Lord Sharkey

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

3 APPG memberships (as of 22 Jul 2022)
Mortgage Prisoners, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, Whistleblowing
2 Former APPG memberships
Alternative Lending, Open Banking and Payments
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
2nd Jul 2019 - 23rd Apr 2020
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
16th Jul 2019 - 23rd Apr 2020
Economic Affairs Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019
Information Committee (Lords)
12th Jun 2014 - 31st Aug 2016
Draft Deregulation Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Jul 2013 - 11th Dec 2013


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 6th September 2022
10:30
Industry and Regulators Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The work of Ofwat
6 Sep 2022, 10:30 a.m.
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Jonson Cox - Chair at Port of London Authority
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Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Monday 4th July 2022
Written Answers
Monday 18th July 2022
Cystic Fibrosis: Mental Health Services and Social Workers
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of (1) paediatric cystic fibrosis centres, and (2) adult cystic fibrosis centres, in …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 9th January 2020
Financial Services (Duty of Care) Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to require the Financial Conduct Authority to make rules for authorised persons to owe a duty of care …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Sharkey has voted in 299 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Sharkey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Stedman-Scott (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(13 debate interactions)
Baroness Penn (Conservative)
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(10 debate interactions)
Baroness Sherlock (Labour)
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(40 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(27 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(20 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Pension Schemes Act 2021
(7,488 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(6,280 words contributed)
Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021
(5,663 words contributed)
Financial Services Bill 2019-21
(4,033 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Sharkey's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Sharkey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Sharkey has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Sharkey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Lord Sharkey


A bill to require the Financial Conduct Authority to make rules for authorised persons to owe a duty of care to consumers in their regulated activities


Last Event - 1st Reading
Thursday 9th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for non-interest-bearing student finance facilities.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Thursday 26th May 2016

To give a statutory pardon to Alan Mathison Turing for offences under section 11of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 of which he was convicted on 31 March 1952.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 25th July 2012

Lord Sharkey has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


15 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body (1) what plans they have to publish all submissions to the review of the Restoration and Renewal Programme received from Members of both Houses of Parliament and those outside Parliament, (2) if they have such plans, when they will publish those submissions, and (3) if they have no such plans, why not.

The Strategic Review report, which is now available on the Restoration and Renewal Programme website, includes a detailed summary of the submissions made by Members of both Houses and by others.

14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidelines the Department for Education (1) has, and (2) follows, for the time taken in responding to communications from members of the House of Lords.

In line with Cabinet Office guidance, ministers within the department aim to respond to hon. and right hon. Members of the House of Lords within 18 working days to a piece of written correspondence, written parliamentary questions within 14 days of receipt, and commitments in the House to write to hon. and right hon. Members within 10 working days or as soon as possible.

As you will understand, the department has been dealing with unprecedented volumes of correspondence due to the impact of COVID-19. The department ensures that urgent cases raised by hon. and right hon. Members are prioritised wherever possible and is taking steps to provide substantive responses in as short a time as possible.

6th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of (1) paediatric cystic fibrosis centres, and (2) adult cystic fibrosis centres, in England employed (a) a social worker, and (b) a clinical psychologist, as part of their multi-disciplinary team, for each year since 2015.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 17 March (HL7072), what the (1) mean, (2) median, and (3) maximum, waiting times were for patients who had been coded as having received a specialised service in (a) February 2020, and (b) the most recent period for which figures are available; and how many had waited longer than 18 weeks before receiving their treatment in each period.

The information requested on mean and maximum waiting times is not held. In February 2020, the estimated median waiting time for admitted treatment was 14.6 weeks, with 10,272 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment. The estimated median waiting time for non-admitted treatment was 9.4 weeks, with 18,018 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment.

In January 2022, the estimated median waiting time for admitted treatment was 13.7 weeks, with 7,705 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment. The estimated median waiting time for non-admitted treatment was 10.7 weeks, with 21,868 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment.

This data includes those patients referred to services directly commissioned by NHS England.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients were waiting for elective treatment for which NHS England’s specialised services function was responsible in (1) February 2020, and (2) the latest month for which figures are available; how many of these patients had already waited over 18 weeks; and what was the (a) mean, and (n) median, waiting time for those patients in each time period.

The data is not available in the format requested. Patients are coded as receiving a specialised service after their treatment has taken place, therefore the number of patients waiting for specialised services is not available.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Blackwood of North Oxford on 1 May 2019 (HL Deb, col 1020) that they intend to "ensure that the review takes into account the benefits offered by new treatments for severe life-threatening and rare diseases", what plans they have to provide assurances that NICE will not end the use of rarity as a decision modifier in its highly specialised technology appraisal process.

It is too soon to comment on the potential outcomes of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) methods review and any changes to that may be proposed, but issues around the use of modifiers are being explored.

NICE expects to consult on the case for change later this year, and there will be a second consultation in 2021 on the updated methods manual.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 12 May (HL4366), which aspects of the forthcoming EU Clinical Trial Regulation (Regulation (EU) (No 536/2014) they currently consider to be in the best interests of (1) UK patients, (2) industry, (3) non-commercial researchers, and (4) hospitals.

The Medicines and Medical Devices Bill 2020 will provide the mechanism to allow the United Kingdom to decide any aspects of the forthcoming European Union Clinical Trial Regulation (EU CTR) it would want to implement through national legislation.

The CTR is largely based on internationally recognised requirements to conduct a clinical trial and national UK legislation already implements many aspects of these international requirements.

Future changes made to the UK legislation will be done on the basis of what is in the best interests of the UK with the focus on remaining a leading global player, promoting patient safety; attracting more research to the UK; and enabling the UK to keep up with emerging technologies and maintain an internationally competitive clinical trials infrastructure.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure UK–EU clinical trials can continue after the end of the transition period, and once the EU?Clinical Trial Regulation?(Regulation (EU) No 536/2014) comes into effect.

The Government is committed to a world-leading regulatory system for clinical trials that allows us to collaborate effectively globally, ensuring the United Kingdom remains one of the best places in the world for science and innovation. At the end of the transition period, clinical trials will continue to be approved at a national level, working to international standards as they are now. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), along with partners across the UK healthcare ecosystem, has taken steps to ensure that all trials including multinational trials can continue seamlessly.

The MHRA, Health Research Authority, ethics services, National Institute for Health Research, National Health Service and devolved administrations have been preparing to implement the forthcoming European Union Clinical Trials Regulation since it was agreed in 2014. The UK will implement those aspects of the regulation which are in the best interests of UK patients, industry, non-commercial researchers and hospitals when it comes into force and this is currently expected during 2022.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential impact of COVID-19 on the work programme of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, in particular (1) the development and publication of technology appraisal guidance, and (2) the review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has adapted its priorities to support the National Health Service, local authorities and the wider health and social care sector to tackle COVID-19.

NICE’s immediate priorities include frontline staff being released from committee meetings and panels to minimise the disruption to critical care for those affected by COVID-19 and minimising the publication of outputs that might be a distraction during this critical time. NICE will only publish guidance, including technology appraisal guidance that is therapeutically critical or focused on COVID-19-related issues, and will continue with, but not publish other work, as staffing and other resources allow, including the review of its methods and processes. Information about the NICE methods review will be available shortly.

These priorities will be reviewed in six to eight weeks.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has adequate levels of patient and patient group participation in its review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has had a specific workstream focussing on patient involvement aspects of both its methods and processes. NICE held a workshop with 22 patient groups, used the findings to develop an in-depth questionnaire and received responses from 52 patient groups. The findings and proposals of this are informing the other workstreams.

Further key aspects include having three patient group representatives on the Methods Review Working Group; having patient representatives on task and finish groups undertaking the detailed methods work; convening a Stakeholder Insight Group to inform process developments, which has numerous patient group representatives; and outreach talks at various key patient group meetings.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they estimate the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will issue a consultation on changes to the routing criteria for the appraisal of medicines through its highly specialised technologies programme.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is continuing to work through the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on its work programmes. NICE anticipates that further information on the timing of the consultation on changes to the routing criteria for the appraisal of medicines through its highly specialised technologies programme should be available within the next few weeks.

1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 25 November (HL Deb, cols 1002–03), what sanctions may be imposed, and by whom, on financial services organisations that breach Financial Conduct Authority Guidance on the treatment of UK Politically Exposed Persons, their families and known close associates.

Further to the answer of 25 November 2021 by Viscount Younger of Leckie, from April 2018, the Financial Ombudsman has had jurisdiction to consider complaints from Politically Exposed Persons about their treatment by banks, and since 2018, have received fewer than 10 complaints in this area.

Where the Financial Ombudsman find that a bank has not followed regulations, best practice or acted in a fair and reasonable manner, the Financial Ombudsman will tell the bank to put the consumer in the position they would have been in had the bank’s error or wrongdoing not occurred. The Financial Ombudsman also has the power to order banks to pay for financial loss, distress or inconvenience depending on the experience of the consumer.

However, the Financial Ombudsman does not apply sanctions or penalties on banks. The Financial Conduct Authority, as anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing supervisor for financial services firms in the UK, has the power to impose civil penalties (fines and censure statements) and prohibitions on management.

15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration, if any, they have given to creating a new category of tax advantaged share scheme, analogous to the existing employee share ownership schemes, for which people in the gig economy would be eligible.

The government is not considering creating a new tax-advantaged share scheme for self-employed contractors.

The purpose of all the existing schemes is to encourage employee share ownership and support employers' efforts to foster a more enterprising and productive relationship with their employees.

Where companies employ staff directly, they may offer tax-advantaged options to their employees through one of the existing schemes.

30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many written directions Ministers have been asked to give (1) to Permanent Secretaries, and (2) to other officials, in each of the last 10 years; and in each case, (a) which Ministers and officials were involved, and (b) to what the written directions referred.

There have been 41 Ministerial Direction published since April 2011. There was no general requirement to publish Ministerial Directions prior to this date.

Thirty -eight of these direction were requested by Permanent Secretaries or Acting Permanent Secretaries. One of those (from the Permanent Secretary at the Department of Health and Social Care) was jointly requested by the Chief Executive of the NHS. Of the remainder, two were requested by the Chief Executive of UK Export Finance and one by the Chief Executive of the NHS.

Details of all published Ministerial Directions can be found on the gov.uk website.[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ministerial-directions