Lord Aberdare Portrait

Lord Aberdare

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

EU Internal Market Sub-Committee
23rd Jun 2015 - 2nd Jul 2019
Information Committee (Lords)
16th May 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Digital Skills
12th Jun 2014 - 4th Feb 2015


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye
One of 21 Crossbench Aye votes vs 3 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Friday 22nd October 2021
Assisted Dying Bill [HL]

My Lords, I support the Bill, above all as a matter of choice. I congratulate my noble friend Lady Meacher …

Written Answers
Monday 19th July 2021
Training: Finance
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that independent training providers have access to funding …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Aberdare has voted in 178 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(13 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(8 debate interactions)
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Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Aberdare, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Aberdare has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Aberdare has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Aberdare has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Aberdare has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


47 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the provision of services into the EU by UK citizens living in (1) EU, (2) EEA and (3) EFTA, countries; and what steps they intend to take to reduce or offset that impact.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and the UK free trade agreement with the EEA-EFTA states, provide for a wide variety of obligations regarding the treatment by one Party of investors, services suppliers and natural persons of the other Party. Some of these provisions may be affected by the place of residence of the natural person in question, and the legal position will depend on the details of each specific case. UK citizens will need to check whether and how the provisions apply to them.

Government routinely publishes a wide range of analysis on the UK economy. Other bodies, such as the Office for Budget Responsibility, also regularly publish economic analysis on the impact of the UK's trade deal with the EU.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the terms of the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the provision of services into the European Union apply equally to UK citizens living in (1) EU, (2) EEA and (3) EFTA, countries, so that they can provide services outside their host state.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and the UK free trade agreement with the EEA-EFTA states, provide for a wide variety of obligations regarding the treatment by one Party of investors, services suppliers and natural persons of the other Party. Some of these provisions may be affected by the place of residence of the natural person in question, and the legal position will depend on the details of each specific case. UK citizens will need to check whether and how the provisions apply to them.

Government routinely publishes a wide range of analysis on the UK economy. Other bodies, such as the Office for Budget Responsibility, also regularly publish economic analysis on the impact of the UK's trade deal with the EU.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to monitor (1) adoption of, and (2) compliance with, the Construction Playbook by (a) departments, and (b) their arm’s-length bodies.

The Construction Playbook, published in December 2020, includes 14 key policy reforms which will help government and industry work better together to deliver quality public works and value for money. It applies to all central government departments and their ALBs on a ‘comply or explain’ basis and we have strengthened approvals processes, including Cabinet Office controls for projects over £10m total value and the Treasury approvals process, to ensure compliance.

We recognise that this will be a journey and adoption will be demonstrated through ‘faster, better, greener’ public works achieved by a greater proportion of projects applying the Playbook over time and support will be provided to departments and ALBs to embed the Construction Playbook into their public works projects and programmes.

We are committed to annually reviewing the content of the Construction Playbook including working to facilitate prompt, fair and effective payment practices throughout the supply chain. The use of Project Bank Accounts is required unless there are compelling reasons not to do so and the Prompt Payment Measure allows contracting authorities to exclude suppliers on the basis of poor payment performance. At this time we do not have any plans to provide additional guidance on cash retentions specifically.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to add any guidance on retentions to the Construction Playbook when it is next reviewed.

The Construction Playbook, published in December 2020, includes 14 key policy reforms which will help government and industry work better together to deliver quality public works and value for money. It applies to all central government departments and their ALBs on a ‘comply or explain’ basis and we have strengthened approvals processes, including Cabinet Office controls for projects over £10m total value and the Treasury approvals process, to ensure compliance.

We recognise that this will be a journey and adoption will be demonstrated through ‘faster, better, greener’ public works achieved by a greater proportion of projects applying the Playbook over time and support will be provided to departments and ALBs to embed the Construction Playbook into their public works projects and programmes.

We are committed to annually reviewing the content of the Construction Playbook including working to facilitate prompt, fair and effective payment practices throughout the supply chain. The use of Project Bank Accounts is required unless there are compelling reasons not to do so and the Prompt Payment Measure allows contracting authorities to exclude suppliers on the basis of poor payment performance. At this time we do not have any plans to provide additional guidance on cash retentions specifically.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which government construction procurers comply with Regulation 113 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 which gives public sector bodies a statutory duty to ensure that 30-day payment clauses are inserted in all sub-contracts and sub-sub-contracts.

This information is not held centrally. Individual contracting authorities are responsible for complying with Regulation 113 of the Public Contract Regulations 2015 on relevant procurements. Businesses are encouraged to report instances of late or unfair payment in public sector contracts to the Public Procurement Review Service.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) construction, and (2) maintenance, contracts issued by departments since 1 January 2018 have used cash retentions; what was the total value of these retentions; how many of these retention monies have been released; and how long on average it took to release these monies.

Information is not collected on the use of cash retentions in construction and maintenance contracts for Central Government.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they provide to (1) departments, and (2) their respective arms-length bodies, regarding the use of cash retentions in (a) construction, and (b) maintenance projects.

Guidance is not provided to departments and arms-length bodies, regarding the use of cash retentions in construction and maintenance projects.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the use of cash retentions by local authorities in (1) construction, and (2) maintenance, contracts; and what data they hold on the use of such retentions since 1 January 2018.

No assessment has been made of the use of cash retentions by local authorities in construction and maintenance contracts, and the Department does not hold this data.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they give to local authorities regarding the use of cash retentions in (1) construction, and (2) maintenance, projects.

Guidance is not provided to local authorities regarding the use of cash retentions in construction and maintenance. Local authorities are independent of government, and it is for them to decide whether or not to hold cash retentions in relation to the projects they fund.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on putting in place reciprocal arrangements allowing exemptions from visa requirements for UK citizens to perform short-term paid work in EU countries in return for similar exemptions for EU citizens coming to the UK.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) already includes measures for short-term business visitors, who can perform a list of 11 activities without requiring a work-permit, subject to a limited number of Member State reservations. EU Member States may allow more activities without a work-permit than those specified in the agreement. This will vary country to country.

Visa-free travel is not usually part of Free Trade Agreements, although the UK and EU both allow visa-free visits in their domestic laws. EU nationals can visit the UK for up to 6 months and perform a wide range of business activities (which can be found under the ‘Permitted Activities’ of the Immigration Rules). UK nationals can visit the EU for 90 days in every 180 days and also perform a range of visitor activities, although these will vary from Member State to Member State.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to initiate formal bilateral talks with any EU member states on reciprocal arrangements for touring musicians during this calendar year.

This Government recognises the importance of touring for UK cultural professionals and understands that the cultural and creative sectors rely on the ability to move people across borders quickly, simply, and with minimal cost and administration.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are more generous than many EU Member States. Our door is open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position, and it is within Member States’ gift to match our arrangements..

We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, to look at the issues and options, such as working with bilateral partners in Europe, to help the sectors resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of providing financial support to music exporters looking to export to the EU.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK music sector and the rich breadth of musical talent across the UK. According to UK Music’s 2020 report, the sector contributed £5.8bn GVA to the UK economy in 2019 and generated £2.9bn in export revenue.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how creative professionals operate in the EU. UK musicians are, of course, still able to tour and perform in the EU. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes. We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, to look at the issues and options to help the sectors resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so.

The UK music industry continues to benefit from the Department for International Trade’s Music Export Growth Scheme (MEGS) which has been running since 2014. Over 280 small and medium-sized music businesses from across the UK have received grants through the scheme to support marketing and promotional activities to help them grow their international business. The government also funds The International Showcase Fund, which is administered by PRS Foundation and awards grants to enable music artists and creators to perform at key music showcase events and conferences around the world.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the accessibility of commercial COVID-19 cancellation insurance for live events.

The Government is aware of the concerns which have been raised about the challenge of securing indemnity cover for live events. My officials continue to work closely with the affected sectors to understand all barriers to reopening, including potential challenges around indemnity cover.

For instance, DCMS has established a sector-led sub-group for Outdoor Events and Festivals. The sub-group, chaired by industry, has developed draft planning guidance for how music festivals may be able to take place in the future, and adapt to the latest regulations and guidance, with input from Public Health England (PHE) and DCMS. There is also a dedicated Indoor Venues Steering Group, similarly tasked and composed of industry representatives, PHE and DCMS officials.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the decision not to offer a Government-backed reinsurance scheme on the number of live music events that will go ahead in the summer.

We are aware of the concerns which have been raised about the challenge of securing indemnity for live events. Department officials have been working closely with the affected sectors to understand the challenges and to keep the situation under review.

Understandably, the bar for considering government intervention is set extremely high, especially in light of recent announcements including the considerable extension to the furlough scheme and local business support. My officials are continuing to collect evidence of all of the barriers live events are facing to reopening. There are a number of factors which influence the viability of music festivals, and indemnity insurance is only one aspect of this.

We are keeping the situation under review and working closely with Her Majesty’s Treasury on this issue to determine the appropriate and most effective response for the sector within the public health context.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on the mutual recognition of professional qualifications; and what plans they have to ensure that UK Mountain Professionals will benefit from Mutual Recognition Agreements.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) provides a framework under which the UK and the EU may agree Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on the recognition of professional qualification covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition for their professional qualifications within EU Member States.

Arrangements are implemented on a profession-by-profession basis and depend upon reciprocal cooperation from both the UK and EU Member States. The framework enables UK and EU professional bodies or authorities to make recommendations on MRAs to the Partnership Council.  Once an arrangement has been adopted, a professional qualified in the UK (e.g. an engineer) will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their qualifications within an EU Member State.

The Government continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

The government will provide help and guidance to UK regulatory authorities and professional bodies to help them benefit from these provisions as well as other recognition paths. Where visas apply, our agreement with the EU contains measures that will help ensure processes are as prompt and smooth as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on (1) the activities, and (2) the livelihoods, of UK professional international mountain leaders, and in particular those whose mountain tours pass through several EU countries.

The Withdrawal Agreement protects UK nationals who live or are a frontier worker in an EU Member State at the end of the Transition Period. Those who have had a professional qualification recognised under the EU legislation listed in the Withdrawal Agreement will keep the right to practise the profession in the Member State in which they live or work. This includes many professions in scope of the Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive such as engineering and accounting.

As of 1 January 2021, UK-qualified professionals who wish to supply services in the EU should seek recognition for their qualifications using the national rules in EU Member States. Professionals should check the European Commission’s Regulated Professions Database to find out if their profession is regulated in the state in which they are seeking to work. They should then contact the single point of contact for that country to find out how to get their professional qualification recognised. Alternatively, they can seek advice from the UK Centre for Professional Qualifications (UK NARIC) to find out which regulatory or professional body they should contact.

The UK-EU TCA provides a framework under which the UK and the EU may agree Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) on the recognition of professional qualification covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition for their professional qualifications within EU Member States.

Arrangements are implemented on a profession-by-profession basis and depend upon reciprocal cooperation from both the UK and EU Member States. The framework enables UK and EU professional bodies or authorities to make recommendations on MRAs to the Partnership Council.  Once an arrangement has been adopted, a professional qualified in the UK (e.g. an engineer) will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their qualifications within an EU Member State.

The Government continues to engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector to hear their priorities for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Officials are currently engaging with the tourism trade bodies, including the British Association of International Mountain Leaders (BAIML) to gather feedback on priority regulators and qualifications for the tourism sector.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of workers who have left (1) the music, (2) the performing arts, and (3) the creative, sector since March.

We recognise that businesses and workers in the creative industries have been severely impacted by Covid-19.

The Government has not made an assessment of the number of workers who have left the music, performing arts and creative sector since March. We have worked closely with music and cultural sector representative bodies to maximise the survival of businesses and employee retention in the sector, through the extensive range of support the Government has provided to businesses and the self-employed.

We are committed to continuing to work with the music and cultural sectors to understand the difficulties they face and help them access support through these challenging times and through recovery.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to assess the effect of the introduction of Tier 2 and Tier 3 COVID-19 measures on (1) live music venues, (2) theatres, and (3) other live performance venues.

Since Thursday 5 November, new national restrictions have been in force in England to control the spread of coronavirus and to limit contacts between households.

During this period, performing arts venues such as theatres, concert halls (including grassroots music venues) and entertainment venues can continue to operate under Stages 1 and 2 of the performing arts roadmap. This means performing arts professionals may continue to rehearse and train, and perform for broadcast or recording purposes. Other than for this purpose, these venues must close.

We have always said that further reopening of the performing arts sector would be dependent on the public health context at the time. DCMS has convened a Venues Steering Group which includes representatives from leading sector organisations as well as Public Health England and other experts to develop an action plan for maximizing activity under Stages 3 and 4, when it is permitted again, and for how we safely proceed to Stage 5 of the roadmap. DCMS will continue to work with these sectors to establish an appropriate pilot process for testing the return to stage 5 activity when appropriate and are working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care on the Government Mass Testing Programme.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken (1) to support live music venues to operate in a COVID-19 secure manner, and (2) to propagate best practice in that industry.

The Performing Arts guidance was developed in collaboration with the live events sectors to help venues put on live events in a covid secure manner.

The Secretary of State announced an unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the cultural sector which will benefit the music sector by providing support to venues and many other cultural organisations to stay open and continue operating. So far, over £500 million has been announced from the Culture Recovery Fund for over 2,000 cultural organisations across England, almost a fifth of which has, so far, gone to the music sector. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations including venues, festivals and theatres.

As part of this, £3.36 million was shared between 136 grassroots music venues across England which had successfully applied for emergency support in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. These emergency grants of up to £80,000 enabled venues to cover ongoing running costs incurred during closure, such as rent and utilities but also allowed them the chance to adapt to become covid secure for socially distanced live audiences when permitted.

In order to propagate best practice across the industry, the Entertainment and Events Working Group gathers key industry bodies to help produce detailed guidance and ensure that the latest updates to that guidance are shared with their sectors.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of how successful the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme have been in retaining workers in (1) the creative, and (2) the music, sector.

No estimate is available currently for the impact of Self-Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS) and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) on creative and music sector workers specifically.

As of 31 July, a total of 2.6 million people have claimed a SEISS grant with the value of these claims totalling £7.6 billion. More than two thirds of cultural freelancers received support through SEISS.

9.6 million employments have been furloughed through CJRS for at least part of the period between March to June. These claims have been made by 1.16 million employers, with 61% of eligible employers claiming.

We recognise that the music and creative sectors has been severely impacted by Covid-19. We continue to meet with stakeholders to discuss the challenges facing the industry.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimates they have made of (1) job losses, and (2) business closures, in (a) live music venues, (b) the live music supply chain, and (c) the music sector as a whole, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

No estimate is available currently for this but we are continuing to meet with live music stakeholders to understand the specific impacts that Covid is having on the whole industry.

The Chancellor has announced the Winter Economy Plan to protect jobs and support businesses over the coming months, once the existing SEISS and CJRS come to end. From November, the Jobs Support Scheme will provide further support to returning workers, while the extended Self-Employed Income Support Scheme will aid the self-employed who are currently actively trading but are facing reduced demand.

In addition, the Secretary of State provided a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This support package will benefit the live music sector by providing support to venues and many other organisations to stay open and continue operating.

As part of this support package, £3.36 million has been shared among 136 venues across England who applied for the Emergency Grassroot Music Venues Fund. This funding has supported grassroots venues to survive the imminent risk of collapse caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the proportion of live music venues in England that have re-opened under stage 4 of the phased return to professional performing arts.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to the live music sector.

No estimate is available currently for this but we are continuing to meet with live music stakeholders to provide support and guidance for venues to re-open and stage live events.

As part of the Government’s 5 stage roadmap to get performing arts and live entertainment sectors back up and running as soon as possible, venues and organisations are able to put on live performances in front of a socially-distanced audience in line with the latest Covid secure guidance.

We recognise that the live music industry and its supply chain has been severely impacted by Covid-19. We continue to meet with the stakeholders to discuss the specific issues facing the industry.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the proportion of live music performances taking place in England in September 2020 in comparison to the same period last year.

We appreciate that the Covid-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge to the live music sector.

No estimate is currently available. However, through our ongoing dialogues with industry, we are aware that there are significantly fewer events taking place when compared to the same period last year.

As part of the Government’s 5 stage roadmap to get performing arts and live entertainment sectors back up and running as soon as possible, venues and organisations are able to put on live performances in front of a socially-distanced audience in line with the latest Covid secure guidance.

We recognise that the live music industry and its supply chain has been severely impacted by Covid-19. We continue to meet with the stakeholders to discuss the specific issues facing the industry.


Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to announce sector specific support for the commercial arts sector.

On 5 July, DCMS announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, including performing arts and theatres, museums and galleries, heritage sites, live music venues and independent cinema.

We want this package to support organisations across the cultural, heritage and creative sectors, and will publish further detailed guidance as soon as possible in July.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) theatres, (2) live music venues, (3) concert halls, and (4) arenas, about the average capacity needed to make a profit.

As part of continued engagement with our sectors, DCMS Ministers, and officials have spoken to many organisations in the arts and culture sectors directly, as well as arms-length bodies and sector representatives.

Through this engagement we know that the capacity needed to make a profit varies not just between the sub-sectors, but also between individual organisations and on an even more granular level, what those organisations programme. These considerations, as well as costs relating to staffing, fixed costs, maintenance, production costs, and loans, also impact upon the size of the possible finance gap an organisation may have when considering when and whether to reopen.

Following the establishment of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce, on 23 June the Prime Minister announced that from 4 July theatres will be permitted to reopen for rehearsal, pre-production and broadcast, although not yet for live performance with an audience. Alongside the work that we are doing with representatives of the entertainment and events industry to develop supporting guidance, this represents the first steps in the roadmap to recovery for our nations’ theatres.

The Government remains committed to supporting the cultural sector through this pandemic and getting the curtain up at venues for live performances across the country as soon as it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment, if any, they have made of the proportion of (1) theatres, (2) live music venues, (3) concert halls, and (4) arenas, for which it would be more expensive to open under social distancing restrictions than to remain closed.

As part of continued engagement with our sectors, DCMS Ministers, and officials have spoken to many organisations in the arts and culture sectors directly, as well as arms-length bodies and sector representatives.

Through this engagement we know that the capacity needed to make a profit varies not just between the sub-sectors, but also between individual organisations and on an even more granular level, what those organisations programme. These considerations, as well as costs relating to staffing, fixed costs, maintenance, production costs, and loans, also impact upon the size of the possible finance gap an organisation may have when considering when and whether to reopen.

Following the establishment of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce, on 23 June the Prime Minister announced that from 4 July theatres will be permitted to reopen for rehearsal, pre-production and broadcast, although not yet for live performance with an audience. Alongside the work that we are doing with representatives of the entertainment and events industry to develop supporting guidance, this represents the first steps in the roadmap to recovery for our nations’ theatres.

The Government remains committed to supporting the cultural sector through this pandemic and getting the curtain up at venues for live performances across the country as soon as it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they estimate live arts performances to resume (1) with, and (2) without, social distancing restrictions.

As part of continued engagement with our sectors, DCMS Ministers, and officials have spoken to many organisations in the arts and culture sectors directly, as well as arms-length bodies and sector representatives.

Through this engagement we know that the capacity needed to make a profit varies not just between the sub-sectors, but also between individual organisations and on an even more granular level, what those organisations programme. These considerations, as well as costs relating to staffing, fixed costs, maintenance, production costs, and loans, also impact upon the size of the possible finance gap an organisation may have when considering when and whether to reopen.

Following the establishment of the Cultural Renewal Taskforce, on 23 June the Prime Minister announced that from 4 July theatres will be permitted to reopen for rehearsal, pre-production and broadcast, although not yet for live performance with an audience. Alongside the work that we are doing with representatives of the entertainment and events industry to develop supporting guidance, this represents the first steps in the roadmap to recovery for our nations’ theatres.

The Government remains committed to supporting the cultural sector through this pandemic and getting the curtain up at venues for live performances across the country as soon as it is safe to do so.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that independent training providers have access to funding on an equal basis with other adult skills providers, including colleges.

The government recognises the important role Independent Training Providers (ITPs) play in delivering adult training and skills. After changes in the law brought about by the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, it was decided to procure an element of the Adult Education Budget (AEB) openly and competitively, for contracts for services provision. ITPs can submit bids for these contracts in Education and Skills Funding Agency non-devolved areas. In areas where the AEB has been devolved, mayoral combined authorities are now responsible for the provision of AEB-funded adult education for their residents and for deciding which providers to fund.

5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve communication at a (1) local, and (2) national, level about best practices in the delivery of adult skills.

The steps being taken to improve communication at a local and national level about best practices in the delivery of adult skills were outlined in the white paper, Skills for Jobs: Lifelong Learning for Opportunity and Growth, published in January 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/skills-for-jobs-lifelong-learning-for-opportunity-and-growth.

We are trailblazing new employer-led Local Skills Improvement Plans in a small number of areas in the 2021-22 financial year. They will be created by employer representative bodies working closely with further education colleges, other providers and key local stakeholders and will set out the key changes needed in a local area to make technical skills training more responsive to employers’ skills needs. Alongside the trailblazers, we are legislating to put Local Skills Improvement Plans on a statutory footing as part of the Skills and Post-16 Education Bill.

Local Skills Improvement Plans will provide a framework to help colleges and other providers reshape what they offer, to tackle skills mismatches and ensure that they are responding as effectively as possible to labour market skills needs. We will also make development funding available in the 2021-22 financial year in a number of pilot areas to support colleges to reshape their provision to address local priorities that have been agreed with local employers.

We will reform our funding and accountability systems to better support providers in their role. To this end, The Skills for Jobs: A New Further Education Funding and Accountability System Government Consultation was published on 15 July 2021: https://consult.education.gov.uk/fe-funding/reforms-to-funding-and-accountability/. This consultation proposes a range of steps to improve communication at local and national level about effective skills delivery:

  • Specifying the outcomes we expect through a new published Performance Dashboard
  • Introducing a new skills measure that will feature in the dashboard and capture how well local and national skills needs are met
  • Exploring an enhanced role for Ofsted to inspect how well local and national skills needs are met
  • Enabling the Further Education Commissioner to enhance its existing leadership role, with a renewed focus on driving improvement and championing excellence in colleges
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the importance of independent training providers in delivering training to meet current and future skills shortages in (1) the North East, and (2) the wider UK economy.

In our Skills for Jobs White Paper, published in January 2021, we recognised the unique knowledge and capacity that independent training providers bring. They are the largest provider type delivering apprenticeships and they contribute substantially to adult education and training. In the academic year 2019 to 2020, enrolments at publicly funded private sector providers were:

- 21,700 apprentices and 15,900 adults in the North East

- 429,190 apprentices and 175,810 adults in England.

This prominence across the market is why we are legislating through the Skills and Post-16 Education Bill to place duties on independent training providers, alongside other post-16 providers, to co-operate with employer representative bodies in developing Local Skills Improvement Plans, so they can play their part in responding to the skills gaps that the plans identify.

11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the provision of practical music education in England.

The government is committed to all pupils and students receiving a high-quality education and it has continued to be the case that music education, including one-to-one lessons, can be undertaken in school, college or university so long as safety precautions are undertaken.

In relation to schools, advice has been provided in COVID-19 guidance since August 2020, setting out how teaching music can be conducted safely. This includes visits by peripatetic teachers, including music teachers from music education hubs. The hubs acted swiftly and innovatively to support schools through the COVID-19 outbreak, including the continuation of continuing professional development to classroom teachers.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, the department also introduced several initiatives for schools and parents including signposting to a range of online music education resources such as BBC Education, Oak Academy and other professional organisations such as Music Mark.

Following the announcement by my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, on 22 February 2021, the government published updated guidance for full opening of schools on 8 March. The guidance continues to make clear that the curriculum should remain broad and ambitious so that the majority of pupils are taught a full range of subjects over the year, including music. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

In addition, updated guidance for out-of-school venues, such as supplementary schools providing part-time music provision and private music tutors for under 18s, can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

20th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of apprentices in England leaving apprenticeships early during the COVID-19 pandemic as a result of (1) furlough, and (2) redundancy, broken down by industry sector.

We are committed to supporting apprentices to safely continue with, and complete, their apprenticeship programmes during the COVID-19 outbreak.

We have introduced flexibilities to enable furloughed apprentices to continue with their apprenticeship training and undertake end-point assessments wherever possible. We have also taken significant steps to support apprentices who suffer redundancy.

We launched the Redundancy Support Service for Apprentices which provides clear, accessible advice and guidance to individuals, as well as a vacancy sharing scheme to help apprentices find new opportunities with employers. Over 1,200 employers have submitted opportunities to the vacancy sharing service for redundant apprentices. We have also amended legislation to enable more apprentices to complete their apprenticeship in the event of redundancy.

Where it is not possible and practicable for the apprentice to continue training, a break in learning can be used to allow the apprentice to return to learning at a future date. Our guidance can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-apprenticeship-programme-response.

The department does not collect data on furloughed and redundant apprentices by industry sector.

From 30 July 2020, employers have been able to record on the apprenticeship service if an apprenticeship has ended due to a redundancy. Our collected data on 1 December 2020 shows that 1,360 apprenticeships have ended due to redundancy since August 2020. This figure does not include all apprenticeship redundancies as not all non-levy employers are currently using the service. Further breakdown of data can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships.

28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funding they will make available to education establishments to invest in virtual learning environments.

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the department is investing £14.3 million to fund expert technical support for schools to get set up on an accredited digital education environment. Using this funding, schools and multi academy trusts can apply to get set up on one of two free-to-use digital education environments: Google’s G Suite for Education or Microsoft’s Office 365 Education.

Further information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-technology-for-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19#get-help-using-online-education-platforms.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that apprentices, including those on higher and degree courses, will have their courses funded to completion, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We understand that apprentices, including those undertaking higher level and degree apprenticeships, may face disruption to their learning as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

We are supporting employers and training and assessment providers to make use of distance-learning tools, wherever it is possible and practicable to do so, to enable as many people as possible to continue with and complete their apprenticeships.

We recognise that some apprentices may be unable to undertake training at present and that training providers may not currently be able to deliver it. We have therefore temporarily changed the funding rules to allow employers and providers to initiate a break in learning of over 4 weeks to ensure that apprentices can promptly resume their learning when they can do so.

Funding remains available for all apprentices continuing their apprenticeships, including higher level and degree apprenticeships.

Further guidance for apprentices, employers and providers can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-apprenticeship-programme-response.

We are keeping this guidance under review and will publish updates as the situation evolves.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to provide funding to public sector training providers for the breaks in learning caused by the COVID-19 pandemic as opposed to these funds being drawn from employers' levy funding.

We are working with training providers, end-point assessment organisations and external quality assurance organisations during this challenging time to support employers and apprentices.

We are encouraging training providers to deliver training to apprentices remotely and via e-learning as far as it is practicable. Where that is not possible and a break in learning of more than 4 weeks is necessary, payments to the training provider will be suspended for the duration of the break in learning. For levy-paying employers, this means that payments from their apprenticeship service accounts will be paused. Further guidance for employers and training providers is available at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-apprenticeship-programme-response.

Where the COVID-19 outbreak results in loss of income due to ceased or reduced delivery of training, training providers should consider their eligibility and apply for the wide range of financial support that HM Treasury has announced for businesses. Full details of this substantial package of support can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19/covid-19-support-for-businesses.

9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether UK musicians will need (1) Convention on International Trade In Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora certificates, and (2) Carnets, for instruments being transported from Great Britain to Northern Ireland after 31 December.

After the Transition Period, controls implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will apply to the movement of CITES specimens between Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI). This is as a result of our international obligations under CITES, and the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol. If a musical instrument contains CITES-listed species (and is not exempted) then CITES documents will be required for movements from GB to NI after 31 December. ATA Carnets cannot be used as an alternative to CITES documentation.

However, after the Transition period, ATA Carnets will become an option for temporarily moving goods between the UK, EU and NI. Use of an ATA Carnet is optional, and it is a commercial decision as to whether it is the most cost-effective method in each specific circumstance.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to enable UK orchestras to continue to use (a) specialist UK-based hauliers, or (b) their own trucks, to transport musical instruments across multiple EU countries, and (2) to negotiate with the EU an exemption to barriers of the movement of goods for cultural purposes.

The Trade and Co-operation Agreement (TCA) between the UK and the EU allows UK hauliers to undertake up to 2 additional laden journeys, cross-trade or cabotage, within the EU after a laden international journey from the UK, with a maximum of 1 cabotage movement outside Ireland. These rules will also apply to specialist hauliers, such as hauliers who carry equipment for musicians and other performers, even when using their own truck.

Our assessment is that the TCA will allow the vast majority of haulage operations that were being undertaken by UK hauliers before the end of the transition period. However, UK operators will not be allowed to undertake more than 2 movements within the EU before returning to the UK. This issue was discussed in detail as part of negotiations, but the EU was unwilling to agree more flexible arrangements.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many pancreatic cancer surgeries have been cancelled in each month since January 2020.

The data requested on cancelled surgery is not collected centrally.

16th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in each month since January 2020; and what percentage of those diagnoses have been at Stage (1) 1, (2) 2, (3) 3, and (4) 4, respectively.

The number of diagnoses of pancreatic cancer by stage of diagnosis in 2020 is not yet available. The stage group by cancer type for diagnoses in 2020 is expected to be published in 2022.

8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Admission Temporaire Carnets will be required for portable musical instruments carried by musicians for professional purposes when travelling (1) between the UK and the EU, and (2) between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

ATA carnets are an option for moving goods temporarily between the UK and the EU; Temporary Admission is another. Whether to use an ATA carnet is generally a commercial decision based on cost effectiveness and the individual’s or business’s circumstances. A carnet is generally not necessary for musicians travelling between GB and NI or between GB and the EU with accompanied instruments (carried or taken with the individual in personal baggage or a vehicle). In this case a person can make a “declaration by conduct” which is simply the act of moving through a ‘Green Channel’ at a port or airport.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority Government Construction Strategy 2016–20, published in March 2016, whether they are on course to achieve the forecasted £1.7 billion efficiency saving predicted to be promoted through best practice in construction procurement and delivery; and how any such savings have been so far achieved.

The Government has achieved the efficiency saving set out in the Government Construction Strategy 2016-20 and at the end of March 2020 had recorded over £1.7 billion savings. This has been enabled by: improving government’s capability as a construction client; developing digital capability in design and construction; improving transparency for industry by publishing the National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline; and developing new models and approaches to procurement. It has led to efficiency savings being made through volume and margin reductions, rate discounts, de-scoping of projects and departmental reforms.

The Government has also recently published its Construction Playbook which aims to further improve how construction projects are assessed, procured and delivered.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Infrastructure & Projects Authority Government Construction Strategy 2016–20, published in March 2016, how many departments have piloted Integrated Project Insurance (IPI); and what encouragement the Infrastructure and Projects Authority has provided to government procurers to use IPI.

Through the Government’s Construction Strategy 2016-20 Integrated Project Insurance (IPI), the Trial Projects Working Group, set up by Cabinet Office, piloted IPI on Dudley College’s project to build a Centre for Advanced Building Technologies. However, when the Working Group completed its work in 2017, after four years of development, it was felt that the IPI model needed further involvement from industry before it could be adopted by Government departments. To date there has been no further trialling or adoption of the model other than an extension to the original contract.

The Government through the Crown Commercial Service (CCS) and the Infrastructure Projects Authority via commercial specialists cite the IPI model in presentations to customers and programmes and it is referenced in the CCS’s Construction Works and Associated Services Framework as one of the approaches that clients might consider when procuring construction services. It will also be offered in CCS’s new Construction Professional Services Framework, which is due to go to the market in early 2021.

The Government has also recently published its Construction Playbook to support the upskilling of Government as a client, and includes reference to IPI, which will assist departments in making procurement decisions and considering if the IPI model might be applicable.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the cost of maintaining (1) the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and (2) the Job Retention Scheme, at the current level for businesses that are unable to open as a result of restrictions in place to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

The information requested is not available.

The latest Management Information [1], which shows claims for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, was published on 22 September 2020 on GOV.UK.

This shows that by 19 July 2020 a total of £7.6 billion had been claimed for the first SEISS grant and by 20 September 2020 a total of £5.6 billion had been claimed for the second SEISS grant.

This information also shows that £39.3 billion had been claimed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme by 20 September 2020.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-coronavirus-covid-19-statistics

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether self-employed musicians from the EU coming to the UK on a regular basis can do so under Permitted Paid Engagement; and if not, what plans they have to make arrangements to facilitate such visits.

The Permitted Paid Engagement visitor route allows professionals in several sectors, including musicians, to enter the UK for up to one month to undertake permitted paid engagements, where they have been invited by a UK-based organisation and without the need to apply through the sponsored work routes.

Whilst there is no formal limit on how many times a visitor can enter the UK under this route, decision makers will consider whether any repeat use is for temporary work; the applicant’s main place of employment is overseas and they do not intend to live in the UK through frequent or successive visits.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)