Lord Grocott Portrait

Lord Grocott

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 2nd July 2001


1 APPG membership (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Heritage Rail
1 Former APPG membership
Lithuania
Built Environment Committee
14th Apr 2021 - 31st Jan 2023
International Relations and Defence Committee
25th May 2016 - 28th Jan 2021
Leader's Group on Working Practices
27th Jul 2010 - 26th Apr 2011
Committee for Privileges and Conduct (Lords)
10th Jun 2002 - 28th Nov 2008
Communications and Digital Committee
18th Feb 2008 - 26th Nov 2008
Procedure and Privileges Committee
10th Jun 2002 - 28th Jan 2008
Committee of Selection (Lords)
10th Jun 2002 - 28th Jan 2008
Administration and Works Committee (Lords)
10th Jun 2002 - 28th Jan 2008
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
29th May 2002 - 25th Jan 2008
Refreshment Committee (Lords)
25th Nov 2002 - 18th Nov 2004
House of Lords Offices Committee
10th Jun 2002 - 7th Nov 2002
Refreshment Sub Committee
10th Jun 2002 - 7th Nov 2002
Lord in Waiting (Whip)
11th Jun 2001 - 29th May 2002


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 6th March 2024
10:30
Division Votes
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Automated Vehicles Bill [HL]
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 112 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 204
Speeches
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill
My Lords, I agreed with so much of what the right reverend Prelate has just said and I apologise if …
Written Answers
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Ministry of Defence: Public Appointments
To ask His Majesty's Government what public appointments are made directly by the Secretary of State for Defence.
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 5th December 2023
House of Lords (Hereditary Peers) (Abolition of By-Elections) Bill [HL] 2023-24
A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 so as to abolish the system of by-elections for hereditary …
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Grocott has voted in 338 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

8 Dec 2021 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Grocott voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 38 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 125 Noes - 162
16 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Grocott voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 51 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 145 Noes - 179
View All Lord Grocott Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
(32 debate interactions)
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
(25 debate interactions)
Baroness Neville-Rolfe (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(17 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(96 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(26 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(18 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Grocott's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Grocott, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


6 Bills introduced by Lord Grocott


A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 to remove the by-election system for the election of hereditary peers.

Lords - 60%

Last Event - Committee: 1st Sitting : House Of Lords
Friday 9th December 2016
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 so as to abolish the system of by-elections for hereditary peers

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 3rd December 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 so as to abolish the system of by-elections for hereditary peers

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 13th March 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 so as to abolish the system of by-elections for hereditary peers.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 5th December 2023

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 so as to abolish the system of by-elections for hereditary peers

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Monday 18th July 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to repeal the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Thursday 12th June 2014

Lord Grocott has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


88 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11 Other Department Questions
25th Jan 2024
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker during the past 14 years in respect of which public bills that started in the House of Commons has a motion been tabled to decline to give the bill a second reading in the House of Lords.

There have been five such cases since 2010, including the motion on 29 January 2024 relating to the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill. The other four bills, along with the dates they were debated on second reading, were the Health and Social Care Bill (11-12 October 2011); the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill (3-4 June 2013); the Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill (4 November 2014); and the Illegal Migration Bill (10 May 2023).

30th Nov 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what checks are made to determine whether peers on the Register are willing to put their names forward for hereditary peer by-elections; and how often any such checks are made.

All those on the register of hereditary peers maintained under Standing Order 9(4) who were members of the House before the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999 indicated their willingness to stand in hereditary peer by-elections, either before the first edition of the Register was issued on 13 November 2002, or subsequently. Hereditary peers who have succeeded to their titles since 1999 are required to petition the House to “direct the Clerk of the Parliaments to enter [them] on the register of hereditary peers who wish to stand in any by-election for election to Your Lordships’ House”.

Every peer on the register is contacted before each by-election to ask if they wish to be a candidate, and if a peer no longer wishes to be included on the register, they can request that their name be removed from it at any time.

30th Nov 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether he will publish a copy of the Register of Hereditary Peers with the year each peer was added to the Register.

The Register of Hereditary Peers (HL Paper 2) was first published on 13 November 2002, and is published at the start of each session of Parliament. The table below gives the year in which each peer was first listed in the Register as published at the start of each Session.

Title

Year of first inclusion in HL Paper 2

Aberdeen and Temair, M.

2021

Abergavenny, M.

2002

Addison, V.

2002

Ailsa, M.

2016

Albemarle, E.

2010

Aldenham, L.

2002

Aldington, L.

2002

Alexander of Tunis, E.

2002

Ampthill, L.

2012

Annaly, L.

2006

Ashbourne, L.

2022

Ashburton, L.

2021

Aylesford, E.

2008

Baillieu, L.

2022

Balfour, E.

2004

Beaufort, D.

2019

Bedford, D.

2003

Belper, L.

2002

Belhaven and Stenton, L.*

2022

Bicester, L.

2019

Biddulph, L.

2002

Birkett, L.

2021

Bolton, L.

2007

Boston, L.

2007

Braybrooke, L.

2019

Brentford, V.

2003

Bridges, L.

2019

Bristol, M.

2006

Bruntisfield, L.

2008

Buccleuch and Queensberry, D.

2008

Burnham, L.

2005

Cadman, L.

2002

Cairns, E.

2002

Calverley, L.

2002

Carew, L.

2002

Carlisle, E.

2003

Carnarvon, E.

2019

Cawley, L.

2002

Chorley, L.

2019

Clanwilliam, E. (L. Clanwilliam)

2009

Clydesmuir, L.

2002

Cobham, V.

2007

Cochrane of Cults, L.

2019

Combermere, V.

2002

Cranbrook, E.

2002

Cromer, E.

2002

Dacre, B.

2016

Darcy de Knayth, L.

2008

Daresbury, L.

2002

Darling, L.

2006

Darnley, E. (Clifton, L.)

2019

Daventry, V.

2002

Davies, L.

2004

De Clifford, L.

2019

De La Warr, E.

2002

De L’Isle, V.

2002

De Ramsey, L.

2002

Devonport, V.

2002

Dormer, L.

2019

Downshire, M. (Hillsborough, E.)

2019

Drogheda, E. (L. Moore)

2002

Dudley, E.

2015

Dudley, L.

2003

Dundonald, E.

2002

Durham, E.

2008

Dysart, E.*

2022

Eglinton and Winton, E.

2019

Eldon, E.

2019

Elibank, L.

2019

Ellenborough, L.

2014

Enniskillen, E. (L. Grinstead)

2003

Erne, E. (L. Fermanagh)

2019

Ferrers, E.

2014

Fisher, L.

2013

Fortescue, E.

2003

Gage, V. (L. Gage)

2002

Gainsborough, E.

2012

Glenconner, L.

2015

Glendyne, L.

2008

Gormanston, V. (L. Gormanston)

2002

Grafton, D.

2012

Grantley, L.

2002

Gray, L.

2004

Grimston of Westbury, L.

2016

Grimthorpe, L.

2004

Haddington, E.

2019

Halifax, E.

2002

Hamilton and Brandon, D.

2012

Hamilton of Dalzell, L.

2008

Hankey, L.

2017

Harrowby, E.

2008

Hayter, L.

2014

Hazlerigg, L.*

2022

Hemphill, L.

2013

Herbert, L.

2002

Hereford, V.

2006

Hill, V.

2004

Hindlip, L.

2002

Hives, L.

2019

HolmPatrick, L.

2002

Hood, V.

2003

Iddesleigh, E.

2005

Ironside, L.

2022

Iveagh, E.

2002

Kenilworth, L.

2002

Kennet, L.

2012

Kilbracken, L.

2009

Kilmarnock, L.

2015

Kimberley, E.

2003

Latymer, L.

2004

Lauderdale, E.

2009

Lawrence, L.

2002

Leathers, V.

2002

Leven and Melville, E.

2017

Lichfield, E.

2007

Limerick, E. (L. Foxford)

2003

Lloyd George of Dwyfor, E.

2012

Lucan, E. (L. Bingham)

2017

Mackintosh of Halifax, V.

2002

McNair, L.

2005

Margadale, L.

2003

Margesson, V.

2016

Marlborough, D.

2015

Massereene and Ferrard, V. (L. Oriel)

2002

Melville, V.

2012

Merthyr, L.

2017

Meston, L.

2002

Middleton, L.

2015

Milford, L.

2002

Milner of Leeds, L.

2004

Milverton, L.

2002

Monckton of Brenchley, V.

2007

Monk Bretton, L.

2022

Monson, L.

2012

Moran, L.

2015

Morris, L.

2014

Morris of Kenwood, L.

2006

Morton, E.

2017

Mostyn, L.

2015

Mountgarret, V. (L. Mountgarret)

2006

Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton, L.

2022

Napier and Ettrick, L.

2013

Nathan, L.

2009

Nelson of Stafford, L.

2007

Newall, L.

2002

Noel-Buxton, L.

2015

Normanton, E. (Somerton, L.)

2019

Norrie, L.

2002

Norwich, V.*

2022

Nunburnholme, L.

2007

Onslow, E.

2012

Oranmore and Browne, L. (L. Mereworth)

2003

Oxfuird, V.

2005

Penrhyn, L.

2004

Polwarth, L.

2006

Poole, L.

2002

Powerscourt, V. (L. Powerscourt)

2016

Rathcavan, L.

2002

Renwick, L.

2021

Richmond, Lennox and Gordon, D.

2019

Robertson of Oakridge, L.

2009

Rochdale, V.*

2022

Rossmore, L.

2022

Rowallan, L.

2002

Roxburghe, D.

2021

Russell, E.

2016

Rutland, D.

2002

St Davids, V.

2009

St Levan, L.

2014

Savile, L.

2009

Scarbrough, E.

2004

Seaford, L.

2002

Selborne, E.

2022

Sempill, L.

2002

Shaftesbury, E.

2007

Simon of Wythenshawe, L.*

2022

Snowdon, E.

2019

Somerleyton, L.

2013

Southampton, L.

2016

Spens, L.

2007

Stockton, E.

2003

Strange, L.

2006

Sutherland, D.

2002

Swansea, L.

2006

Swinfen, L.*

2022

Temple of Stowe, E.

2014

Terrington, L.

2002

Teviot, L.

2002

Tollemache, L.

2002

Torrington, V.

2002

Vernon, L.

2002

Vivian, L.

2005

Walpole, L.

2022

Weir, V.

2002

Wemyss and March, E.

2009

Wharton, L.

2003

Wigram, L.

2019

Wilton, E. (Ebury, L.)

2002

Windlesham, L.

2012

Wise, L.

2014

Woolton, E.

2002

Wrenbury, L.

2014

Wynford, L.

2012

Yarborough, E.

2002

*Peers who have been added to the register since the most recent edition of HL Paper 2 was published on 10 May 2022.

30th Nov 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether he will publish a list of each peer on the Register of Hereditary Peers that has contested a hereditary peer by-election; and in each case, on what date or dates those by-elections took place.

The information is given in the attached table. Hereditary peers who have been successful candidates in by-elections, and who are therefore no longer included in the Register, are not listed. The ‘by-election name’ in each case is the title of the former member whose death or resignation from the House precipitated the by-election.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what has been the (1) individual, and (2) total, cost of the five most recent hereditary peer by-elections in the House of Lords.

The costs incurred in conducting the five most recent hereditary peer by-elections are set out in the table below. Three of these ballots were for two vacancies.

Date

Cost (inclusive of VAT)

Rotherwick, L. – Conservative

March 2022

£420

Brabazon of Tara, L., Swinfen, L. (combined) – Conservative

July 2022

£600

Ullswater, V., Colwyn, L. (combined) – Whole House

October 2022

£900

Listowel, E. – Crossbench

October 2022

£390

Astor of Hever, L., Home, E. (combined) – Conservative

October 2022

£600

TOTAL

£2,910

These costs represent the fees to be paid to Civica, the contractor that supports the Administration in conducting by-elections. They exclude the cost of time spent by House of Lords staff, for whom such work forms part of their normal duties, which cannot therefore be costed separately.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what was the cost of delivering each of the seven hereditary peer by-elections this year in respect of (1) outside contractors, and (2) the time of House staff.

There have been five hereditary peer by-elections this year, with three Conservative vacancies filled by means of a single by-election. The cost in respect of outside contractors was as follows:

Date

Civica invoice (inclusive of VAT)

Mar, C. – Whole House

June 2021

£1,440

Selborne, E., Denham, L., Selsdon, L. (combined) – Conservative

June 2021

£600

Elton, L. — Whole House

July 2021

£1,440

Rea, L. – Labour

July 2021

£0 (no ballot)

Simon, V. – Whole House

November 2021

£1,440

TOTAL

£4,920

These costs were in addition to the cost of House of Lords staff time spent organising the by-elections. Such time forms part of their normal duties and therefore cannot be costed separately.

13th Oct 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many Private Members’ Bills in each of the last five sessions were introduced in the House of Lords; and, for each session, how many of them received Royal Assent.

The figures for private members’ bills that started in the House of Lords are set out below. Figures are provided from the 2014–15 session, as the 2019 session lasted less than a month, up to and including the present session to date.

Session

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

2017–19

2019

2019–21

2021–22 to date

PMBs introduced in the House of Lords

34

48

51

74

40

86

30

Lords-starting PMBs receiving Royal Assent

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

21st Jul 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, following the recent hereditary peers by-election after the retirement of Lord Elton, how many peers (1) were entitled to vote, (2) voted; how many ballot papers were spoilt; and what the percentage turnout was.

The details of the by-election to replace Lord Elton are as follows:

Vacancy Created By:

Number of Members eligible to vote:

Number of Members who voted:

Number of spoiled ballot papers:

Percentage turnout:

Lord Elton

785

237

0

30%

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, in the hereditary peers' by-election following the retirement of the Countess of Mar, (1) how many peers were entitled to vote, (2) how many peers voted, (3) how many ballot papers were spoiled, and (4) what was the percentage turnout.

The details of the by-election to replace the Countess of Mar are as follows:

Vacancy Created By:

Number of Members eligible to vote:

Number of Members who voted:

Number of spoiled ballot papers:

Percentage turnout:

The Countess of Mar

783

317

0

40%

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans he has to arrange for media access to the counts for by-elections of hereditary peers.

The Procedure and Privileges Committee agreed on 2 March that the forthcoming hereditary peer by-elections to replace the Earl of Selborne, Lord Denham, Lord Selsdon, the Countess of Mar, Lord Rea and Lord Elton should be carried out using electronic means. Electors will vote using a secure on-line portal. The count will be an electronic process with the manual addition of a small number of postal ballots. There are no plans to allow media access to the count as it is an electronic process. Full details of the results will be available to the media and other interested parties on-line after the result has been announced in the Chamber.

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which members of His Majesty's Government are not in receipt of a ministerial salary.

The full list of ministers can be found on gov.uk at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/ministerial-appointments-november-2023

The ministers currently appointed who are not in receipt of a ministerial salary are: Richard Holden MP, Rt Hon John Glen MP, Baroness Nevile-Rolfe DBE CMG, Lord Ahmad, Rt Hon Lord Benyon, the Earl of Minto, Lord Bellamy KC, Rt Hon Sir John Whittingdale OBE MP, Andrew Griffith MP, Viscount Camrose, Lord Markham CBE, Rt Hon Earl Howe CBE, Lord Johnson CBE, Lord Offord of Garvel, Baroness Barran MBE, and Baroness Swinburne.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 21 September (HL9981), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what has been the average tenure of office notwithstanding machinery of government changes, during the past 10 years, of (1) the Prime Minister, (2) the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and (3) the Secretary of State for (a) Foreign Affairs, (b) Home Affairs, (c) Education, (d) Health, (e) Defence, (f) Transport, (g) Culture, Media and Sport, (h) Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (i) Work and Pensions, (j) Northern Ireland, (k) Scotland, and (l) Wales.

The Cabinet Office does not collate this data centrally. Notwithstanding, to assist the noble Lord’s scrutiny, a list has been compiled from public information. The 10 year period used is 4 October 2013 - 4 October 2023.

Where Ministers were in post on 4 October 2013, our calculations have used the start of their tenure, which may precede that date.

Minister

Average Tenure from 4/10/2013-4/10/2023 (Rounded to the nearest day)

Prime Minister

979

Chancellor of the Exchequer

699

Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

699

Secretary of State for Home Affairs

699

Secretary of State for Education

489

Secretary of State for Health

674

Secretary of State for Defence

729

Secretary of State for Transport

809

Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport

368

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

506

Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

543

Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

578

Secretary of State for Scotland

1219

Secretary of State for Wales

674

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what has been the average tenure of office notwithstanding machinery of government changes, during the past 10 years, of (1) the Prime Minister, (2) the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and (3) the Secretary of State for (a) Foreign Affairs, (b) Home Affairs, (c) Education, (d) Health, (e) Defence, (f) Transport, (g) Culture, Media and Sport, (h) Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (i) Work and Pensions, (j) Northern Ireland, (k) Scotland, and (l) Wales.

The Cabinet Office does not calculate the average tenure of ministerial office. However, details of ministerial office-holders are on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/ministers. Details of the previous holders of each ministerial post dating back to 2010 are also available by selecting each ministerial role on this webpage, then 'previous holders’.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many private members’ bills starting in (1) the House of Commons, and (2) the House of Lords, have received Royal Assent since the 2019 general election.

Details on how many private members' bills starting in both the House of Commons and House of Lords from the 2019 General Election to the 2021-22 session are available on the Parliament website at: https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/research-briefings/sn04568/. In the current parliamentary session the following private members' bills have reached Royal Assent:

Bill title

House of introduction

Ballot Secrecy Bill

Lords

Carer’s Leave Bill

Commons

Child Support Collection (Domestic Abuse) Bill

Commons

Co-operatives, Mutuals and Friendly Societies Bill

Commons

Electricity Transmission (Compensation) Bill (formerly Electricity and Gas Transmission (Compensation) Bill)

Commons

Employment (Allocation of Tips) Bill

Commons

Mobile Homes (Pitch Fees) Bill

Commons

Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Bill

Commons

Offenders (Day of Release from Detention) Bill

Commons

Pensions Dashboards (Prohibition of Indemnification) Bill

Commons

Protection from Redundancy (Pregnancy and Family Leave) Bill

Commons

Shark Fins Bill

Commons

Supported Housing (Regulatory Oversight) Bill

Commons

In addition, the following private members' bills are awaiting Royal Assent. These bills originated in the House of Commons:

  • Child Support (Enforcement) Bill

  • Employment Relations (Flexible Working) Bill

  • Equipment Theft (Prevention) Bill

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many life peers have been appointed on the advice of the former Prime Minster, Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP; and how these appointments were distributed between the following parliamentary groupings: (1) Conservative, (2) Labour, (3) Liberal Democrat, and (4) the Crossbenches.

Publicly available information shows that 87 peerages have been created on the advice of Rt Hon Boris Johnson. 44 of these were Conservative, 13 were Labour and 19 were Crossbench. Ultimately it is for the Prime Minister to recommend to the Sovereign which individuals ought to be appointed to the House of Lords.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 16 November (HL Deb col 888), how many additional Conservative peers they consider it will be necessary to appoint to ensure that the Conservative Party is not “underrepresented in the Lords”.

Appointments to the House of Lords are a matter for the Prime Minister to advise the Sovereign. There is a longstanding convention that the Leader of the Opposition may nominate political peers from, or representing, their own political party. Recent nomination lists include both government and opposition peers as well as cross bench and non-affiliated peers.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether it is their policy to maintain the current party balance in the House of Lords, whereby the party of His Majesty’s Government has over 90 peers more than the Official Opposition.

Appointments to the House of Lords are a matter for the Prime Minister to advise the Sovereign. There is a longstanding convention that the Leader of the Opposition may nominate political peers from, or representing, their own political party. Recent nomination lists include both government and opposition peers as well as cross bench and non-affiliated peers.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government to list the peers who have been appointed to the House since 2010 to serve as ministers; and, in each case, how long the peer remained in ministerial office.

Life peers are appointed by Her Majesty the Queen to serve in the House of Lords for life, or until they retire from the House. Such peers may continue to provide public service long after they have ceased to be a Minister of the Crown – as the Noble Lord will, I am sure, attest himself.

The Government does not hold this information centrally.

Notwithstanding, to assist the Noble Lord’s scrutiny, the attached list of ministers who were appointed to the House of Lords within a month of appointment to Government has been compiled from information in the public domain. For completeness, we have provided information from 1997 to now.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
18th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ask the House of Lords Appointments Commission to vet the candidates who stand in the hereditary peer by-election to be held on 8 February.

There are no plans for candidates who stand for election to hereditary seats in the House of Lords to be subject to vetting by the House of Lords Appointments Commission.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord True on 11 February (HL12711) and 8 March (HL13422), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what is their assessment of the equivalent figures for (1) the Labour, and (2) the Liberal Democrat, Party when following a similar methodology to the one used to determine underrepresentation of the Conservative Party in the House of Lords.

Reflecting the method in my previous answers, the Liberal Democrat party is over-represented; the Conservative Party is significantly under-represented; the Labour Party has a proportion of seats in this House that is less than its seat share in the Commons, but not by a significant amount.

Notwithstanding that, there are different ways of assessing the issue. For example, one may wish to consider the share of this House excluding cross-benchers and bishops, or look at composition of peers taking a political whip. Under both measures, Liberal Democrats are significantly over-represented.

The noble Lord will be able to make his own further calculations from public domain information, if he wishes.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 11 February (HL12711), what is their assessment of the equivalent figures for (1) the Labour, and (2) the Liberal Democrat, Party when following a similar methodology to the one used to determine underrepresentation of the Conservative Party in the House of Lords.

Based on that methodology, my assessment is that the Liberal Democrat Party, in particular, is significantly over-represented in the House of Lords.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
28th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord True on 27 January (HL Deb, col 1600), what is the statistical basis for the statement that "the Conservative Party has been underrepresented in your Lordships’ House".

The Conservative voice is under-represented in the Lords and has been for some time. The Conservative Party has been the largest party in the 2010, 2015, 2017 and 2019 general elections. In the 2019 general election, Conservatives won 56 per cent of the seats. Yet the Conservative Party still only has 33 per cent of the seats in the Lords, a figure which has remained substantively unchanged despite that repeated pattern of strong electoral support.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
30th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the representation of the (1) Conservative, (2) Labour, and (3) Liberal Democrat, parties in the House of Lords; and what plans they have to take that level of representation into account in any future recommendations for life peerage appointments to the House.

Members of the House of Lords are appointed from a wide range of backgrounds to ensure the House is able to carry out its scrutiny work effectively. In line with established convention, the number of nominations to be offered to individual political parties is a matter for the Prime Minister.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 11 August (HL7357), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what was the total cost of the work of the four Parliamentary Boundary Commissions, from the passage of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011 to the publication of their reports of September 2018.

The total expenditure of the Boundary Commissions for England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland in the period 2010/11 to 2017/18, and up to September 2018 in 2018/19, was £15.6m. This includes the cost of the 2018 Boundary Review which was approximately £7.1m.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total cost of the work of the four Parliamentary Boundary Commissions, from the passage of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011 to the publication of their reports of September 2018.

Figures for expenditure over each financial year are published by the Boundary Commissions for England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland as part of their annual reports. These are available online.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
25th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government who are the Trade Envoys; to which country each Trade Envoy has been assigned; and what is the party affiliation of each Trade Envoy and the length of time in post.

There are currently 36 Prime Minister’s Trade Envoys and information as below.

Country

Trade Envoy

Date of PM Appointment

LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN

Colombia, Chile, Peru, Argentina

Mark Menzies MP (Con)

September 2016 & September 2017 for Argentina

Panama, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica

Baroness Hooper of Liverpool (Con)

October 2020

Brazil

Marco Longhi MP (Con)

August 2021

AFRICA

Algeria

Lord Risby of Haverhill (Con)

November 2012

Uganda & Rwanda (watching brief for DRC)

Lord Popat (Con)

January 2016

Egypt and Cameroon

Sir Jeffrey Donaldson MP (DUP)

January 2016 & August 2021 for Cameroon

Nigeria

Helen Grant MP (Con)

October 2020

Kenya

Theo Clarke MP (Con)

Reappointed May 2023

South Africa & Mauritius

Andrew Selous MP(Con)

September 2017 & January 2023 for Mauritius

Tanzania

Lord Walney (Non-Affiliated)

August 2021

Ghana

Baroness Hoey (Non-Affiliated)

August 2021

Tunisia & Libya

Yvonne Fovargue MP (Lab)

March 2022

Angola, Zambia & Ethiopia

Laurence Robertson MP (Con)

Reappointed March 2023

MIDDLE EAST

Israel

Lord Austin of Dudley (Non-affiliated)

October 2020

Iran

Lord Lamont of Lerwick (Con)

January 2016

Lebanon

Lord Risby of Haverhill (Con)

August 2019

Iraq

Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne (Con)

January 2014

Jordan, Kuwait & Palestine Territories

Baroness Morris of Bolton (Con)

November 2012

UAE

Gareth Thompson MP (Con)

March 2023


EECAN

Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan

Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne (Con)

April 2016 & Kazakhstan July 2017

Mongolia

Daniel Kawczynski MP (Con)

October 2020

Ukraine

Baroness Meyer (Con)

October 2020

Turkey

Lord Hutton (Lab)

May 2022

EUROPE

Switzerland & Liechtenstein

Sir Stephen Timms MP (Lab)

August 2021

Western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia)

Martin Vickers MP (Con)

October 2020

APAC

Australia

Lord Botham (Crossbench)

August 2021

Taiwan

Lord Faulkner (Lab)

January 2016

Japan

Greg Clark MP (Con)

May 2022

Thailand, Myanmar, Brunei & Vietnam

Mark Garnier MP (Con)

October 2020 & for Vietnam January 2023

Singapore

Lord Sarfraz (Con)

January 2022

Republic of Korea

Sir John Whittingdale (Con)

May 2022

Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines & ASEAN

Richard Graham MP (Con)

Reappointed March 2023

Cambodia & Laos

Heather Wheeler MP (Con)

Reappointed March 2023

New Zealand

David Mundell MP (Con)

Reappointed March 2023

SOUTH ASIA

Bangladesh

Rushanara Ali MP (Lab)

March 2016

Sri Lanka

Lord Mervyn Davies of Abersoch (Crossbench)

October 2020

North America

Canada

Dame Maria Miller MP (Con)

May 2022

USA (specific focus on driving trade promotion with existing MOU states)

Sir Conor Burns MP (Con)

May 2023

Lord Johnson of Lainston
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will establish a beneficial ownership register of overseas entities which own UK property, as envisaged in the draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill.

As set out in the Written Ministerial Statement I made on 2nd November 2021, the Government remains committed to establishing a new beneficial ownership register of overseas entities that own UK property. This register will help combat money laundering and achieve greater transparency in the UK property market. We will legislate when parliamentary time allows.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what public appointments are made directly by the Secretary of State for Education.

Public appointments made by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education are published on the Public Appointment Order in Council; please see the attached document. The appointments are publicly announced on GOV.UK and can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/department-for-education-non-executive-appointments. The order includes those roles where official sign off by the King and/or the Prime Minister is required.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many secondary academy trusts comprise: (1) single academies, (2) two academies, (3) three academies, (4) four academies, and (5) five academies.

In May 2020, there are 2,675 secondary academies, free schools, studio schools and university technical colleges (UTCs), out of a total of 3,453 state-funded secondary schools. This is 77% of all secondary schools. Please note that the number of secondary schools includes middle deemed secondary schools, 16+ schools, all through schools and secondary schools.

Academy trusts may comprise of either one phase of education, or multiple phases of education. The table below provides the number of academies within academy trusts that have at least one secondary academy. The number of academies within these trusts also includes primary, special and alternative provision (AP) academies, free schools, studio schools and UTCs.

Table 1: Number of academy trusts, by size of academy trust, and number of academies within those trusts

Number of academies in a trust

Number of academy trusts with one or more secondary academy

Number of primary, secondary, special and AP academies within these trusts

1

786

786

2

138

276

3

106

318

4

77

308

5

72

360

More than 5

277

3574

Total

1456

5622

Source: Get information about schools, taken from 1 May 2020.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of secondary schools are now academies.

In May 2020, there are 2,675 secondary academies, free schools, studio schools and university technical colleges (UTCs), out of a total of 3,453 state-funded secondary schools. This is 77% of all secondary schools. Please note that the number of secondary schools includes middle deemed secondary schools, 16+ schools, all through schools and secondary schools.

Academy trusts may comprise of either one phase of education, or multiple phases of education. The table below provides the number of academies within academy trusts that have at least one secondary academy. The number of academies within these trusts also includes primary, special and alternative provision (AP) academies, free schools, studio schools and UTCs.

Table 1: Number of academy trusts, by size of academy trust, and number of academies within those trusts

Number of academies in a trust

Number of academy trusts with one or more secondary academy

Number of primary, secondary, special and AP academies within these trusts

1

786

786

2

138

276

3

106

318

4

77

308

5

72

360

More than 5

277

3574

Total

1456

5622

Source: Get information about schools, taken from 1 May 2020.

8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which parts of the Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill would not have been allowed had the UK remained a member of the EU.

The Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill goes further than Article 13 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU in a number of ways. In particular The Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill introduces a proportionate accountability mechanism, involving the Animal Sentience Committee. It applies to all policy areas and has no exemptions.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the Department for International Development's budget relates to Africa south of the Sahara.

The UK spends more than £5 billion in ODA in Africa each year, through both country specific bilateral programming and through UK funding to multilateral organisations.

Details of DFID spend are contained in Statistics on International Development. The most recent publication contains provisional aid spend for 2019 and shows DFID region or country specific bilateral official development assistance (ODA) spend in Africa in 2019 was £2.448 billion.

In addition to region/country specific bilateral ODA, £2.607 billion was spent on projects where it has not been possible to assign to any single recipient country or region. A proportion of this will have been spent in Africa.

DFID’s total ODA spend in 2019 was £11.107 billion.

Spend in Africa above does not include imputed shares of UK funding to the general core budgets of multilateral organisations. The latest spend numbers available are for 2018, and show the imputed UK share of Multilateral Net ODA spent in sub-Saharan Africa was £2.2 billion.

6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the current annual cost of the Trade Envoy programme is.

In 2019-20 the cost of the Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy Programme was £651,387. All costs incurred are subject to departmental restrictions and guidelines which apply to the programme’s use of public funds.

6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government to list the current trade envoys broken down by their membership of the (1) Conservative party, (2) Labour party, (3) Liberal Democrat party, (4) Crossbench group in the House of Lords, and (5) Non-affiliated peers in the House of Lords.

There are currently 36 Trade Envoys. A full list including their political affiliation is below.

Trade Envoy

Political party

1

Andrew Selous

Conservative (1)

2

Baroness Hooper

Conservative (1)

3

Baroness Meyer

Conservative (1)

4

Baroness Morris of Bolton

Conservative (1)

5

Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

Conservative (1)

6

Conor Burns

Conservative (1)

7

Damien Moore

Conservative (1)

8

Daniel Kawczynski

Conservative (1)

9

Darren Henry

Conservative (1)

10

David Mundell

Conservative (1)

11

Dr. Andrew Murrison

Conservative (1)

12

Felicity Buchan

Conservative (1)

13

Heather Wheeler

Conservative (1)

14

Helen Grant

Conservative (1)

15

Katherine Fletcher

Conservative (1)

16

Laurence Robertson

Conservative (1)

17

Lord Astor of Hever

Conservative (1)

18

Lord Lamont

Conservative (1)

19

Lord Popat

Conservative (1)

20

Lord Risby of Haverhill

Conservative (1)

21

Marco Longhi

Conservative (1)

22

Mark Eastwood

Conservative (1)

23

Mark Garnier

Conservative (1)

24

Mark Menzies

Conservative (1)

25

Martin Vickers

Conservative (1)

26

Richard Graham

Conservative (1)

27

Theo Clarke

Conservative (1)

28

Lord Faulkner

Labour (2)

29

Rushanara Ali

Labour (2)

30

Stephen Timms

Labour (2)

31

Lord Botham

Crossbench (4)

32

Baroness Hoey

Non-affiliated (5)

33

Lord Austin

Non-affiliated (5)

34

Lord Davies of Abersoch

Non-affiliated (5)

35

Lord Walney

Non-affiliated (5)

36

Sir Jeffrey Donaldson

Democratic Unionist Party

6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the change in title from the Prime Minister's Trade Envoys to Trade Envoys indicates a change in accountability.

There has been no change in title or accountability of the ‘Prime Minister’s Trade Envoys’, however the formal title is occasionally shortened to ‘Trade Envoys’ for brevity.

6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what factors determine which of the UK's trading partners are allocated a trade envoy.

The Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy Programme supports British businesses overseas and attracts investment into the UK. The programme works in collaboration with other trade promotion activities, and it focuses on emerging and high growth markets where additional senior interactions can be valuable, or larger economies where multiple interactions at different levels are effective. Trade Envoys are appointed to markets where there are opportunities to increase bilateral trade.

The Department for International Trade is constantly reviewing suitable countries, regions, and markets to identify where the appointment of a Trade Envoy can be of greatest benefit to the trade and investment aims of the UK, with the Prime Minister ultimately making the decision to appoint.

10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Grimstone of Boscobel on 22 February (HL13173) and 9 March (HL13586), to list in the body of their answer which specific countries they have secured continuity trade agreements with since the UK’s departure from the EU.

In addition to our deal with the EU, we have secured trade agreements with 66 non-EU countries, covering £890 billion of trade in total (2019 data). These are:

Albania;

Antigua and Barbuda;

Barbados;

The Bahamas;

Belize;

Botswana;

Cameroon;

Canada;

Colombia;

Côte d’Ivoire (The Ivory Coast);

Costa Rica;

Chile;

Dominica;

The Dominican Republic;

Ecuador;

Egypt;

El Salvador;

Eswatini (Swaziland);

The Faroe Islands;

Fiji;

Ghana;

Grenada;

Guyana;

Guatemala;

Georgia;

Honduras;

Iceland;

Israel;

Japan;

Jordan;

Jamaica;

Kenya;

Kosovo;

Lebanon;

Lesotho;

Liechtenstein;

Mexico;

Morocco;

Moldova;

Mozambique;

Mauritius;

Nicaragua;

Norway;

North Macedonia;

Namibia;

Peru;

Panama;

Papua New Guinea;

The Palestinian Authority;

Saint Lucia;

St. Vincent and the Grenadines;

Samoa;

The Solomon Islands;

St. Kitts and Nevis;

The Seychelles;

South Africa;

Switzerland;

Singapore;

South Korea;

Suriname;

Trinidad and Tobago;

Tunisia;

Turkey;

Ukraine;

Vietnam; and

Zimbabwe.

9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the UK's departure from the EU, which countries they have signed continuity trade agreements with.

We have secured trade agreements with 64 non-EU countries. Total trade with these countries was worth £216 billion in 2019. This accounts for 97% of the value of trade with non-EU countries that we set out to secure agreements with at the start of the trade continuity programme.

After the transition period began, we expanded the ambition of our programme above and beyond this original scope, securing agreements with Japan, Turkey, Vietnam and Singapore, which together accounted for £71 billion of trade in 2019.

All countries with which the United Kingdom has a trade deal are set out on GOV.UK.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government to list all current appointments to the Trade Envoy Programme, detailing for each individual (1) the date of their appointment, (2) the countries to which they are assigned, and (3) the political party or grouping to which they belong.

There are currently 30 Trade Envoys. A full list including their date of appointment, assigned markets and political affiliation is attached.

19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to publish the party or group affiliations of UK trade envoys.

A written ministerial statement was laid in both Houses on Monday, 5th October listing all the Prime Minister’s Trade Envoys. We have no plans to publish further information on party or group as this is already in the public domain.

12th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Davies of Gower on 6 December (HL701), whether they will now answer the question put; namely, how much money has been spent to date on the Crewe leg (Phase 2a) of HS2.

As noted in the Parliamentary Report published in November 2023, to date £1bn (2019 prices) has been spent on the Phase 2a leg of HS2.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Davies of Gower on 22 November (HL278), whether the Prime Minister's commitment to deliver new rail schemes "far more quickly" than the scrapped Manchester leg of HS2, as set out in their Network North published in October (CP 946), applies to the lines from (1) Burton to Leicester, and (2) Stoke to Leek.

Under the Network North announcement, the Government has committed to delivering both schemes, both of which could be delivered quicker than Phase 2b of HS2 which was due to complete in 2041.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 26 October (HL10766), how much money has been spent to date on the Crewe leg (Phase 2a) of HS2.

This is set out in the latest Parliamentary Report on HS2. The Department will continue to work with HS2 Ltd to bring early / enabling site activities to a safe stop and conclude any land remediation activities for the handing back of sites.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 26 October (HL10766), how much money has been spent to date on the Manchester leg of HS2.

Information related to the spend to date on HS2, including Phase 2b Western Leg, was provided in the most recent Parliamentary Report published in November 2023.

To date, £0.7bn (2019 prices) has been spent on the Phase 2b Western Leg of the HS2 Programme. This funding was used to prepare the Phase 2b Western Leg Bill. Following the Network North announcement, Government is now considering options to repurpose this Bill in order to deliver Northern Powerhouse Rail.

The Department for Transport remains committed to providing regular updates to Parliament on the progress of the Programme with a further update expected in Spring 2024.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to paragraph 63 in the Department of Transport's document Network North published in October (CP 946), what is (1) the estimated cost, and (2) the estimated completion date, for the lines from (a) Burton to Leicester, and (b) Stoke to Leek.

Following the Network North announcement, the Department for Transport is in the early stages of planning next steps, including delivery timelines, for individual schemes and is working closely with Network Rail and other delivery partners to develop and deliver on Government priorities. Further information will be set out in due course.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the cancellation of the Manchester leg of HS2, whether they will list the proposed new rail schemes, indicating in each case (1) the estimated cost, and (2) the estimated date of completion.

The full list of rail infrastructure schemes has been published on gov.uk and can be found by searching for the title ‘Network North: transforming British transport’.

Officials are in the early stages of planning, including delivery timelines and estimated costs, for these schemes and are working closely with Network Rail and other partners to develop and deliver these Government priorities.

All schemes will be subject to the development and approval of business cases and will undergo all formal governance, in line with relevant fiscal and legal duties.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 December 2021 (HL5014), whether they will now (1) answer the questions put, and (2) publish the level of funding they have provided for cycle lanes to each local authority in each of the last five years.

The next Cycling and Walking report to Parliament, due to be published in spring 2022, will contain details of all of the funding that the Government has provided for active travel schemes, including cycle lanes, to each local authority in each year. This is complex as the funding comes from several different funding streams, making a short summary difficult. Some of the information, such as a breakdown of how much capital funding was provided to each local authority for active travel schemes in 2020/21 under the Active Travel Fund, is already available on gov.uk. Copies of the previous report to Parliament and funding breakdowns by local authority covering the years up to 2018/19 are available in the House libraries as well as on gov.uk.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL Deb, col 1340), what funding they have provided for cycle lanes to each local authority in each of the last five years.

On 7 February 2020, the Department published a detailed breakdown of annual investment in cycling and walking from 2016/17 to 2018/19 alongside the first report on progress made towards delivering the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS). This includes information on how much funding each local authority received over that period. Copies of the report and other associated information are available on GOV.UK. An update including a detailed breakdown of annual investment in 2019/20 and 2020/21 will be published in due course. In the meantime, local authority allocations under the Active Travel Fund in 2020/21 are published on the Department for Transport’s website.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 3 August (HL7358), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what are the (1) absolute numbers, and (2) proportions of commuters, travelling into by London by (a) rail including London Underground, (b) bus, (c) car, (d) bicycle, and (e) motor cycle.

The 2018 ONS Labour Force Survey found that of those who worked in London, and reported a usual method of travel to work (a) 46% travelled by rail, (b) 12% by bus, (c) 27% by car, (d) 5% by bicycle and (e) 1% by motorcycle, the remaining 10% by other methods.

Based on this, an estimated (a) 1,790,000 people travelled by rail, (b) 471,000 by bus, (c) 1,066,000 by car, (d) 178,000 by bicycle and (e) 39,000 by motorcycle and 380,000 by other methods. These estimates are based on those in the survey with a work place in London and reporting a usual method of travel to work and as such may not cover all work-related travel activity into London.

The department will publish the 2019 modal analysis using the 2019 ONS Labour Force Survey in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the (1) absolute numbers, and (2) proportions of commuters, travelling into by London by (a) rail including London Underground, (b) bus, (c) car, (d) bicycle, and (e) motor cycle.

To monitor the use of the transport system during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, the Department for Transport provides statistics on transport use by mode, published every Wednesday. Data on usage of the different transport modes is available on GOV.UK.

This includes usage of Tube and Bus in London compared to a pre Covid-19 baseline. Specific data on the purpose of a journey (e.g. commuting) by mode is not available for the Covid-19 period yet. Historic data on this can be found in the National Travel Survey and in Transport Statistics Great Britain both available on GOV.UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what are the current outstanding by-elections for hereditary peers, indicating in each case the numbers of electors to be involved.

The by-elections for hereditary peers currently outstanding are to fill the vacancies left by the retirements of the Earl of Selborne and the Countess of Mar. In respect of the vacancy created by the retirement of the Earl of Selborne the remaining 46 Conservative excepted hereditary peers are eligible to vote. In respect of the vacancy created by the retirement of the Countess of Mar the whole House is entitled to vote to fill the vacancy as she was elected by the whole House to act as a Deputy Chairman.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the franchise of each Train Operating Companies is due for renewal.

The attached table shows the renewal date for all franchise agreements.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what public appointments are made directly by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care.

The statutory basis for public appointments is set out in the Public Appointments Order in Council 2023, which lists public appointments regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments and includes those identified as being made by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, listed as entries under the Department of Health and Social Care. A copy of the document is attached.

When the order is next updated by Cabinet Office, it will also include public appointments to the board of the Health Services Safety Investigations Body, which are made by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care is also responsible for making the following public appointments, which are not regulated by the Commissioner:

- Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, chair and non-executive members;

- UK Health Security Agency, chair and non-executive members; and

- NHS Pensions Board, chair only.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Kamall on 27 January (HL Deb col 436) regarding the ethical international recruitment of nurses, what ethical provisions were included in the agreements with (1) Kenya, (2) Malaysia, and (3) the Philippines, to which he referred in his Written Answer on 20 December 2021 (HL4956).

The Government to Government agreements established with Kenya, Malaysia and the Philippines commit to ensuring fair, ethical and sustainable recruitment and employment of healthcare professionals, pursuant to existing laws and regulations in each partner country. We are working with the Governments of Malaysia and Kenya to develop detailed implementation guidelines which will be published in due course. Our agreement with the Philippines confirms that United Kingdom recruiters will consider the national demand for healthcare in relation to the number of healthcare workers in the Philippines.

1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 20 December 2021 (HL4956), whether they will publish the details of the Government to Government agreements with (1) Kenya, (2) Malaysia, and (3) the Philippines.

Copies of the agreements with Kenya, Malaysia and the Philippines on healthcare workforce recruitment are attached.

14th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Kamall on 13 December (HL Deb, col 8), which countries have a surplus of medical professionals.

The information requested is not held centrally. However, we are aware of a number of countries with unemployed nurses and countries that train excess numbers of nurses for their domestic requirements in order to give employment opportunities. We are in discussions with the Governments of some of these countries regarding supporting their health systems and giving opportunities to trained staff in the United Kingdom. We have established Government to Government health worker migration agreements with Kenya, Malaysia and the Philippines this year and a Health Workforce Taskforce with the Government of India as part of the Enhanced Trade Partnership, signed earlier in 2021.

9th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 22 November (HL3795) detailing the steps they are taking regarding Russia's occupation of Crimea, what steps they are taking regarding Israel's occupation of the Golan Heights.

The UK position on the status of the Occupied Golan Heights is well-known and has not changed. In line with international law, and relevant Security Council resolutions, notably Resolutions 242 and 497, we do not recognise Israel's sovereignty over the territories occupied by Israel since June 1967, including the Golan Heights, and we do not consider them part of the territory of the State of Israel. Annexation of territory by force is prohibited under international law. Any declaration of a unilateral border change goes against the foundation of the rules-based international order and the UN Charter.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking in response to UN member states that have annexed parts of neighbouring states, in particular, in respect of (1) Russia's annexation of Crimea, and (2) Israel's annexation of the Golan Heights.

Annexation of territory by force is prohibited under international law. Any declaration of a unilateral border change goes against the foundation of the rules-based international order and the UN Charter.

The UK does not recognise the illegal annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol by Russia. We continue to make clear to Moscow that Crimea is, and will remain part of, Ukraine.

We have used our G7 Presidency to keep Crimea high on the international agenda, as shown by our G7 Foreign Ministers' statements on Crimea in March and April and the G7 Cornwall Summit communiqué in June, in which leaders reiterated their support for the Ukraine's independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity and called on Russia to withdraw troops and materiel from Crimea. We strongly support the establishment of the International Crimea Platform, as a means to raise global ambition on Crimea and hold Russia to account for its actions. We will continue to call for international monitoring missions to have access to Crimea, currently denied by Russia.

The UK's position on the status of the Occupied Golan Heights is well-known and has not changed. We do not consider them part of the territory of the State of Israel.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had with the government of Israel in respect of Israeli plans to annex parts of the West Bank.

We made clear our deep concerns about reports that the new Israeli Government coalition has reached an agreement which may pave the way for annexation of parts of the West Bank at the UN Security Council remote meeting on the Middle East Peace Process on 23 April. The UK position is clear: any unilateral moves towards annexation of parts of the West Bank by Israel would be damaging to efforts to restart peace negotiations and contrary to international law. The Prime Minister reiterated our opposition to the unilateral annexation of territory during a call with Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, on 6 February.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the government of Israel's activities in the Golan Heights.

The UK's position on the status of the Occupied Golan Heights is clear and has not changed. In line with international law, and relevant UN Security Council Resolutions, notably Resolutions 242 and 497, we do not recognise Israel's sovereignty over the territories occupied by Israel since June 1967, including the Golan Heights, and we do not consider them part of the territory of the State of Israel.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the government of Russia's activities in the Crimean Peninsula.

On 18 March the Foreign Secretary made a statement condemning the illegal annexation of Crimea and called on Russia to release the 90 political prisoners held in Crimea and Russia, and end its unlawful control of the peninsula.

The Russian illegal annexation of Crimea in 2014 was a flagrant violation of a number of Russia's international commitments, including under the UN Charter, the OSCE Helsinki Final Act and the Budapest memorandum. The UK's position is clear - we will never recognise Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea. Russia must fully respect Ukraine's independence and territorial integrity. The ongoing militarisation of the peninsula, together with restrictions imposed by Russia on international shipping passing through the Kerch Strait, presents a serious security threat to the Black Sea region. We are also deeply concerned about the ongoing human rights violations experienced by ethnic and religious minorities in Crimea. What Russia has done and continues to do in Crimea breaches its obligations under international law and presents a serious challenge to the international rules-based order.

17th Mar 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the Written Answers by the Senior Deputy Speaker (Lord McFall of Alcluith) on 4 July 2018 (HL8851) and 18 July 2018 (HL9279), what hereditary peer by-elections have taken place under the terms of the House of Lords Act 1999 since the retirement of the Earl Baldwin of Bewdley on 9 May 2018; and in each of those by-elections, how many (1) candidates, and (2) electors, there were; and what was (a) the number of votes cast for the winning candidate, and (b) the percentage of the electorate who voted, in each case.

Since the retirement of Earl Baldwin of Bewdley there have been hereditary peer by-elections held following the deaths of Viscount Slim and Lord Skelmersdale and the retirements of Lord Northbourne and Lord Glentoran. The details of each by-election are as follows:

Vacancy created by

Number of candidates

Number of electors

Number of votes cast for winner

Turnout

Full details

Lord Glentoran

11

47

26

91.48%

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-information-office/2018/Hereditary-peers-by-election-result-(Glentoran).pdf

Lord Northbourne

11

31

14

93.54%

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-information-office/2018/Result-by-election-28-11-18.pdf

Lord Skelmersdale

16

785

110

32.99%

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-information-office/2019/Result-by-election-23-01-19.pdf

Viscount Slim

14

31

18

90.32%

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-information-office/2019/Result-by-election-27-03-19.pdf

11th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many police officers have (1) joined, and (2) left, the police force since 2019.

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officers joining and leaving the police service in the “Police workforce, England and Wales” statistical bulletin. The table below shows the full-time equivalent (FTE) police officer joiners and leavers, in the 43 territorial police forces in England and Wales, since 1 April 2019.

Table 1: Police officer (FTE) joiners and leavers, England and Wales

Financial year

Joiners

Leavers

2019/20

12,883

7,141

2020/21

12,127

6,018

2021/22

12,789

8,117


Note: Excludes those transferring between forces.

Separately, as part of the “Police officer uplift, England and Wales” statistical bulletin, the Home Office publishes data on new police officer recruits, on a headcount basis.

The latest data, covering recruitment up to 30 September 2022, shows there have been 37,773 new police officer recruits (headcount) to the 43 territorial police forces in England and Wales since November 2019. This refers only to new police officer recruits joining the Police Service. Those returning to the police service, such as after a period of absence and transfers from other forces are not included.

Leavers data are not published as part of the “Police officer uplift” statistical bulletin.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in the East Midlands.

[Answer] The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the tables below show the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

West Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,666

147

Warwickshire

1,035

179

West Mercia

2,219

172

West Midlands

6,516

223

West Midlands

11,436

193

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

East Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,849

174

Leicestershire

1,979

180

Lincolnshire

1,067

140

Northamptonshire

1,272

169

Nottinghamshire

2,072

178

East Midlands

8,239

170

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

1,966

211

North Yorkshire

1,481

179

South Yorkshire

2,437

173

West Yorkshire

5,342

229

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,226

204

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,088

196

Cumbria

1,221

244

Greater Manchester

6,866

242

Lancashire

2,999

199

Merseyside

3,629

254

North West

16,803

229

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,325

233

Durham

1,141

179

Northumbria

3,155

216

North East

5,621

211

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Greater London as at 31 March 20201,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

759

..

Metropolitan Police

32,199

360

Greater London

32,958

368

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

West Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,703

150

Warwickshire

1,041

180

West Mercia

2,279

176

West Midlands

6,983

238

West Midlands

12,006

202

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

East Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,899

179

Leicestershire

2,114

192

Lincolnshire

1,089

143

Northamptonshire

1,368

182

Nottinghamshire

2,121

183

East Midlands

8,591

178

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

2,028

217

North Yorkshire

1,533

185

South Yorkshire

2,624

186

West Yorkshire

5,494

236

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,679

212

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,164

203

Cumbria

1,251

250

Greater Manchester

7,018

247

Lancashire

3,088

205

Merseyside

3,698

259

North West

17,219

235

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,392

245

Durham

1,180

185

Northumbria

3,344

228

North East

5,916

222

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Greater London as at 30 September 20202,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

822

..

Metropolitan Police

33,782

377

Greater London

34,604

386

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

These figures are calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in the West Midlands.

[Answer] The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the tables below show the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

West Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,666

147

Warwickshire

1,035

179

West Mercia

2,219

172

West Midlands

6,516

223

West Midlands

11,436

193

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

East Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,849

174

Leicestershire

1,979

180

Lincolnshire

1,067

140

Northamptonshire

1,272

169

Nottinghamshire

2,072

178

East Midlands

8,239

170

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

1,966

211

North Yorkshire

1,481

179

South Yorkshire

2,437

173

West Yorkshire

5,342

229

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,226

204

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,088

196

Cumbria

1,221

244

Greater Manchester

6,866

242

Lancashire

2,999

199

Merseyside

3,629

254

North West

16,803

229

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,325

233

Durham

1,141

179

Northumbria

3,155

216

North East

5,621

211

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Greater London as at 31 March 20201,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

759

..

Metropolitan Police

32,199

360

Greater London

32,958

368

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

West Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,703

150

Warwickshire

1,041

180

West Mercia

2,279

176

West Midlands

6,983

238

West Midlands

12,006

202

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

East Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,899

179

Leicestershire

2,114

192

Lincolnshire

1,089

143

Northamptonshire

1,368

182

Nottinghamshire

2,121

183

East Midlands

8,591

178

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

2,028

217

North Yorkshire

1,533

185

South Yorkshire

2,624

186

West Yorkshire

5,494

236

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,679

212

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,164

203

Cumbria

1,251

250

Greater Manchester

7,018

247

Lancashire

3,088

205

Merseyside

3,698

259

North West

17,219

235

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,392

245

Durham

1,180

185

Northumbria

3,344

228

North East

5,916

222

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Greater London as at 30 September 20202,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

822

..

Metropolitan Police

33,782

377

Greater London

34,604

386

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

These figures are calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in Yorkshire and the Humber.

[Answer] The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the tables below show the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

West Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,666

147

Warwickshire

1,035

179

West Mercia

2,219

172

West Midlands

6,516

223

West Midlands

11,436

193

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

East Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,849

174

Leicestershire

1,979

180

Lincolnshire

1,067

140

Northamptonshire

1,272

169

Nottinghamshire

2,072

178

East Midlands

8,239

170

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

1,966

211

North Yorkshire

1,481

179

South Yorkshire

2,437

173

West Yorkshire

5,342

229

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,226

204

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,088

196

Cumbria

1,221

244

Greater Manchester

6,866

242

Lancashire

2,999

199

Merseyside

3,629

254

North West

16,803

229

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,325

233

Durham

1,141

179

Northumbria

3,155

216

North East

5,621

211

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Greater London as at 31 March 20201,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

759

..

Metropolitan Police

32,199

360

Greater London

32,958

368

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

West Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,703

150

Warwickshire

1,041

180

West Mercia

2,279

176

West Midlands

6,983

238

West Midlands

12,006

202

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

East Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,899

179

Leicestershire

2,114

192

Lincolnshire

1,089

143

Northamptonshire

1,368

182

Nottinghamshire

2,121

183

East Midlands

8,591

178

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

2,028

217

North Yorkshire

1,533

185

South Yorkshire

2,624

186

West Yorkshire

5,494

236

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,679

212

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,164

203

Cumbria

1,251

250

Greater Manchester

7,018

247

Lancashire

3,088

205

Merseyside

3,698

259

North West

17,219

235

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,392

245

Durham

1,180

185

Northumbria

3,344

228

North East

5,916

222

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Greater London as at 30 September 20202,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

822

..

Metropolitan Police

33,782

377

Greater London

34,604

386

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

These figures are calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in North West England.

[Answer] The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the tables below show the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

West Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,666

147

Warwickshire

1,035

179

West Mercia

2,219

172

West Midlands

6,516

223

West Midlands

11,436

193

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

East Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,849

174

Leicestershire

1,979

180

Lincolnshire

1,067

140

Northamptonshire

1,272

169

Nottinghamshire

2,072

178

East Midlands

8,239

170

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

1,966

211

North Yorkshire

1,481

179

South Yorkshire

2,437

173

West Yorkshire

5,342

229

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,226

204

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,088

196

Cumbria

1,221

244

Greater Manchester

6,866

242

Lancashire

2,999

199

Merseyside

3,629

254

North West

16,803

229

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,325

233

Durham

1,141

179

Northumbria

3,155

216

North East

5,621

211

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Greater London as at 31 March 20201,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

759

..

Metropolitan Police

32,199

360

Greater London

32,958

368

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

West Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,703

150

Warwickshire

1,041

180

West Mercia

2,279

176

West Midlands

6,983

238

West Midlands

12,006

202

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

East Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,899

179

Leicestershire

2,114

192

Lincolnshire

1,089

143

Northamptonshire

1,368

182

Nottinghamshire

2,121

183

East Midlands

8,591

178

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

2,028

217

North Yorkshire

1,533

185

South Yorkshire

2,624

186

West Yorkshire

5,494

236

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,679

212

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,164

203

Cumbria

1,251

250

Greater Manchester

7,018

247

Lancashire

3,088

205

Merseyside

3,698

259

North West

17,219

235

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,392

245

Durham

1,180

185

Northumbria

3,344

228

North East

5,916

222

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Greater London as at 30 September 20202,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

822

..

Metropolitan Police

33,782

377

Greater London

34,604

386

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

These figures are calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in Greater London.

[Answer] The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the tables below show the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

West Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,666

147

Warwickshire

1,035

179

West Mercia

2,219

172

West Midlands

6,516

223

West Midlands

11,436

193

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

East Midlands as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,849

174

Leicestershire

1,979

180

Lincolnshire

1,067

140

Northamptonshire

1,272

169

Nottinghamshire

2,072

178

East Midlands

8,239

170

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

1,966

211

North Yorkshire

1,481

179

South Yorkshire

2,437

173

West Yorkshire

5,342

229

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,226

204

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,088

196

Cumbria

1,221

244

Greater Manchester

6,866

242

Lancashire

2,999

199

Merseyside

3,629

254

North West

16,803

229

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

North East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,325

233

Durham

1,141

179

Northumbria

3,155

216

North East

5,621

211

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

Greater London as at 31 March 20201,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

759

..

Metropolitan Police

32,199

360

Greater London

32,958

368

  1. Figures provided are on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

West Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Staffordshire

1,703

150

Warwickshire

1,041

180

West Mercia

2,279

176

West Midlands

6,983

238

West Midlands

12,006

202

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

East Midlands as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Derbyshire

1,899

179

Leicestershire

2,114

192

Lincolnshire

1,089

143

Northamptonshire

1,368

182

Nottinghamshire

2,121

183

East Midlands

8,591

178

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Yorkshire and the Humber as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Humberside

2,028

217

North Yorkshire

1,533

185

South Yorkshire

2,624

186

West Yorkshire

5,494

236

Yorkshire and the Humber

11,679

212

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cheshire

2,164

203

Cumbria

1,251

250

Greater Manchester

7,018

247

Lancashire

3,088

205

Merseyside

3,698

259

North West

17,219

235

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

North East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Cleveland

1,392

245

Durham

1,180

185

Northumbria

3,344

228

North East

5,916

222

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

Greater London as at 30 September 20202,3

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

London, City of

822

..

Metropolitan Police

33,782

377

Greater London

34,604

386

  1. Figures provided are on a headcount basis

3. City of London per capita analysis is omitted due to its disproportionately small permanent population.

These figures are calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in the East of England.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the table below shows the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

South West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon & Somerset

2,803

163

Devon & Cornwall

3,100

175

Dorset

1,238

160

Gloucestershire

1,176

185

Wiltshire

1,007

139

South West Total

9,324

166

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

South East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2,692

135

Kent

3,780

203

Surrey

1,928

161

Sussex

2,717

159

Thames Valley

4,310

178

South East Total

15,428

168

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

Eastern region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1,262

187

Cambridgeshire

1,545

181

Essex

3,298

179

Hertfordshire

2,086

175

Norfolk

1,665

183

Suffolk

1,219

160

Eastern Total

11,076

178

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

South West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon and Somerset

2965

172

Devon and Cornwall

3273

185

Dorset

1306

169

Gloucestershire

1231

193

Wiltshire

1042

144

South West

9817

175

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

South East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2893

145

Kent

3898

210

Surrey

2041

171

Sussex

2904

170

Thames Valley

4510

186

South East

16246

177

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

Eastern region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1317

195

Cambridgeshire

1625

190

Essex

3398

184

Hertfordshire

2187

184

Norfolk

1737

191

Suffolk

1269

167

Eastern

11533

185

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

These figures calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in South East England.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the table below shows the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

South West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon & Somerset

2,803

163

Devon & Cornwall

3,100

175

Dorset

1,238

160

Gloucestershire

1,176

185

Wiltshire

1,007

139

South West Total

9,324

166

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

South East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2,692

135

Kent

3,780

203

Surrey

1,928

161

Sussex

2,717

159

Thames Valley

4,310

178

South East Total

15,428

168

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

Eastern region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1,262

187

Cambridgeshire

1,545

181

Essex

3,298

179

Hertfordshire

2,086

175

Norfolk

1,665

183

Suffolk

1,219

160

Eastern Total

11,076

178

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

South West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon and Somerset

2965

172

Devon and Cornwall

3273

185

Dorset

1306

169

Gloucestershire

1231

193

Wiltshire

1042

144

South West

9817

175

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

South East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2893

145

Kent

3898

210

Surrey

2041

171

Sussex

2904

170

Thames Valley

4510

186

South East

16246

177

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

Eastern region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1317

195

Cambridgeshire

1625

190

Essex

3398

184

Hertfordshire

2187

184

Norfolk

1737

191

Suffolk

1269

167

Eastern

11533

185

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

These figures calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9280), how many police officers there are per head of the population in each Police Force Area in South West England.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. From Table H4 in the data tables published alongside this bulletin, the table below shows the total number of police officers and the number of police officers per 100,000 population in each force of the relevant regions requested as at 31 March 2020.

South West region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon & Somerset

2,803

163

Devon & Cornwall

3,100

175

Dorset

1,238

160

Gloucestershire

1,176

185

Wiltshire

1,007

139

South West Total

9,324

166

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

South East region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2,692

135

Kent

3,780

203

Surrey

1,928

161

Sussex

2,717

159

Thames Valley

4,310

178

South East Total

15,428

168

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

Eastern region as at 31 March 20201

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1,262

187

Cambridgeshire

1,545

181

Essex

3,298

179

Hertfordshire

2,086

175

Norfolk

1,665

183

Suffolk

1,219

160

Eastern Total

11,076

178

  1. The figures provided are on a full-time equivalent basis

More recent figures are available, but on a headcount basis that is not comparable with previous publications reporting on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. The tables below provide the total number of officers and total officers per 100,000 population on a headcount basis as at 30 September 2020.

South West region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Avon and Somerset

2965

172

Devon and Cornwall

3273

185

Dorset

1306

169

Gloucestershire

1231

193

Wiltshire

1042

144

South West

9817

175

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

South East region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Hampshire

2893

145

Kent

3898

210

Surrey

2041

171

Sussex

2904

170

Thames Valley

4510

186

South East

16246

177

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

Eastern region as at 30 September 20202

Total Officers

Officers per 100,000 population

Bedfordshire

1317

195

Cambridgeshire

1625

190

Essex

3398

184

Hertfordshire

2187

184

Norfolk

1737

191

Suffolk

1269

167

Eastern

11533

185

  1. The figures provided are on a headcount basis

These figures calculated using data from the Home Office’s new quarterly Police Uplift publication, reporting the progress of the Police Uplift Programme that is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. The latest Uplift publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9278), what was the total number of police officers in the latest year for which figures are available.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

From this data collection, the table below shows the total number of police officers in England in 2010, 2015 and the latest year for which figures are available (the year ending 31 March 2020) on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis and on a headcount basis.

Total Police Officers (England)

Year ending 31 March…

FTE

Headcount

2010

136,365

138,551

2015

120,437

123,017

2020

122,112

124,492

The Home Office has also recently started collecting and publishing police officer numbers (on a headcount basis only) on a quarterly basis to report the progress of the Police Uplift Programme. The Programme is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. Taken from this new data series, the number of police officers in England from October 2019 to September 2020 on a headcount basis is shown in the table below.

Police Officers (England)

Month

Headcount

Oct-19

120570

Nov-19

121331

Dec-19

121607

Jan-20

122291

Feb-20

122924

Mar-20

124492

Apr-20

124768

May-20

125109

Jun-20

125933

Jul-20

127000

Aug-20

127257

Sep-20

127611

These data are collected and published on a headcount basis and are therefore not comparable to the FTE figures published in the long-running ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ bulletin. The latest Police Uplift quarterly publication covering the period to September 2020 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9278), what was the total number of police officers in England in 2015.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

From this data collection, the table below shows the total number of police officers in England in 2010, 2015 and the latest year for which figures are available (the year ending 31 March 2020) on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis and on a headcount basis.

Total Police Officers (England)

Year ending 31 March…

FTE

Headcount

2010

136,365

138,551

2015

120,437

123,017

2020

122,112

124,492

The Home Office has also recently started collecting and publishing police officer numbers (on a headcount basis only) on a quarterly basis to report the progress of the Police Uplift Programme. The Programme is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. Taken from this new data series, the number of police officers in England from October 2019 to September 2020 on a headcount basis is shown in the table below.

Police Officers (England)

Month

Headcount

Oct-19

120570

Nov-19

121331

Dec-19

121607

Jan-20

122291

Feb-20

122924

Mar-20

124492

Apr-20

124768

May-20

125109

Jun-20

125933

Jul-20

127000

Aug-20

127257

Sep-20

127611

These data are collected and published on a headcount basis and are therefore not comparable to the FTE figures published in the long-running ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ bulletin. The latest Police Uplift quarterly publication covering the period to September 2020 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 October (HL9278), what was the total number of police officers in England in 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

From this data collection, the table below shows the total number of police officers in England in 2010, 2015 and the latest year for which figures are available (the year ending 31 March 2020) on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis and on a headcount basis.

Total Police Officers (England)

Year ending 31 March…

FTE

Headcount

2010

136,365

138,551

2015

120,437

123,017

2020

122,112

124,492

The Home Office has also recently started collecting and publishing police officer numbers (on a headcount basis only) on a quarterly basis to report the progress of the Police Uplift Programme. The Programme is delivering on the current Government’s manifesto pledge to recruit 20,000 additional police officers in England and Wales by March 2023. Taken from this new data series, the number of police officers in England from October 2019 to September 2020 on a headcount basis is shown in the table below.

Police Officers (England)

Month

Headcount

Oct-19

120570

Nov-19

121331

Dec-19

121607

Jan-20

122291

Feb-20

122924

Mar-20

124492

Apr-20

124768

May-20

125109

Jun-20

125933

Jul-20

127000

Aug-20

127257

Sep-20

127611

These data are collected and published on a headcount basis and are therefore not comparable to the FTE figures published in the long-running ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ bulletin. The latest Police Uplift quarterly publication covering the period to September 2020 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-september-2020

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many police officers there are per head of population in each policing area in England.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

The latest available data in this statistical series, broken down by Police Force Area, cover the situation as at 31 March 2020, and can be found here : https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2020

Table H4 of the accompanying data tables provide information on the number of police officers per 100,000 population by Police Force Area. Open Data tables, which contain the number of officers in each Police Force Area since 2007, are also available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-open-data-tables

While the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin remains the key measure of the size of the police workforce, as part of the Police Officer Uplift Programme, the Home Office also publishes a quarterly update on the number of officers (headcount) in England and Wales. Data are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-officer-uplift-statistics

We have attached the information due to the size of the data which would exceed the word limit for responses to written parliamentary questions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total number of police officers in England (1) in 2010, (2) in 2015, and (3) in the latest year for which figures are available.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size and composition of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. We have attached the information due to the size of the data which would exceed the word limit for responses to written parliamentary questions

The latest available data in this statistical series, broken down by Police Force Area, cover the situation as at 31 March 2020, and can be found here : https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2020

Table H4 of the accompanying data tables provide information on the number of police officers per 100,000 population by Police Force Area. Open Data tables, which contain the number of officers in each Police Force Area since 2007, are also available: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-open-data-tables

While the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin remains the key measure of the size of the police workforce, as part of the Police Officer Uplift Programme, the Home Office also publishes a quarterly update on the number of officers (headcount) in England and Wales. Data are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-officer-uplift-statistics

We have attached the information due to the size of the data which would exceed the word limit for responses to written parliamentary questions

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what public appointments are made directly by the Secretary of State for Defence.

As specified in the Public Appointment Order in Council, 15 November 2023, 2023-2-Public-Appointments-Order-In-Council.pdf (independent.gov.uk), the Secretary of State for Defence is responsible for public appointments to the following public bodies and offices:

Armed Forces Pay Review Body

Defence Nuclear Safety Expert Committee

Departmental Board for the Ministry of Defence (non-executive members)

Independent Medical Expert Group

Independent Monitoring Board for the Military Corrective Training Centre

Nuclear Research Advisory Council

Oil and Pipelines Agency

Royal Air Force Museum

Scientific Advisory Committee on the Medical Implications of Less-Lethal Weapons

Service Complaints Ombudsman

Service Police Complaints Commissioner

Single Source Regulations Office

Veterans Advisory and Pensions Committees

Earl of Minto
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Goldie on 6 August 2020 (HL7356), how much have the ten largest deployments of UK armed forces overseas increased or decreased over the past five years.

A summary of the ten largest deployments of military personnel over the past five years has been extracted from the annual statistics published on GOV.uk, and captured in the table below:

Year

1-Apr-15

1-Apr-16

1-Apr-17

1-Apr-18

1-Apr-19

1-Apr-20

Total Overseas

15,300

10,560

9,260

9,040

8,220

6,050

Cyprus

2,400

2,250

2,250

2,160

2,150

2,290

United States

610

670

820

920

790

730

Germany

10,020

5,310

3,870

3,580

2,850

540

Belgium

310

290

290

280

290

290

Canada

280

260

290

280

310

260

Kenya

200

260

250

250

260

250

Italy

180

180

180

190

180

180

Gibraltar

160

160

160

170

160

160

Brunei

160

160

170

170

180

160

Saudi Arabia

120

130

120

120

120

130

Source: Defence Statistics

Annual statistics on the locations of UK Armed Forces across the globe can be accessed using the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/location-of-all-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-index

2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Goldie on 6 August (HL7356), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, how many serving members of the UK armed forces are stationed abroad, listed by country of assignment.

The number of Service members of the UK Armed Forces stationed abroad is 6,050. The table below details the country of assignment.

Country

Number of personnel

Germany

540

Cyprus

2,290

Belgium

290

Gibraltar

160

Italy

180

Netherlands

120

Portugal

20

Norway

40

France

60

Czech Republic

20

Denmark

10

Spain

30

Georgia

10

Afghanistan (locally engaged civilians)

80

Brunei

160

British Indian Ocean Territory (including Diego Garcia)

40

Nepal

20

Pakistan

10

Singapore

10

Saudi Arabia

130

Oman

110

Bahrain

20

Kuwait

40

Jordan

20

Turkey

40

United Arab Emirates

50

Israel

10

Qatar

30

Kenya

250

Sierra Leone

10

South Africa

10

Nigeria

20

Somalia

10

United States of America

730

Canada

260

Belize

30

South America

10

Falkland Islands

70

Australia

60

New Zealand

10

Unallocated

20

27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many serving members of the UK armed forces are stationed abroad, listed by country of assignment.

The stationed locations of UK Armed Forces across the globe and within the UK are detailed in the annual statistics published on 9 July 2020. This can be accessed using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/location-of-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-2020 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/location-of-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-2020

Further information on UK Armed Forces stationed abroad is listed on the Excel workbook on sheets 1.1A and 1.1B.

17th Mar 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker which peers would form the electorate in hereditary peer by-elections taking place under the terms of the House of Lords Act 1999 for a (1) Conservative, (2) Crossbench, (3) Labour, and (4) Liberal Democrat, vacancy.

The following members, minus whichever member had created the vacancy, would be the electorate for a hereditary peer by-election for a vacancy in each party or group.

In the event of a by-election to replace a Conservative hereditary peer, the electorate would be:

The Earl of Arran

Lord Ashton of Hyde

Lord Astor of Hever

Viscount Astor

Earl Attlee

Lord Bethell

Lord Borwick

Lord Brabazon of Tara

Viscount Bridgeman

Lord Brougham and Vaux

The Earl of Caithness

Earl Cathcart

Lord Colgrain

Lord Colwyn

The Earl of Courtown

Lord Crathorne

Lord De Mauley

Lord Denham

The Earl of Dundee

Viscount Eccles

Lord Elton

Lord Fairfax of Cameron

Lord Geddes

Lord Glenarthur

Viscount Goschen

Lord Henley

The Earl of Home

Earl Howe

The Earl of Lindsay

The Earl of Liverpool

Lord Lucas

Lord Mancroft

The Duke of Montrose

Lord Moynihan

Lord Northbrook

Lord Reay

Viscount Ridley

Lord Rotherwick

Lord Selsdon

The Earl of Shrewsbury

Lord Strathclyde

Lord Swinfen

Lord Trefgarne

Viscount Trenchard

Viscount Ullswater

Viscount Younger of Leckie

In the event of a by-election to replace a crossbench hereditary peer, the electorate would be:

Lord Aberdare

Viscount Brookeborough

Lord Carrington

The Earl of Clancarty

Viscount Colville of Culross

The Earl of Cork and Orrery

Viscount Craigavon

Lord Cromwell

The Earl of Devon

The Earl of Erroll

Viscount Falkland

Lord Freyberg

Lord Greenway

Lord Hylton

The Earl of Listowel

The Earl of Lytton

The Countess of Mar

Lord Mountevans

Lord Palmer

Earl Peel

Lord Ravensdale

The Earl of Rosslyn

Lord Russell of Liverpool

The Earl of Sandwich

The Duke of Somerset

Lord St John of Bletso

The Earl of Stair

Lord Thurlow

Lord Trevethin and Oaksey

Lord Vaux of Harrowden

Viscount Waverley

In the event of a by-election to replace a Labour hereditary peer, the electorate would be:

Lord Grantchester

Viscount Hanworth

Lord Rea

Viscount Simon

In the event of a by-election to replace a Liberal Democrat hereditary peer, the electorate would be:

Lord Addington

The Earl of Glasgow

Viscount Thurso

There are some members sitting in the House as excepted hereditary peers who have changed their party or group affiliation. If a vacancy were created by one of those members leaving the House, the seat in the House would revert back to the previous party or group. However, while those members are not sitting in their original party or group, they do not form part of the electorate for any hereditary peer by-elections that may arise in those groupings.

1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many overseas voters requested a vote in the 2019 general election, listed by the constituency to which they were allocated.

At the 2019 General Election, the Electoral Commission reported that approximately 230,000 overseas electors were registered to vote. The Commission published (attached) a breakdown of overseas electors by constituency in Great Britain. https://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/sites/default/files/2020-05/UKPGE%202019-%20Electoral%20Data-Website.xlsx>.

Overseas electors have the option to vote by post, by proxy or in person (where the elector is in the relevant constituency on the day of the poll). The Government does not hold data on the voting method used by overseas electors to cast their vote or how many of them do. The Government does not hold data on the number of overseas electors who submitted a postal vote application.

1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many additional people will be enfranchised by their proposal to introduce votes for life for British citizens living overseas.

The Elections Bill Impact Assessment estimates the removal of the 15 year rule will increase the number of British citizens abroad who are eligible to register to vote from 0.9 million - 1.1 million people to 3.2 million - 3.4 million people in 2023/24.