Lord Black of Brentwood Portrait

Lord Black of Brentwood

Conservative - Life peer

Became Member: 9th July 2010


Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee)
22nd Jul 2021 - 30th May 2024
Democracy and Digital Technologies Committee
13th Jun 2019 - 16th Jun 2020
Sexual Violence in Conflict Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 22nd Mar 2016
Information Committee (Lords)
22nd Jun 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Privacy and Injunctions (Joint Committee)
18th Jul 2011 - 12th Mar 2012


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Black of Brentwood has voted in 307 divisions, and 7 times against the majority of their Party.

7 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 97 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 59 Noes - 99
5 Jul 2022 - Sitting Times - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 99 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 158 Noes - 124
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 180 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 209 Noes - 193
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 204 Noes - 192
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 199 Noes - 199
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 180 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 192
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Black of Brentwood voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 202 Noes - 187
View All Lord Black of Brentwood Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
Lord Markham (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Online Safety Act 2023
(3,141 words contributed)
National Security Act 2023
(2,771 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Black of Brentwood's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Black of Brentwood, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


3 Bills introduced by Lord Black of Brentwood


A bill make provision for an inquiry into police conduct of Operation Conifer to be established

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 29th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A bill to make provision about the commercial breeding of cats; and for connected purposes.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Monday 8th June 2015

First reading took place on 24 July. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2014-15 session of Parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. A bill to make provision about the commercial breeding of cats; and for connected purposes.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Thursday 24th July 2014

Lord Black of Brentwood has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they are considering any proposals to protect individuals living with HIV from discrimination in various sectors, including healthcare, education, employment and housing; and, if so, what are their plans.

The Equality Act’s definition of disability automatically covers people with HIV when they are in or seeking employment or seeking to access services, whether in the public or private sectors.

As well as providing protection from discrimination, the Act requires employers and service providers to make reasonable adjustments for people living with HIV. For example, an employer would be expected to allow such an employee reasonable time off work to visit hospital in connection with their condition. Employers and service providers who fail to meet their legal obligations can face legal action, should the disabled person opt for this.

In addition, the public sector equality duty (section 149 of the Act - 'PSED') requires public authorities, in the exercise of their functions, to have due regard to the need to:

  • eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment, victimisation and any other unlawful conduct prohibited by the Act;

  • advance equality of opportunity between people who share and people who do not share a relevant protected characteristic; and

  • foster good relations between people who share and people who do not share a relevant protected characteristic.

A raft of guidance and codes of practice are available to help employers and service providers comply with their legal obligations under the Act. People with HIV who think they have experienced discrimination may contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS), the government helpline established to provide free bespoke advice and in-depth support to individuals with discrimination concerns. The EASS can be contacted via their website - http://www.equalityadvisoryservice.com/, by telephone on 0808 8000082 or text phone on 0808 8000084. The EASS has the ability to intervene on an individual’s behalf with a service provider to help resolve an issue. The EASS can also advise people who wish to take their complaint further on their options.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their research on conversion therapy practices in the UK has included consultation with (1) religious organisations opposed to a ban, and (2) survivor groups and victims.

The Government will ban conversion therapy. The ban will cover both sexual orientation and gender identity. How we ban these practices is a complex issue that we must get right. Officials continue to consult a range of organisations with diverse views. As well as this consultation, officials continue to assess the most up-to-date evidence, including that of the UN’s Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. We have also undertaken research to understand practices, experiences and impacts associated with conversion therapy and will publish this in due course. The Government is working at pace on this issue and will outline its plans shortly.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include bans on attempts to change someone's gender identity with any ban on conversion therapy practices.

The Government will ban conversion therapy. The ban will cover both sexual orientation and gender identity. How we ban these practices is a complex issue that we must get right. Officials continue to consult a range of organisations with diverse views. As well as this consultation, officials continue to assess the most up-to-date evidence, including that of the UN’s Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. We have also undertaken research to understand practices, experiences and impacts associated with conversion therapy and will publish this in due course. The Government is working at pace on this issue and will outline its plans shortly.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association Curbing deception: a world survey of legal restriction of so-called "conversion therapies", published in 2020, what assessment they have made of its findings, especially its strategies to restrict conversion therapy practices.

The Government will ban conversion therapy. The ban will cover both sexual orientation and gender identity. How we ban these practices is a complex issue that we must get right. Officials continue to consult a range of organisations with diverse views. As well as this consultation, officials continue to assess the most up-to-date evidence, including that of the UN’s Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. We have also undertaken research to understand practices, experiences and impacts associated with conversion therapy and will publish this in due course. The Government is working at pace on this issue and will outline its plans shortly.

25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the United Nations Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity Report on Conversion Therapy, published in February 2020, what assessment they have made of its findings; and what plans they have this year to take forward the recommendation to ban conversion therapy.

The Government will ban conversion therapy. The ban will cover both sexual orientation and gender identity. How we ban these practices is a complex issue that we must get right. Officials continue to consult a range of organisations with diverse views. As well as this consultation, officials continue to assess the most up-to-date evidence, including that of the UN’s Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. We have also undertaken research to understand practices, experiences and impacts associated with conversion therapy and will publish this in due course. The Government is working at pace on this issue and will outline its plans shortly.

13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people died in England from an AIDS-related illness in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available.

A response to the noble Lord’s Parliamentary Question of 13 July is below and attached.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Black of Brentwood
House of Lords
London
SW1A 0PW

19 July 2022

Dear Lord Black,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people died in England from an AIDS-related illness in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available (HL1722).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration. Causes mentioned on the death certificate are converted to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes, with the underlying cause of death defined as the disease or injury that initiated the events that directly lead to the death. At the ONS, we use the term “due to” to refer to the underlying cause of a death. Table 1 of the attached dataset shows the number of number of deaths due to HIV disease ICD-10 codes, from 2011 to 2021, registered in England.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths [1] due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease ICD-10 codes [2], by year, 2011 to 2021 [3], England [4]

Year

B20

B21

B22

B23

B24

Total Per Year

2011

101

18

30

29

7

185

2012

109

27

31

22

11

200

2013

96

30

38

29

8

201

2014

83

36

10

8

15

152

2015

96

39

6

4

16

161

2016

74

43

6

10

19

152

2017

90

34

7

6

20

157

2018

78

28

7

5

15

133

2019

64

28

11

7

10

120

2020

68

20

20

12

13

133

2021

76

15

21

3

20

135

Total per code

935

318

187

135

154

1729

Source: Office for National Statistics

Footnotes:

[1] Number of deaths by ICD-10 code are available through our explorable dataset NOMIS from 2013 onwards, this can be accessed here: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/query/construct/summary.asp?reset=yes&mode=construct&dataset=161&version=0&anal=1&initsel=

[2] International Classification of Diseases 10th edition (ICD-10) codes are as follows: B20, HIV disease resulting in infectious and parasitic diseases; B21, HIV disease resulting in malignant neoplasms; B22, HIV disease resulting in other specified diseases; B23, HIV disease resulting in other conditions; B24, Unspecified HIV disease.

[3] Figures are for deaths registered in a calendar year, rather than death occurrences.

[4] Figures are based on area of usual residence and exclude non-residents.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which government departments are participating in Stonewall's Diversity Champions Programme; how much they are spending on the Programme; whether any government departments are making payments to Stonewall for other initiatives; and if so, how much is each department spending.

The information requested is not held centrally. The Government supports inclusive workplaces and, as has been the case for many years, departments work with a variety of external schemes.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have died from AIDS-related illnesses in the UK in each of the last ten years for which figures are available.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Lord Black of Brentwood

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

18 May 2021

Dear Lord Black,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people have died from AIDS-related illnesses in the UK in each of the last ten years for which figures are available (HL138).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. National Records Scotland (NRS) and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths where the underlying cause was Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are defined by the ICD-10 codes B20 to B24.

Table 1 provides the number of deaths, in England and Wales, where HIV was either mentioned on the death certificate as a factor that contributed to the death or was the underlying cause of death. Figures are provided for deaths registered in 2010 to 2019, the latest available 10-year period of finalised mortality data.

Please note that ONS mortality statistics are based on the cause of death that was reported by the doctor or coroner when they certified the death. More information on the process of death certification and cause of death coding is available in the User guide to mortality statistics[1]. Public Health England publish an alternative source of data on HIV deaths[2], which is based on a specialised database of HIV diagnosis, AIDS, and deaths data.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths with ICD-10 codes related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mentioned on the death certificate, England and Wales, deaths registered in 2010 to 2019[3][4][5][6]

Year

Deaths “involving” HIV

of which, deaths “due to” HIV

2010

320

248

2011

258

192

2012

278

209

2013

275

208

2014

308

159

2015

308

171

2016

299

156

2017

297

162

2018

292

139

2019

276

124

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/methodologies/userguidetomortalitystatisticsjuly2017

[2]https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hiv-annual-data-tables

[3]Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring in each calendar year.

[4]Deaths include non-residents.

[5]The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10) definitions are as follows: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (B20-B24).

[6]Deaths "involving" a cause refer to deaths that had this cause mentioned anywhere on the death certificate, whether as an underlying cause or not. Deaths "due to" a cause refer only to deaths that had this as the underlying cause of death.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what role the Cabinet Secretary plays in relation to supervising Special Advisors; and what guidance they have issued on the application of the Nolan Principles to Special Advisors.

The Seven Principles of Public Life apply to anyone who works as a public office-holder.

The Code of Conduct for Special Advisers, at paragraph 9, sets out that “The responsibility for the management and conduct of special advisers, including discipline, rests with the Minister who made the appointment. It is also the appointing Minister’s responsibility to ensure that their special adviser(s) adhere to this Code of Conduct.” It does not specify any such role for the Cabinet Secretary.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
7th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have any plans to ban the sale of domestic fireworks in England; and if not, whether they will undertake a consultation on that subject.

The majority of individuals who use fireworks do so in a responsible and safe manner. There are enforcement mechanisms in place to tackle situations when fireworks are misused.

The Government has no plans to ban the sale of domestic fireworks or consult on this matter at this current time.

15th Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to ask Ofcom to conduct a review in accordance with section 34(1) or section 44(1) of the Postal Services Act 2011, before moving to amend the statutory minimum requirements of the universal postal service.

The Government has no current plans to change the statutory minimum requirements of the universal postal service, set out in the Postal Services Act 2011, which requires letter deliveries to every UK address, six days a week at standard price.

15th Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on the magazine industry of amending the Postal Services Act 2011 to move to a five-day letter delivery.

The Government has no current plans to change the statutory minimum requirements of the universal postal service, set out in the Postal Services Act 2011, which requires letter deliveries to every UK address, six days a week at standard price.

13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial impact on the UK news media sector of the decision to expand the text and data mining copyright exception.

The Government asked specific questions about impact in the consultation on AI and IP, but received very limited quantitative evidence. An impact assessment will be published alongside the legislation when laid. The proposed exception will be targeted to limit negative impacts, and the government welcomes further evidence from rights holders on how to best achieve this.

13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial impact on the UK professional photography sector of the decision to expand the text and data mining copyright exception.

The Government asked specific questions about impact in the consultation on AI and IP, but received very limited quantitative evidence. An impact assessment will be published alongside the legislation when laid. The proposed exception will be targeted to limit negative impacts, and the government welcomes further evidence from rights holders on how to best achieve this.

13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the financial impact on the UK professional publishing industry of the decision to expand the text and data mining copyright exception.

The Government asked specific questions about impact in the consultation on AI and IP, but received very limited quantitative evidence. An impact assessment will be published alongside the legislation when laid. The proposed exception will be targeted to limit negative impacts, and the government welcomes further evidence from rights holders on how to best achieve this.

19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to (1) the BBC Mid Term Review 2024, published on 22 January, and (2) the BBC’s plans to introduce advertising on podcasts and on-demand content via third-party services, what steps they are taking to ensure that Ofcom’s regulation of the BBC ensures the Corporation does not unduly harm the commercial sector.

The BBC has responsibilities set out in its Royal Charter to avoid unnecessary adverse impacts on the market. As the BBC’s independent regulator, it is for Ofcom to hold the BBC to account in meeting its obligations both to its audiences and to the market, as set out in the Royal Charter and Framework Agreement.

The Government’s recent Mid-Term Review of the BBC stresses the need for the BBC meaningfully to engage with its competitors, and for high standards of transparency. Our recommendations seek to secure more effective engagement between competitors, the BBC and Ofcom on competition and market issues, enabling the BBC and Ofcom to make more informed decisions about changes which may affect the BBC’s competitors, and to ensure that the BBC’s competitors are better able to inform those decisions.

The Government will continue to monitor the effectiveness of the reforms as we approach the renewal of the BBC’s Royal Charter. We will examine the BBC’s role in the wider market, including how the regulatory framework may need to evolve to reflect shifts in technology and consumer behaviour, as part of our work in the next Charter Review. In the meantime, the BBC must rise to the challenge and make sure to strike the correct balance between its obligations.

19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the BBC’s initiatives to engage with competitors on their plans to introduce advertising on podcasts and on-demand content via third-party services.

The BBC has responsibilities set out in its Royal Charter to avoid unnecessary adverse impacts on the market. As the BBC’s independent regulator, it is for Ofcom to hold the BBC to account in meeting its obligations both to its audiences and to the market, as set out in the Royal Charter and Framework Agreement.

The Government’s recent Mid-Term Review of the BBC stresses the need for the BBC meaningfully to engage with its competitors, and for high standards of transparency. Our recommendations seek to secure more effective engagement between competitors, the BBC and Ofcom on competition and market issues, enabling the BBC and Ofcom to make more informed decisions about changes which may affect the BBC’s competitors, and to ensure that the BBC’s competitors are better able to inform those decisions.

The Government will continue to monitor the effectiveness of the reforms as we approach the renewal of the BBC’s Royal Charter. We will examine the BBC’s role in the wider market, including how the regulatory framework may need to evolve to reflect shifts in technology and consumer behaviour, as part of our work in the next Charter Review. In the meantime, the BBC must rise to the challenge and make sure to strike the correct balance between its obligations.

19th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the BBC’s plans to introduce advertising on podcasts and on-demand content via third-party services; and whether the plans are compatible with the Royal Charter and Agreement.

The BBC has responsibilities set out in its Royal Charter to avoid unnecessary adverse impacts on the market. As the BBC’s independent regulator, it is for Ofcom to hold the BBC to account in meeting its obligations both to its audiences and to the market, as set out in the Royal Charter and Framework Agreement.

The Government’s recent Mid-Term Review of the BBC stresses the need for the BBC meaningfully to engage with its competitors, and for high standards of transparency. Our recommendations seek to secure more effective engagement between competitors, the BBC and Ofcom on competition and market issues, enabling the BBC and Ofcom to make more informed decisions about changes which may affect the BBC’s competitors, and to ensure that the BBC’s competitors are better able to inform those decisions.

The Government will continue to monitor the effectiveness of the reforms as we approach the renewal of the BBC’s Royal Charter. We will examine the BBC’s role in the wider market, including how the regulatory framework may need to evolve to reflect shifts in technology and consumer behaviour, as part of our work in the next Charter Review. In the meantime, the BBC must rise to the challenge and make sure to strike the correct balance between its obligations.

8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have monitored the implementation of the "My Charity Commission Account" service by the Charity Commission; what representations they have received about it; and whether they are satisfied with the speed with which the Charity Commission is dealing with complaints about it.

The ‘My Charity Commission Account’ service is designed to facilitate a more direct relationship between the Charity Commission and trustees, helping to ensure that they are supported in their role and well equipped to oversee their charities. The Charity Commission has confirmed that most charities have set up accounts and the Commission is working hard to support any that are having difficulty. Any trustees wishing to send the Commission feedback on the service can do so by emailing myaccount@charitycommission.gov.uk or calling the contact centre on 0300 066 9197.

20th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 6 September (HL9930), what powers they have to intervene in the work of the Charity Commission where a case is made that it is not acting in the public interest; and if they have no such powers, where accountability for the Commission sits.

The Charity Commission is an independent registrar and regulator. Section 13(4) of the Charities Act 2011 makes clear that, in the exercise of its functions, the Charity Commission is not subject to the direction or control of any Minister of the Crown or of another government department.

The Charity Commission is accountable in several ways. Decisions made by the Charity Commission in exercising its functions are subject to appeal or review either by the First-tier Tribunal, the Upper Tribunal, or by way of judicial review in the High Court. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport Ministers answer for the Charity Commission in Parliament, and the regulator can be called to give evidence to Committees in both Houses of Parliament. The Charity Commission is also required to present its annual report and audited accounts to Parliament, providing key information about its activities and performance.

Further details on the Charity Commission’s governance and accountability is available in the Charity Commission Framework Document 2023, published on GOV.UK.

6th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how long is the term of office of the chair of the Charity Commission.

The Chairman of the Charity Commission for England & Wales, Orlando Fraser KC, was appointed for a three-year term commencing on 25 April 2022 and ending on 24 April 2025. Ministers have the authority to reappoint the Chairman for a second term in accordance with the Charities Act 2011 and the Governance Code for Public Appointments.

6th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the chair and trustees of the Charity Commission about the appointment of trustees to the Actors' Benevolent Fund, and the application of section 80 of the Charities Act 2011.

As an independent regulator, the Charity Commission for England & Wales carries out its functions independently of ministerial direction or Government control. His Majesty’s Government has, therefore, not discussed this case with the Charity Commission.

6th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the conduct of the Charity Commission in relation to its enquiries about the Actors' Benevolent Fund.

As an independent regulator, the Charity Commission for England & Wales carries out its functions independently of ministerial direction or Government control. His Majesty’s Government has, therefore, not discussed this case with the Charity Commission.

17th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they will list the specific benefits that have accrued to (1) the UK music industry, and (2) musicians, as a result of the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

HM Government is working with every sector to seize the economic and political opportunities arising from our departure from the European Union – ensuring that our laws, regulations, and policies are helping to boost growth, drive innovation, and increase the competitiveness of the United Kingdom. We are developing trade deals with priority markets – something we could not do while a member of the European Union – focusing on alleviating trade barriers to enhance the movement of goods, global sales of services, and a forward-thinking intellectual property framework.

We are already delivering on some of the key opportunities for the UK music industry and musicians. Recent analysis shows that the fastest-growing recorded music markets are outside the EU, in Latin America and Asia – driven by the rapid growth of streaming. The Department for International Trade delivers an export programme for music, focusing on these priority markets, with upcoming trade missions to the USA, Australia, India, China and Japan, and the British Music Embassy at ‘South by Southwest’ in Austin, Texas.

The Government recognises that the way musicians work in and with the European Union has changed that now we are no longer a member of it. The Government is committed to supporting the sector to adapt to these new arrangements, and has worked with sector representatives and directly with Member States to clarify what this entails.

In addition, the Government continues to provide export support for the UK’s creative industries through a range of export support programmes, including the successful Music Export Growth Scheme and the International Showcase Fund, designed to introduce successful UK music projects across the globe, in Europe and beyond.

5th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they have invested in Unboxed: The Festival of Brexit; how many people have attended the festival to date; and what analysis they have made of value for money for the taxpayer.

UNBOXED: Creativity in the UK is a £120 million UK-wide celebration of creativity and innovation delivered through 10 major commissions. It is not called the ‘Festival of Brexit’.

Latest figures show that to date over three million people have engaged with UNBOXED, physically and digitally, and this number will only increase during the last two months of live programming, with two major commissions still to launch.

A departmental Accounting Officer Assessment for the programme was published on 12 August. It stated that our pre-delivery assessment of the costs and benefits for UNBOXED showed the programme would be value for money, even where some expected benefits are not monetisable. DCMS has kept the programme under review to ensure that it remains value for money.

There is also an independent evaluation of the programme underway. This will consider areas such as job creation; training, development and volunteering opportunities offered; the number of people who experience UNBOXED in person and online; and the number of participants in the learning and engagement programmes delivered by the creative teams across the country. It will be published in early 2023.

8th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the BBC’s use of licence fee revenue to produce online news services, which compete with commercial publishers, is compatible with (1) the BBC Charter, and (2) legal constraints on the use of public funds.

Under the Royal Charter, the BBC has an obligation to provide impartial news and information to help people understand and engage with the world around them. The Charter requires the BBC public services to promote its Mission and Public Purposes, including the provision of news in the UK through “online services”; it therefore allows for the use of licence fee revenue for online news services. In doing so, the BBC is required to have particular regard to the effects of its activities on competition in the UK and to seek to avoid adverse impacts on competition which are not necessary for the effective fulfilment of the Mission and the promotion of the Public Purposes.

Her Majesty’s Government carefully considered the BBC's market impact as part of Charter Review in 2015/16, and designated Ofcom as the BBC regulator to ensure the BBC is robustly held to account on its competitive impact.

The Government also committed the independent Cairncross Review into the future of journalism. This was published in 2019, and urged the BBC to think more carefully about how its news provision can act as a complement to, rather than a substitute for, commercial news.

The Charter Mid-Term Review will look at the BBC’s market impact, evaluating how the BBC and Ofcom assess the market impact and public value of the BBC in an evolving marketplace and how that relates to the wider UK media ecology, including with regard to commercial radio and local news sectors and other content makers and distributors.

18th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which EU Member States they have spoken to since 1 January about touring arrangements for musicians; and whether any of the solutions relating (1) to visas, and (2) to work permits advocated by music organisations sitting on the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport's Cultural Renewal Taskforce Working Groups were discussed at those meetings.

This Government understands that the cultural and creative sectors rely on the ability to move people across borders quickly, simply, and with minimal cost and administration. Touring is a vital part of musicians’ and performers’ careers, providing not only a vital income stream, but also enriching opportunities for cultural exchange across the world.

The UK’s rules for touring creative professionals are more generous than many EU Member States. Our proposals remain on the table and our door is open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, to look at the issues and options, to help the sectors resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so.

We will engage with bilateral partners to find ways to make life easier for those working in the creative industries in countries across the EU. We will prioritise seeking to ensure all Member States’ public guidance around existing rules is simple and accessible.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement and the changes to the level of mobility and bureaucracy for touring performers, what plans they have to provide additional funding for the performing arts sector to mitigate against any potential (1) additional costs, and (2) loss of work, for such performers.

We know that while leaving the EU will bring changes and new processes to touring and working in the EU, it will also bring new opportunities. Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how practitioners operate in the EU.

Going forward we will continue to work closely with the sector, including with representative organisations, to assess the impact and to ensure businesses and individuals have the advice and guidance they need to meet new requirements. This includes the creation of a DCMS-led working group to bring together sector leads and other government departments to look at the issues facing these sectors when touring in the EU and explore what further steps could be taken to support them.

This Government recognises the importance of our world leading creative and cultural industries. That is why it provided an unprecedented £1.57bn package of support to help these sectors through the COVID-19 pandemic. To date over £1 billion has been awarded to over 3000 organisations, with 75,000 jobs saved so far, and many more freelancers also benefiting from new work that can now be created. This demonstrates our firm commitment to ensuring that UK culture continues to thrive.

29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Cats Cats as Companions, published 15 June; and what assessment they have made of the benefits to people's health and wellbeing of owning or interacting with pets, including cats.

I welcomed this report at the time of publication, and you can see my quote here: http://www.apgocats.co.uk/reports/. The report ‘Cats as Companions: Can Cats Help Tackle Loneliness?’ from the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Cats rightly outlines the complex nature of loneliness and the importance of tailoring interventions to an individual’s needs. The government welcomes the interest in the important issue of loneliness. It will continue to work to tackle loneliness and improve the evidence base on the causes and the best ways to reduce it.

10th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why any reference to the creative industries was omitted from the proposals contained in The Future Relationship with the EU: The UK’s Approach to Negotiations (CP211), published in February.

The creative industries are diverse in nature, and therefore a number of cross-cutting areas within the proposals will be relevant to them. We want a relationship with the EU which is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, and centred on free trade. As part of this, the UK is committed to supporting its thriving cultural and creative economy. In 2018, the Creative Industries contributed over £111bn to the UK economy, exporting over £35bn in services. As such, we will continue to support and celebrate cultural cooperation with EU Member States - with whom we share our history and values - as well as with partners around the world to ensure the UK’s vibrant cultural and creative industries continue to thrive.

8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they are planning to introduce any measures to include HIV education as a part of the school curriculum in order to promote understanding about HIV and tackle stigma among children; and, if so, what are their plans.

In September 2020 the government made Relationships Education compulsory for primary school pupils, Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for secondary school pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in state-funded schools.

In secondary schools, the Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) statutory guidance states that pupils should be taught factual knowledge around sex, sexual health, and sexuality, set firmly within the context of relationships. Pupils should learn about contraception, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), developing intimate relationships and resisting pressure to have sex. Further information and a link to the guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

To support teachers to deliver these topics safely and with confidence, the department has produced RSHE Teacher Training Modules. The ‘intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health’ topic specifies that by the end of secondary school, pupils should know how the different STIs, including HIV/AIDS, are transmitted, how risk can be reduced through safer sex and the importance of and facts about testing. Pupils are also taught about HIV/AIDS at Key Stages 3 and 4 of the science curriculum. Further information and a link to the training modules can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health.

From primary education onwards, age appropriate Relationships Education supports pupils to treat each other with kindness, consideration and respect, including understanding the importance of respectful relationships and the different types of loving and healthy relationships that exist.

The department will be launching a public consultation by the end of this year on a draft revised RSHE guidance, so that interested parties can contribute their comments and ideas, including on sexual health and STIs, including HIV/AIDS education. The department will carefully consider responses received and intends to publish the final guidance in 2024.

11th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many entries there were for (1) GCSE, and (2) A level, in music for each of the past five years for which figures are available; and of these, how many entries were from (a) fee-paying schools, and (b) the maintained sector.

In 2022, the government published the national plan for music education to allow all children and young people in England the opportunity to progress their musical interests and talents, including professionally.

The plan addresses how the department will achieve this vision by 2030. This includes schools and academy trusts having clear approaches to supporting their pupils to progress with music beyond the age of 14, including opportunities to study music qualifications, such as graded exams, GCSEs, A levels and vocational and technical qualifications.

The number of pupils entering GCSE music in all state funded and independent institutions between the 2017/18 and 2021/22 academic years is available in the links below.

Data relating to GCSE entries in 2022/23 will be available in October 2023.

The number of pupils entering GCSE relates to those at the end of Key Stage 4.

The number of A level entries by pupils aged 16 to 18 in England in music since 2017/18 academic year can be found in the link below. The published data available includes a breakdown for state-funded pupils (those in state-funded schools and further education colleges) and all pupils (which additionally includes pupils in independent schools, hospital schools, Pupil Referral Units, and Alternative Provision). However, for A levels in music the difference in entries is almost entirely from independent schools.

Data relating to A level entries in 2022/23 will be available in November 2023.

The number of pupils entering GCSE music are available in the following links for each academic year:

The number of pupils entering A level music for academic years 2017/18 to 2021/22 is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/debe1398-86a0-4b07-5a7f-08dbb9ac4483.

17th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many pupils in England took A Levels in (1) Latin, and (2) Ancient Greek, for each of the last 10 years for which figures are available; and how many of these were from (a) state schools, and (b) independent schools.

The number of A level entries by students in England aged 16 to 18 in Latin or classical Greek since the 2012/13 academic year can be found in the attached table. A breakdown by state funded students only exists from the 2017/18 academic year.

Number of A level exam entries for Classical Greek in England

Academic Year

All students

All state-funded students

Independent schools

2021/22

187

19

168

2020/21

162

15

147

2019/20

185

9

176

2018/19

202

18

184

2017/18

234

24

210

2016/17

211

2015/16

213

2014/15

224

2013/14

250

2012/13

241

Number of A level exam entries for Classical Greek in England

Academic Year

All students

All state-funded students

Independent schools

2021/22

1,023

266

757

2020/21

1,018

274

744

2019/20

982

230

752

2018/19

1,078

282

796

2017/18

1,150

296

854

2016/17

1,173

2015/16

1,108

2014/15

1,224

2013/14

1,271

2012/13

1,249

[1] Exam entries are for the academic year for 16-18 students, after discounting. Includes pending awards.

[2] Figures are based on provision data (from 2017/18 to 2021/22) and revised/final data from (2012/13 to 2016/17).

[3] Subject breakdown on institution types (All state-funded students) not published prior to 2017/18.

12th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 21 September (HL2205), what similar steps they are taking, if any, to encourage the study of ancient Greek in state schools in England.

The recently launched Latin Excellence Programme will provide pupils in participating state schools in England with a broad Classics education in addition to Latin provision. However, the department has no plans to introduce new initiatives specifically for the study of ancient Greek.

All schools are free to teach ancient Greek as a language option if they so choose. Ancient Greek can also be taught in primary schools as a key stage 2 language option. It is included under the languages pillar of the GCSE EBacc performance measure.

6th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage the studying of Classics in state schools in England and Wales.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

To encourage the study of classics in state schools in England, the department has launched the new £3.9 million Latin Excellence Programme (LEP), beginning in September 2022. The LEP will be delivered by the National Centre of Excellence and run by Future Academies, a multi-academy trust based in London.

The aim of the LEP is to improve pupils’ attainment through increased access to, and uptake of, GCSE in Latin, whilst also contributing to pupils’ broader classics education. The National Centre of Excellence will work with up to 40 schools across the country to support high-quality key stage 3 and 4 teaching, using a common curriculum which teachers will be trained to deliver by the Centre.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to publish the second National Plan for Music Education.

The government is committed to ensuring that all children and young people have access to a good quality music education.

On 6 August 2021, the department announced plans to work with a panel of experts from across the music education sector to develop a refreshed national plan for music education. This will shape the future of music education and follows the publication of the non-statutory Model Music Curriculum on 26 March 2021. Further information on this curriculum can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-music-in-schools.

The advisory panel includes teachers, representatives from the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain and UK Music. It will also feature Darren Henley, Chief Executive of Arts Council England, whose independent review of music education in England informed the original national plan. Further information on his review can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/music-education-in-england-a-review-by-darren-henley-for-the-department-for-education-and-the-department-for-culture-media-and-sport.

The plan will be published early next year.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many school pupils in England have taken (1) GCSE, and (2) A Level, music in each year since 2011.

Data on the number of pupils in England who have taken GCSE music in each academic year since 2010/11 is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/7251178a-2269-43d4-8ae0-77cf21cf4409.

Data on the number of pupils in England who have taken A level music in each academic year since 2010/11 is available in the below table:

A level entries into music of all students aged 16-18[1] since academic year 2010/11

Year 2010/11 to 2020/21[2]. Coverage: England.

Year

Number of pupils entering music exam

2010/11

8,709

2011/12

8,203

2012/13

7,655

2013/14

7,184

2014/15

6,709

2015/16

6,155

2016/17

5,585

2017/18

5,440

2018/19

5,120

2019/20

5,000

2020/21

5,000

[1] Exam entries are for the current exam year for 16-18 students, after discounting. Includes pending awards.

[2] Data for 2010/11 to 2018/19 are revised and data for 2019/20 and 2020/21 are provisional.

[3] Entries since academic year 2010/11 to 2018/19 can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-attainment-at-19-years#a-levels-and-other-16-to-18-results.

[4] Entries for acadmic years 2019/20 and 2020/21 can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/f74d6b70-5a7e-43c7-9610-5b6aea6d0d7c.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take in response to the judgment on Tameside MBC v L (Unavailability of Regulated Therapeutic Placement), made in the High Court on 5 July; and whether they will publish any action plan for dealing with the matters arising from this judgment.

Every child growing up in care should have a stable, secure environment where they feel supported and can thrive. The judgment in the case of Tameside MBC v L raises many concerns about the lack of available children’s home provision for some of the most vulnerable children in care.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to make sure there is sufficient provision in their area to meet the needs of all children in their care. We understand that local authorities sometimes find themselves in positions where the most appropriate placement is difficult to access. This is why the government announced £24 million of investment at the Spending Review in November to start a programme of work to support local authorities maintain and expand provision in secure children’s homes. We are also currently developing a new capital funding programme for open residential children’s homes to aid local authorities to develop innovative approaches to reduce the number of children needing care over time, and to develop provision for children with more complex needs or children on remand.

The government launched a bold, broad and independently-led review, to take a comprehensive look at what is needed to make a real difference to the needs, experiences and outcomes of the children supported by children’s social care. The Care Review, led by Josh MacAlister, has now reached its first major milestone with the publication of its Case for Change, published on 17 June. The Case for Change recognises many of the issues raised in the judgment in this case. We eagerly await the review’s final report and recommendations, which will follow further consultation, analysis and public engagement. At that stage we will consider the review’s recommendations and any cost implications.

28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students took (1) GCSE, and (2) A Level, music in each year from 2010 to 2020.

This information is not yet available for the academic year 2019/20. It will become available once we release our provisional publications between November and December 2020. For GCSEs this will be available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/entries-for-gcse-november-2020-exam-series.

For A Levels this will be available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/a-level-and-other-16-18-results-2019-to-2020-provisional.

Information on the number of entries in music GCSEs[1][2][3][4][5] and A Levels in England for the academic years 2009/10 to 2018/19[6] inclusive is provided in the tables below.

Number of GCSE entries in music by pupils at the end of key stage 4

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

45,433

43,157

40,761

41,256

42,446

43,698

41,650

38,897

34,709

34,580

Source: Key stage 4 attainment data

Information on the number of entries in music A Levels in England for the academic years 2009/10 to 2018/19[7][8] inclusive is provided in the tables below.

Number of A level entries in music by pupils at the end of key stage 5[9]

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

8,841

8,709

8,203

7,655

7,184

6,709

6,155

5,585

5,440

5,120

Source: Key stage 5 attainment data

[1] Pupils are identified as being at the end of key stage 4 if they were on roll at the school and in year 11 at the time of the January school census for that year. Age is calculated as at 31 August for that year, and the majority of pupils at the end of key stage 4 were age 15 at the start of the academic year. Some pupils may complete this key stage in an earlier or later year group.

[2] Discounting has been applied where pupils have taken the same subject more than once and only one entry is counted in these circumstances. Prior to 2014, best entry discounting, where the pupil’s best result is used was in place in performance tables. From 2014 onwards, first entry rules were introduced, where a pupil’s first entry in that subject is used in performance tables. For more information on discounting and early entry, see: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/key-stage-4-qualifications-discount-codes-and-point-scores.

[3] All schools includes state-funded schools, independent schools, independent special schools, non-maintained special schools, hospital schools, pupil referral units and alternative provision. Alternative provision includes academy and free school alternative provision. Since September 2013, general further education colleges and sixth-form colleges have been able to directly enrol 14 to 16 year-olds. The academic year 2014/15 was the first year in which colleges have pupils at the end of key stage 4. From 2016 onwards, entries and achievements for these pupils are included in figures as state-funded schools.

[4] Total number of entries include pupils who were absent, whose results are pending and results which are ungraded or unclassified.

[5] Includes GCSE full courses, level 2 equivalents, GCSE double awards and AS levels.

[6] 2009/10 to 2017/18 results taken from final data; 2018/19 results taken from revised data.

[7] 2009/1010 to 2017/18 results taken from final data; 2018/19 results taken from revised data and includes all schools and colleges in England.

[8] Covers students aged 16 to 18 at the beginning of the academic year, i.e. 31 August.

[9] This is the number of entries, rather than the number of students, so may include resits.

15th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether the Animal Welfare (Electronic Collars) (England) Regulations 2023 to ban the use of electronic shock collars on cats and dogs in England are still due to come into force from 1 February.

The Animal Welfare (Electronic Collars) (England) Regulations 2023 were considered in Grand Committee on 19 June and must be considered in the Other Place before they can come into force. The Government remains committed to banning the use of electronic shock collars in England. Parliamentary business will be announced in the usual way.

7th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have made any studies about the impact of domestic firework use on domestic animals, including cats and dogs; and, if not, whether they will commission one.

It is an offence under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to cause unnecessary suffering to an animal, and this includes through the misuse of fireworks. Users of fireworks need to use them responsibly and be aware of animals close by, and those found guilty of causing animals unnecessary suffering can face up to five years’ imprisonment. We have no current plans to commission any studies on the impact of domestic firework use on domestic animals.

17th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they intend to introduce legislation to ban the use of electric shock collars on cats and dogs in England.

The Animal Welfare (Electronic Collars) (England) Regulations will make it an offence to attach an electronic shock collar to a cat or dog, or to be in possession of a remote-control device capable of activating such a collar when attached to a cat or dog. The regulations have been considered in this House and will be considered in the Other Place in due course. Parliamentary business will be announced in the usual way.

17th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they intend to regulate the breeding of cats to protect cats and their kittens.

Under the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 (the Regulations), anyone in the business of breeding and selling cats as pets needs to have a valid licence issued by their local authority. Licensees must meet strict statutory minimum welfare standards which are enforced by local authorities who have powers to issue, refuse, vary or revoke licences.

Defra has been working on a post-implementation review of the Regulations in line with the requirements of the Regulations’ review clause. This review considers whether the Regulations have met their objectives, and where there could be scope to further improve the protections they provide to breeding cats and their offspring. The review will be published soon.

19th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Benyon on 13 July (HL Deb col 1885), whether they intend to include cats at the outset of any proposed pet abduction offence.

We have listened carefully to views expressed on pet abduction during the passage of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill and we will take this feedback into consideration when delivering this measure.

19th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Benyon on 13 July (HL9238), what is the makeup of the Veterinary Medicines Directorate’s internal scientific review committee; what process and criteria the scientific review committee follows to develop its assessment report; and what documents are provided to the scientific review committee by Veterinary Medicines Directorate assessors.

The scientific review committee for pharmaceutical products is chaired by the Head of Pharmaceuticals. Membership includes all pharmaceutical assessors (quality, safety and efficacy), representatives from Regulatory Affairs, Pharmacovigilance, and other government bodies including the UK Health Security Agency, Health and Safety Executive, Food Standards Agency, Environment Agency, and the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs of Northern Ireland. Other agencies may also be invited on an ad hoc basis.

The documents for the formal review meeting include the assessment report, list of questions to be addressed by the applicant and an executive summary which highlights the main issues and the benefit-risk conclusion.

The scientific review committee provides a formal peer -review forum, where each application is summarised, and key issues raised and discussed. The operation of the committee is described in internal operating procedures. Formal minutes are produced. The committee output is to endorse the list of questions for the applicant, decide whether these are likely to be resolvable, agree the benefit-risk conclusion and decide whether or not further scientific advice from the Veterinary Products Committee should be sought.

Similar scientific committee and processes are in place for non-pharmaceutical products (immunological and biological products).