sponsors and actions they must take to maintain a licence were ruled to be lawful and derived from the authority of the Immigration Act 1971, which would include requirements on the numbers of CAS allocated to sponsors.

Data on CAS allocations for specific institutions is not currently published. However, we do produce data at detailed sponsorship dataset which breaks down the numbers of CAS used by types of educational institution.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many sponsoring institutions have unsuccessfully requested increases to their Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) allocations.

The Home Office continues to welcome international students and we place no limit on their numbers.

In February 2021, the UK Government published an update to the International Education Strategy, recommitting to the ambitions to sustainably increase international students in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

New sponsors can apply for an allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) of up to 50 percent of their current student body. Subsequent annual requests can be made for up to a 50 percent increase on a CAS allocation for sponsors who have assigned more than 50 CAS in the previous year.

There is no upper limit on the number of CAS which can be allocated across the system, or the number of providers able to gain a sponsor licence. Sponsors are able to submit additional in-year requests on an exceptional basis and there are no limits on the total number of CAS to be allocated in any given year. These requirements are set out in the published Student Sponsor guidance.

In the case of R (on the application of New London College Limited) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) the Supreme Court found the general principle of mandatory requirements for sponsors and actions they must take to maintain a licence were ruled to be lawful and derived from the authority of the Immigration Act 1971, which would include requirements on the numbers of CAS allocated to sponsors.

Data on CAS allocations for specific institutions is not currently published. However, we do produce data at detailed sponsorship dataset which breaks down the numbers of CAS used by types of educational institution.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies issued were unassigned (1) by institution, and (2) in total, in each of the last five years.

The Home Office continues to welcome international students and we place no limit on their numbers.

In February 2021, the UK Government published an update to the International Education Strategy, recommitting to the ambitions to sustainably increase international students in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

New sponsors can apply for an allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) of up to 50 percent of their current student body. Subsequent annual requests can be made for up to a 50 percent increase on a CAS allocation for sponsors who have assigned more than 50 CAS in the previous year.

There is no upper limit on the number of CAS which can be allocated across the system, or the number of providers able to gain a sponsor licence. Sponsors are able to submit additional in-year requests on an exceptional basis and there are no limits on the total number of CAS to be allocated in any given year. These requirements are set out in the published Student Sponsor guidance.

In the case of R (on the application of New London College Limited) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) the Supreme Court found the general principle of mandatory requirements for sponsors and actions they must take to maintain a licence were ruled to be lawful and derived from the authority of the Immigration Act 1971, which would include requirements on the numbers of CAS allocated to sponsors.

Data on CAS allocations for specific institutions is not currently published. However, we do produce data at detailed sponsorship dataset which breaks down the numbers of CAS used by types of educational institution.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) allocations were given to holders of student sponsor licences (1) by institution, and (2) in total, in each of the last five years.

The Home Office continues to welcome international students and we place no limit on their numbers.

In February 2021, the UK Government published an update to the International Education Strategy, recommitting to the ambitions to sustainably increase international students in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

New sponsors can apply for an allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) of up to 50 percent of their current student body. Subsequent annual requests can be made for up to a 50 percent increase on a CAS allocation for sponsors who have assigned more than 50 CAS in the previous year.

There is no upper limit on the number of CAS which can be allocated across the system, or the number of providers able to gain a sponsor licence. Sponsors are able to submit additional in-year requests on an exceptional basis and there are no limits on the total number of CAS to be allocated in any given year. These requirements are set out in the published Student Sponsor guidance.

In the case of R (on the application of New London College Limited) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) the Supreme Court found the general principle of mandatory requirements for sponsors and actions they must take to maintain a licence were ruled to be lawful and derived from the authority of the Immigration Act 1971, which would include requirements on the numbers of CAS allocated to sponsors.

Data on CAS allocations for specific institutions is not currently published. However, we do produce data at detailed sponsorship dataset which breaks down the numbers of CAS used by types of educational institution.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the legal basis for the imposition of limits on the numbers of Confirmations of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) allocations to individual institutions seeking to admit international students.

The Home Office continues to welcome international students and we place no limit on their numbers.

In February 2021, the UK Government published an update to the International Education Strategy, recommitting to the ambitions to sustainably increase international students in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

New sponsors can apply for an allocation of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) of up to 50 percent of their current student body. Subsequent annual requests can be made for up to a 50 percent increase on a CAS allocation for sponsors who have assigned more than 50 CAS in the previous year.

There is no upper limit on the number of CAS which can be allocated across the system, or the number of providers able to gain a sponsor licence. Sponsors are able to submit additional in-year requests on an exceptional basis and there are no limits on the total number of CAS to be allocated in any given year. These requirements are set out in the published Student Sponsor guidance.

In the case of R (on the application of New London College Limited) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) the Supreme Court found the general principle of mandatory requirements for sponsors and actions they must take to maintain a licence were ruled to be lawful and derived from the authority of the Immigration Act 1971, which would include requirements on the numbers of CAS allocated to sponsors.

Data on CAS allocations for specific institutions is not currently published. However, we do produce data at detailed sponsorship dataset which breaks down the numbers of CAS used by types of educational institution.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to assist universities in identifying (1) where in-country recruitment agents are failing to detect fraud, or (2) where agents are themselves engaged in malpractices, by publishing visa refusal rates by recruitment agent.

The Government wishes to attract international students to study in the UK as they enhance our educational institutions both financially and culturally.

The Student Route has robust safeguards to prevent the types of historic immigration abuse seen a decade ago on the previous Tier 4 route, with international students now being a highly compliant cohort.

UKVI decision-makers can carry out verification checks on documents submitted with an application and may interview applicants to assess their credibility and intentions. Anyone who has used false documents, misrepresented their personal circumstances or practiced deception by any other means, will have their application refused and may face a ban on making further applications for up to 10 years.

All policy, including around financial and credibility requirements, is kept under review. UKVI also carry out a range of activities to assist sponsors in maintaining the integrity of the route, allowing them to identify possible risks and establish best practice.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of whether elements of Canada's Student Direct Scheme, including proof of funds and deposit requirements, would improve the integrity of the UK visa system for international students.

The Government wishes to attract international students to study in the UK as they enhance our educational institutions both financially and culturally.

The Student Route has robust safeguards to prevent the types of historic immigration abuse seen a decade ago on the previous Tier 4 route, with international students now being a highly compliant cohort.

UKVI decision-makers can carry out verification checks on documents submitted with an application and may interview applicants to assess their credibility and intentions. Anyone who has used false documents, misrepresented their personal circumstances or practiced deception by any other means, will have their application refused and may face a ban on making further applications for up to 10 years.

All policy, including around financial and credibility requirements, is kept under review. UKVI also carry out a range of activities to assist sponsors in maintaining the integrity of the route, allowing them to identify possible risks and establish best practice.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the rates of fraud relating to the demonstration of proof of funds in international student visa applications, and (2) of the reported prevalence of fraudulent practices by rogue agents providing funds on a short-term basis, in order to assist students to meet the finance expectations and recycling the same funding to assist multiple students.

The Government wishes to attract international students to study in the UK as they enhance our educational institutions both financially and culturally.

The Student Route has robust safeguards to prevent the types of historic immigration abuse seen a decade ago on the previous Tier 4 route, with international students now being a highly compliant cohort.

UKVI decision-makers can carry out verification checks on documents submitted with an application and may interview applicants to assess their credibility and intentions. Anyone who has used false documents, misrepresented their personal circumstances or practiced deception by any other means, will have their application refused and may face a ban on making further applications for up to 10 years.

All policy, including around financial and credibility requirements, is kept under review. UKVI also carry out a range of activities to assist sponsors in maintaining the integrity of the route, allowing them to identify possible risks and establish best practice.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)