Lord Stevens of Birmingham Portrait

Lord Stevens of Birmingham

Crossbench - Life peer

Became Member: 5th July 2021


Lord Stevens of Birmingham is not a member of any APPGs
Lord Stevens of Birmingham has no previous appointments


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Division Votes
Wednesday 18th October 2023
Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill
voted Aye
One of 49 Crossbench Aye votes vs 6 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 204
Speeches
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill
My Lords, the right reverend Prelate the Bishop of Southwark’s mention of Hackney reminded me that, some years back, when …
Written Answers
Wednesday 28th February 2024
Mental Health Services: Finance
To ask His Majesty's Government when before 1 April they will confirm whether NHS mental health funding will increase as …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Stevens of Birmingham has voted in 28 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Stevens of Birmingham Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Lansley (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Kamall (Conservative)
(3 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(19 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Health and Care Act 2022
(9,451 words contributed)
Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023
(1,543 words contributed)
Procurement Act 2023
(1,380 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Stevens of Birmingham's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Stevens of Birmingham, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Stevens of Birmingham has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Stevens of Birmingham has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


21 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
15th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when the Office for National Statistics will conclude its review of the classification of universities in the National Accounts, first announced in January 2017.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Office for National Statistics is not responsible for making an assessment of the non-statistical impacts of classification decisions. Therefore, no such assessment has been made of other consequences.

The Lord Stevens of Birmingham

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

19 January 2024

Dear Lord Stevens of Birmingham,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking when the Office for National Statistics (ONS) will conclude its review of the classification of universities in the National Accounts, first announced in January 2017 (HL1604). And further to the classification review of universities announced by the ONS in January 2017, what assessment we have made of the (1) fiscal, and (2) other, consequences of universities being reclassified as public bodies as a result of that review (HL1606).

The ONS regularly reviews legislation and guidance relating to a number of institutions, including universities, to determine whether any changes would have a potential impact on their sector classification. As such, the classification review of universities in the UK, first announced on 31 January 2017 [1] will consider whether the substantial rise in tuition fees from 2012, and other changes in funding arrangements affect the classification of universities.

A further statement on the classification review of universities in the UK was released on 5 April 2018 [2]. This statement explained that the classification review had been paused because of the announcement of the review of post-18 education and funding, which raised the possibility that the cap for tuition fees may be altered. As this could affect the classification status of individual universities, the statement confirmed the classification review would recommence when there is more certainty in this area.

It was necessary to further postpone the classification review of universities in the UK due to new higher priority classification cases, such as support schemes initiated during the COVID-19 pandemic, and more recently, the energy support schemes introduced in 2022 and 2023.

At present, the ONS plans to begin the classification review of universities in the UK from Quarter 2 (April – June) 2024. However, classification priorities can change quickly, and the expected dates of completion are only indicative. Our forward work plan 3 is updated each month to reflect changes in priorities. Table 1 shows the expected timetable for the classification review.

Table 1: Expected timetable for the classification review of universities [3]

Name of case

Expected date of completion

Universities (Scotland)

Quarter 2 (Apr to Jun) 2024

Universities (Northern Ireland)

Quarter 3 (Jul to Sep) 2024

Universities (Wales)

Quarter 3 (Jul to Sep) 2024

Universities (England)

Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2025

Source: Forward Work Plan December 2023 (19 December 2023)

The ONS has not yet made an assessment of the fiscal consequences of universities being reclassified as public bodies. Within our forward work plan, for each of the four cases involved, we have provided an indication that the impact on fiscal aggregates could be small (less than £100 million change).

The ONS is not responsible for making an assessment of the non-statistical impacts of classification decisions. Therefore, no such assessment has been made of other consequences.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] Classification review of universities in the UK - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

[2] Further statement on the classification review of universities in the UK - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

[3] Economic statistics sector classification – Forward Work Plan dataset (XLSX, 128KB)

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the classification review of universities announced by the Office for National Statistics in January 2017, what assessment they have made of the (1) fiscal, and (2) other, consequences of universities being reclassified as public bodies as a result of that review.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Office for National Statistics is not responsible for making an assessment of the non-statistical impacts of classification decisions. Therefore, no such assessment has been made of other consequences.

The Lord Stevens of Birmingham

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

19 January 2024

Dear Lord Stevens of Birmingham,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking when the Office for National Statistics (ONS) will conclude its review of the classification of universities in the National Accounts, first announced in January 2017 (HL1604). And further to the classification review of universities announced by the ONS in January 2017, what assessment we have made of the (1) fiscal, and (2) other, consequences of universities being reclassified as public bodies as a result of that review (HL1606).

The ONS regularly reviews legislation and guidance relating to a number of institutions, including universities, to determine whether any changes would have a potential impact on their sector classification. As such, the classification review of universities in the UK, first announced on 31 January 2017 [1] will consider whether the substantial rise in tuition fees from 2012, and other changes in funding arrangements affect the classification of universities.

A further statement on the classification review of universities in the UK was released on 5 April 2018 [2]. This statement explained that the classification review had been paused because of the announcement of the review of post-18 education and funding, which raised the possibility that the cap for tuition fees may be altered. As this could affect the classification status of individual universities, the statement confirmed the classification review would recommence when there is more certainty in this area.

It was necessary to further postpone the classification review of universities in the UK due to new higher priority classification cases, such as support schemes initiated during the COVID-19 pandemic, and more recently, the energy support schemes introduced in 2022 and 2023.

At present, the ONS plans to begin the classification review of universities in the UK from Quarter 2 (April – June) 2024. However, classification priorities can change quickly, and the expected dates of completion are only indicative. Our forward work plan 3 is updated each month to reflect changes in priorities. Table 1 shows the expected timetable for the classification review.

Table 1: Expected timetable for the classification review of universities [3]

Name of case

Expected date of completion

Universities (Scotland)

Quarter 2 (Apr to Jun) 2024

Universities (Northern Ireland)

Quarter 3 (Jul to Sep) 2024

Universities (Wales)

Quarter 3 (Jul to Sep) 2024

Universities (England)

Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2025

Source: Forward Work Plan December 2023 (19 December 2023)

The ONS has not yet made an assessment of the fiscal consequences of universities being reclassified as public bodies. Within our forward work plan, for each of the four cases involved, we have provided an indication that the impact on fiscal aggregates could be small (less than £100 million change).

The ONS is not responsible for making an assessment of the non-statistical impacts of classification decisions. Therefore, no such assessment has been made of other consequences.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] Classification review of universities in the UK - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

[2] Further statement on the classification review of universities in the UK - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

[3] Economic statistics sector classification – Forward Work Plan dataset (XLSX, 128KB)

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government by what date they expect British universities to have a definitive answer as to whether the UK has succeeded in formally associating with the Horizon Europe research and innovation programme.

The UK stands ready to formalise our association to Horizon Europe at the earliest opportunity. At the recent EU-UK Specialised Committee the EU confirmed they were unwilling to move on UK association due to broader political issues. We continue to push the EU, by whatever means possible, to formalise our association but the EU is not living up to the commitments it made in 2020.

We recognise that delays by the EU have led to uncertainty for researchers, businesses and innovators based in the UK, including British Universities. To provide reassurance the Government has guaranteed funding for the first wave of eligible, successful applicants to Horizon Europe.

Given the EU’s persistence in delaying our association, it is only right and responsible that we are prepared for all outcomes, including one where we are not able to associate. Our priority is to support UK researchers and provide immediate stability and continuity for the sector. To this end, we are developing a coherent, compelling and high-quality programme to provide the fellowships, collaborations and industry engagement so valued in Horizon.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the speech by the Minister for Higher and Further Education on 24 February regarding their response to Dr Philip Augar's Review of Post-18 Education and Funding, published in May 2019, what proportion of their modelled overall reduction in future costs to taxpayers from student loans arises from (1) the new proposals themselves, (2) changes to the discount rate, or (3) other factors.

The fiscal impacts of the student loan reforms announced on Thursday 24 February 2022 are detailed in full in the equality impact analysis (EIA) published alongside the announcement, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reform-equality-impact-assessment.

Updates to the Resource, Accounting, and Budgeting (RAB) charge, that result from the change to the discount rate, announced by the government on 13 December 2021, are provided in Annex B of the EIA linked to above. The proportion of loan outlay issued is not expected to be repaid in present terms. Forecasts of the savings that will result from the reforms, set out in Tables 11 and 12 of the EIA, use the updated RAB as a baseline, meaning the discount rate change does not account for any of these savings.

The forecast savings are wholly attributable to the two-year tuition fee freeze and changes to student loan repayment terms, as set out on page 13 of the higher education policy statement & reform consultation, and do not incorporate other elements of the reform package. The consultation is attached.

The savings do include the changes to the Plan 2 repayment threshold for 2022/23 financial year, announced on 28 January 2022, prior to the announcement of the whole reform package.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when before 1 April they will confirm whether NHS mental health funding will increase as a share of overall NHS expenditure in 2024/25, as required by section 3(2) of the Health and Care Act 2022.

Information on mental health funding within the National Health Service will be made available once NHS planning guidance is published.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, given that the Independent Review of the Mental Health Act was published five years ago and that the most recent Conservative manifesto included a promise to legislate in this Parliament, why a bill on Mental Health Act reform was not mentioned in the King's Speech.

We recognise that the absence of a Mental Health Bill in the King’s Speech is disappointing to many people. It remains our intention to bring forward a Mental Health Bill when Parliamentary time allows.

We continue to take forward non-legislative commitments to improve the care and treatment of people detained under the Act, including continuing to pilot models of Culturally Appropriate Advocacy, which will provide tailored support to hundreds of people from ethnic minorities to better understand their rights when they are detained under the Mental Health Act. NHS England has launched the Patient and Carer Race Equality Framework for all mental health trusts in the National Health Service to embed across England. We are also investing over £400 million of funding between 2020/21 and 2023/24 to eradicate dormitories and give patients the privacy of their own ensuite bedroom.

NHS England is taking forward a new Mental Health, Learning Disability and Autism Inpatient Quality Transformation Programme to support cultural change and a new bold, reimagined model of care for the future across all NHS-funded mental health, learning disability and autism inpatient settings. This programme will complement and further support our existing commitments to improve the quality of community care and reduce the need for inpatient care.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 9 February (HL 5339), whether NHS England and integrated care board aggregate NHS mental health expenditure would still be expected to increase as a share of their total expenditure in 2023/24 compared with 2022/23 if "non-recurrent" expenditure had not been excluded from the baseline calculation; and if not, to itemise and quantify expected "non-recurrent" expenditure in both years.

The non-recurrent expenditure excluded from the baseline calculation is the specific funding provided at Spending Review 2021 for costs relating to COVID-19. Central funding for pensions costs is also excluded as this cannot be split between staff working on mental health and other areas. However, making no adjustments, mental health expenditure as a share of total National Health Service expenditure is still expected to increase, from 8.3% in 2022/23 to 8.5% in 2023/24.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when before 1 April 2023 they will confirm whether NHS mental health funding will increase as a share of overall NHS expenditure in 2023/24, as required by section 3(2) of the Health and Care Act 2022.

On 23 January 2023 the Government gave a written ministerial statement setting out its expectation for mental health spending by NHS England and integrated care boards (ICBs) in aggregate in the 2023/24 financial year. It stated that in that financial year, the Government expects mental health spending to continue to increase as a proportion of the total recurrent expenditure incurred by NHS England and ICBs in aggregate.

The following table shows recurrent National Health Service baseline spend as well as the forecast share thereof for mental health for financial years 2023/23 and 2023/24. This includes, at aggregate ICB level, baseline spend within scope of the Mental Health Investment Standard which covers all spending on mental health from an ICB’s core allocations, and at NHS England level, service development fund spending and specialised commissioning spending on mental health.

2022/23

2023/24

Recurrent NHS baseline (£ billion)

142.4

153.0

Total forecast mental health spend (£ billion)

12.7

13.6

Mental health share of recurrent baseline

8.90%

8.92%

It should be noted that the figures in the table will, in part, be based on projections, owing to the statutory requirement to lay the statement before Parliament ahead of the new financial year.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which of the 40 new NHS hospitals that they propose to build in England by 2030 now have planning permission; and when construction is due to start on each site.

As of 2 February 2023, within the New Hospital Programme, 21 schemes have received either full or outline planning permission. A document is attached of specific details on schemes which have received planning permission and their construction start time frames.

Requirements for planning permission are dependent on when the schemes will progress as part of the New Hospital Programme, and we will continue to support trusts with their planning applications as and when required. This approach to delivery of the new hospitals involves different schemes being grouped into ‘cohorts’, which represent a balance of progress for earlier schemes while enabling implementation standardisation and utilise economies of scale across schemes in later cohorts. This will ensure staff and patients benefit from new facilities that represent improved value for money and realise the full benefits of a programme approach.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the (1) planned construction start date, (2) expected construction completion date, and (3) budgeted cost, for each of the 40 new NHS hospitals they propose to build in England by 2030.

The Government has committed to build 40 new hospitals by 2030, in addition to eight previously announced schemes.

The schemes are grouped into five cohorts for delivery by 2030, based on an assessment of readiness to progress and the extent to which schemes can realise the benefits of the national programme. This assessment is subject to continuous review and the timescales for individual schemes may change. A current list of schemes and cohorts is attached, due to the size of the data. This includes where schemes are in construction and indicative construction start timescales. There are eight schemes in cohort five, which refers to schemes yet to be confirmed and are currently subject to an ongoing selection process.

At the Spending Review in 2020, the Government confirmed an initial £3.7 billion for the first four years of the programme. Funding from 2024/25 will be set out in further detail at future spending reviews. Specific timetables and funding allocations for individual schemes will be determined through the business case assurance process. In May 2022, the programme secured approval to progress the schemes in cohort two and the approach to delivering the programme was confirmed.

5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it remains their policy, set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, that funding for mental health services should annually grow as a share of overall NHS revenue expenditure.

The NHS Long Term Plan committed to increase spending on mental health services in real terms by at least £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24. We are ensuring every clinical commissioning group and integrated care board meets the Mental Health Investment Standard for spending on mental health to increase at least in line with the growth in their overall funding allocations.

15th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the International Committee of the Red Cross concerning securing access to Israeli hostages being held in Gaza.

Since October 7, the UK government has been working with relevant partners across the region, including the International Committee of the Red Cross, to help secure the release of hostages and better understand their status, including working to gain information on proof of life and access to medical professionals. As the Foreign Secretary has said, we need a humanitarian pause now to allow for the release of hostages.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how much development assistance they have provided to South Africa over the past 10 years.

The UK's development assistance to South Africa promotes a strategic partnership with a focus on shared priorities including economic development, climate change, gender equality and strengthening health systems. South Africa still faces major development challenges - particularly around poverty, inequality and unemployment - and remains eligible to receive donor assistance. Since 2014 the UK has provided South Africa with £267,928,979 in development assistance as our relationship has evolved from one of aid to one of mutual co-operation and strategic partnerships.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Venezuela regarding the territorial integrity of Guyana.

The UK Government does not recognise the legitimacy of the Maduro regime. We are concerned by the recent steps taken by Venezuela. We are clear that the border was settled in 1899 through international arbitration. The Foreign Secretary has reassured President Ali of this. We continue to work with regional partners and international bodies to de-escalate tensions.

Minister Rutley visited Guyana on 18 December to show UK support for its territorial integrity. He met with President Ali, Foreign Secretary Todd, National Security Advisor Captain Gerry Gouveia, Defence Force Chief of Staff Brigadier Omar Khan and The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretary General Dr Carla Barnett to show UK support for Guyana's territorial integrity.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what (1) diplomatic, (2) defence, and (3) other support, they will provide to the government of Guyana, following Venezuela's referendum proposing the illegal annexation of Guyana's Essequibo region.

We are concerned by the recent steps taken by Venezuela. We are clear that the border was settled in 1899 through international arbitration. The Foreign Secretary has reassured President Ali of this. We continue to work with regional partners and international bodies to de-escalate tensions.

Minister Rutley visited Guyana on 18 December. He met with President Ali, Foreign Secretary Todd, National Security Advisor Captain Gerry Gouveia, Defence Force Chief of Staff Brigadier Omar Khan and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretary General Dr Carla Barnett to show UK support for Guyana's territorial integrity.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether The Equipment Plan 2023–2033, published on 4 December, includes comprehensive cost estimates for the Royal Marines' Future Commando modernisation programme.

The Commando Force modernisation programme is delivering a transformational change to the UK's amphibious capability. The programme will be delivered in two investment increments, called OPERATE and FIGHT.

OPERATE will deliver a transformation of 3 Commando Brigade's operational capability on land. This element is fully funded with cost estimates being included in the Equipment Plan 2023-2033.

FIGHT will deliver the additional capabilities required to conduct ship-to-shore operations in a contested maritime environment. Estimates for this increment are not included in the Equipment Plan but will be considered within the 2025 Defence Review investment decisions.

Earl of Minto
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether The Equipment Plan 2023–2033, published on 4 December, includes full predicted costs for their proposed development and acquisition of new ground-launched, long range, precision-guided weapons; and if not, why.

The development and acquisition of new ground-launched, long range, precision-guided weapons are included in the Equipment Plan 2023-2033.

All Land Deep Fires Programme costs have been included except for Land precision strike, for which funding has not yet been committed.

Earl of Minto
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government why The Equipment Plan 2023–2033, published on 4 December, includes full predicted costs for the Royal Navy and RAF but not British Army capabilities required to deliver (1) the Integrated Review Refresh 2023, published in March, and (2) the Defence Command Paper: Defence's response to a more contested and volatile world, published in July.

The Equipment Plan 2023-33 is based on data from the close of financial year 2022-23 and does not reflect the policy intent set out in the Defence Command Paper Refresh published this July. The department's operating model, where responsibility for managing the equipment plan is delegated to Top Level Budgets, allows them to have different financial positions and to be at different stages of addressing their financial pressures.

Earl of Minto
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the threat posed by recent developments in (1) Russian, and (2) Chinese, hypersonic missile technology.

Russia and China continue to progress in the development and deployment of hypersonic missiles and technologies and these weapons pose an increasing threat to international stability.

17th Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government by what date they plan to have equipped the Royal Navy surface fleet with adequate capabilities to defend itself from hypersonic missile attack.

The Royal Navy is constantly reviewing and updating their offensive and defensive capabilities based upon intelligence and threat analysis.

Due to the sensitive nature of these assessments, it is inappropriate to discuss the specific nature of our capabilities and the operational analysis being conducted