Claudia Webbe Portrait

Claudia Webbe

Independent - Leicester East

First elected: 12th December 2019


Firearms Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Foreign Affairs Committee
11th May 2020 - 5th Jan 2022
Committees on Arms Export Controls
6th Jul 2020 - 5th Jan 2022
Backbench Business Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 29th Apr 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Claudia Webbe has voted in 627 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Claudia Webbe Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nigel Evans (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
Eleanor Laing (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(17 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(15 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(13 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2020
(1,559 words contributed)
Finance Act 2023
(1,339 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Claudia Webbe's debates

Leicester East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza

Undocumented Migrants are suffering in silence, with no access to adequate Financial support, or any help. The Government should grant an urgent Amnesty of 5years to those with no criminal record so that they could live their lives as normal human beings and pay tax to help the UK economy.

Currently, it is not compulsory for primary or secondary school students to be educated on Britain's role in colonisation, or the transatlantic slave trade. We petition the government to make education on topics such as these compulsory, with the ultimate aim of a far more inclusive curriculum.

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.

Black Women in the U.K. are 5 times more likely to die during pregnancy and after childbirth compared to White Women (MBRRACE, 2019). We need more research done into why this is happening and recommendations to improve health care for Black Women as urgent action is needed to address this disparity.

As the Coronavirus escalates, there are concerns that a trade deal between the UK Government and the US deal might not exempt our NHS, leaving it vulnerable to privatisation and in direct contradiction to promises this would not happen.

The University and College Union has repeatedly called on its members to strike. However, strikes are ineffective if students, not employees are the main source of revenue. For this to change, government needs to step in and require universities to reimburse tuition fees lost due to strike action.

All students should be reimbursed of this years tuition fees as universities are now online only due to COVID-19, with only powerpoints online for learning materials which is not worthy of up to £9,250. Furthermore, all assessments are being reconsidered to ‘make do’ and build up credits.

As students are unable to access facilities or continue with their eduction at their university setting in the following semester, we would like to request that the government considers refunding tuition payments for Semester 3.

The quality of online lectures is not equal to face-to-face lectures. Students should not have to pay full tuition fees for online lectures, without experiencing university life. The Government should require UK universities to partially refund tuition fees while online teaching is implemented.

Students across the UK have returned to University to be told our learning will be predominantly online for the foreseeable future. The Government should therefore lower our tuition fees and we should receive a partial refund for the effects this will have on our learning and university experience.

We want the Education Secretary and the Government to step in and review the exam board’s decision on how GCSE and A-Level grades will be calculated and awarded due to the current coronavirus crisis. We want a better solution than just using our previous data to be the basis of our grade.

A significant number of students will sit their final 2021 examinations. The outcome of which undoubtedly will be their passport, for many of their future life chances and successes. In order for this to be done fairly, it is imperative that the amount of content they are tested on is reduced.


Latest EDMs signed by Claudia Webbe

17th April 2024
Claudia Webbe signed this EDM on Friday 19th April 2024

The cost of private rent in England and rent controls

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House notes the huge cost of private rents in England and increase in private rents since private tenancies were deregulated and section 21 no-fault evictions were introduced under the Housing Act 1988; recognises the challenges with accurately estimating average private rents but further notes historical data points to …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 6
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
15th April 2024
Claudia Webbe signed this EDM on Monday 15th April 2024

Trapped podcast on IPP sentences

Tabled by: John McDonnell (Labour - Hayes and Harlington)
That this House praises the tireless work by campaigners fighting against the injustice of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, which were abolished in 2012 but not retrospectively, and commends the Trapped podcast for shining a powerful spotlight on the ongoing scandal of these indefinite and potentially never-ending sentences; agrees …
25 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 3
Scottish National Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Claudia Webbe's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Claudia Webbe, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Claudia Webbe has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Claudia Webbe

Claudia Webbe has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Jul 2023
To ask the Prime Minister, whether he raised the case of Dr. Abduljalil Al-Singace with the Crown Prince and Prime Minister of Bahrain.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 13 December 2022, PQ 102991.

Rishi Sunak
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
13th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to paragraphs 28 and 29 of the summary grounds of the Secretary of State provided in the High Court case between the King (on the application of Al-Haq) v the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, AC-2023-LON-003634, whether any of the arms export licences identified in the Change in Circumstances review have been revoked since January 2024.

The Government is monitoring the situation in Israel and Gaza very closely.

The Government can and does respond quickly and flexibly to changing international circumstances. All licences are kept under careful and continual review and are able to be amended, suspended, refused or revoked as circumstances require.

HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make it her policy to (a) monitor and (b) report on the impact of UK-supplied arms on civilians in the Israel-Hamas conflict.

The UK export licensing system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK.

We rigorously assess every application on a case-by-case basis against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (the SELC).

The SELC provide a thorough risk assessment framework for export licence applications and require us to think hard about the impact of providing equipment and its capabilities. We will not license the export of equipment where to do so would be inconsistent with the SELC.  These are not decisions we take lightly.

Our assessments draw on all available information relevant to the criteria in the case, including reports from NGOs and our overseas network.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will publish a breakdown of the type of military equipment which has been licensed for export to Israel in last five years.

HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics on GOV.UK, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. Military, Other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data also specifies whether the goods covered by a particular licence are for ultimate use by the destination country or whether the goods are due to be incorporated into another product for use by a third-party destination (ie incorporation licences).

This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

The most recent publication was on 30th August 2023, and covered the period 1st January – 31st March 2023. Information covering 1st April – 30th June 2023 will be published on 16th January 2024.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many arms licences have been issued to Israel in the last five years; and what those licences were for.

HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data

The most recent publication was on 30th August 2023, and covered the period 1st January – 31st March 2023. Information covering 1st April – 30th June 2023 will be published on 16th January 2024.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to ensure (a) transparency and (b) accountability of arms sales to countries involved in conflicts.

HM Government takes its export control responsibilities very seriously and we operate one of the most robust and transparent export control regimes in the world.

We rigorously assess every application on a case-by-case basis against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (the Criteria). The Criteria provide a thorough risk assessment framework and we will not issue an export licence to any destination where to do so would be inconsistent with the Criteria.

We can and do respond quickly and flexibly to changing international circumstances. All licences are kept under careful and continual review as standard. Acting upon advice from other Government departments, in particular the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office regarding the situation in country and the risks this poses with respect to the UK’s export control responsibilities. Secretary of State for Business and Trade is able to amend, suspend or revoke extant licences and refuse new licence applications as circumstances require.

We publish comprehensive Official Statistics every quarter about the decisions we make on licence applications including those issued, refused or revoked. This includes data on outcome, end user destination(s), value and licence (product type). This is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Departments are taking to help ensure that garment factories in Leicester East constituency are (a) inspected effectively and (b) meet legal obligations on (i) pay, (ii) safety and (ii) working conditions.

HMRC enforces the National Minimum Wage on behalf of the Department for Business and Trade. Where HMRC identify other risks such as potential Modern Slavery & Human Trafficking, HMRC will make referrals to the bodies with the powers to investigate.

Similarly, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will respond to intelligence about unsafe working practices that they receive from a variety of sources including workers and other agencies. This follow up includes inspection where it is the most effective form of intervention.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether the Government is taking steps to encourage UK retailers to audit their supply chains on a continuous basis to ensure that workers in those supply chains are (a) paid a living wage and (b) work in a safe environment.

This Government is committed to building an economy that works for everyone. Through the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and the National Living Wage (NLW) the Government protects the lowest paid within our society. On 1 April 2023, the National Living Wage increased 9.7% to £10.42 from £9.50 an hour. The Government takes reports of serious labour exploitation and illegal working practices very seriously, and regularly engage on these issues.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the guidance entitled Adapting historic homes for energy efficiency: a review of the barriers, published on 3 January 2024, what steps her Department plans to take to (a) identify and (b) tackle ineffective (i) heating and (ii) insulation within homes.

In January 2024, the Government published the cross-government review ‘Adapting historic homes for energy efficiency: a review of the barriers’, alongside an independent research report ‘Defining and identifying complex-to-decarbonise homes’.

The review looks at the practical barriers to energy efficiency and low carbon heating measures in historic homes, and sets out the actions government is taking to overcome these barriers.

The Government is investing £6.6 billion over this Parliament on clean heat and improving energy efficiency in buildings, reducing our reliance on fossil fuel heating. In addition, £6 billion of new Government funding will be made available from 2025 to 2028.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Groceries Code Adjudicator, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing regulatory bodies for other industries, including the garment industry.

Increased regulatory burdens result in increased costs for business, and could have an anticompetitive impact by restricting choice, driving up prices and inhibiting innovation in the supply of services.

In the response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a fashion watchdog, or garment trade adjudicator, in respect of ensuring that brands fulfil their contracts and pay garment factories on time and in full.

In response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

Small businesses affected by late or unfair payment practices can contact the Small Business Commissioner’s investigation service at enquiries@smallbusinesscommissioner.gov.uk or by calling the office on 0121 695 7770.

14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a fashion watchdog, or garment trade adjudicator, to prevent incidences of brands from making late amendments to orders with resultant costs to suppliers.

While the adjudicator model has had some success in raising standards in the groceries sector, there are significant differences between those two industries which calls into question how effectively the model can be transferred.

In the response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a fashion watchdog, or garment trade adjudicator, to prevent incidences of brands from cancelling orders without paying compensation.

While the adjudicator model has had some success in raising standards in the groceries sector, there are significant differences between those two industries which calls into question how effectively the model can be transferred.

In the response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a garment trade adjudicator to prevent abusive purchasing practices in the garment industry.

While the adjudicator model has had some success in raising standards in the groceries sector, there are significant differences between those two industries which calls into question how effectively the model can be transferred.

In the response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to (a) improve working conditions and (b) ensure payment of at least the minimum wage in Leicester since the investigations into wage exploitation in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence given by the then Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility to the Environmental Audit Committee on 18 December 2018, Session 2017-19, HC 1148, whether prosecutions were made after the investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and/or the national living wage in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence of the Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility to the Environmental Audit Committee on 18 December 2018, HC 1148, published on 30 January 2019, which Government agencies were involved in the investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and the national living wage in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to implement recommendations arising from investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and the national living wage in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence given by the then Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility to the Environmental Audit Committee on 18 December 2018, Session 2017-19, HC 1148, if he will publish any recommendations, conclusions and findings from the investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and/or the national living wage in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence given by the then Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility to the Environmental Audit Committee on 18 December 2018, HC 1148, if he will publish the (a) scope and (b) nature of the investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and/or the national living wage in Leicester’s garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence by the then Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility to the Environmental Audi Committee on 18 December 2018, HC 1148, whether he has plans to publish the outcomes of investigations into underpayment of the national minimum wage and/or national living wage in Leicester's garment industry.

A multi-agency taskforce operated in Leicester for over a year to investigate allegations of widespread labour market non-compliance, including underpayment of National Minimum Wage. HMRC investigate the National Minimum Wage, but the taskforce also included the Gangmaster and Labour Abuse Authority, Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate, Health and Safety Executive, National Crime Agency, Leicestershire Police and Home Office Immigration Enforcement. The taskforce visited over 300 premises in the city to ensure compliance and also undertook a programme of community engagement in Leicester to encourage whistle-blowers to come forward. While the bodies involved remain vigilant, the activity undertaken so far has not uncovered evidence of widespread modern slavery.

HMRC have a number of open cases remaining and will continue to investigate based on intelligence and risk-modelling, sharing information as appropriate. Enforcement action will be considered according to the evidence. To date, HMRC have issued two Labour Market Enforcement Undertakings to employers in the Leicester garment industry. There have not been any criminal prosecutions. We cannot comment on ongoing investigations.

19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to end Government support for Oil Drilling in Horse Hill, Surrey in the context of the UK’s climate commitments under the Paris and Glasgow COP Agreements.

As the case remains before the Courts following the recent hearing, it would not be appropriate to comment.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to end UK Government support for Liquid Natural Gas in Mozambique in the context of the UK’s climate commitments under the Paris and Glasgow COP Agreements.

The UK Government no longer provides any new direct financial or promotional support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, other than in limited circumstances.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to end Government support for the new Cambo oil field in the context of the UK’s climate commitments under the Paris and Glasgow COP Agreements.

The Government’s domestic offshore oil and gas sector remains important to the UK and continues to keep the country warm, fuel the economy and strengthen security of supply. While the government is working to drive down demand for fossil fuels, this will be a gradual transition. There will continue to be ongoing demand for oil and gas over the coming years, as recognised by the independent Climate Change Committee, with the UK expected to remain net importers of oil and gas as domestic demand continues to outstrip domestic production.

Development proposals for fields with existing licences, such as Cambo, are subjected to extensive scrutiny by the Oil and Gas Authority, and the Offshore Petroleum Regulator for Environment and Decommissioning. This includes an environmental impact assessment, a public consultation, and careful examination from the Oil and Gas Authority under its revised strategy – effectively a net zero test – before development consent can be issued.

The Government has not provided any financial support for the Cambo field.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to end Government support for Whitehaven Coal Mine in the context of the UK’s climate commitments under the Paris and Glasgow COP Agreements.

The Government has not provided any financial support for the proposed Whitehaven Coal Mine.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on the (a) UK’s support for Liquid Natural Gas in Mozambique and (b) the compatibility of that support with the UK’s climate commitments under the Paris and Glasgow COP Agreements.

My Rt. Hon. Friends the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Foreign Secretary have not discussed any UK support for Liquid Natural Gas in Mozambique.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the (a) accuracy of reports that burning all 800 million barrels of oil in the new Cambo oil field would be ten times the annual emissions of Scotland and (b) the implications for the UK’s climate commitments of that matter.

No decision has yet been made regarding the proposed Cambo field, which is expected to produce up to 170 million barrels of oil over 25 years.

The figure of 800 million barrels refers to an estimate of Cambo’s total oil in place, of which only a fraction can be feasibly produced.

Oil and gas production from existing licenses is already factored into our projections of future supply, and even as we move towards net zero, we will remain net importers of oil and gas.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to (a) prevent the development of the Cambo oil field and (b) support oil and gas workers and communities in the transition towards renewable energy.

Development proposals for fields with existing licences, such as Cambo, are subject to a rigorous scrutiny process prior to consent by the independent Oil and Gas Authority, as well as an environmental impact assessment and a public consultation by the Offshore Petroleum Regulator for Environment and Decommissioning.

This Government’s landmark North Sea Transition Deal – the first of its kind in the world – will support oil and gas workers in the green transition.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps his Department has taken to enable and support overseas workers who are victims of corporate harm in the supply chain of UK fashion brands to access remedy via UK courts.

Whether an overseas worker would be able to access remedy against a UK company in the courts of England and Wales or an employment tribunal would depend on a number of different factors, including whether the court or tribunal has territorial jurisdiction, the nature of the employment relationship, and what right the claimant is asserting under UK law. This would be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

The UK government has an extensive history of funding organisations such as the Ethical Trading Initiative who proactively support worker representation, freedom of association and collective bargaining. This support has led to direct remediation of labour rights violations for vulnerable workers, including dismissal for joining a union.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to establish a judge-led public inquiry into Leicester’s garment industry.

We are engaging with the sector to understand the systemic issues that lead to non-compliance and what measures could be used to tackle them. I have met with the British Retail Consortium to discuss the issues in the sector and will be holding a roundtable with their members to further discuss potential solutions. We also look forward to seeing the outcomes of work between the enforcement agencies and retailers as part of the work of the Apparel and General Merchandise Public/Private Protocol, a partnership between the enforcement agencies and industry partners, including NGOs, sector bodies and brands, aimed at tackling labour exploitation in the garment industry.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a Garment Trading Adjudicator, similar to the Groceries Code Adjudicator, to reduce exploitation in the UK’s garment industry.

The Groceries Code Adjudicator has been successful in ensuring large grocery retailers treat their direct suppliers lawfully and fairly, through its effective enforcement of the Groceries Supply Code of Practice. There are significant differences between the groceries sector and the fashion industry in terms of scale and distribution of market share, so we need to understand whether this model would be as effective in driving the right sort of behaviour in garment factories. BEIS officials have met with Fiona Gooch from Traidcraft to further discuss the proposal and continue to consider this question.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a statutory mandatory human rights and due diligence responsibility for the textile and clothing industry.

The Modern Slavery Act specifically requires UK large businesses to publish transparency in supply chains statements in a prominent place on their website.

The Government expects all companies operating within the UK to put measures in place to protect their supply chains from labour exploitation. Following changes to the Modern Slavery Act – where timelines are to be confirmed - organisations will be required to include information about their organisation’s structure and supply chains in their modern slavery statement or to explicitly state that their statement omits this information.

The Home Office announced a series of measures to strengthen the Modern Slavery Act, including introducing fines for businesses that do not comply with their transparency obligations. We will introduce the necessary legislation, setting out the level of those fines, as soon as parliamentary time allows.

The Government provides advice to businesses on human rights issues across their supply chains, including pressing them to undertake appropriate due diligence to satisfy themselves that their activities do not support, or risk being seen to support, any human rights violations or abuses. BEIS has reinforced this message through engagement with businesses, industry groups and other stakeholders.

UK listed companies are required to report on social and environmental impacts material to their business, including information about supply chains, where this is necessary for an understanding of the business as part of annual reports.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a compulsory requirement for garment industry companies to publish a full list of their suppliers.

The Government currently has no plans for introducing a compulsory requirement for garment industry companies to publish a full list of their suppliers.

The Government encourages businesses to be open and transparent to respond to consumers’ legitimate interest in where and how the products they buy have been manufactured. UK listed companies are required to report on impacts material to their business including information about supply chains where this is necessary for an understanding of the business as part of their annual reports.

Under section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, the UK became the first country in the world to require businesses to report on how they prevent modern slavery in their operations. Following consultation, the Home Office has announced a series of measures to strengthen the Modern Slavery Act. Organisations will be required to include information about their organisation’s structure and supply chains in their modern slavery statement or to explicitly state that their statement omits this information. These new measures will be introduced once parliamentary time allows.

A multi-faceted approach is required to address supply chain challenges. The Government recently hosted two Minister-led roundtables with garment industry leaders, civil-society and other key stakeholders, during which a range of different solutions were explored.

BEIS officials are also in the process of engaging with retailers, civil society and key organisations to explore the merits and challenges of different approaches.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the finding by the British Retail Consortium that workers in Leicester's apparel manufacturing industry are underpaid by over £2.1 million a week, what steps his Department is taking to enforce UN guiding principles on business and human rights in respect of the duty of employers to remedy human rights violations in respect of underpaid wages in that industry in (a) Leicester and (b) the rest of the UK.

The UK supports the United Nations Guiding Principles on business and human rights, the authoritative voluntary international framework to steer practical action by Governments and businesses worldwide.

The UK was the first state to produce a national action plan to respond to the UN Guiding Principles. The Plan sets out how the UN Guiding Principles are applied in the UK and expectations of UK businesses’ conduct, including that they comply with relevant laws and respect internationally recognised human rights.

In the UK, the right to just and favourable remuneration for work is protected by National Minimum Wage legislation, which is enforced by the HMRC National Minimum Wage team. All businesses, irrespective of size or business sector, are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff, and consequences for not complying with paying NMW can include fines of 200% of the arrears, public naming and, for the worst offences, criminal prosecution. HMRC follows up on every worker complaint it receives, even those which are anonymous.

HMRC are an active participant in the multiagency taskforce which is responding to allegations of non-compliance in the Leicester garment sector and has undertaken joint operations with partner agencies in Leicester for a number of years. They have historically investigated more than 150 textile businesses, including multiple employers operating in Leicester; and have opened a significant number of investigations in Leicester since 1 July 2020.

HMRC continues to take proactive steps in this industry. They have written to over 18,000 workers in the textile sector flagging their entitlement to minimum wage, common causes of underpayment and encouraging confidential reporting of employers and have written to over 2500 employers in the sector highlighting the main risks which lead to NMW underpayment.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing maximum pay ratios between maximum and minimum earners for garment industry companies and their supply chains.

We have not made an assessment of the merits of this proposal. Levels of renumeration of staff above the National Minimum Wage is a matter for employers.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to promote transparency and accountability within garment industry supply chains.

UK listed companies are required to report on social and environmental impacts material to their business, including information about supply chains, where this is necessary for an understanding of the business as part of annual reports.

The Government looks to businesses to be open and transparent in responding to consumers’ interest in where and how the products they source have been manufactured, including the use of raw materials. Since being introduced, we have seen more businesses open up about their supply chains, identify high-risk areas and introduce tailored steps to support vulnerable workers.

The Government response to the Transparency in Supply Chains consultation, published on 22 September 2020, committed to taking forwards an ambitious package of changes to strengthen and future-proof the Modern Slavery Act’s transparency legislation, including:

  • Extending the reporting requirement to public bodies with a budget of £36 million or more.
  • Mandating the specific reporting topics statements must cover.
  • Requiring organisations to publish their statement on the new Government digital reporting service.
  • Setting a single reporting deadline by which all modern slavery statements must be published.
  • Considering enforcement options in line with the ongoing development of the Single Enforcement Body for Employment rights.

The Home Office announced a series of measures to strengthen the Modern Slavery Act, including introducing fines for businesses that do not comply with their transparency obligations. We will introduce the necessary legislation, setting out the level of those fines as soon as parliamentary time allows.

BEIS and the Home Office are also working in partnership with the industry through the Apparel and General Merchandise Public and Private Protocol, a partnership between enforcement bodies and industry partners, including, the British Retail Consortium, UK Fashion and the Textile Association. This is aimed at tackling all forms of labour exploitation in the garment industry.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of actively involving trade unions in workplace inspections in order to help tackle exploitation in the garment industry.

Trade unions have been involved in the Apparel and General Merchandise Public/Private Protocol, a partnership between enforcement bodies and industry partners aimed at tackling all forms of labour exploitation in the garment trade. Brands, sector bodies and trade unions are working with the enforcement agencies to bring a coordinated approach to improve working conditions in the UK supply chain. All partners are participating in the following workstreams: worker and community voice; intervention mechanisms; business accountability; and regulation, legislation and political engagement.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a Fit-to-Trade licensing scheme so that no garment factory could operate unless it was approved by labour enforcement agencies.

BEIS officials, along with Home Office colleagues and the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority have been engaging with the British Retail Consortium and the wider retail sector to understand the systemic issues that lead to non-compliance and what measures could be used to tackle them. Given the serious nature of the allegations in Leicester and the spectrum of issues and concerns, it is imperative that we have a strong evidence base to inform the options we are considering in order to protect vulnerable workers and drive-up standards.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received on bringing forward legislative proposals on textile and garment adjudication similar to the Groceries Code Adjudicator to regulate the purchasing practices of brands.

The Groceries Code Adjudicator was established in 2013 to enforce the Groceries Supply Code of Practice (the Groceries Code). The Groceries Code was introduced to address unfair trading practices identified by the Competition Commission in a market investigation into the grocery retail sector in 2009. The competition authorities have not investigated similar supply chain issues in the textile and garment sectors.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to (a) tackle the payment of illegal wages to workers in parts of Leicester’s garment industry and (b) ensure those workers are (i) compensated and (ii) reimbursed.

As a result of the allegations of labour exploitation in Leicester, a new multi-agency taskforce led by the GLAA has been set up to bring together the enforcement bodies to continue to work together to secure robust intelligence to enable appropriate enforcement activity. It consists of: HMRC National Minimum Wage; Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate (BEIS); Leicestershire Police; National Crime Agency; Leicester City Council; Department for Work and Pensions and Immigration Enforcement (Home Office).

HMRC’s National Minimum Wage team are active participants in the Leicester Taskforce and are attending visits to textile businesses in Leicester. They have also set up a new dedicated team to investigate Leicester textile businesses and other potential non-compliance textile hotspots across the UK. Where appropriate, these cases will be investigated with HMRC tax colleagues and taskforce partners. While we cannot comment on individual cases, HMRC have a number of open investigations in the textiles industry in Leicester. Where non-compliance is found, they will take appropriate enforcement action. This can include issuing notices of underpayment, recovering arrears for workers, issuing penalties to employers and, in the most serious cases, prosecutions. Since 2012/13, HMRC have recovered over £215,000 in wage arrears for 411 textile workers in the UK and issued over £325,000 in corresponding penalties to employers.

HMRC are also undertaking outreach activities with local groups in Leicester designed to promote awareness of National Minimum Wage rights for workers, and support employers and agency partners in Leicester. This includes distributing multi-lingual advice leaflets for workers, writing directly to both textile workers and employers, and a bespoke webinar for textile sector employers.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what legal steps his Department has taken to (a) compensate workers and (b) ensure minimum wage compliance following the Levitt review of Boohoo wage practices.

As a result of the allegations of labour exploitation in the textile industry in Leicester, a multi-agency taskforce led by the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) has been set up to bring together the enforcement bodies to continue to work together to secure robust intelligence to enable appropriate enforcement activity. HMRC’s National Minimum Wage team are active participants in the Leicester Taskforce and are attending visits to textile business in Leicester. They have also set up a new dedicated team to investigate Leicester textile businesses and other potential non-compliance textile hotspots across the UK. HMRC are undertaking outreach activities with local groups in Leicester designed to promote awareness of National Minimum Wage rights for workers, and support employers and agency partners in Leicester. This includes distributing multi-lingual advice leaflets for workers, writing directly to both textile workers and employers, and a bespoke webinar for textile sector employers.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Home Secretary has written to Boohoo setting out her expectation that the company demonstrates long-term commitment to enhancing the protections for workers and preventing exploitation in its supply chains. The Home Secretary has said that she was deeply concerned by the allegations against Boohoo and expects the company to fully cooperate with law enforcement agencies and implement the commitments they have made after the Levitt Review. The GLAA has established a constructive working dialogue with Boohoo to help tackle labour exploitation in the wider textiles industry and they have subsequently begun providing information to help inform enforcement activity.

HMRC have a range of enforcement tools that they can use to tackle minimum wage offences, including issuing notices of underpayment, recovering arrears for workers, issuing penalties to employers and, in the most serious cases, prosecutions. While we cannot comment on individual cases, HMRC have a number of open investigations in the Leicester textiles sector and will take appropriate enforcement action where non-compliance is found. Since 2012/13, HMRC have recovered over £215,000 in wage arrears for 411 textile workers in the UK and issued over £325,000 in corresponding penalties to employers.

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take on workers’ rights following the conclusion of the Alison Levitt QC report into exploitation in Leicester’s garment industry.

Exploiting vulnerable workers for commercial gain is despicable and we expect businesses to do all they can to tackle abuse and exploitation in their supply chains. The findings of this review are concerning and we expect Boohoo to continue to fully cooperate with law enforcement agencies in their ongoing investigations in Leicester.

In response to the allegations of labour market non-compliance in Leicester garment factories, a taskforce led by the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority has been set up. The taskforce coordinates a multi-agency approach to enforcement activity, the gathering and sharing of intelligence and wider community engagement aimed at encouraging reporting and helping raise awareness of workers’ rights. It includes: HMRC National Minimum Wage; Employment Agencies Standards Inspectorate; Leicestershire Police; National Crime Agency; Leicester City Council; Department for Work and Pensions and Immigration Enforcement. Where evidence of non-compliance is found, the enforcement bodies will take appropriate enforcement activity.

The Government is committed to improving enforcement of employment rights and following a consultation, we have announced our intention to create a single enforcement body. The single enforcement body will provide a clearer route for workers to raise a complaint and get support, enabling more coordinated enforcement action and the use of pooled intelligence to better target proactive enforcement.

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that garment manufacturers in Leicester work with trade unions to set employee terms and conditions.

We are deeply concerned by reports of illegal and unsafe working conditions for garment workers in Leicester.

Collective bargaining is largely a matter for individual employers, their employees and their trade unions. The Government encourages employers to engage with their workforce’s representatives, whether these be union or non-union representatives.

The Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority and Leicester City Council, both members of the Taskforce that has been established in response to the allegations of labour abuse in Leicester, have engaged with the TUC on the issues in the garment trade. We are also working with industry through the Apparel and General Merchandise Public and Private Protocol, a partnership between enforcement bodies and industry partners – including the British Retail Consortium, UK Fashion and the Textile Association – aimed at tackling all forms of labour exploitation in the garment trade

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure that businesses in the hospitality supply chain are able to access the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund.

Under the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF), businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March, with a rateable value of less than £51,000, will have been eligible for cash grants of up to £25,000 per property.

Eligibility for the RHLGF was therefore contingent on businesses being in scope of the Expanded Retail Discount Scheme for Business Rates, as set out here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/business-rates-retail-discount-guidance. This eligibility definition was agreed by Ministers as a way of ensuring that Local Authorities could target businesses at pace and ensure that the process of disbursing funding could proceed quickly.

As per the Expanded Retail Discount guidance, properties that will benefit from the relief will be occupied hereditaments that are wholly or mainly being used:

  1. as shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues,
  2. for assembly and leisure; or
  3. as hotels, guest & boarding premises and self-catering accommodation.

In order to qualify for the relief, the hereditament should be wholly or mainly being used for the qualifying purposes as outlined in the guidance. The guidance is not intended to be exhaustive and authorities should determine for themselves whether particular properties not listed are broadly similar in nature to those included within the guidance and, if so, to consider them eligible for the relief.

In addition, on?1 May,?the Government announced the Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund. This scheme was intended to support small businesses?in some of the hardest hit sectors?that were previously outside the scope of the Small Business and Retail, Hospitality & Leisure Grant Funds.

Local authorities were responsible for defining the precise eligibility for this Fund?and?may choose to make payments to businesses based on local economic need,?subject to those businesses meeting the specific eligibility criteria.?Guidance for Local Authorities was published 13 May: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-business-support-grant-funding-guidance-for-businesses.

Businesses which are not eligible for or have not received grant funding should be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business.?For further information please?visit:?https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to raise the minimum wage to (a) at least £10 an hour or (b) a real living wage as calculated by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Government is committed to building an economy that works for everyone. Through the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and the National Living Wage (NLW) the Government protects the lowest paid within our society.

The Low Pay Commission (LPC) is an independent and expert body which makes annual recommendations on the appropriate rates for NMW and NLW and other low pay related issues. They will continue to recommend the path of the NLW going forward, aiming to increase the NLW to two-thirds of median earnings by 2024, provided economic conditions allow.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that garment companies in Leicester comply with their responsibilities under the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

The Government expects UK businesses to act according to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the authoritative, voluntary international framework, which steers all businesses worldwide on these matters and sets expectations that they should respect human rights.

The UK was the first country in the world to produce a national action plan, in 2013, to respond to the voluntary Guiding Principles and subsequently we were also the first to review and update our national plan, in 2016. Our action plan confirms the expectation that all our businesses should comply with all applicable laws; identify and prevent human rights risks; and behave in line with the Guiding Principles, including in management of their supply chains here and overseas.

Following the increase in COVID-19 infections in Leicester and fresh allegations of links to unsafe working conditions, labour exploitation, and potential modern slavery in textiles factories, the National Crime Agency have launched an investigation into these serious concerns. If evidence of wrongdoing and illegal exploitation comes to light, the perpetrators will face the full force of the law.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to encourage trade union membership to help tackle exploitation in Leicester’s garment industry.

The Government recognises the positive role trade unions can play in the workplace, however collective bargaining is largely a matter for individual employers, their employees and their trade unions. Where possible, industrial relations should be undertaken on a voluntary basis, although if workers want a union to represent them, they have the means to secure this through the CAC statutory recognition procedure.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions officials of his Department have had with representatives of (a) trade unions and (b) civil society groups on labour rights (i) protections and (ii) violations in supply chains.

As part of his annual strategy 2018/19, the former Director of Labour Market Enforcement - Sir David Metcalf – recommended that the Government introduce joint responsibility to encourage the top of the chain to take an active role to tackle labour market breaches through their supply chain. Sir David also recommended that provisions should be made to enable the temporary embargo of “hot goods” to disrupt supply chain activity where significant non-compliance is found.

The Government consulted on these recommendations as part of a wider consultation on the creation of a new Single Enforcement Body for employment rights. During the consultation period, officials from the Department discussed labour market breaches in supply chains with a range of representatives of trade unions and civil society groups. This included a dedicated roundtable to discuss non-compliance in supply chains, and a meeting with members of the Modern Slavery Strategy Implementation Group to further discuss the topic. These discussions have been of great value and the Government response to the consultation will be published in due course.