James Grundy Portrait

James Grundy

Conservative - Leigh

1,965 (4.2%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 12th December 2019


2 APPG memberships (as of 13 May 2024)
Coalfield Communities, Heritage and Regeneration
3 Former APPG memberships
Conservation, Places and People, Rugby League, Whistleblowing
Electronic Trade Documents Bill [HL]
14th Jun 2023 - 14th Jun 2023
Offenders (Day of Release from Detention) Bill
1st Feb 2023 - 8th Feb 2023
Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill
2nd Mar 2022 - 22nd Mar 2022
Dormant Assets Bill [HL]
15th Dec 2021 - 11th Jan 2022
Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Bill [HL]
1st Dec 2021 - 9th Dec 2021
Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill
3rd Nov 2021 - 18th Nov 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, James Grundy has voted in 945 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
28 Jun 2023 - Education - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Conservative No votes vs 237 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 373 Noes - 28
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
21 Feb 2024 - Ceasefire in Gaza - View Vote Context
James Grundy voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 24 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 20 Noes - 212
View All James Grundy Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(6 debate interactions)
Greg Smith (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(22 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all James Grundy's debates

Leigh Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing death by careless/dangerous driving is between 5-14 yrs. The sentence for failing to stop after a fatal collision must be increased.

The offence of causing 'death by dangerous driving' should be widened to include: failure to stop, call 999 and render aid on scene until further help arrives.

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.


Latest EDMs signed by James Grundy

21st February 2024
James Grundy signed this EDM on Wednesday 21st February 2024

No confidence in the Speaker

Tabled by: William Wragg (Independent - Hazel Grove)
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
90 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 42
Scottish National Party: 41
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Workers Party of Britain: 1
View All James Grundy's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by James Grundy, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


James Grundy has not been granted any Urgent Questions

James Grundy has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

James Grundy has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 27 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Oct 2020
What recent discussions he has had with the devolved Administrations on the UK's trade negotiations with the EU.

The UK Government regularly engages the devolved administrations on the negotiations and preparations for the end of the transition period. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster chaired a meeting of the Joint Ministerial Committee (EU Negotiations) on 3 September, attended by devolved administration Ministers, which included a discussion on readiness. I also chaired one of my regular meetings on readiness with devolved administration Ministers on 1 October. The Government remains committed to continuing this engagement.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
16th Nov 2021
What steps he is taking to increase pay for low-paid workers.

In April 2022, we will increase the National Living Wage by 59p to £9.50. This puts us back on track for it to reach two-thirds of median earnings by 2024. The minimum wage increases are expected to benefit two and a half million workers across the UK next year.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the financial effect of covid-19 on self-employed musicians.

The Government recognises the significant challenge the current pandemic poses to many individuals and freelancers working in the music industry.

The Government has carried out an assessment of access to the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) for individuals’ working in the Arts, Entertainment and Recreation Sector:

  • For SEISS round 1: 76,000 individuals given an average of £2,700

  • For SEISS round 2: 72,000 individuals given an average of £2,400

  • For SEISS round 3: 66,000 individuals given £2,700

We are working very hard to help freelancers in those sectors access support, including through the Self Employment Income Support Scheme and funding from Arts Council England.

The Government has and will continue to look for ways to improve the Self Employment Income Support Scheme grant and existing support.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support the Government plans to provide to rugby league clubs to ensure the safe return of local sport following the covid-19 pandemic.

To date, the government has provided an unprecedented £300 million Sport Winter Survival Package to give a lifeline to organisations that would otherwise not survive the winter as a result of the restriction on spectators announced from 1 October. This included a provisional allocation of £12 million to support rugby league which is in addition to the £16 million cash injection government announced in May 2020 to safeguard the immediate future of the sport for the communities it serves.

Furthermore, rugby league clubs will have benefitted from the £220m of National Lottery and Exchequer funding committed by Sport England since March 2020 to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic. This sector support was recently boosted by an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations as part of Sport England’s new strategy Uniting the Movement. Further details of Sport England funding including the organisations that have benefited can be found at: https://www.sportengland.org/why-were-here.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment has been made of the effect of the increase in students undertaking unpaid work placement years.

The government recognises that this academic year has been incredibly difficult for students. As a result of these exceptional circumstances, some students are facing financial hardship. Students experiencing financial hardship as a result of COVID-19 or for other reasons should contact their higher education (HE) provider.

We have made an additional £85 million of student hardship funding available to HE providers in the 2020/21 academic year. Providers have flexibility in how they distribute the funding to their students, in a way that best prioritises those in greatest need.

This is in addition to the £256 million of government-funded student premium funding already available to HE providers to draw on towards student hardship funds for the 2020/21 academic year.

We know that not all students will face financial hardship. The current measures aim to target support for students in greatest need and the government continues to monitor the situation to look at what impact this funding is having.

Undergraduate students undertaking work placement years with private employers receive a reduced-rate non-means tested loan for living costs from Student Finance England, on the expectation that the private employer who benefits from the student’s work should provide support for the student rather than the taxpayer.

The government, however, makes an exception for many work placements in the public sector by making available the full-rate partially means-tested loan for living costs package to encourage students to gain work experience in these areas. This ensures that low-income students undertaking working placements in the public sector receive targeted support through the student support system.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Department is taking to support students experiencing financial difficulty who wish to undertake an unpaid placement year at university.

The government recognises that this academic year has been incredibly difficult for students. As a result of these exceptional circumstances, some students are facing financial hardship. Students experiencing financial hardship as a result of COVID-19 or for other reasons should contact their higher education (HE) provider.

We have made an additional £85 million of student hardship funding available to HE providers in the 2020/21 academic year. Providers have flexibility in how they distribute the funding to their students, in a way that best prioritises those in greatest need.

This is in addition to the £256 million of government-funded student premium funding already available to HE providers to draw on towards student hardship funds for the 2020/21 academic year.

We know that not all students will face financial hardship. The current measures aim to target support for students in greatest need and the government continues to monitor the situation to look at what impact this funding is having.

Undergraduate students undertaking work placement years with private employers receive a reduced-rate non-means tested loan for living costs from Student Finance England, on the expectation that the private employer who benefits from the student’s work should provide support for the student rather than the taxpayer.

The government, however, makes an exception for many work placements in the public sector by making available the full-rate partially means-tested loan for living costs package to encourage students to gain work experience in these areas. This ensures that low-income students undertaking working placements in the public sector receive targeted support through the student support system.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress he is making on plans for the safe return of students on heavily vocational BTEC courses to colleges.

To support the return to college of all students from 8 March, the department has worked closely with Public Health England to develop and refresh the system of controls for education settings to reduce and mitigate the risk of transmission of COVID-19. New measures include asymptomatic testing and recommending the increased use of face coverings.

In addition, to prepare for return, colleges should update their risk assessments and ensure they are implementing the system of controls, this includes assessing the risks particular to their setting and provision.

For those students whose courses are more vocational in nature (for example, for courses that require close contact, require access to specialist equipment or are taught in non-traditional classroom environments such as workshops), the further education COVID-19 guidance sets out additional steps and considerations colleges can take, details of which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision. Colleges are advised to put greater emphasis on the other measures outlined in the systems of controls, such as increased use of face coverings, increased ventilation, in addition to the use of screens or barriers and follow the relevant working safely during COVID-19 guidance to reduce the risk of transmission, details of the guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to ensure that people who own electric cars but do not have access to off-street parking will be able to charge their vehicles at home.

The Government is supporting local authorities to deploy chargepoints for their residents without access to off-street parking to ensure this is not a barrier to drivers being able to realise the benefits of owning an EV. The On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS) is available to all UK local authorities, and has so far awarded funding to over 135 different local authorities, to install over 5,000 chargepoints. This year, £20 million is available under this scheme to ensure more local authorities and residents can benefit from the scheme.

A new Local EV Infrastructure fund will be made available to local authorities later in the 2022-23 financial year, which will facilitate the rollout of larger-scale chargepoint infrastructure projects across England.

Drivers without off-street parking at home can also take advantage of the Workplace Charging Scheme, which provides Government support of up to £350 towards the cost of installing a charge point socket for staff and fleet use, with a maximum of 40 sockets available per business. To date over 8,000 businesses have used this scheme to install over 19,000 chargepoint sockets. There are a growing number of solutions for drivers without private parking, such as initiatives like community charging, where those with personal chargepoints can share access with other residents.

The Government’s forthcoming EV Infrastructure Strategy will define our vision for the continued roll-out of a world-leading charging infrastructure network across the UK. The strategy will focus on how we will unlock the chargepoint rollout needed to enable the transition from early adoption to mass market uptake of EVs. We will set out our next steps to address barriers to private investment, and level up charge point provision. The strategy will clearly establish Government’s expectations for the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders in the planning and deployment of charging infrastructure alongside how we will intervene to address the gaps between the current market status and our vision, and how we will monitor progress.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding opportunities he plans to make available for investment in rail and light rail improvements.

As part of the Spending Round in 2020 over £2 billion of funding has been confirmed in 2021-22 for rail services, which builds on the estimated £12.8 billion of support for transport services that the government has already committed to provide in 2020-21.

As part of the levelling-up agenda, the Government announced in January 2020 that it has pledged £500 million for the Restoring Your Railway Programme to start reopening lines and stations, regenerating local economies and improving access to jobs, homes and education.

Between 2019 and 2024, approximately £38 billion has been allocated for investment in operations, maintenance and renewals of the rail network, of which around £20 billion is for Network Rail’s renewals programme.

To date, the Government has announced over £150 million of emergency grant funding to support the Light Rail sector. This funding has ensured that light rail services continue to run throughout the pandemic, enabling essential journeys such as those made by NHS staff and other key workers.

As announced in the 2020 Budget and confirmed in the Spending Review, the government is investing £4.2 billion in the transport networks of eight city regions across England from 2022, including Greater Manchester. These intra-city transport settlements will be based on plans put forward by city regions and could be used to fund light rail improvements.

In addition, the Transforming Cities Fund is a £2.5 billion fund focused on public and sustainable transport infrastructure. It is currently providing funding for light rail improvements in some cities, including Greater Manchester.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to support a funded pilot project aimed to create a national blueprint for the provision of Autism Assistance Dogs.

The Department of Health and Social Care has no current plans to fund a pilot project aimed to create a national blueprint for the provision of Autism Assistance Dogs.

It is for local commissioners to ensure that the appropriate provision is available to meet the health and care needs of the local population, including considering whether they provide Autism Assistance Dogs as part of their provision. NHS England is developing a framework of best practice to assist commissioners to improve outcomes for autistic people.

Integrated care boards and National Health Service trusts should have due regard to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines ‘Autism spectrum disorder in under 19s: support and management’ and ‘Autism spectrum disorder in adults: diagnosis and management’. These evidenced guidelines set out how health and social care professionals can provide support for autistic people.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to reduce health inequalities.

No decisions have been taken in relation to the Health Disparities White Paper.

The Department continues to review how health disparities can be addressed and further information will be available in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on public health of the closure of gyms as a result of covid-19 restrictions.

The Government considers the impact restrictions may have on public health.

Whilst we recognise that exercise is important for people’s mental and physical health, gyms are high risk settings for spreading COVID-19.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on health of missed dental appointments as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

No such assessment has been made.

Dental practices have been able to open for face to face care from 8 June, with urgent provision backed up by over 600 urgent dental care centres across the country. The Department is working closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Chief Dental Officer for England to increase levels of service, as fast as is safely possible.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have set out guidance that dentists should focus on care that is urgent, care to vulnerable groups and then overdue routine appointments. In circumstances where patients are unable to access an urgent dental appointment directly through a National Health Service dental practice, they should contact NHS 111 for assistance.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the financial effect of the fallow times required between dentistry appointments on a dentist's total funding from the Government, in the latest period for which data is available.

No such assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made in setting up a commission to determine the future of adult social care.

The Government is committed to sustainable improvement of the adult social care system and will bring forward proposals in 2021. The long-term reform of social care is a complex topic, which requires full and thorough consideration, particularly in light of the current circumstances.

The Department has recently held detailed discussions with stakeholders about social care and the impact of COVID 19 on reform priorities, including a roundtable with workforce representatives. We will continue to work with and listen to stakeholders as reform plans develop.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 20,000 police officers recruited as part of the national campaign will be recruited to Greater Manchester Police.

The Government is committed to increasing the number of police officers by 20,000 by March 2023.

As at 31 December 2020, 6,620 additional officers had been recruited in England and Wales as a result of the Police Uplift Programme with Greater Manchester Police having recruited an additional 266 additional officers against the force’s year one allocation of 347.

For year 2 of the Programme, Greater Manchester has an uplift allocation of 325 police officers to be recruited by March 2022.

13th Jul 2020
What steps her Department is taking to remove foreign national offenders from the UK during the covid-19 pandemic.

Foreign national offenders who abuse our hospitality should be in no doubt of our determination to deport them.

We continue to remove where there are available routes and by charter flight operations.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment he has made of the potential impact on local communities of the projects funded through the latest tranche of awards from the (a) Levelling Up Fund and (b) Community Ownership Fund.

The Levelling Up Fund considers the impact of projects in local communities, by looking at how strongly each bid aligns and supports local need.

The Community Ownership Fund considers the impact of projects in local communities by assessing how an asset under community ownership will deliver benefits to a local community and bolster pride of place.

Michael Gove
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to increase the availability of high quality social housing including (a) bungalows for pensioners and (b) homes for young families.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of affordable housing and is investing over £12 billion in affordable housing over 5 years, the largest investment in affordable housing in a decade. This includes the new £11.5 billion Affordable Homes Programme, which will leverage up to £38 billion of private finance and will provide up to 180,000 new affordable homes across the country, should economic conditions allow.

Around half of the new programme will be for social and affordable rent, and it will deliver more than double for social rent than the current programme. 10% of delivery will be used to increase the supply of much needed specialist or supported housing, including housing for older people.

We will also be using the new Affordable Homes Programme to fund a First Homes pilot of 1500 homes. The First Homes scheme will help local first-time buyers onto the property ladder by offering homes at a discount of at least 30% compared to the market price. That same percentage will then be passed on with the sale of the property to future first-time buyers, meaning homes will always be sold below market value, benefiting future generations. On 4 June, we launched the first phase with further sites set to launch across the country in the coming weeks.

Whilst we do not set requirements for the types of affordable housing that are delivered, Registered Providers work closely with local authorities to ensure that delivery meets local housing need.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the cumulative total is of Government funding in response to covid-19 that has been provided to Wigan Council.

I refer the Hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave on 26 February 2021 to question 153417.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities prioritise the development of brown field sites over green belt and green field sites.

The National Planning Policy Framework expects local authorities to prioritise brownfield land for development wherever possible. Local authorities are best placed to assess the potential of individual sites, and each authority is required to publish a register of its developable brownfield suitable for new homes.

Brownfield redevelopment is supported by funding including the £4.1 billion Housing Infrastructure Fund, the £400 million Brownfield Fund, and the Home Building Fund, which had a £450 million funding boost last year taking the total to £4.95 billion. In addition, details of the new Brownfield Land Release Fund, which will unlock brownfield sites and release serviced plots on local authority owned land, will be announced shortly.

Consultation on the White Paper Planning for the Future closed on 29 October 2020. My Department is undertaking further detailed policy development on individual elements of the reform proposals. However, we have made clear that local authorities would still have responsibility for protecting the Green Belt and other valued greenfield land.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the cumulative total is of covid-19 related funding allocated to Wigan Council.

Wigan Council has so far received almost £28 million of emergency grant funding since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic as part of its share of the £4.6 billion of unringfenced support to councils across the country.

Wigan has also received £9.3 million through the Contain Outbreak Management Fund, £5.7 million through the Infection Control Fund, £3.1 million via the sales, fees and charges income support scheme and £1.1 million via the Covid Winter Grant Scheme. This additional £19.2 million of support alongside almost £3 million of other grant funding to Wigan comes to a cumulative total of £50.1 million of funding since the start of the Pandemic.

In addition, Wigan Council will receive over £9 million in unringfenced funding to address the impacts of COVID-19 in the next financial year. This is alongside an increase in settlement Core Spending Power up to over £11 million.

Source of COVID-19 Support

Allocated to Wigan (£m)

Total COVID-19 Additional Funding for LAs for 2020/21 (£m)

28.0

Further Direct Support - 20/21

COMF - Test and Trace Service Support Grant (£m)

2.4

COMF - Additional Surge Funding (£m)

6.9

ASC Infection Control Fund(Round 1 and 2)(£m)

5.7

ASC Workforce Capacity Fund (£m)

0.8

ASC Rapid Testing Fund (£m)

0.7

Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV) Funding (£m)

0.2

Compliance and Enforcement Grant (£m)

0.2

Reopening High Streets Safely Fund (£m)

0.3

Provisional Rough Sleeping emergency funding (£m)

0.006

Next Steps Accommodation Programme (NSAP) (£m)

0.3

Local Authority Emergency Assistance Grant for Food and Essential Supplies (£m)

0.4

DWP Covid Winter Grant Scheme (£m)

1.1

Sales, Fees and Charges Compensation Scheme (£m)

3.1

Total direct COVID-19 funding for Wigan for 2020/21 (£m)

50.1

Settlement

Annual Change (£m)

11.3

Annual Change (%)

4.7%

21/22 Funding

Additional Unringfenced Tranche Funding for 2021/22

9.5

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether Wigan Council applied to the Towns Fund.

An initial 101 towns were selected to submit proposals for Towns Deals as a part of the £3.6 billion Towns Fund. There was no application process.

Wigan is, however, one of 101 places shortlisted for the Future High Streets Fund.?We are now in the final stages of the assessment process and expect to announce the outcome of that competition before the end of the year.

Levelling up continues to be at the heart of this Government’s agenda and that is why at Spending Review, we announced a new £4 billion Levelling Up Fund which will invest in local infrastructure that has a visible impact on people and their communities and will support economic recovery.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department received applications from Wigan Council for funding from the Towns Fund for projects in Leigh constituency.

An initial 101 towns were selected to submit proposals for Towns Deals as a part of the £3.6 billion Towns Fund. There was no application process.

Wigan is, however, one of 101 places shortlisted for the Future High Streets Fund.?We are now in the final stages of the assessment process and expect to announce the outcome of that competition before the end of the year.

Levelling up continues to be at the heart of this Government’s agenda and that is why at Spending Review, we announced a new £4 billion Levelling Up Fund which will invest in local infrastructure that has a visible impact on people and their communities and will support economic recovery.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
8th Sep 2021
What recent progress the Government has made on establishing the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

From 2022, the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will target the people and places most in need, and we will publish our prospectus in due course.

This will complement work already underway on the Levelling Up Fund, Community Renewal Fund and Community Ownership Fund where applications are currently being considered.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland