Neil Coyle Written Questions

42 Questions to Home Office tabled by Neil Coyle


Date Title Questioner
17 Mar 2020, 4:30 p.m. European Arrest Warrants: Gibraltar Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the maintenance of a framework similar to the European Arrest Warrant for Gibraltar after UK access to the European Arrest Warrants ends.

Answer (James Brokenshire)

The Government has always been clear that Gibraltar is an integral part of our negotiations with the EU and we have committed to involve Gibraltar fully as we negotiate the next stage of the UK-EU relationship.

The UK is not seeking to participate in the European Arrest Warrant as part of the future relationship. The agreement should instead provide for fast-track extradition arrangements, based on the EU’s Surrender Agreement with Norway and Iceland which came into force in 2019, but with appropriate further safeguards for individuals beyond those in the European Arrest Warrant.

12 Mar 2020, 5:53 p.m. Crime: Exploitation Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Queen's Speech December 2019 Background Briefing Notes, whether she plans to include a statutory definition of criminal exploitation in the Serious Violence Bill.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Queen’s Speech set out an ambitious package of reforms to deliver on the people’s priorities, to tackle violent crime and to safeguard people’s streets and neighbourhoods. This includes the introduction of the Serious Violence Bill. The Bill will create a new legal duty on a range of local agencies, including the police, councils and local health bodies, to prevent and reduce serious violence. It will also introduce new court orders, which will make it easier for the police to stop and search those convicted of knife and offensive weapon offences, and prevent them from carrying knives on our streets.

The Bill and draft guidance for local agencies will be published in due course.

11 Feb 2020, 3:40 p.m. Anti-terrorism Control Orders Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it is her Department’s policy to reinstate Control Orders.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Protecting the British public is the Government’s first priority.

This Government is committed to ensuring that appropriate tools are available to the police and Security Service for the protection of national security.

There are no plans at this time to re-introduce control orders. Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) give the Security Service and police powerful measures to help manage the risk posed. They provide some of the most restrictive measures available in the democratic world. TPIMs have been endorsed by the courts, counter-terrorism reviewers, the police, and the Security Service. The police and Security Service believe TPIMs reduce the national security risk posed by those subject to them.

We also have a range of other measures available. These include: stringent conditions during any post-release licence period; notification requirements for terrorist offenders, which only last year the Government strengthened; and Serious Crime Prevention Orders, which were extended to terrorist offenders last year and provide the police with strengthened powers to manage terrorists on their release.

Last week we also announced that we are considering whether new legislation is required to provide additional assurance when terrorist offenders are released from prison.

We will do everything we can to protect the public.

11 Feb 2020, 3:40 p.m. Anti-terrorism Control Orders Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the reintroduction of Control Orders.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Protecting the British public is the Government’s first priority.

This Government is committed to ensuring that appropriate tools are available to the police and Security Service for the protection of national security.

There are no plans at this time to re-introduce control orders. Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) give the Security Service and police powerful measures to help manage the risk posed. They provide some of the most restrictive measures available in the democratic world. TPIMs have been endorsed by the courts, counter-terrorism reviewers, the police, and the Security Service. The police and Security Service believe TPIMs reduce the national security risk posed by those subject to them.

We also have a range of other measures available. These include: stringent conditions during any post-release licence period; notification requirements for terrorist offenders, which only last year the Government strengthened; and Serious Crime Prevention Orders, which were extended to terrorist offenders last year and provide the police with strengthened powers to manage terrorists on their release.

Last week we also announced that we are considering whether new legislation is required to provide additional assurance when terrorist offenders are released from prison.

We will do everything we can to protect the public.

8 Oct 2019, 4:11 p.m. Metropolitan Police: Recruitment Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the additional police officers will be recruited (a) to the Metropolitan Police and (b) to work in Southwark.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8 Oct 2019, 3:04 p.m. Domestic Abuse Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has plans to bring forward legislative proposals on Domestic Abuse in autumn 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The landmark Domestic Abuse Bill was introduced in the Commons on 16 July 2019. The Bill sits alongside a package of non-legislative measures targeted at tackling this abhorrent crime.

The Government is committed to progressing this Bill and Second Reading took take place on 2 October. The Bill will be carried carried over into the next session of Parliament.

9 Sep 2019, 4:58 p.m. Domestic Abuse Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it is Government policy to bring forward the Domestic Abuse Bill in autumn 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

6 Sep 2019, 2:45 p.m. Immigration Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it remains her Department's policy to reduce immigration to the UK; and what her policy is on international students coming to the UK to study.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

We strongly believe in the benefits of migration and we will continue to ensure that we attract the best and brightest talent to the UK. We will deliver a system that welcomes to this country the people who want to contribute, but that enables us to control migration.


We want to attract international students to study in the UK and study at our world class institutions.

3 Sep 2019, 4:25 p.m. Police: Recruitment Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timeline is for recruiting the 20,000 extra police officers announced by the Prime Minister on 24 July 2019.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Prime Minister has said that 20,000 extra police officers will be recruited over the next three years.

24 Apr 2019, 2:30 p.m. Female Genital Mutilation Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to improve the evidence base for understanding the levels and risks of female genital mutilation in the UK.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls.

In March 2019, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government allocated £375,000 for 37 local authority areas to fund locally-driven out-reach, engagement and communications on the practice of FGM. It is for Local Authorities to determine how best to utilise funding to combat the practice of FGM in their areas.

Data on FGM includes a 2015 City University and Equality Now study, part funded by the Home Office, which estimated that 137,000 women and girls who had migrated to England and Wales were living with the consequences of FGM, and approximately 60,000 girls aged 0-14 were born in England and Wales to mothers who had undergone FGM. The study also provides a breakdown of FGM prevalence estimates by local authority area which is available online at http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/12382/.

In addition, NHS Digital publishes data on the prevalence of FGM within the NHS in England. The most recent quarterly statistics were published in February 2019. A detailed breakdown of these statistics, including by local authority and age, is available online at https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/female-genital-mutilation.

To improve understanding of the prevalence of so-called ‘Honour Based Abuse’ (HBA), we introduced a mandatory HBA collection to the Annual Data Requirement (ADR) of police forces in England and Wales. This requires police forces to record where a crime has been committed in the context of preserving the honour of a family or community. This new collection is also capturing police recorded offences of FGM which were initially reported to the police under the mandatory reporting duty https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mandatory-reporting-of-female-genital-mutilation-procedural-information

24 Apr 2019, 2:30 p.m. Female Genital Mutilation Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how his Department measures the efficacy of funding to prevent and protect girls and young women from female genital mutilation.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls.

In March 2019, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government allocated £375,000 for 37 local authority areas to fund locally-driven out-reach, engagement and communications on the practice of FGM. It is for Local Authorities to determine how best to utilise funding to combat the practice of FGM in their areas.

Data on FGM includes a 2015 City University and Equality Now study, part funded by the Home Office, which estimated that 137,000 women and girls who had migrated to England and Wales were living with the consequences of FGM, and approximately 60,000 girls aged 0-14 were born in England and Wales to mothers who had undergone FGM. The study also provides a breakdown of FGM prevalence estimates by local authority area which is available online at http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/12382/.

In addition, NHS Digital publishes data on the prevalence of FGM within the NHS in England. The most recent quarterly statistics were published in February 2019. A detailed breakdown of these statistics, including by local authority and age, is available online at https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/female-genital-mutilation.

To improve understanding of the prevalence of so-called ‘Honour Based Abuse’ (HBA), we introduced a mandatory HBA collection to the Annual Data Requirement (ADR) of police forces in England and Wales. This requires police forces to record where a crime has been committed in the context of preserving the honour of a family or community. This new collection is also capturing police recorded offences of FGM which were initially reported to the police under the mandatory reporting duty https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mandatory-reporting-of-female-genital-mutilation-procedural-information

24 Apr 2019, 2:30 p.m. Female Genital Mutilation Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how his Department plans to advise local authorities on the targeting of funding for tackling female genital mutilation across the UK.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls.

In March 2019, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government allocated £375,000 for 37 local authority areas to fund locally-driven out-reach, engagement and communications on the practice of FGM. It is for Local Authorities to determine how best to utilise funding to combat the practice of FGM in their areas.

Data on FGM includes a 2015 City University and Equality Now study, part funded by the Home Office, which estimated that 137,000 women and girls who had migrated to England and Wales were living with the consequences of FGM, and approximately 60,000 girls aged 0-14 were born in England and Wales to mothers who had undergone FGM. The study also provides a breakdown of FGM prevalence estimates by local authority area which is available online at http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/12382/.

In addition, NHS Digital publishes data on the prevalence of FGM within the NHS in England. The most recent quarterly statistics were published in February 2019. A detailed breakdown of these statistics, including by local authority and age, is available online at https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/female-genital-mutilation.

To improve understanding of the prevalence of so-called ‘Honour Based Abuse’ (HBA), we introduced a mandatory HBA collection to the Annual Data Requirement (ADR) of police forces in England and Wales. This requires police forces to record where a crime has been committed in the context of preserving the honour of a family or community. This new collection is also capturing police recorded offences of FGM which were initially reported to the police under the mandatory reporting duty https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mandatory-reporting-of-female-genital-mutilation-procedural-information

7 Mar 2019, 6:48 p.m. Immigrants Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2019 to Question 222021, how many changes of circumstance applications to gain recourse to public funds were granted by his Department in 2015-16.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

These statistics are not included in Governments published migration statistics. The Government has no current plans to collect and collate the statistics in the manner requested as it would incur disproportionate cost to the public purse.

7 Mar 2019, 6:48 p.m. Immigrants Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2019 to Question 222021, how many changes of circumstance applications to gain recourse to public funds were granted by his Department in 2016-17.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

These statistics are not included in Governments published migration statistics. The Government has no current plans to collect and collate the statistics in the manner requested as it would incur disproportionate cost to the public purse.

7 Mar 2019, 6:48 p.m. Immigrants Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2019 to Question 222021, how many changes of circumstance applications to gain recourse to public funds were granted by his Department in 2017-18.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

These statistics are not included in Governments published migration statistics. The Government has no current plans to collect and collate the statistics in the manner requested as it would incur disproportionate cost to the public purse.

7 Mar 2019, 6:23 p.m. Immigrants: Children Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2019 to Question 222020, how many migrant families were supported by local authorities under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989 in (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17, (c) 2017-18.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office does not hold information centrally on how many migrant families were supported by local authorities under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989.

25 Feb 2019, 5:11 p.m. Immigrants Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February to Question 216277, how many change of circumstance forms relating to no recourse to public funds his Department received in (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

These statistics are not included in published migration statistics.The Government has no current plans to collect and collate the statistics in the manner requested and to do so would incur disproportionate cost to the public purse.

25 Feb 2019, 5:10 p.m. Immigrants: Children Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February 2019 to Question 216277, if his Department will start to collect data on how many children are living in households with parents subject to no recourse to public funds.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no current plans to start collecting this data. No recourse to public funds is a general restriction applied to the majority of migrants whether here as short-term visitors or with a view to settlement. The restriction can be removed following application for those with a right to remain on a specified human rights basis who would otherwise be destitute. It is not applied to those granted leave for international protection reasons and certain other vulnerable migrants.


Migrants who remain here without leave will not have access to public funds. The nature of illegal entry or overstaying make it difficult to accurately be confident on the numbers of children in these households, but local authorities do collect data on those supported under s.17 of the Children Act and where migrant families are involved this data is provided to the Home Office. The Home Office works regularly with local authorities to help lift the restriction for those who are eligible. In addition, immigration legislation does not prevent the provision of necessary support and assistance in order to safeguard the wellbeing of children.

25 Feb 2019, 5:10 p.m. Immigrants: Children Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February 2019 to Question 216277, for what reasons his Department does not collect data on how many children are living in households with parents subject to no recourse to public funds.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no current plans to start collecting this data. No recourse to public funds is a general restriction applied to the majority of migrants whether here as short-term visitors or with a view to settlement. The restriction can be removed following application for those with a right to remain on a specified human rights basis who would otherwise be destitute. It is not applied to those granted leave for international protection reasons and certain other vulnerable migrants.


Migrants who remain here without leave will not have access to public funds. The nature of illegal entry or overstaying make it difficult to accurately be confident on the numbers of children in these households, but local authorities do collect data on those supported under s.17 of the Children Act and where migrant families are involved this data is provided to the Home Office. The Home Office works regularly with local authorities to help lift the restriction for those who are eligible. In addition, immigration legislation does not prevent the provision of necessary support and assistance in order to safeguard the wellbeing of children.

12 Feb 2019, 5:30 p.m. Immigration: EU Nationals Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the (a) average time is and (b) longest time it has taken for a family subject to No Recourse to Public Funds conditions to achieve settled status.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Within the family migration route an individual and their dependants become eligible to apply for settlement after five years. If the requirements of the Immigration Rules for settlement are not met, then leave can be extended for 30 month periods at a time until they are, otherwise they will qualify after ten years. These periods of leave to remain, including leave granted to parents with children in the UK, will be subject to a no recourse to public funds condition, unless to avoid destitution or there are exceptional financial circumstances.

12 Feb 2019, 11:49 a.m. Immigrants: Children Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children are living in households with parents subject to No Recourse to Public Funds.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office does not hold the data requested.

24 Jan 2019, 5:51 p.m. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Crime Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has any plans to ensure that people sentenced for deliberately transmitting sexual diseases to other people are placed on the sex offenders' register.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

There is no specific offence of deliberately transmitting a sexual disease. This behaviour can be charged under Sections 18 and 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861.

There are no current plans to make persons convicted of these offences subject to notification requirements (commonly referred to as being placed on the Sex Offenders Register).

24 Jan 2019, 5:44 p.m. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Crime Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has plans to provide police with additional powers police to assist investigations into cases involving the deliberate transmission of sexual diseases.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

There is no specific offence of deliberately transmitting a sexual disease. This behaviour can be charged under Sections 18 and 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861.

There are no current plans to make persons convicted of these offences subject to notification requirements (commonly referred to as being placed on the Sex Offenders Register).

Where an allegation is made to the police of deliberate transmission of a sexual disease, the police already have powers to investigate under Sections 18 and 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861.

24 Jan 2019, 5:40 p.m. Criminal Investigation: Medical Records Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has plans to ensure police forces can access the medical records of suspects in (a) rape, (b) transmitted disease, (c) grievous bodily harm with intent and (d) other cases.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The general position is that if information is given in circumstances where it is expected that a duty of confidence applies, that information cannot normally be disclosed without the information provider's consent.

Three circumstances making disclosure of confidential information lawful are:

• where the individual to whom the information relates has consented;
• where disclosure is in the public interest; and
• where there is a legal duty to do so, for example a court order.

So, under the common law, a healthcare provider wishing to disclose a patient's personal information to anyone outside the team providing care should first seek the consent of that patient.

There are legal gateways for sharing data and the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE and Codes issued under the Act). These include a range of explicit and implied powers enabling the police to seek and share information, in pursuit of their policing purposes, including preventing a crime and protecting persons from harm.

16 Jan 2019, 4:35 p.m. Immigration: EU Nationals Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the settled status scheme will apply in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We will continue to run the EU Settlement Scheme in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario, for EU citizens resident in the UK by 29 March 2019.

As confirmed by the policy paper “Citizens’ Rights – EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU” published by the Department for Exiting the European Union on 6 December 2018, the basis for qualifying for status under the scheme will remain the same as proposed in a ‘deal’ scenario and will be focused on residence in the UK. This means that any EU citizen living in the UK by 29 March 2019 will be eligible to apply to the scheme, securing their status in UK law

16 Jan 2019, 4:13 p.m. Migrant Workers: EU Nationals Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what advice the Government is providing to employers on employing non-UK EU nationals in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The statutory code of practice and guidance published on gov.uk https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/right-to-work-checks-employers-guide is clear that employers already need to carry out right to work checks on EU citizens, as they do with all prospective employees to prevent illegal working.

Current arrangements, under which EU citizens can demonstrate their right to work in the UK by producing their national passport or identity card, will continue after the UK leaves the European Union until the future border and immigration system is introduced. The White Paper https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/766465/The-UKs-future-skills-based-immigration-system-print-ready.pdf on the future immigration system is clear that when we move to the future system, we will not require employers to undertake retrospective right to work checks on existing EU employees.

Employers will not be required to distinguish between those who arrived before and after March 2019.

4 Jul 2018, 1:17 p.m. Immigrants: Caribbean Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many staff have been allocated to the Windrush generation task group; and how many countries will be covered by the work of that taskforce.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Pursuant to the reply to Question 137147 given to the hon. Member for Bermondsey and Old Southwark on 26 June, the Taskforce consists of approximately 150 staff.

The Windrush Scheme, launched on 30-May, is not limited to the Windrush generation or those from Commonwealth countries. The Scheme also allows for some people who are nationals of countries other than the Commonwealth, settled in the UK prior to 31 December 1988, to make an application free of charge for a document that confirms their lawful status.

26 Jun 2018, 2:19 p.m. UK Visas and Immigration: Staff Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her oral contribution of 16 April 2018, Official Report, column 27, on Windrush Children (Immigration Status), how many staff she plans to deploy to the dedicated team to help people to evidence their right to be here and to access the necessary services.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Taskforce currently consists of approximately 150 staff, who have been seconded from a number of areas of UKVI, including Premium Service Centre, Citizenship, Work and Study commands. Of these around two thirds deal with the casework elements of the process. The remainder run the helpline and associated outreach work. We are carefully monitoring the impact that the secondments are having on the business as usual areas that the staff came from and are considering what the shape of a long-term unit for this work may take.

26 Jun 2018, 2:19 p.m. UK Visas and Immigration: Staff Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her oral contribution of 16 April 2018, Official Report, column 27, on Windrush Children (Immigration Status), how she plans to recruit staff to work in the dedicated team to help people to evidence their right to be here and to access the necessary services.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Taskforce currently consists of approximately 150 staff, who have been seconded from a number of areas of UKVI, including Premium Service Centre, Citizenship, Work and Study commands. Of these around two thirds deal with the casework elements of the process. The remainder run the helpline and associated outreach work. We are carefully monitoring the impact that the secondments are having on the business as usual areas that the staff came from and are considering what the shape of a long-term unit for this work may take.

26 Jun 2018, 2:19 p.m. UK Visas and Immigration: Staff Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her oral contribution of 16 April 2018, Official Report, column 27, on Windrush Children (Immigration Status), whether the staff she plans to deploy to the dedicated team to help people to evidence their right to reside in the UK and to access the necessary services will be (a) new Civil Service recruits or (b) reassigned from within her Department.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Taskforce currently consists of approximately 150 staff, who have been seconded from a number of areas of UKVI, including Premium Service Centre, Citizenship, Work and Study commands. Of these around two thirds deal with the casework elements of the process. The remainder run the helpline and associated outreach work. We are carefully monitoring the impact that the secondments are having on the business as usual areas that the staff came from and are considering what the shape of a long-term unit for this work may take.

26 Jun 2018, 12:34 p.m. Police: Greater London Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if his Department will take steps to ensure that the National and International Capital Cities Grant funding meets all London's policing needs.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

We have been clear that the police will have the resources they need to fight crime and protect the public. The Metropolitan Police Service will receive over £2.5bn in direct revenue funding for 2018/19 including the £174m National and International Capital City (NICC) Grant and over £640m in precept, up by £49m from last year. In addition, the Mayor decided to provide additional funding from business rates income, meaning that the MPS will receive a total of £110m additional funding this year compared to 2017/18.

Decisions on future funding levels, including the NICC Grant, will be taken in due course noting that the Home Secretary has stated that he will be prioritising funding for the police at the next Spending Review.

24 Apr 2018, 11:55 a.m. Immigration Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long the average leave to remain application takes from application to decision; and whether there is a backlog.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Information on processing of cases against service standards, and on work in progress levels, by case type, is published in the Home Office’s in-country Migration Transparency data, at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-february-2018

23 Apr 2018, 10:34 a.m. Visas Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the current backlog of visa applications is; and how long on average a visa application takes to be processed from application to decision.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The published information on processing times for visa applications is published as part of the Migration Transparency data, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

19 Apr 2018, 4:53 p.m. Immigrants Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people excluding those on student visas have been granted leave to remain in the UK with no recourse to public funds since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Where recourse to public funds is not automatic, leave to remain in the UK is normally granted with a condition of No Recourse to Public Funds unless to prevent destitution. The number of those granted leave with no recourse to public funds excluding those on student visas is not held in a format which can be reported on.

However the total number of in-country grants of leave to remain is recorded and can be found in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, Extensions tables, latest edition at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-october-to-december-2017/list-of-tables

26 Mar 2018, 9:01 a.m. Sergei Skripal and Yulia Skripal Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will certify the attempted murder of Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury on 4 March 2018 as an act of terrorism.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

Police are treating this incident as an attempted murder and it has not been declared a terrorist incident.

20 Feb 2018, 12:06 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of deaths of detainees held in immigration detention centres.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The prevention of deaths in detention is a priority for the Home Office. The adults at risk in immigration detention policy, which came into force on 12 September 2016, was part of the Government’s response to Stephen Shaw’s review of the welfare of vulnerable people in immigration detention. It introduced a case-by-case evidence-based assessment of the appropriateness of detention for any individual who is considered vulnerable, balanced against the immigration control considerations that apply in their case. Mr. Shaw’s follow up to his original review started on 4 September 2017 and will include an assessment of the implementation of all of his earlier review recommendations.

The treatment and health services received by individuals in immigration detention should be equivalent to that received by people in the community. Individuals are offered a physical and mental examination within 24 hours of admission to detention, and there is a requirement for IRC doctors to report to the Home Office any special illness or conditions that might affect the decision to continue the detention of an individual. There are also in place processes for staff to follow when there has been a change to the physical or mental health of a detainee, or a change in the nature or severity of their identified vulnerability, which may impact on the decision to detain.

Staff at all immigration removal centres (IRC) are trained to identify those at risk of self harm so that action can be taken to minimise the risk. All incidents of self harm are treated very seriously and every step is taken to prevent incidents of this nature. Formal risk assessments on initial detention and systems for raising concerns at any subsequent point feed into established self harm procedures in every IRC, which are in turn underpinned by the Home Office Operating Standard on the prevention of self-harm and Detention Services Order 06/2008 Assessment Care in Detention Teamwork (ACDT).

Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. Every effort is made to learn lessons from these investigations.

20 Feb 2018, 11:15 a.m. British Nationality: Children Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much parents with no recourse to public funds must pay to establish that their children are UK nationals.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

A child born in the UK will be a British citizen if at the time of the birth one or more of their parents is settled or a British citizen. Evidence of these facts is sufficient to establish that a child is British.

2 Nov 2017, 5:22 p.m. Extreme Sports: Urban Areas Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to introduce provisions for bringing prosecutions against urban climbers and base jumpers who access tall buildings and major tourist attractions.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The police have a range of powers to deal with criminal activity, which includes public order offences, aggravated trespass and anti-social behaviour. There are also measures that can be taken to combat trespass through civil courts. When criminal activity does occur, the decision whether to arrest individuals is an operational matter for the police in line with their duties to keep the peace, to protect communities, and to prevent the commission of offences.

The Home Office keep the available police powers under constant review and work closely with National Police Leads to ensure they are fit for purpose and allow the police to respond appropriately to a range of offences.

11 Sep 2017, 2:08 p.m. Entry Clearances Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 17 July to Question 4282, how many people waiting beyond the normal standard response times currently have no estimate of when their decision will be made.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

When an application is defined as non-straightforward due to complexity, the customer will be written to and in this correspondence it is explained that their case will not be decided within the normal standard timeframes but that a decision will be made as soon as possible, and that the customer will be notified if there is any change. Cases deemed non-straightforward are subject to regular review.

Published data on UKVI’s performance against service standards for applications made in the UK and from overseas, including the proportion of cases classified as non-straightforward, is available at:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

17 Jul 2017, 4:14 p.m. Visas Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of her Department's and UK Border Agency decisions were not made within the standard timeframe under the classification of complexity in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Published data on UKVI’s performance against service standards for applications made in the UK and from overseas, including the proportion of cases classified as non-straightforward, can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration.

Where an application is defined as non-straightforward due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard, and to explain what will happen next.

5 Jul 2017, 2:42 p.m. Fire Prevention: Southwark Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government has taken to ensure fire prevention work is conducted in Southwark since the closure for Southwark Fire Station.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Each fire and rescue authority is required to produce an integrated risk management plan identifying and assessing the fire and rescue related risks facing its communities, and to demonstrate how their resources will be used to mitigate these. It is the responsibility of each fire and rescue authority to manage their resources across prevention, protection and operational response to meet local risk.

5 Jul 2017, 12:30 p.m. Fire Stations Neil Coyle

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fire stations there were in England in (a) 2010 and (b) 2017.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The latest published information on numbers of fire stations can be found in Table 1403 of the “Fire and rescue authorities: operational statistics bulletin for England 2015 to 2016” available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-data-tables