Sir Alan Campbell Written Questions

8 Questions to Department of Health and Social Care tabled by Sir Alan Campbell


Date Title Questioner
27 Mar 2020, 1:49 p.m. Coronavirus: Health Services Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether routine treatment will be stopped during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Edward Argar)

National Health Service organisations were advised, in a letter to them from NHS England and NHS Improvement dated 17 March, that they should assume to need to postpone all non-urgent elective operations from 15 April at the latest, for a period of at least three months. NHS trusts also have full local discretion to wind down elective activity over the next 30 days as they see best, to free up staff for refresher training, beds for COVID-19 patients, and theatres/recovery facilities for adaptation work. Emergency admissions, cancer treatment and other clinically urgent care should continue unaffected.

13 May 2019, 4:06 p.m. Public Health: Finance Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Spending Review will include targeted investment in public health to improve regional health outcomes.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Local authorities will receive over £3.1 billion in 2019/20 for use on public health. Future funding priorities will be determined through the Spending Review process. In its Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has already committed to strengthen action on prevention and health inequalities. All local health systems will be expected to set out in 2019 how they will reduce health inequalities by 2023/24 and 2028/29.

5 Dec 2017, 2:21 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on legal advice by North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group in each of the last three years.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England advises that NHS North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCGs) spending on legal advice since 2014/15 is as follows:

2014/15 £9,826

2015/16 £49,064

2016/17 £40,837

2017/18 £40,692 (year-to-date, up to end of October 2017, month seven)

Please note that legal costs listed include all costs incurred as a result of direct patient care, and do not just relate to advice in respect of organisations or contracts.

The year-to-date figure for 2017/18 includes £17,281 in respect of the CCG’s response to the legal challenge to the urgent care procurement process earlier this year, and £1,281 in relation to the new urgent care work which is currently underway. There are no further costs associated with the urgent care procurement process, as this work is carried out by officers of the CCG and North of England Commissioning Support as part of their normal work.

5 Dec 2017, 2:21 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent by North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group on the formal process entered into in January 2017 to secure a new provider for urgent care services in North Tyneside.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England advises that NHS North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCGs) spending on legal advice since 2014/15 is as follows:

2014/15 £9,826

2015/16 £49,064

2016/17 £40,837

2017/18 £40,692 (year-to-date, up to end of October 2017, month seven)

Please note that legal costs listed include all costs incurred as a result of direct patient care, and do not just relate to advice in respect of organisations or contracts.

The year-to-date figure for 2017/18 includes £17,281 in respect of the CCG’s response to the legal challenge to the urgent care procurement process earlier this year, and £1,281 in relation to the new urgent care work which is currently underway. There are no further costs associated with the urgent care procurement process, as this work is carried out by officers of the CCG and North of England Commissioning Support as part of their normal work.

5 Dec 2017, 2:17 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the level of funding was, per patient, for North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group in the last financial year for which figures are available.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England’s published clinical commissioning group (CCG) allocation figures are published, and accessible via the link below. Per capita allocations are found in column nine, and figures from the last financial year – 2016-17 – begin on page one. Data for North Tyneside CCG can also be found on this page.

These figures are as published when allocations were updated in January 2016, and thus do not include any adjustments that may subsequently have been made locally. It should be noted that these figures relate to funding for core CCG services only; they do not, for example, include primary medical care.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ccg-allocations.pdf

5 Dec 2017, 2:17 p.m. Clinical Commissioning Groups Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the mean level of funding was, per patient, for each English Clinical Commissioning Group in the last financial year for which figures are available.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England’s published clinical commissioning group (CCG) allocation figures are published, and accessible via the link below. Per capita allocations are found in column nine, and figures from the last financial year – 2016-17 – begin on page one. Data for North Tyneside CCG can also be found on this page.

These figures are as published when allocations were updated in January 2016, and thus do not include any adjustments that may subsequently have been made locally. It should be noted that these figures relate to funding for core CCG services only; they do not, for example, include primary medical care.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ccg-allocations.pdf

3 Nov 2017, 11:47 a.m. Diabetes: Medical Equipment Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of flash glucose monitoring on the management of diabetes.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Freestyle Libre, a flash glucose monitoring system has been approved for reimbursement on National Health Service prescription from 1 November 2017 through listing in Part IX of the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff.

The NHS Business Services Authority carries out the assessment of Part IX applications made by manufacturers on behalf, of the Secretary of State for Health, for prescribing at NHS expense by an appropriate practitioner.

The listing of a medical device in the Drug Tariff should not be interpreted as a recommendation to prescribe a particular product. Patients will need to discuss the ongoing management of their condition with their healthcare professional and consider whether flash glucose monitoring is suitable for them.

Any device made available for prescribing to patients through listing in Part IX is required to meet set criteria, namely that the product is safe and of good quality, it is appropriate for general practice and, if relevant, non-medical prescribing, and it is cost effective.

Within its financial constraints, the NHS is committed to providing access to new drugs and medical technologies. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

3 Nov 2017, 11:47 a.m. Diabetes: Medical Equipment Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department takes to ensure that people with diabetes have access to new and emerging technologies as they come to market.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Freestyle Libre, a flash glucose monitoring system has been approved for reimbursement on National Health Service prescription from 1 November 2017 through listing in Part IX of the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff.

The NHS Business Services Authority carries out the assessment of Part IX applications made by manufacturers on behalf, of the Secretary of State for Health, for prescribing at NHS expense by an appropriate practitioner.

The listing of a medical device in the Drug Tariff should not be interpreted as a recommendation to prescribe a particular product. Patients will need to discuss the ongoing management of their condition with their healthcare professional and consider whether flash glucose monitoring is suitable for them.

Any device made available for prescribing to patients through listing in Part IX is required to meet set criteria, namely that the product is safe and of good quality, it is appropriate for general practice and, if relevant, non-medical prescribing, and it is cost effective.

Within its financial constraints, the NHS is committed to providing access to new drugs and medical technologies. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.