Lord Bassam of Brighton Portrait

Lord Bassam of Brighton

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 3rd November 1997

Shadow Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)

(since February 2023)

Shadow Spokesperson (Science, Innovation and Technology)

(since February 2023)

Lord Bassam of Brighton is not a member of any APPGs
1 Former APPG membership
Trailer and Towing Safety
Shadow Spokesperson (Energy and Net Zero)
21st Feb 2023 - 26th Oct 2023
Shadow Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and International Trade)
15th Apr 2020 - 20th Feb 2023
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Sport)
14th May 2020 - 20th Feb 2023
Electronic Trade Documents Bill [HL] Special Public Bill Committee
12th Dec 2022 - 20th Feb 2023
Shadow Spokesperson (Further & Higher Education)
25th Mar 2019 - 17th May 2021
Sentencing (Pre-consolidation Amendments) Bill [HL] Special Public Bill Committee
20th Jun 2019 - 23rd Jul 2019
Regenerating Seaside Towns and Communities Committee
17th May 2018 - 19th Mar 2019
Procedure and Privileges Committee
7th Oct 2008 - 1st Feb 2018
Committee of Selection (Lords)
7th Oct 2008 - 1st Feb 2018
Services Committee
1st Sep 2016 - 1st Feb 2018
Committee for Privileges and Conduct (Lords)
2nd Jun 2010 - 1st Feb 2018
Shadow Chief Whip (Lords)
12th May 2010 - 24th Jan 2018
Deputy Chairman of Committees (Lords)
2nd Jun 2010 - 24th Jan 2018
Deputy Speaker (Lords)
29th Nov 2010 - 24th Jan 2018
Deputy Speaker (Lords)
18th Dec 2008 - 24th Jan 2018
Deputy Chairman of Committees (Lords)
7th Oct 2008 - 24th Jan 2018
Administration and Works Committee (Lords)
8th Jun 2015 - 31st Aug 2016
Administration and Works Committee (Lords)
16th Dec 2008 - 1st May 2012
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
5th Oct 2008 - 6th May 2010
Lords in Waiting (HM Household)
7th Jun 2001 - 5th Oct 2008


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Bassam of Brighton has voted in 360 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Bassam of Brighton Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(109 debate interactions)
Viscount Camrose (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
(56 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(49 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Dormant Assets Act 2022
(7,720 words contributed)
Trade Bill 2019-21
(4,966 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Bassam of Brighton's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Bassam of Brighton, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Bassam of Brighton has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Bassam of Brighton has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what funding they will offer to grassroots music venues, such as Brighton Concorde 2, to prevent them from closing down.

HM Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the backbone of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues across the country of all sizes. We work with the industry and across Government to improve the sector's resilience, as demonstrated through the £1.57 billion Cultural Recovery Fund during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the £18 billion Energy Bills Relief Scheme.

We will continue to engage with the sector on the impact of current pressures. As part of this engagement, the Minister for Media, Tourism and Creative Industries, Julia Lopez MP, is meeting Music Venues Trust shortly to discuss issues facing the live music sector, and further ways to support the growth of the music sector and wider creative industries.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the benefits of applying a levy on ticket sales for large music events and at large arenas for investment in grassroots music.

HM Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the backbone of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues across the country of all sizes. We work with the industry and across Government to improve the sector's resilience, as demonstrated through the £1.57 billion Cultural Recovery Fund during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the £18 billion Energy Bills Relief Scheme.

We will continue to engage with the sector on the impact of current pressures. As part of this engagement, the Minister for Media, Tourism and Creative Industries, Julia Lopez MP, is meeting Music Venues Trust shortly to discuss issues facing the live music sector, and further ways to support the growth of the music sector and wider creative industries.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to address (1) pitch invasions, and (2) fan disorder, at football stadiums in order to ensure the safety of (a) fans, and (b) footballers.

The safety of all attendees at sporting events – whether they are fans, players, coaches or officials – is of the highest importance.

The Sports Minister, the Rt Hon Stuart Andrew MP, recently convened a round-table meeting with representatives from the football authorities to discuss issues relating to fan disorder at football matches, and the actions that all parties can continue to take. We will continue to work closely with the relevant authorities to ensure that all spectators and players can continue to enjoy football safely.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what representations they have received concerning the Governing Body Endorsements regulations; and what plans they have to review the current arrangements.

The Governing Body Endorsement process is led by the Home Office. Regular reviews are a common and integral part of it.

The Government has committed to a review of the efficiency of the existing visa system for English football in attracting the best global talent while maintaining strong support for young domestic players to develop from the grassroots level. The scope of the review will include the Governing Body Endorsement criteria for English football.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many cases have been brought to court relating to charges made at England Euro 2020 matches played at Wembley.

No central data is kept that would identify how many cases have been brought to court specifically relating to charges made at England Euro 2020 matches. To obtain this information would require a manual review of CPS case files which would come at a disproportionate cost.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, over the past 12 months, how many individual devices issued by government departments have been identified as containing malware.

The government does not comment on issues concerning national security.

The Government Cyber Security Strategy, published in January 2022, sets out how we will build and maintain our cyber defences. The strategy outlines how departments must be able to minimise the impact when malware is found.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many (1) successful, and (2) unsuccessful, cyberattacks have been identified in each government department over the past 12 months.

The government does not comment on issues concerning national security.

The Government Cyber Security Strategy, published in January 2022, sets out how we will build and maintain our cyber defences. A key objective of the strategy covers how the Government will minimise the impact of cyber security incidents. Departments will need to prepare for incidents, be able to respond and contain when they inevitably do happen and learn the lessons from them after the event.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the monthly expenditure for hospitality, entertainment, and related purposes, at No 10 Downing Street for the period from March 2020 to December 2021.

10 Downing Street is a constituent part of the Cabinet Office. The Cabinet Office publishes transparency data by type of expenditure each month. I will place in the Library the published data for that period.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many bottles of wine were purchased for hospitality, entertainment, and related purposes, for consumption at No 10 Downing Street for the period from March 2020 and December 2021.

10 Downing Street is a constituent part of the Cabinet Office. The Cabinet Office publishes transparency data by type of expenditure each month. I will place in the Library the published data for that period.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they amended the guidance on responding to parliamentary questions to take account of the use of external contractors in preparing and drafting responses.

Departments are responsible for their responses to written parliamentary questions. Written parliamentary questions receive final sign off from Ministers.

The Cabinet Office has produced guidance for civil servants on drafting answers to parliamentary questions. This can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drafting-answers-to-parliamentary-questions-guidance.

Civil servants and Ministers conduct these duties in line with their respective codes of conduct.

The Department of Health and Social Care has outlined that the department’s contract included a general clause for Deloitte to provide support to civil servants in responding to written questions, freedom of information requests and media queries. They have not been directly responsible for drafting replies.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of written answers to questions tabled by members of both Houses of Parliament were drafted by external contractors in the current parliamentary session.

Departments are responsible for their responses to written parliamentary questions. Written parliamentary questions receive final sign off from Ministers.

The Cabinet Office has produced guidance for civil servants on drafting answers to parliamentary questions. This can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drafting-answers-to-parliamentary-questions-guidance.

Civil servants and Ministers conduct these duties in line with their respective codes of conduct.

The Department of Health and Social Care has outlined that the department’s contract included a general clause for Deloitte to provide support to civil servants in responding to written questions, freedom of information requests and media queries. They have not been directly responsible for drafting replies.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which departments use external contractors to prepare responses to questions tabled by members of the House of Lords and Members of Parliament; and, in each case, how often such contractors are used.

Departments are responsible for their responses to written parliamentary questions. Written parliamentary questions receive final sign off from Ministers.

The Cabinet Office has produced guidance for civil servants on drafting answers to parliamentary questions. This can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drafting-answers-to-parliamentary-questions-guidance.

Civil servants and Ministers conduct these duties in line with their respective codes of conduct.

The Department of Health and Social Care has outlined that the department’s contract included a general clause for Deloitte to provide support to civil servants in responding to written questions, freedom of information requests and media queries. They have not been directly responsible for drafting replies.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
23rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date the Prime Minister was first briefed by officials on the potential threats posed by COVID-19 to the UK economy.

The Prime Minister and Cabinet have been regularly briefed on COVID-19 since the outbreak of the virus. These briefings have included assessments of the potential impacts to the UK economy and public health. These issues have also regularly been discussed at meetings of the COBR Committee. Additionally, since 16 March, a series of Cabinet Committees have convened to support the Government’s efforts.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
23rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date the Cabinet was first briefed about the threats posed to public health and the economy by COVID-19.

The Prime Minister and Cabinet have been regularly briefed on COVID-19 since the outbreak of the virus. These briefings have included assessments of the potential impacts to the UK economy and public health. These issues have also regularly been discussed at meetings of the COBR Committee. Additionally, since 16 March, a series of Cabinet Committees have convened to support the Government’s efforts.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
23rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date the Prime Minister was first briefed by officials about COVID-19 and its potential impact on public health.

The Prime Minister and Cabinet have been regularly briefed on COVID-19 since the outbreak of the virus. These briefings have included assessments of the potential impacts to the UK economy and public health. These issues have also regularly been discussed at meetings of the COBR Committee. Additionally, since 16 March, a series of Cabinet Committees have convened to support the Government’s efforts.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish a report at the conclusion of their inquiry into allegations of bullying by the Home Secretary.

I refer the noble Lord to my answer on 12th March 2020 to Lord Young of Cookham (Official Record, House Of Lords,Vol. 802. Col. 1158).

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
13th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of reduced Official Development Assistance funding for research and development on (1) the public health sector, and (2) the health of UK citizens.

In line with the requirements of the International Development Act (2002), our Official Development Assistance (ODA) funds take as their focus the social and economic development and welfare of countries identified by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) Development Assistance Committee (DAC). As per OECD and IDA requirements, we do not use these funds for the development and welfare of citizens or sectors in the UK or other High-Income Countries. Though there will inevitably be some secondary or indirect benefit to the UK derived through our ODA-funded research partnerships, it would not fit the purpose of ODA funding to actively consider this when making ODA spending decisions.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of reduced Official Development Assistance funding for research and development on (1) the UK’s skills base, and (2) levels of employment, in research and development.

The challenging financial situation we face due to the Covid-19 pandemic has resulted in a temporary reduction in the UK’s aid spending target from 0.7% of GNI to 0.5%. This means making difficult decisions when it comes to prioritising how we spend aid money to deliver the most impactful outcomes.

The Government recognises the importance of supporting international research partnerships, and supporting the UK research sector. Our commitment to research and innovation has been clearly demonstrated by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Budget announcement of increasing investment in R&D across government to £14.6bn in 2021/22; and as has been set out in our Integrated Review ambitions, international collaboration is central to a healthy and productive R&D sector.

On 1st April, the Department set out an additional £250m of funding for the R&D sector. As a result, UK scientists will have access to more public funding than ever before. This takes total Government investment in R&D to £14.9 billion in 2021/22 and follows four years of significant growth in R&D funding, including a boost of more than £1.5 billion in 2020/21.

We are currently working with UKRI, and all our Global Challenges Research Fund and Newton Fund Delivery Partners, to manage the financial year 2021/22 ODA allocations. Our Delivery Partners have communicated with award holders setting out the next stage of the review of ODA funding next year, and to explore options for individual programmes. Full details have been published on the UKRI website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on supplies of COVID-19 vaccines to the UK in the event of the UK's departure from the EU without a deal.

The UK has put in place a number of measures to facilitate trade with the EU beyond the end of the transition period and to avoid any adverse impact to vaccine supply beyond 1 January 2021.

The Government has worked with COVID-19 vaccine suppliers to support them with robust contingency plans.

If necessary, we will use alternative supply routes and Government procured freight capacity, in line with current Government advice.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made in the negotiations regarding future participation by the UK in the Horizon Europe research programme; and what preparations are being made to address any shortfall in UK research capacity should the UK cease to participate in Horizon Europe.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK becomes a global science superpower and continues to collaborate with Europe on scientific research. The UK is ready to consider a relationship in line with non-EU Member State participation in Horizon Europe, provided that this represents value for money and is in the UK’s interest. Any agreements relating to Union programmes should contain fair terms for UK participation. This should include fair treatment of participants, a fair and appropriate financial contribution, provisions allowing for sound financial management by both parties, and appropriate governance and consultation.

The shape and content of EU Programmes post-2020, including Horizon Europe, are currently being negotiated in the EU Institutions and have not yet been finalised. These EU Programmes must be adopted by the EU before arrangements for potential UK participation could be finalised.

I refer the Noble Lord to a Written Ministerial Statement made by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 May (HCWS245), which set out that discussions covered all workstreams including: general terms for UK participation in programmes, including provisions for financial contribution.

We are also considering a range of alternative schemes to support international research and innovation collaboration in tandem with Horizon Europe negotiations. These include options to address immediate needs and work through to any future funding scenario.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what process they will use to decide the lengths of extension given to doctoral students funded by UK Research and Innovation; and how that process will take into account the level of uncertainty about the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic when determining the lengths of extension granted. [T]

The Government is aware of the consequent pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic on doctoral students and their ability to complete work. This is a difficult time for all post graduate students, academic staff and researchers.

UKRI is continuing to engage with the higher education sector and have made sure that all doctoral students funded by UKRI will continue to be paid their stipend. On 9 April it was announced that it will offer a costed extension of up to six months for UKRI PhD students due to complete by 31 March 2021 whose study has been impacted by the pandemic. Those students not in their final year may be granted extensions on a case by case basis.

On 24 April, UKRI issued detailed guidance to universities on how the policy should be implemented. UKRI has outlined that universities must put in place processes that are based upon the principles of ensuring all UKRI doctoral students are supported to complete their projects and that they should be treated fairly, generously and sympathetically given the disruptions caused to research programmes and individual’s personal circumstances.

UKRI will continue to engage with the wider sector about the implementation of the extension and to identify and understand future impact. The extension will be reviewed in four months’ time to ensure that any further impacts to doctoral training are taken into account.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to expand UK Research and Innovation until 2025 in the event that no agreement is reached with the EU involving continued participation in Horizon Europe.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK becomes a global science superpower and continues to collaborate with Europe on scientific research. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has made clear that the UK is ready to consider a relationship in line with non-EU Member State participation in Horizon Europe, provided that this represents value for money and is in the UK’s interest. Any agreements relating to Union programmes should contain fair terms for UK participation. This should include fair treatment of participants, a fair and appropriate financial contribution, provisions allowing for sound financial management by both parties, and appropriate governance and consultation.

I refer the Noble Lord to a Written Ministerial Statement made by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 28 April (HCWS209), which set out that UK and EU discussions took place across all workstreams including on EU Programmes.

As a responsible government, we are also developing alternative schemes to support international research and innovation collaboration. This includes options which can address immediate needs and work through to any future funding scenario.

In the Budget, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that government investment in R&D will increase to £22bn by 2024/25, the biggest ever absolute increase. The increase in investment in R&D will include funding for any continued participation in EU research and innovation Programmes or EU replacement schemes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies is bound by the Code of Practice for Scientific Advisory Committees.

SAGE is a scientific advisory committee and as such follows the Science Advisory Committee guidance.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have extend the provision of funding for postgraduate research students funded by UK Research and Innovation whose studies have been disrupted due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government is aware of the consequent pressures of COVID-19 on universities and research institutions. This is a difficult time for all - both undergraduate and post graduate students, academic staff and researchers. BEIS is working with Department for Education and others to consider how best to support researchers, universities, the research community and research institutions.

UKRI has confirmed it?will?offer a costed extension of up to six months for those?PhD students?due to complete by 31 March 2021 and whose study has been impacted by the pandemic. ?This will apply to those who have redeployed to work on COVID-19 related research or other action to support the response.

UKRI has also introduced processes for supporting grant awardees to switch their funding to support COVID-19 priorities.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) funding, and (2) stipend extensions, they intend to provide to those doctoral students and post-doctoral researchers funded by UK Research and Innovation on fixed-term contracts who gave up their normal work in order to support efforts in combatting COVID-19 and assisting the NHS with testing and community support work.

The Government is aware of the consequent pressures of COVID-19 on universities and research institutions. This is a difficult time for all - both undergraduate and post graduate students, academic staff and researchers. BEIS is working with Department for Education and others to consider how best to support researchers, universities, the research community and research institutions.

UKRI has confirmed it?will?offer a costed extension of up to six months for those?PhD students?due to complete by 31 March 2021 and whose study has been impacted by the pandemic. ?This will apply to those who have redeployed to work on COVID-19 related research or other action to support the response.

UKRI has also introduced processes for supporting grant awardees to switch their funding to support COVID-19 priorities.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the timetable for negotiating the association agreement with the Horizon Europe research programme for the 2021–27 period; and when they expect that final details of the agreement will be published.

We will continue to collaborate with the EU on scientific research and have been clear that, where it is in the UK’s interests, we will seek to participate in some specific EU Programmes. The shape and content of the next EU Multi-Annual Financial Framework Programmes for 2021-2027, including Horizon Europe, are currently being negotiated in the EU Institutions and have not yet been finalised. Horizon Europe must be adopted by the EU before any l formal negotiations on possible association could begin.

The UK has played a constructive role in the development of Horizon Europe to ensure that it aligns with UK priorities and we look forward to continuing our relationship in research and innovation with our European partners.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the UK's annual contribution to the Horizon 2020 research programme from 2013 onwards; and what they estimate it will be for each year until 2027.

As a Member State of the EU, the UK did not contribute financially to specific programmes. Member States pay for participation in EU Framework Programmes through the general UK contribution to the EU Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF).

The Withdrawal Agreement means that the UK continues to participate in EU Programmes financed by the 2014-2020 MFF until their closure. Horizon 2020 is a Programme funded under the current MFF. UK scientists, researchers and businesses can continue to participate in these programmes and receive EU grant funding for the lifetime of individual projects, including projects finishing after the transition period ends in 2020. This will include UK participations in Horizon 2020 projects running until 2027 where the funding has been committed under the 2014 – 2020 MFF.

Information on the UK’s participation in Horizon 2020 can be found on the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 dashboard.

The shape and content of EU Programmes post-2020, including Horizon Europe, are currently being negotiated in the EU Institutions. This includes budget discussions which are decided as part of the EU’s Multi-annual Financial Framework negotiation. The Horizon Europe Regulation budget is as of yet unknown and will only be finalised after the overall EU budget has been agreed.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what budget provision they have made for the Horizon Research Programme beyond 2020.

UK scientists, researchers and businesses can continue to participate in, bid for and lead projects in the Horizon 2020 programme as usual after the 31 January 2020.

The Political Declaration indicates a shared intent between UK and EU leaders to agree a framework that would support future collaboration in science, research and innovation. On Horizon Europe, there are a number of elements of this package yet to be agreed, including the provisions on third country association and the Programme budget; these elements will inform our decision on future participation.

30th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay published on 28 March (HL6443), when the next review of the Governing Body Endorsement will take place; how long the review will run for; what criteria will be deployed as part of the assessment; and what consultation will take place with interested parties, and in particular Premier League clubs.

The reviews of each sport’s Governing Body Endorsement criteria are led by the Home Office. Regular reviews are a common and integral part of this work.

The Government is currently carrying out a supplementary rapid review of the competitiveness of English football in attracting the best global talent while maintaining strong support to enable young domestic players to develop from the grassroots level. The scope of the review includes the Governing Body Endorsement criteria for English football. The Football Association, the Premier League, the English Football League, and the Professional Footballers’ Association have been asked for written contributions to the review.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce measures to assist young musicians wishing to tour in the EU; and whether any such plans will be introduced before the end of July.

The Government recognises that there are new requirements for creative workers to work and tour in the EU, including for young musicians. The Government has sought to clarify these new arrangements, which are in many cases more workable than has at times been reported. For example, the vast majority of EU Member States have confirmed that they offer visa and work permit-free routes for touring professionals, including most recently Bulgaria and Croatia. Portable musical instruments, carried or in a vehicle, can be transported cost-free and should not require ATA Carnets. We have also confirmed that splitter vans are not subject to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement requirements on haulage, which is particularly important for emerging artists.

The Government supports our young and emerging artists across the UK through a range of export support programmes, including the Music Export Growth Scheme and the International Showcase Fund, which help musicians to break into international markets. The Government has also established a new Export Support Service from which UK artists can get answers to practical questions about working in Europe.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration, if any, they have given to using funds derived from dormant assets in England to combat loneliness; and whether using funds for this purpose will be included as an option in the first public consultation under section 18A of the Dormant Bank and Building Society Accounts Act 2008.

Until the Dormant Assets Act which has just received Royal Assent, dormant assets funding in England had to be spent on youth, financial inclusion, and social investment. Given this restriction, which was set in primary legislation, the Government was not able to consider other causes such as loneliness.

We have now expanded the Scheme, and new primary legislation enables greater flexibility to consider evolving social and environmental needs in England. In line with the Dormant Assets Act [2022], the first consultation launched for the expanded Scheme will include youth, financial inclusion, social investment wholesalers, and community wealth funds as options. As part of the consultation, which will be launched as soon as this Summer, respondents will be able suggest formally alternative causes for which the English portion could be used, including loneliness.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support the Summer Reading Challenge in 2022 to ensure that children have access to reading materials over the summer holidays; and, in particular, how they will support children in areas where reading is uncommon.

The Government recognises the vital part reading and public libraries play in the lives of so many people, and the pleasure they bring to people of all ages. The Reading Agency, with funding from the Government via Arts Council England, will deliver the Summer Reading Challenge, in 2022, in partnership with public libraries. The theme this year celebrates science and innovation, as well as the key role of the imagination in both reading and the sciences.

Almost all library authorities in the United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies will take part in the Summer Reading Challenge in 2022. This includes 27 authorities who will adopt an extended cross-authority approach to delivering the Summer Reading Challenge this year (an increase from 11 in the first year). This involves local authorities working with strategic partners in education, children’s services, and public health to widen reach and engagement for children living in areas of disadvantage through schools, early years provision, and other community settings.

The Reading Agency anticipates the Challenge in 2022 has the potential to reach one million children. This will include those in urban locations, particularly in the Midlands and North of England, large counties with fairly large rural communities, as well as coastal communities and the first pilot authorities in Scotland.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to commit further funding to address loneliness during winter this year.

In 2018, HM Government launched the world’s first tackling loneliness strategy. Since 2018 we have invested almost £50 million in tackling loneliness. This includes over £34 million in reducing loneliness for response to COVID-19 as part of the £750 million voluntary and community sector funding package.

In September 2021 we launched the Loneliness Engagement Fund, which provided small grants between £15,000 and £50,000 to organisations which could engage with target groups at high risk of loneliness. Nine organisations received grants through the fund, including charities supporting disabled people and young people.

The Government also plays a role in tackling loneliness by setting national direction and supporting other organisations across society to play their part. The tackling loneliness strategy sets out three objectives for the Government's work to tackle loneliness:

  • reducing the stigma associated with feeling lonely, by building a national conversation through our communications campaigns;

  • driving a lasting shift so loneliness is considered in policy-making and delivery by organisations across sectors; and

  • building the evidence base, making a compelling case for action across society.

The Government is continuing to take action to tackle loneliness this winter, including through a new communications campaign launched in January which encourages young people to take small actions to “lift someone out of loneliness”. We continue to support organisations to take action on loneliness through our Tackling Loneliness Network. We are supporting Network members to connect and share resources through our digital platform.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will produce a comprehensive assessment of the impact of Channel 4 privatisation on (1) businesses and jobs in the UK media production sector, (2) the balance in the creative economy between London and the rest of the UK, and (3) UK viewers’ access to original and distinctive UK content.

Channel 4 has played an important role in supporting independent production in the UK. The government has been clear that we want Channel 4 to remain a public service broadcaster (PSB), with obligations and benefits similar to those all PSBs have including those that are currently privately-owned if there is a change of ownership.

We are clear that Channel 4’s public service remit, and its strengths both in working with independent producers across the country and in showing original, distinctive content, are precisely the attributes we would expect to be attractive to a buyer, and that we would expect any buyer to be likely to nurture and develop through new investment.

Channel 4 is one of this country’s greatest broadcasting assets, but we must think long-term about the challenges ahead and make sure it has the capital it needs to continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting.

We have consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 for years to come. Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We have received around 60,000 responses, and we are carefully considering the views and evidence we have received to inform the government’s final decision.

Once we have answered the questions set out in the consultation, we will know what specific impacts to assess and will therefore be in a position to carry out an impact assessment.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) global media companies, (2) UK broadcasters, and (3) financial institutions, about the possibility of their purchasing Channel 4.

Channel 4 is one of this country’s greatest broadcasting assets. We must think long-term about the challenges ahead and make sure it has the capital it needs to continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting. We have therefore consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 in the years to come.

The government has not decided whether to sell Channel 4, or how Channel 4 may be sold. Ministers and DCMS officials have been meeting a broad range of interested parties throughout the consultation process. Their views and evidence along with the consultation responses we have received will inform our policy-making and final decision.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they had with the board of Channel 4 about the desirability of privatisation before announcing a review into private ownership of the channel.

Government Ministers meet members of the Channel 4 board and executive team regularly to discuss a range of issues.

The government intends to consult on a potential change in ownership of Channel 4 on the basis that an alternative ownership model (but one where it keeps a public service remit) may be better for the broadcaster and its ability to contribute socially, economically and culturally in the decades to come.

The public consultation was published on 06 July 2021. It will run for 10 weeks, closing on 14 September 2021. The Government is seeking views from a broad range of stakeholders to inform its policy making.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of how Channel 4’s current (1) ownership model, and (2) commissioning strategy, is affecting its performance as a public service broadcaster.

Channel 4 has delivered on its remit successfully and helped grow the UK’s independent production sector. It has also done an excellent job in managing the recent uncertainty in the market. However, the government is concerned that its current public ownership model presents challenges to its ability to grasp opportunities and keep pace in the future.

Further detail regarding the government’s assessment is provided in the government’s recent publication, “Consultation on a potential change of ownership of the Channel 4 Television Corporation”, copies of which have been placed in the libraries of both Houses.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken in the last three months to progress their proposed online harms legislation; and whether such legislation will be subject to pre-legislative scrutiny.

The government is firmly committed to making the UK the safest place to be online, and DCMS and the Home Office are working at pace to introduce this legislation. We will publish a Full Government Response to the Online Harms White Paper later this year. This will be followed by legislation in 2021, when parliamentary time allows.

It is vital that we get this legislation right and we will make a final decision on pre-legislative scrutiny nearer the time of introduction. We are mindful of the need to balance speed and scrutiny when introducing these measures, and we will continue to engage with parliamentarians as we prepare legislation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) any governance and regulatory gaps in online harms protections that will emerge at the end of the transition period for the UK’s departure from the EU, and (2) the risks to young people from any further delay to the publication of proposed online harms legislation.

As the Government has transposed all relevant legislation, there will not be any gaps in online harms protection at the end of the transition period. The government is also working at pace to deliver online harms legislation next year, which will introduce comprehensive protections for young people.

The Government transposed the revised Audiovisual Media Services Directive into domestic law on the 30th September and the Regulations came into force on the 1st of November 2020. UK-established video sharing platforms are required to take appropriate measures to protect minors from content which may impair their physical, mental or moral development, and all users from illegal content.

The AVMS Directive aligns well with the Government’s plans to tackle online harms, in particular in its requirements on UK-established video sharing platforms to have systems in place to protect users, especially minors. It should be noted that the video sharing platform regime will be repealed and will be superseded by the online harms regulatory framework, once it comes into force.

The Government is firmly committed to making the UK the safest place to be online and is working at pace to introduce this legislation. We will publish the Full Government Response to the Online Harms White Paper consultation later this year, which will contain more detailed proposals on online harms regulation and will be released alongside interim voluntary codes on tackling online terrorist and child sexual exploitation and abuse content and activity. This will be followed by legislation, which will be ready next year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the capability of UK regulators (1) to maintain existing statutory protections relating to harmful online content, and (2) to ensure effective enforcement of these protections, between the end of the transition period for the UK’s departure from the EU and the enactment of their proposed online harms legislation.

The Government is firmly committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the end of the transition period will not affect this. Regulations transposing the revised Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMS Directive) came into force on the 1st of November 2020 and require UK-established video sharing platforms (VSPs) to have systems and processes in place to protect the public, including minors, from illegal and harmful material. Ofcom has the power to take enforcement action against UK-established VSPs which do not take adequate appropriate measures, or which do not implement the measures adequately, in order to protect UK users.

VSPs established in the European Economic Area will not be regulated by Ofcom and will be regulated by the Member State that they are established in. As the regulation under this VSP regime is systems regulation and not content regulation, we expect platforms based outside of the UK to set up and invest in systems in order to comply with the AVMS Directive. It is anticipated that these same systems will also be introduced for their UK subsidiaries particularly in anticipation of the incoming online harms regime. Regulation provided by other EU Member States will therefore be effective and robust enough to provide protection to UK users until such time as the online harms regime is in place.

As the AVMS Directive aligns well with the Government’s plans to tackle online harms, the VSP regime will be repealed and superseded by the online harms regulatory framework, once it comes into force. We will publish the Full Government Response to the Online Harms White Paper consultation later this year, which will contain more detailed proposals on online harms regulation.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) which measures should be brought forward to restore grassroots cricket to at least its pre-COVID-19 levels of activity; (2) what plans they have to develop a national strategy; and (3) who they plan to consult on any such strategy.

Officials are working very closely with the England and Wales Cricket Board on plans to deliver the safe return of club cricket as soon as possible. We are working at pace to shape guidance that will allow the safe return of competitive cricket and other team sports. Any shared sporting equipment may risk transmission, but these risks can be mitigated with good hygiene practice as being adopted across a wide range of sectors. I hope to make further progress on this in the coming weeks so that teams can enjoy a great cricketing summer.

In terms of developing and consulting on a national strategy for grassroots cricket, this is a matter for the England and Wales Cricket Board.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) whether they will publish the scientific evidence that cricket balls are a potential vector for COVID-19; (2) when this information was shared with the England and Wales Cricket Board; and (3) which mitigation measures were discussed with the Board.

Officials are working very closely with the ECB and their medical experts to understand the unique qualities of cricket. We are working at pace to shape guidance that will allow the safe return of competitive cricket and other team sports. Any shared sporting equipment may risk transmission, but these risks can be mitigated with good hygiene practice as being adopted across a wide range of sectors.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial support they intend to provide to (1) the England and Wales Cricket Board, and (2) other governing bodies for cricket.

Sport England, the national sports council for England, has provided £9m to the England and Wales Cricket Board for 2017- 2021 period, plus an additional £1.2m of funding for a specific volunteering project linked to the Cricket World Cup in 2019. As part of Sport England’s flexible support to system partners during Covid-19, they have committed to rolling over funding for a further year (details about this can be found on Sport England’s website (https://www.sportengland.org/how-we-can-help/coronavirus/funding-innovation-and-flexibility).

Other national governing bodies of cricket are outside the remit of Sport England funding.

The Government recognises the impact that Covid-19 is having on the sporting sector. The Chancellor announced an unprecedented package of measures to help businesses during this period, including £330 billion worth of government-backed and guaranteed loans to support businesses across the UK. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and Self-Employed Income Support Scheme have supported businesses across the UK and in every sector, including sport.

In addition, Sport England, announced £210 million of funding to help sport and physical activity organisations deal with the short and long term effects of the pandemic.

The Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage has been engaging with the England and Wales Cricket Board to ensure they are aware of the assistance available to the sport and how it can be accessed. We know this is a challenging period for all sports and we continue to work closely with the whole sector to understand the issues they face and how we can best support them through this difficult time.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to developing a post-COVID-19 recovery strategy for (1) elite, and (2) grass roots, level sports.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is having regular discussions with sector and industry bodies to understand the impact of COVID-19 on sport and how we can provide support. This includes the Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage chairing a fortnightly meeting with over 25 sporting organisations. Sport is also represented on the department’s Cultural Renewal Taskforce, which is looking at ways to get sectors across the department back up and running.

Government has already published three stages of guidance for the return of elite sporting competition, and guidance for the return of outdoor grassroots sport and recreation. These are available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-phased-return-of-sport-and-recreation

Further guidance will be published in due course to help sporting organisations understand how they can operate safely as lockdown restrictions are further eased in the future.

This is in addition to financial support that has been made available to the sector. The Chancellor announced a host of measures to help businesses, with £330 billion worth of government backed and guaranteed loans to support businesses across the UK. In addition, Sport England, has also announced £210 million of funding to help sport and physical activity organisations deal with the short and long term effects of the pandemic.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the (1) Football Association, (2) Premier League, and (3) English Football League, to ensure the provision of a police presence at venues where closed football matches are due to take place to discourage the congregation of fans and to enforce social distancing outside such venues.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is having regular discussions with sector and industry bodies to understand the impact of COVID-19 on sport and how we can provide support. This includes the Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage chairing a fortnightly meeting with over 25 sporting organisations. Sport is also represented on the department’s Cultural Renewal Taskforce, which is looking at ways to get sectors across the department back up and running.

Government has already published three stages of guidance for the return of elite sporting competition, and guidance for the return of outdoor grassroots sport and recreation. These are available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-phased-return-of-sport-and-recreation

Further guidance will be published in due course to help sporting organisations understand how they can operate safely as lockdown restrictions are further eased in the future.

This is in addition to financial support that has been made available to the sector. The Chancellor announced a host of measures to help businesses, with £330 billion worth of government backed and guaranteed loans to support businesses across the UK. In addition, Sport England, has also announced £210 million of funding to help sport and physical activity organisations deal with the short and long term effects of the pandemic.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, following several recent school closures resulting from cyberattacks, what steps they are taking to ensure (1) schools, and (2) other public services, have good cyber resilience.

The Department recognises that cyber security is a concern for many schools and academy trusts. To support schools with this, the Department released Cyber Security Standards in October 2022, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/meeting-digital-and-technology-standards-in-schools-and-colleges/cyber-security-standards-for-schools-and-colleges. These standards provide a base level requirement for good cyber security practices in schools, helping to raise resilience across the sector and make schools harder targets. Many of the areas suggested for improvement are low cost or free to implement.

The Department’s Risk Protection Arrangement (RPA) has more than 9,500 member schools, which constitutes 43% of eligible schools in England, and includes cover for cyber incidents as standard from the 2022/23 membership years. In the event of a cyber incident, RPA members have access to a 24/7 incident response service. Since September 2022, cyber cover has been available to multi academy trust RPA members, provided they meet the required criteria.

Jisc is the UK digital, data and technology agency focused on education, research and innovation. The Department continues to fund Jisc to provide quality connectivity and cyber security to Further Education colleges in England. In addition to network cyber security measures, Jisc provides advice, guidance, and training on cyber security, including alerts and information on identified security risks. This support includes access to a Cyber Security Incident Response Team. Jisc offers similar support to Higher Education, funded by the Office for Students.

The Department also continues to work closely with the NCSC (National Cyber Security Centre) to identify incidents and conduct analysis to monitor and identify emerging cyber threats.

Schools can access cyber security training for staff from the NCSC and the NCSC Active Cyber Defence tools are now available to all schools. These assist in protecting schools from a range of attacks. Further advice can be found on the NCSC schools’ website at: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/section/education-skills/cyber-security-schools.

In the event of a cyber attack, the Department has a cyber security team who can provide advice and guidance to assist with recovery. To report an incident and receive support, schools can contact: sector.incidentreporting@education.gov.uk. Schools are also encouraged to report all cyber incidents to Action Fraud via their reporting site here: https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/.

The Department will continue to develop the support and tools offered to schools and academy trusts to improve their cyber security and resilience. This will help to streamline reporting and data capture and improve mutual understanding between the Department and schools.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the financial aid available through the Turing scheme compares to that available through the Erasmus+ scheme.

The Turing Scheme will be backed by £110 million to support international projects and activities during the 2021/22 academic year. This will provide funding for around 35,000 students in universities, colleges, and schools to go on placements and exchanges overseas, a similar number as under Erasmus+.

This was set out in a one year Spending Review, but the government has a clear aim to use this scheme as part of our long-term ambitions for a Global Britain. The benefits of the exchanges will be assessed and used to build on the scheme. Funding decisions for subsequent years will be subject to future spending reviews.

Grants available through the Turing Scheme are comparable with Erasmus+ for the most part, but there is also new support available for disadvantaged students and students with special educational needs and disabilities which was not available through Erasmus+. All participating students will receive grants dependent on their destination country to contribute towards their cost of living. The grant support available under the Turing Scheme is currently slightly higher than that under Erasmus+. Under the Turing Scheme, we will provide a grant of £335–£380 per month, plus a disadvantaged supplement of £110 per month. With Erasmus+, under current exchange rates, students received a grant equivalent to £315–£360, with a disadvantaged supplement of £100. Students can continue to apply for student finance.

For schools and colleges, all participants will receive travel funding, whereas Erasmus+ only provided travel support to higher education participants who travelled to Partner Countries, which was around only 3% of UK participants. With the Turing Scheme, we are introducing funding for travel costs for disadvantaged higher education students to all destinations. Additionally, we are providing funding for visas, passports, and related travel insurance for disadvantaged participants in all sectors.

For participants with special educational needs and disabilities, the scheme will fund up to 100% of actual costs for support directly related to their additional needs, as Erasmus+ did, with the new addition of preparatory visits for staff to carry out risk assessments and ensure their students will be able to access and take part in all elements of a placement equally. More information on funding available can be found at: www.turing-scheme.org.uk.

For all students participating in the Turing Scheme, we expect tuition fees to be waived by host institutions, as under Erasmus+. This is a matter for individual institutions to agree, and something that universities do as a matter of course when they form exchange partnerships with international providers.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)