Jon Trickett Written Questions

2090 Questions to Government Departments tabled by Jon Trickett


Date Title Questioner
29 Jul 2020, 3 p.m. Coronavirus: Social Distancing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will place in the Library a copy of the (a) Chief Medical Officer (b) Public Health England advice on reducing the social distancing guidance from two meters to one meter.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

The Government commissioned a review into the two metre social distancing rule and took advice from a range of experts, including the Chief Medical Officer, Chief Scientific Advisor, and the Chief Economic Adviser to HM Treasury, to ensure that it comprehensively examined how the two metre rule works, the evidence around transmission of the virus in different environments and international comparisons.

The review findings were published on the GOV.UK website and can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-two-metre-social-distancing-guidance/review-of-two-metre-social-distancing-guidance

28 Jul 2020, 4:51 p.m. Business: Government Assistance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to ensure the consistent application of Business Support Grants for organisations in receipt of Small Business Rates relief across local government; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Government has put forward a package support for businesses to help with their ongoing business costs in recognition of the disruption caused by Covid-19. This includes the Small Business Grants Fund (SBGF). Businesses in scope of this scheme are those with a property that, on 11 March 2020, were in receipt of either Small Business Rates Relief (including those with a Rateable Value between £12,000 and £15,000 which received tapered relief) or Rural Rates Relief.

Local authorities are responsible for delivering grants to eligible businesses and we have provided detailed Grant Funding Schemes guidance for local authorities on the eligibility for, and provision of, this fund: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-business-support-grant-funding. We are also working closely with local authorities to ensure the appropriate assurance checks are made before grants are paid out and to promote and share best practice, including providing supplementary guidance and FAQs.

28 Jul 2020, 9:28 a.m. Television Licences: Older People Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with representatives from the BBC on that organisation reversing its forthcoming changes to the free over-75s television licence allowance.

Answer (Mr John Whittingdale)

The government meets with the BBC on regular occasions to discuss a wide range of issues, including the over 75 concession. The Government has consistently made clear its disappointment with the BBC's decision to restrict the over 75 licence fee concession to only those in receipt of pension credit. We recognise the value of free TV licences for over-75s and believe they should be funded by the BBC.

The BBC remains responsible for the administration of the concession and it will be responsible for setting out what those affected will need to do. It must look urgently at how it can use its substantial licence fee income to support older people and deliver for UK audiences of all ages.

27 Jul 2020, 4:06 p.m. Community Assets: Non-domestic Rates Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the cost to the public purse would be of introducing Business Rates Relief on community assets.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

My department does not hold information on the business rates collected by local authorities from individual ratepayers. Nevertheless, many assets of community value, such as pubs, public halls and sports grounds, will benefit from the business rates holiday and therefore pay no rates in the current financial year. Assets of community value may also be eligible for other reliefs, including small business rate relief. In total, the additional reliefs provided in response to the coronavirus pandemic, combined with existing measures to reduce the burden of business rates, will save ratepayers over £23 billion over the next five years.

27 Jul 2020, 4:05 p.m. Council Tax Benefits Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will allocate grant funding to meet the increase in council tax benefit payments from the 2020-21 baseline figure.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

The Chancellor has launched the 2020 Comprehensive Spending Review, which will conclude in the autumn and set out the Government’s spending plans. The Spending Review will be the opportunity to look at funding for local government in the round and the Government has made a commitment to, as part of this process, apportioning irrecoverable council tax losses between central and local government. The Government has also announced that the repayment of council tax collection fund deficits arising in 2020-21 will be spread over the next three years rather than the usual period of a year, giving councils breathing space in setting budgets for next year.

27 Jul 2020, 4:04 p.m. Local Government Finance: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what direct funding the Government has made available to Town and Parish Councils to cover the financial costs incurred by those councils as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

On 2 July, the Secretary of State announced an additional £500 million of support for councils. This is in addition to the £3.2 billion announced in April, taking the total given to councils to help their communities through the crisis to over £3.7 billion in unringfenced funding, an unprecedented level of additional financial support in recent times. This grant is unringfenced, recognising that local authorities are best placed to decide how to meet the major Covid-19 service pressures in their local area.

The Government does not have powers to offer direct financial support to parish and town councils, which are funded through a precept collected from within the overall council tax paid by the residents of the parish or town. We therefore encourage parish and town councils to work with their principal authority (district or unitary council) where they are delivering vital services that have been impacted by Covid-19.

24 Jul 2020, 2:46 p.m. Housing: Overcrowding Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many people are living in overcrowded accommodation in (a ) Havering, (b) Wiltshire, (c) Wandsworth, (d) Gloucestershire, (e) Ealing, (f) Hammersmith and Fulham, (g) Doncaster, (h) Plymouth, (i) Barking and Dagenham, (j) Westminster, (k) Milton Keynes, (l) Wakefield, (m) Haringey, (n) Medway, (o) Hounslow, (p) Brent, (q) Harrow, (r) Kensington and Chelsea, (s) Slough, (t) Suffolk, (u) Redbridge, (v) Sandwell, (w) Enfield, (x) Tower Hamlets, (y) York, (z) Sunderland, (aa) Wigan, (bb) Windsor and Maidenhead, (cc) Leicester, (dd) Gateshead, (ee) Isle of Wight, (ff) Richmond upon Thames, (gg) Portsmouth, (hh) Redcar and Cleveland, (ii) Derbyshire and (jj) Walsall local authority area.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

The Ministry for Housing Communities and Local Government carries out the English Housing Survey each year. The survey collects information on overcrowding at the national and regional level. Data on overcrowding at a regional level can be found here : https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/research-briefings/sn01013/ . The English Housing Survey is a sample survey of just over 13,000 respondents and 6,200 dwellings per year. The survey is not designed to provide data at the neighbourhood or local authority level since it does not survey enough people in each local authority to make the results statistically robust at that level.

24 Jul 2020, 2:19 p.m. Unemployment: Young People Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many unemployment young people there are in (a) Hemsworth constituency, (b) Wakefield Council area and (c) West Yorkshire Combined Authority area.

Answer (Mims Davies)

Estimates of the number of people who are unemployed are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the Annual Population Survey (APS), a large household survey.

Estimates are based on a sample of cases and therefore subject to sampling uncertainty. Estimates at sub-regional geographies such as local authorities and parliamentary constituencies or sub-groups such as unemployed young people are especially uncertain.

New figures were released on 16 July 2020 for the April 2019 - March 2020 survey period on the NOMIS website.

(https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/)

24 Jul 2020, 2:09 p.m. Poverty: Children Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children were living in poverty in (a) Hemsworth constituency, (b) Wakefield Council area and (c) West Yorkshire Combined Authority area as at (i) 15 July 2010 and (ii) 15 July 2020.

Answer (Will Quince)

National Statistics on the number and percentage of children in low income are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication. The rates of children in absolute poverty in the Yorkshire and the Humber region in the three years to 18/19 has decreased, both before and after housing costs, compared to the three years to 09/10.

Latest statistics for the number of children who are in low income for England and the Yorkshire and the Humber region can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/households-below-average-income-199495-to-201819, “children-hbai-timeseries-1994-95-2018-19-tables” in table 4.17ts (relative low income, before and after housing costs) and 4.23ts (absolute low income, before and after housing costs).

The Department now publishes supplementary official statistics on the number of children in low income families at constituency level. Children in Low Income Families data is published annually.

The latest figures from 2014/15 to 2018/19 can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-in-low-income-families-local-area-statistics-201415-to-201819

24 Jul 2020, 10:52 a.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is taking steps to (a) restructure and (b) reassess the viability of the High Speed Two project as a result of the Infrastructure and Projects Authority issuing a red Delivery Confidence Assessment rating in its Annual Report on Major Projects 2019-20.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

The IPA’s report refers to the status of the HS2 project in September 2019. This was before the project was comprehensively reset in February 2020 with a revised budget and schedule, and provision of adequate contingency. Steps have also been taken to ensure the project is delivered in a more disciplined and transparent manner with, for example, a dedicated HS2 Minister appointed and bi-annual updates to be provided to Parliament.

In line with the findings of the Oakervee Review, published in February 2020, we will also be creating new delivery arrangements for Euston, and have committed to drawing up an Integrated Rail Plan for the Midlands and the North by the end of this year.

22 Jul 2020, 4:20 p.m. Poverty: West Yorkshire Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many in-work households were living in poverty in (a) Hemsworth constituency, (b) Wakefield Council area and (c) West Yorkshire Combined Authority area as at (i) 15 July 2010 and (ii) 15 July 2020.

Answer (Will Quince)

This information is not held.

22 Jul 2020, 1:49 p.m. Coronavirus: West Yorkshire Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people (a) under 50 years old, (b) aged 51 to 65, (c) aged 66 to 75, (d) aged 76 and above by (i) gender, (ii) ethnicity, (iii) socio-economic group and (iv) occupation have (A) tested positive for and (B) died as a result of covid-19 in (1) Hemsworth constituency, (2) Wakefield Council area and (3) West Yorkshire Combined Authority area.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

22 Jul 2020, 1:46 p.m. Coronavirus: Death Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died as a result of covid-19 in each socio-economic group.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

15 Jul 2020, 5:59 p.m. Pupils: West Yorkshire Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils have been attending a (a) primary and (b) secondary school in (i) Hemsworth parliamentary constituency (ii) the Wakefield Council area on a daily basis since 1 June 2020.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department does not hold the information in the format required. National data on pupil attendance in educational establishments since 23 March was last published on Tuesday 7 July at the following link, covering data up to Thursday 2 July:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak-23-march-to-1-july-2020.

The publication includes breakdowns of attendance statistics for both primary and secondary schools and colleges from 1 June.

The data is collected from individual education establishments and the published figures include estimates for non-response.

15 Jul 2020, 5:32 p.m. Local Government Finance: Wakefield Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect on the (a) financial revenue raised and (b) costs incurred by Wakefield District Council as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

Local government is an essential part of our response to Covid-19 and has mobilised to help us keep the country moving, protect the NHS and save lives, whilst delivering social care and other vital public services. We are providing local authorities with an unprecedented package of support, including £3.7 billion of un-ringfenced grants and the £600m Infection Control Fund. To date, Wakefield has received £20.49 million from the first and second tranche of unringfenced funding and received £3.54 million as part of the Infection Control Fund. We will write out to all councils setting out funding allocations and methodology for third tranche of funding shortly.

In total, the Government has provided £5 billion in cashflow measures and almost £28 billion in additional funding to support councils, businesses and their communities. We have also announced measures to address councils’ lost income, including:

  • A co-payment scheme to cover irrecoverable Sales, Fees and Charges income in 20/21 with the Government covering 75 per cent of losses beyond 5 per cent of planned income
  • Phased repayment of Collection Fund deficits over the next 3 years
  • A commitment to determine what support is needed to help councils meet the pressures of irrecoverable tax income at the Spending Review

It is important that we carefully monitor the pressures councils are facing. We have now carried out three rounds of the Covid-19 financial monitoring survey and received data for every single authority in the latest round.

We are extremely grateful for the continued collaboration from councils, which enables us to understand pressures at a national and local level. A summary of the data provided to us by councils in England from the first two rounds of monitoring can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-covid-19-financial-impact-monitoring-information. We will publish the results from the third round of monitoring in due course.

15 Jul 2020, 4:51 p.m. Education: Children in Care Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment has he made of the trends in the level educational attainment of children in care at (a) GCSE, (b) A level or equivalent and (c) undergraduate degree level.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Children in care generally have lower educational attainment than other pupils.

63% of looked-after children enter care due to abuse or neglect. They often have a disrupted experience of education and this pre-care experience can have a significant impact on their attainment. Looked-after children are almost four times more likely to have a special educational need (SEN) than all children and this in part can also explain the gap in attainment compared to non-looked after children.

We expect looked-after children to be placed in good or outstanding schools. Schools must appoint a designated teacher for looked-after children and local authorities must have a Virtual School Head who is accountable for the educational attainment of all children looked-after by the local authority. We have introduced the pupil premium plus for looked-after children (£2,345 per eligible pupil and is managed by the Virtual School Head) to deliver the outcomes in each looked-after child’s personal education plan. The department’s exclusions statutory guidance is clear that the headteacher should, as far as possible, avoid permanently excluding a looked after child. The rate of permanent exclusion for looked after children was 0.14% in 2014–15. That has reduced in recent years; in 2017-2018, the rate was 0.05%. The local authority must have regard to the relevant statutory guidance when carrying out its duties in relation to the education of looked after children.

Information on the performance of children who had been looked after continuously for at least 12 months at Key Stage 4 is published in a statistical release. Due to the introduction of reformed GCSEs and the 9-1 grading scale, comparisons over a long timeframe are difficult. Table 5a shows that the percentage of children who had been looked after continuously for at least 12 months achieving the threshold in English and mathematics at grade 5 or above decreased slightly from 7.4% in 2017 to 7.2% in 2019. The publication is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/outcomes-for-children-looked-after-by-local-authorities-31-march-2019.

Equivalent figures are not available for A levels as we do not match data collected for looked-after children with Key Stage 5 attainment data on the national pupil database.

Information on the degree qualifications of children who have been looked after is not held centrally within the department.

The Office for Students published a report that looked at the effects of different characteristics on students’ degree attainment. Annex B describes how care-experienced students have lower rates of achieving a first or upper-second class degree when compared to students who have not been in care. For qualifiers in 2018-19, the attainment rate of care experienced students was 12.1% lower than the attainment rate of students who have not been in care. The report is available here:
https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/publications/differences-in-student-outcomes-further-characteristics/.

Since 2018, we have been working with universities to encourage them to sign up to the Care Leaver Covenant and publish their offer to care leavers. The website is available here:
https://mycovenant.org.uk/offers/educational/.

We continue to work with the sector to better understand the needs of care leavers and increase their attendance and attainment.

15 Jul 2020, 4:49 p.m. Children in Care Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many looked-after children in England there have been place in (a) foster care, (b) residential children’s homes and (c) other residential settings in each year since 2010.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

The number of looked after children placed in foster care, residential homes and other residential settings since 2010 are shown in the attached table.

The latest figures nationally on children looked-after by placement are published in Table A2 of the statistical release ‘Children looked after in England including adoption: 2018 to 2019’, which is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

15 Jul 2020, 3:51 p.m. Council Housing: Waiting Lists Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many people are on a council housing waiting list in each local authority area.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

The number of households on local authorities' waiting lists since 1997 can be found in Live Table 600 which is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-rents-lettings-and-tenancies.

The same household can be in more than one local authority waiting list.

15 Jul 2020, 3:12 p.m. Airbus: Government Assistance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, on what day he held discussions with representative from AirBus on safeguarding jobs in that company; and what support the Government has provided to that company during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Government regular meets with Airbus to discuss a wide range of business issues. Details of meetings held by Ministers in the Department are recorded in our transparency data, which is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings.

Airbus is benefiting from the Government’s £300 billion Covid-19 business support package, which includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Aerospace companies, such as Airbus, are also benefiting from over £6.25 billion of through the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility, as well as our grants for research and development, and through UK Export Finance over the next 18 months.

15 Jul 2020, 2:07 p.m. Universal Credit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average waiting time was for an application for universal credit to be processed in each of the last three years.

Answer (Will Quince)

The latest available information on Universal Credit payment timeliness is published and can be found at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

14 Jul 2020, 5:08 p.m. Unemployment: Hemsworth Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 oubreak on the level of unemployment in Hemsworth consistency.

Answer (Mims Davies)

Estimates of the number of people who are unemployed for sub-regional geographies in the UK are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). At parliamentary constituency level these estimates are subject to a high degree of statistical uncertainty. This is because the sample of the Annual Population Survey, upon which the estimates are based, includes small numbers of people matching this description at this level.

The latest available data is available on the NOMIS website (https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/) and covers the period January to December 2019.

14 Jul 2020, 3:53 p.m. Future High Streets Fund and Towns Fund: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what support will be made available to councils shortlisted for the Future High Street Fund and Towns Fund who need to meet the match-funding requirements but who have incurred additional financial costs as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

A core ambition of both the Towns Fund and Future High Streets Fund (FHSF) is to leverage further investment and co-funding from a range of public and private sector partners. Whilst we have been clear in our guidance that there is no minimum threshold for this, co-funding will form part of our overall assessment of Town Investment Plans (TIPs) and FHSF business cases. We know, however, that COVID-19 impacts may prevent certain challenges and we will allow places to communicate how plans, including co-funding, might have been impacted.

14 Jul 2020, 3:53 p.m. Local Government Finance: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what fiscal plans he has to help mitigate reductions in local authorities business rates revenue as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

On the 2 July my Department laid a written statement on a wide-ranging package of further financial support to ensure local government can continue to fulfil its essential role in the national response to COVID-19. This includes a commitment to support the sector through an apportionment of irrecoverable business rates losses between central and local government, to be agreed at the Spending Review. The Government has also announced that the repayment of collection fund deficits arising in 2020-21, for example because of a reduction in local revenue from business rates, will be spread over the next three years rather than the usual period of a year, giving councils breathing space in setting budgets for next year.

14 Jul 2020, 3:45 p.m. Children in Care: Costs Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what is the average weekly cost to the public purse is for a child in (a) residential care, (b) foster care and (c) other residential care settings.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

The department publishes data about children and young people’s services, including weekly costs, which is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-interactive-tool-lait.

The approximate average weekly cost in England in 2018-19 for a child in residential care was £3,945 and for foster care was £580.

14 Jul 2020, 2:52 p.m. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people in each region of the UK are benefiting from the Coronavirus Retention Scheme.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

HM Revenue and Customs published statistics on the total number of employments furloughed by region of the UK on 11 June 2020. A further release is due on 15 July 2020.

The information published covers the number of employments furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme since the start of the scheme. Within this figure one person could be furloughed from more than one job. The latest statistics and further information are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coronavirus-job-retention-scheme-statistics-june-2020

14 Jul 2020, 2:51 p.m. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that organisations using the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme do not use funding from that scheme as part of an employee’s notice period.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The CJRS is designed to protect jobs and keep people in employment. In cases where terminations of employment or redundancies are unavoidable, employers must abide by the rules. This includes giving a notice period and consulting staff before a final decision is reached.

Employers may continue to claim under the scheme for a furloughed employee who is serving a statutory notice period subject to eligibility based on contract of employment.

However, in the present difficult times, the Government would not expect an employer to take advantage of the CJRS, which has brought benefit to employers and employees alike, in order to make someone redundant on less favourable terms than they would otherwise have received.

14 Jul 2020, 2:49 p.m. Non-domestic Rates: Leisure and Service Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the business rate discount scheme to companies in the retail, hospitality and leisure sector until the end of financial year 2020-21.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

On 17 March, the Chancellor announced a business rates holiday for eligible businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure sector, irrespective of rateable value. All eligible businesses will pay no business rates for the 2020-21 financial year.
14 Jul 2020, 2:49 p.m. Coronavirus: Death Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths due to covid-19 there were per head of the population in each NHS Trust area as of 28 April 2020.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

14 Jul 2020, 2:47 p.m. Self-employment Income Support Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons people classed as self-employed for the 2019-20 tax year only are ineligible for the Self-employment Income Support Scheme.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

In order to ensure that the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) is deliverable, only those who submitted a tax return for 2018-19 are eligible to apply.

This was a difficult decision and it was taken for practical reasons.

Although the self-employed can file returns for the 2019-20 tax year, if HMRC were to rely on these returns for the SEISS there would be an opportunity for fraudulent activity through returns where no trading activity has taken place, where trading profits have been inflated to increase the size of the grant, or where trading profits have been reduced to below the £50,000 threshold in order to become eligible.

Unfortunately, HMRC would not be able to distinguish genuine self-employed individuals who started trading in 2019-20 from fake applications by fraudulent operators and organised criminal gangs seeking to exploit the SEISS.

The newly self-employed may still be eligible for other elements of the unprecedented financial support provided by the Government. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, increased levels of Universal Credit, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

14 Jul 2020, 2:34 p.m. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many companies (a) applied for and (b) received cash grants in excess of £1,000,000 through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme as at 29 April 2020.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is administered through the Pay As You Earn (PAYE) system. Up to and including 29 April 2020, 322 PAYE schemes had each submitted claims totalling in excess of £1,000,000.

HM Revenue and Customs hold information on when payments were made under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme but not when the payments were received by PAYE schemes.

14 Jul 2020, 2:34 p.m. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which companies (a) applied for and (b) received cash grants in excess of £1,000,000 through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme as at 29 April 2020.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is administered through the Pay As You Earn (PAYE) system. Up to and including 29 April 2020, 322 PAYE schemes had each submitted claims totalling in excess of £1,000,000.

HM Revenue and Customs hold information on when payments were made under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme but not when the payments were received by PAYE schemes.

14 Jul 2020, 2:17 p.m. Business: Closures Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many businesses have ceased trading in Hemsworth constituency since March 2020.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

14 Jul 2020, 2:01 p.m. Statutory Sick Pay: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the general public is aware that statutory sick pay is payable from the first day of sickness.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) guidance is available for the general public to access at https://www.gov.uk/statutory-sick-pay.

The guidance states that employees may get SSP for every day they are off work if they cannot work because of coronavirus (COVID-19). The SSP guidance can also be accessed through the coronavirus (COVID-19) hub on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

14 Jul 2020, 1:47 p.m. Pension Credit: Hemsworth Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of pensioners in Hemsworth constituency are in receipt of pension credit.

Answer (Guy Opperman)

As of November 2019, there were 2,626 Pension Credit claimants in Hemsworth.

The department does not hold information on the number of pensioners in Hemsworth constituency.

14 Jul 2020, 12:50 p.m. Statutory Sick Pay: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what information his Department holds on the number of people whose statutory sick pay was affected by the HMRC Statutory Sick Pay Calculator incorrectly calculating SSP as payable from the fourth day and not the first day of sickness in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Chancellor announced at Budget on 11 March 2020 that employees would be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from day 1 in respect of COVID-19 related absences. The Chancellor also confirmed that the Government would refund the costs of up to two-weeks’ SSP for COVID-19 related absences to employers.

These changes had effect from 13 March 2020 and the new system for the SSP rebate launched on 26 May 2020. The Government has ensured that all the guidance available on GOV.UK is correct. The SSP calculator included a caveat to employers while it was being updated to reflect the latest position on SSP entitlement.

The Government is not aware of any employers having been adversely affected as a result of the updates to the guidance or the calculator and the new rebate service has a customer satisfaction score of above 90%.

14 Jul 2020, 12:50 p.m. Statutory Sick Pay: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that employers accessing the Coronavirus Statutory Sick Pay Rebate Scheme are able to recoup money that they have paid out in sick pay from the first day of an employee’s sickness absence.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Chancellor announced at Budget on 11 March 2020 that employees would be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from day 1 in respect of COVID-19 related absences. The Chancellor also confirmed that the Government would refund the costs of up to two-weeks’ SSP for COVID-19 related absences to employers.

These changes had effect from 13 March 2020 and the new system for the SSP rebate launched on 26 May 2020. The Government has ensured that all the guidance available on GOV.UK is correct. The SSP calculator included a caveat to employers while it was being updated to reflect the latest position on SSP entitlement.

The Government is not aware of any employers having been adversely affected as a result of the updates to the guidance or the calculator and the new rebate service has a customer satisfaction score of above 90%.

13 Jul 2020, 3:43 p.m. Coronavirus: Government Assistance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable had registered for Government coronavirus support for the clinically extremely vulnerable as of 13 May 2020.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

341,463 clinically extremely vulnerable individuals had registered to request support with food and/or basic care as at 13 May 2020, using either the website https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus-extremely-vulnerable or dedicated call center helpline. Everyone who has requested support with food has had their data passed to supermarkets for access to priority delivery slots. There are around 2.2 million clinically extremely vulnerable individuals in England, and the vast majority of those registering their needs do not request support.

10 Jul 2020, 2:26 p.m. Aerospace Industry: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will introduce a sector specific job protection package for the aerospace industry in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Kemi Badenoch)

The Government recognises the challenging times facing the aerospace sector as a result of COVID-19. Firms experiencing difficulties as a result of COVID-19 can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

As of midnight 28 June 2020, the CJRS has helped 1.1 million employers across the UK furlough 9.3 million jobs, protecting people’s livelihoods.

The furlough scheme will remain open until October.

It would be challenging to target the CJRS to specific sectors in a fair and deliverable way, and it may not be the case that this is the most effective or sensible way to provide longer term support for those sectors most affected by coronavirus.

It would also be difficult to target the CJRS at specific sectors without creating distortion, particularly as some firms work across multiple sectors. There are other schemes (including CBILS) that can provide support to specific firms.

The government will continue to engage with businesses and representative groups with the aim of ensuring that support provided is right for these sectors and for the economy as a whole.

9 Jul 2020, 4:02 p.m. Universal Credit: Hemsworth Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of universal credit there were in Hemsworth consistency in each month since January 2020.

Answer (Will Quince)

The available information on the number of people on Universal Credit, by Parliamentary Constituency, is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

9 Jul 2020, 8:02 a.m. Self-employment Income Support Scheme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to support people classed as self-employed for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 tax years and not the 2019-20 tax year who are ineligible for support through the Self-employment Income Support Scheme.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

Self-employed individuals, including members of partnerships, are eligible for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) if they have submitted their Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018-19, continued to trade, and have been adversely affected by COVID-19. To qualify, their self-employed trading profits must be no more than £50,000 and at least equal to their non-trading income.

Individuals who are ineligible for the SEISS may benefit from other elements of the unprecedented financial support provided by the Government. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

22 Apr 2020, 4:49 p.m. Self-employed: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support the Government is providing to self-employed people who have to self-isolate as a result of covid-19 symptoms.

Answer (Mims Davies)

The Chancellor has announced a Self-Employed Income Support Scheme that will help millions of people across the UK, with those eligible receiving a cash grant worth 80% of their average monthly trading profit over the last three years. This covers 95% of people who receive the majority of their income from self-employment.

The government has also announced a package of temporary welfare measures to support those on low incomes through the outbreak, including relaxing the Minimum Income Floor for all self-employed claimants affected by the economic impact of COVID-19. Taken together, these measures provide over £6.5bn of additional support through the welfare system.

21 Apr 2020, 5:54 p.m. Universal Credit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of trends in the level of time taken to speak to a call handler on the universal credit helpline.

Answer (Will Quince)

Since mid-March we have seen a huge volume of calls to the Universal Credit helpline, with over 2 million calls on a single day at one point. We are aware that this demand has meant that some claimants were not able to get through.

People making new claims for Universal Credit no longer need to call the Department as part of the process. Once they have completed their online application we will call them if we need to check any of the information they have given us. We have also introduced new processes to ease pressure on waiting times for identity verification over the phone and other processes.

The Department’s priority is to continue to ensure those who are entitled to benefit receive the support they need at a time when new claims for Universal Credit are at an unprecedented level.

Since 16 March 2020, we have received more than 1.5 million new claims for Universal Credit. 10,000 members of staff from other parts of DWP are being redeployed to support work on new claims and we are urgently recruiting additional people to assist with the processing of claims.

21 Apr 2020, 5:54 p.m. Universal Credit: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to manage an increase in claims for universal credit as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Will Quince)

Since mid-March we have seen a huge volume of calls to the Universal Credit helpline, with over 2 million calls on a single day at one point. We are aware that this demand has meant that some claimants were not able to get through.

People making new claims for Universal Credit no longer need to call the Department as part of the process. Once they have completed their online application we will call them if we need to check any of the information they have given us. We have also introduced new processes to ease pressure on waiting times for identity verification over the phone and other processes.

The Department’s priority is to continue to ensure those who are entitled to benefit receive the support they need at a time when new claims for Universal Credit are at an unprecedented level.

Since 16 March 2020, we have received more than 1.5 million new claims for Universal Credit. 10,000 members of staff from other parts of DWP are being redeployed to support work on new claims and we are urgently recruiting additional people to assist with the processing of claims.

21 Apr 2020, 5:54 p.m. Universal Credit: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the increase in universal credit claims as a result of the covid-19 outbreak has affected claim processing times.

Answer (Will Quince)

Since mid-March we have seen a huge volume of calls to the Universal Credit helpline, with over 2 million calls on a single day at one point. We are aware that this demand has meant that some claimants were not able to get through.

People making new claims for Universal Credit no longer need to call the Department as part of the process. Once they have completed their online application we will call them if we need to check any of the information they have given us. We have also introduced new processes to ease pressure on waiting times for identity verification over the phone and other processes.

The Department’s priority is to continue to ensure those who are entitled to benefit receive the support they need at a time when new claims for Universal Credit are at an unprecedented level.

Since 16 March 2020, we have received more than 1.5 million new claims for Universal Credit. 10,000 members of staff from other parts of DWP are being redeployed to support work on new claims and we are urgently recruiting additional people to assist with the processing of claims.

21 Apr 2020, 5:41 p.m. Universal Credit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how long after first applying can claimants for universal credit receive their first advance.

Answer (Will Quince)

Universal Credit new claim advance payments have long been an integral part of the UC system, allowing claimants to access up to 100% of their total expected monthly award at the start of their claim, which can be paid back over a period of up to 12 months, which will be extended to 24 months from October 2021.

Applications are accepted by phone or online and payments can be issued on the same day.

21 Apr 2020, 4:59 p.m. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme: Agency Workers Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that agency workers facing a loss of income as a result of the covid-19 outbreak receive a wage from the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government seeks, as far as possible, to protect people’s jobs and incomes. This is an unprecedented jobs retention scheme and the Government has been working hard to set out further details on the scheme. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open to any individual who was on an employer’s PAYE payroll on 19 March 2020. Full details can be found in the guidance available at www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme and www.gov.uk/guidance/work-out-80-of-your-employees-wages-to-claim-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme, which provides answers to these questions.

30 Mar 2020, 6:18 p.m. Schools: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether (a) one or (b) both parents are required to be classed as key workers for a child to attend school during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department has recently published guidance for parents and carers in relation to the closure of educational settings, and this is available from:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/closure-of-educational-settings-information-for-parents-and-carers.

The current guidance confirms that children with at least one parent or carer who is critical to the COVID-19 response can attend an education or childcare setting if necessary. However, many families with a parent or carer working in critical sectors will be able to ensure their child is kept at home. Every child who can be safely cared for at home should be, to limit the chance of the virus spreading.

25 Mar 2020, 5:44 p.m. Supermarkets: Coronavirus Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people with specific dietary needs as a result of a medical condition can obtain the food they need from supermarkets.

Answer (Victoria Prentis)

The Government has well-established ways of working with the food industry during disruption to supply situations. We are aware of the additional availability issues faced by people who have particular dietary requirements and are working with the food industry to ensure that everybody is able to get the food that they need. We will continue to work closely with the industry over the coming days and months.

Our retailers already have highly resilient supply chains and they are working around the clock to adapt quickly to these changes in demands. Food supply into and across the UK is resilient.

To help industry respond to this unprecedented demand we have introduced new measures to keep food supply flowing. We have issued guidance to local authorities to allow extended delivery hours to supermarkets so that shelves can be filled up more quickly, and we have implemented extensions to drivers’ hours. We are also temporarily relaxing certain elements of competition law to ensure retailers are able to collaborate effectively in the national interest.

17 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m. Department for International Trade: Quintessentially Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to paragraph 9.1 of the Crown Commercial Service's document, Publication of Central Government Tenders and Contracts, for what reasons her Department's contract with Quintessentially (UK) Limited was not published on Contracts Finder until April 2019 when that contract began in May 2016.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The contract was procured prior to the formation of the Department for International Trade (DIT) by UK Shared Business Services who at the time managed UK Trade and Investment’s (UKTI) procurement activity. DIT took ownership of UKTI’s contracts on formation. UK Shared Business Services is a shared services provider and is jointly owned by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation. UK Shared Business Services was responsible for adding the contract to Contracts Finder before responsibility for the contract was transferred to DIT. After DIT staff noticed the contract was not on Contracts Finder, in early 2019, the contract was added.

The Department are currently running a competitive procurement for a partner for inward investment services. This will replace the current contract with Quintessentially when it expires in May 2020. A notice was published on Contracts Finder and the Official Journal of the EU in January 2020 to inform the market of this opportunity.

Quintessentially won a competitive tender in 2016 which was carried out by UK Shared Business Service who at the time managed UKTI’s procurement activity.

Key performance indicators are designed to reflect the service required and are determined on a case-by-case basis.

DIT does not hold any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the GREAT Investors Programme.

17 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m. Department for International Trade: Quintessentially Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Department plans to renew its contract with Quintessentially (UK) Limited after that contract expires in May 2020.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The contract was procured prior to the formation of the Department for International Trade (DIT) by UK Shared Business Services who at the time managed UK Trade and Investment’s (UKTI) procurement activity. DIT took ownership of UKTI’s contracts on formation. UK Shared Business Services is a shared services provider and is jointly owned by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation. UK Shared Business Services was responsible for adding the contract to Contracts Finder before responsibility for the contract was transferred to DIT. After DIT staff noticed the contract was not on Contracts Finder, in early 2019, the contract was added.

The Department are currently running a competitive procurement for a partner for inward investment services. This will replace the current contract with Quintessentially when it expires in May 2020. A notice was published on Contracts Finder and the Official Journal of the EU in January 2020 to inform the market of this opportunity.

Quintessentially won a competitive tender in 2016 which was carried out by UK Shared Business Service who at the time managed UKTI’s procurement activity.

Key performance indicators are designed to reflect the service required and are determined on a case-by-case basis.

DIT does not hold any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the GREAT Investors Programme.

17 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m. Department for International Trade: Quintessentially Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tendering process for the contract held with her Department by Quintessentially (UK) Limited was competitive and open to rival bids.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The contract was procured prior to the formation of the Department for International Trade (DIT) by UK Shared Business Services who at the time managed UK Trade and Investment’s (UKTI) procurement activity. DIT took ownership of UKTI’s contracts on formation. UK Shared Business Services is a shared services provider and is jointly owned by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation. UK Shared Business Services was responsible for adding the contract to Contracts Finder before responsibility for the contract was transferred to DIT. After DIT staff noticed the contract was not on Contracts Finder, in early 2019, the contract was added.

The Department are currently running a competitive procurement for a partner for inward investment services. This will replace the current contract with Quintessentially when it expires in May 2020. A notice was published on Contracts Finder and the Official Journal of the EU in January 2020 to inform the market of this opportunity.

Quintessentially won a competitive tender in 2016 which was carried out by UK Shared Business Service who at the time managed UKTI’s procurement activity.

Key performance indicators are designed to reflect the service required and are determined on a case-by-case basis.

DIT does not hold any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the GREAT Investors Programme.

17 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m. Department for International Trade: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether it is standard practice for her Department to include in its contracts with suppliers a key performance indicator that specifies that the contractor does not offer services that are not in line with government offering and reputational agreement.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The contract was procured prior to the formation of the Department for International Trade (DIT) by UK Shared Business Services who at the time managed UK Trade and Investment’s (UKTI) procurement activity. DIT took ownership of UKTI’s contracts on formation. UK Shared Business Services is a shared services provider and is jointly owned by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation. UK Shared Business Services was responsible for adding the contract to Contracts Finder before responsibility for the contract was transferred to DIT. After DIT staff noticed the contract was not on Contracts Finder, in early 2019, the contract was added.

The Department are currently running a competitive procurement for a partner for inward investment services. This will replace the current contract with Quintessentially when it expires in May 2020. A notice was published on Contracts Finder and the Official Journal of the EU in January 2020 to inform the market of this opportunity.

Quintessentially won a competitive tender in 2016 which was carried out by UK Shared Business Service who at the time managed UKTI’s procurement activity.

Key performance indicators are designed to reflect the service required and are determined on a case-by-case basis.

DIT does not hold any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the GREAT Investors Programme.

17 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m. Department for International Trade: Quintessentially Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Department holds any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the Great Investors Programme.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The contract was procured prior to the formation of the Department for International Trade (DIT) by UK Shared Business Services who at the time managed UK Trade and Investment’s (UKTI) procurement activity. DIT took ownership of UKTI’s contracts on formation. UK Shared Business Services is a shared services provider and is jointly owned by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation. UK Shared Business Services was responsible for adding the contract to Contracts Finder before responsibility for the contract was transferred to DIT. After DIT staff noticed the contract was not on Contracts Finder, in early 2019, the contract was added.

The Department are currently running a competitive procurement for a partner for inward investment services. This will replace the current contract with Quintessentially when it expires in May 2020. A notice was published on Contracts Finder and the Official Journal of the EU in January 2020 to inform the market of this opportunity.

Quintessentially won a competitive tender in 2016 which was carried out by UK Shared Business Service who at the time managed UKTI’s procurement activity.

Key performance indicators are designed to reflect the service required and are determined on a case-by-case basis.

DIT does not hold any other contracts with Quintessentially (UK) Limited in addition to the contract for the GREAT Investors Programme.

13 Mar 2020, 12:23 p.m. Dental Services: West Midlands Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason NHS England has stopped commissioning orthodontic services throughout the West Midlands.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

NHS England is responsible for commissioning orthodontic services from specialist practitioners in primary care, to meet local need.

NHS England halted orthodontic services in the Midlands region due to concerns about the way the process was managed. Across the region NHS England has extended all existing providers contracts for a further two years, which will now expire in 2022.

NHS England will be working across its national team and Midlands region to undertake a lessons learned exercise. This exercise will inform the decision making around the next steps for orthodontic procurements across those regions.

13 Mar 2020, 12:10 p.m. Quintessentially Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many visits has Quintessentially UK Limited (a) organised or (b) assisted as part of the Great Investors Programme.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The Department for International Trade has a contract with Quintessentially UK to support the attraction of international investment into the UK. Quintessentially UK provides:
support with events and visits, advice on potential investors, introductions for international investors to UK companies, investor engagement strategies, and assurances on the reputation of investors engaged.

The table attached details a breakdown of the visits, events, and support Quintessentially has provided through the Great Investors Programme.

2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Prime Minister approved the appointment of Andrew Sabisky as a special adviser.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings did Andrew Sabisky attend as a Government advisor with (a) officials, (b) members of the Cabinet, and (c) the Prime Minister.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky attended meetings where defence officials were present.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government's contract with Andrew Sabisky has been terminated.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether classified material was discussed at Government meetings attended by Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether civil servants raised concerns the recruitment of Andrew Sabisky as a special adviser.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the recruitment process for Andrew Sabisky complied with the pre-employment controls set out in HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the contract signed by Andrew Sabisky stated the requirement for the application of the Baseline Personnel Security Standard.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who the designated Government contract manager was for the recruitment of Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether concerns were raised internally by Ministers on the employment of Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky's employment history was verified prior to his recruitment as a special adviser.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he made of the HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard in evaluating the suitability of Andrew Sabisky for employment in Government.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky was employed as a special adviser on his Department's pay roll.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Prime Minister: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contractors have been hired by the Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street since 12 December 2019.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the hiring of Andrew Sabisky was paid for with funds from the public purse.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Cabinet Secretary approved the hiring of Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Prime Minister: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contingent workers work for the Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what was Andrew Sabisky's daily rate of pay as a contractor for the Government.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what internal approval processes were followed on the hiring of Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Cabinet Office approved the hiring of Andrew Sabisky.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky's employment was subject to (a) the Baseline Personnel Security Standard, (b) a Counter-Terrorist Check, (c) a Security Check or (d) Developed Vetting.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the hiring of Andrew Sabisky required Ministerial approval.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky was hired as (a) contingent labour or (b) as a consultant.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Andrew Sabisky was (a) employed as a contractor and (b) subject to the civil service code when working for the Government.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:36 p.m. Andrew Sabisky Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Dominic Cummings was involved in the recruitment of Andrew Sabisky as a special adviser.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



2 Mar 2020, 5:21 p.m. High Speed Two: China Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether funding from the public purse was allocated to the visit to Beijing in April 2018 by Mark Thurston, Chief Executive of HS2 Ltd.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

Mark Thurston did not visit Beijing in April 2018. In April 2019 Mark Thurston visited Japan, China and Hong Kong to meet with companies responsible for developing and operating high speed networks, hosted by the British Embassy and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and supported by HM Trade Commissioner to China and the Department for International Trade. The purpose of the visit was to gather international best practice of core elements of High Speed Rail projects, such as station design, maintenance and operational processes. The only business expense claimed was Mark Thurston’s international flights. Where travel is for business purposes it is reasonable for it to be covered by HS2 Ltd in line with its published policies. Mark Thurston covered his own internal travel expenses, accommodation, and expenditure for this trip.

2 Mar 2020, 5:02 p.m. High Speed Two: China Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the purpose was of the visit by Mark Thurston, Chief Executive of HS2 Ltd, to Beijing in April 2018.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

Mark Thurston did not visit Beijing in April 2018. In April 2019 Mark Thurston visited Japan, China and Hong Kong to meet with companies responsible for developing and operating high speed networks. He also visited high speed stations in Tokyo, Beijing and Kowloon. The purpose of the visit was to gather international best practice of core elements of High Speed Rail projects, such as station design, maintenance and operational processes.

At the advice of the previous Chairman, Sir David Higgins, Mark Thurston also undertook two other short, 48hr, overseas visits - to Italy and Spain - in March 2018 to learn from their experiences of delivering High Speed Rail. Spain has the largest high speed network outside of China.

2 Mar 2020, 4:55 p.m. High Speed Two: China Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which individuals accompanied Mark Thurston, Chief Executive of HS2 Ltd, on his visit to Beijing in April 2018.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

Mark Thurston did not visit Beijing in April 2018. On 10 April 2019 Mark Thurston met representatives of the National Development & Reform Commission (NDRC) along with the HM Trade Commissioner to China. On 11 April 2019 Mark Thurston was accompanied by Department for International Trade officials to a round table meeting with NDRC and key Chinese rail companies. The purpose of the visit was to gather international best practice of core elements of High Speed Rail projects, such as station design, maintenance and operational processes.

28 Feb 2020, 3:22 p.m. Sunningdale Park Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of the (a) 103 apartments for people over 55 and (b) 168 new homes scheduled to be built on the former Government Civil Service College site at Sunningdale Park will be classed as affordable housing.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Sunningdale Park was sold, generating £48.4 million for the public purse and unlocking surplus Government land for new homes.

Details of the proposed redevelopment, which has been granted planning permission, are available on the website of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead Council.

27 Feb 2020, 5:23 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many houses have been built on land formerly part of the government estate since 2010; and what proportion of those houses are classed as affordable housing.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

New performance data on both the 2011-15 and 2015-20 Public Land for Housing programmes was published on Thursday 6 February 2020. It showed that over 51,000 homes have been delivered on public sector land sites released through both programmes. We do not hold data on what proportion of those homes built are affordable, however, the Department records the number of affordable homes that are planned. Full details are provided in the performance data release which can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/public-land-for-housing-programme-2015-to-2020-data-release-february-2020 . Once a site has been sold by a department, the allocation of affordable housing is agreed between local authorities and developers on a site by site basis.

26 Feb 2020, 5:11 p.m. Armenia: Gold Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has made representations to the Government of Armenia on the Amulsar gold mine.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

British Embassy Yerevan officials regularly make representations to the Government of Armenia on a range of issues.

11 Feb 2020, 3:29 p.m. Government Departments: Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contracts Interserve holds with central government departments; and (a) with which departments and (b) for what duration those contracts are held.

Answer (Jeremy Quin)

Central Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder, including details of the department awarding the contract and the duration of the contract. (https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk)

11 Feb 2020, 3:28 p.m. Government Departments: Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many Interserve contracts held with central government departments recognise a trade union for staff.

Answer (Jeremy Quin)

This information is not held centrally.

8 Oct 2019, 4:05 p.m. Johnny Mercer: Crucial Academy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department first received a communication from the hon. Member for Plymouth Moor View on the (a) continuation and (b) termination of his role at Crucial Academy Ltd.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Ministerial Code sets out the process by which Ministers should declare and manage potential conflicts of interest, working with their Permanent Secretary and the independent adviser on Ministers’ interests.

As part of this process the Minister declared his directorship in Crucial Academy following his appointment and has resigned from this role. Whilst this process has been underway, the Ministry of Defence put in place measures to avoid any potential conflict. Sir Alex Allan, the independent adviser, has not raised any concerns about the conduct and there has been no breach of the Ministerial Code.

8 Oct 2019, 4:05 p.m. Johnny Mercer: Crucial Academy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department first received a communication from the hon. Member for Plymouth Moor View on the (a) continuation and (b) termination of his role at Crucial Academy Ltd.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Ministerial Code sets out the process by which Ministers should declare and manage potential conflicts of interest, working with their Permanent Secretary and the independent adviser on Ministers’ interests.

As part of this process the Minister declared his directorship in Crucial Academy following his appointment and has resigned from this role. Whilst this process has been underway, the Ministry of Defence put in place measures to avoid any potential conflict. Sir Alex Allan, the independent adviser, has not raised any concerns about the conduct and there has been no breach of the Ministerial Code.

3 Oct 2019, 2:27 p.m. Ministers: Conduct Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the efficacy of the Ministerial Code.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

Responsibility for the Ministerial Code rests with the Prime Minister. The Ministerial Code sets out the standards of propriety and behaviour expected of all Ministers and was updated and re-issued by the Prime Minister on 23 August.

The updated Code includes a new section setting out the policy for ministers taking parental leave and other extended absences from Government, as well as a number of updates, including obligations related to Cabinet confidentiality and the acceptance of foreign decorations.

3 Oct 2019, 1:02 p.m. Johnny Mercer: Crucial Academy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department received oral or written representations from the hon. Member for Plymouth Moor View on the awarding of grant money to Crucial Academy Ltd.

Answer (Matt Warman)

My Department received no oral or written representations from the Honourable Member for Plymouth Moor View, Johnny Mercer MP, on the awarding of grant money to Crucial Academy.

We were made aware by Crucial Academy that Johnny Mercer was a Non-Executive Director for the organisation. He has since left his position at Crucial Academy.

2 Oct 2019, 4:59 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, who the directors will be of the company limited by guarantee to run the National College of Creative Industries.

Answer (Michelle Donelan)

The National College for Creative Industries (NCCI) are currently consulting on their proposed partnership model. The model proposed would result in the NCCI company being responsible for the direction, brand and vision of the National College, and will discharge this responsibility through a board of directors, comprising representatives from the licensed partners and employers. As the NCCI are still at the consultation stage, no appointments have yet been made.

If, following consultation, the proposed partnership model is agreed by the NCCI board there will be no direct funding relationship with the new NCCI company.

2 Oct 2019, 4:59 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the funding allocated to the National College of Creative Industries will be subject to the same grant agreements after the establishment of the private company to replace that organisation.

Answer (Michelle Donelan)

The National College for Creative Industries (NCCI) are currently consulting on their proposed partnership model. The model proposed would result in the NCCI company being responsible for the direction, brand and vision of the National College, and will discharge this responsibility through a board of directors, comprising representatives from the licensed partners and employers. As the NCCI are still at the consultation stage, no appointments have yet been made.

If, following consultation, the proposed partnership model is agreed by the NCCI board there will be no direct funding relationship with the new NCCI company.

2 Oct 2019, 4:48 p.m. Ministers: Conduct Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many requests for investigations into the conduct of ministers has the Director General of the Propriety and Ethics Team received in the last 12 months.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Ministerial Code sets out the process for investigations into the conduct of Ministers:

“If there is an allegation about a breach of the Code, and the Prime Minister, having consulted the Cabinet Secretary, feels that it warrants further investigation, he may ask the Cabinet Office to investigate the facts of the case and/or refer the matter to the independent adviser on Ministers’ interests.”

The published reports of the independent adviser on Ministers’ interests contain information about investigations conducted in response to allegations about the conduct of Ministers.

2 Oct 2019, 3:06 p.m. Government Departments: Ethics Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent advice he has received from the Director General of the Propriety and Ethics Team on the (a) standards and ethics and (b) corporate governance of government departments.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

It has been the policy of successive administrations not to provide the contents of advice from officials to Ministers. Standards, ethics and corporate governance of a government department is a matter for the Permanent Secretary and minister in charge of each individual department.

1 Oct 2019, 12:19 p.m. Rapid Response Unit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Rapid Response Unit is involved in the Get ready for Brexit campaign.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Rapid Response Unit was established in 2018 to identify and rebut disinformation and misinformation, as well as increasing the visibility of government information so it is more accessible to the public. This includes all government communications on core policy areas, including Brexit.

1 Oct 2019, 9:10 a.m. Office for Veterans' Affairs: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many members of staff will be allocated to work for the Office for Veterans' Affairs.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

At the 2019 Spending Round £5million was committed for the Office for Veterans' Affairs in 2020/2021. The staffing requirements for the Office for Veterans’ Affairs remain under consideration and will be confirmed in due course.

30 Sep 2019, 4:49 p.m. Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason parts of Operation Yellowhammer: HMG Reasonable Worst Case Planning Assumptions, published on 11 September 2019 are redacted; and whether he plans to publish those redacted parts.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

I refer the Honourable Member to the letter by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the Chair of the EU Exit Committee. This was sent to all members in response to the Humble Address motion of 9 September, and set out the reasons for redaction.

30 Sep 2019, 4:28 p.m. Government Chief Digital Information Officer Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the newly created role of Chief Digital Information Officer will replace the unfilled role of Chief Data Officer.

Answer (Simon Hart)

The Chief Digital Information Officer will not replace the role of Chief Data Officer. The Government intends to appoint a Chief Data Officer by 2020 as we committed to in the Government Transformation Strategy.

30 Sep 2019, 3:05 p.m. Civil Disorder Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the armed forces will be used to police civil unrest in the event that the scenarios outlined in Operation Yellowhammer: HMG Reasonable Worst Case Planning Assumptions occur.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

The Ministry of Defence has been working across Government, including with the Home Office and the National Police Chiefs' Council, to ensure that Government is adequately prepared for the range of YELLOWHAMMER Planning Assumptions. The maintenance of public order is the responsibility of the police. There are no plans to utilise military personnel in the event of civil unrest in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

30 Sep 2019, 8:58 a.m. General Elections Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has recently conducted a risk assessment of its own capabilities to support a snap election.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Cabinet Office regularly reviews its capabilities to support national elections. The Cabinet Office is fully prepared to undertake all of the necessary activity that is required of it and to work with the Electoral Commission and other organisations which participate in ensuring effective elections should an early general election be called.

9 Sep 2019, 3:09 p.m. Home Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Information about additional hours worked by staff is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. Flexible work arrangements are available for staff to work outside core hours when necessary, e.g. flexi time, time off in lieu or for operational units Annualised Hours Work as an alternative to overtime. However, these arrangements are processed and monitored locally.

3 Sep 2019, 4:22 p.m. HM Passport Office: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the options analysis for HM Passports Office produced by his Department assessed the merits of returning outsourced work to in-house.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Department considered a range of options before launching the ongoing procurement for Scanning Validation and Storage services, which included assessing bringing these services in house.

It was determined that the specialist technology required to efficiently and accurately validate and scan documents submitted to Her Majesty’s Passport Office was more cost effectively accessed via an outsourced contract than by the Department procuring and supporting this technology directly.

3 Sep 2019, 4:12 p.m. HM Passport Office: Sopra Steria Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the (a) quality and (b) value for money of services provided by Sopra Steria for HM Passports Office; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The contract with Sopra Steria for the provision of BPO services contains clauses and performance measures (KPIs) designed to ensure the timeliness and quality of service provision. HMPO has a rigorous contract compliance regime in place supported by a dedicated Supplier Management Team with responsibility for ensuring the provider delivers to the required performance standards set out in the contract.

The contract also requires Sopra Steria to maintain an “Open Book” policy. This provides HMPO with transparency of costs and allows HMPO to closely monitor costs and to ensure value for money.

3 Sep 2019, 4:10 p.m. HM Passport Office: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the potential savings to the public purse of producing an in-house bid for HM Passport Office work.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Department considered a range of options before launching the ongoing procurement for Scanning Validation and Storage services, which included assessing bringing these services in house.

It was determined that the specialist technology required to efficiently and accurately validate and scan documents submitted to Her Majesty’s Passport Office was more cost effectively accessed via an outsourced contract than by the Department procuring and supporting this technology directly.

2 Sep 2019, 9:30 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

The department has made no assessment of the amount of time off in lieu taken by staff in the last 5 years, and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

DCMS has a commitment to ensure that employees maintain a healthy work-life balance, and that the working hours of our staff are compliant with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998. All employees have the opportunity to request to work ‘flexi hours’, meaning that (with line manager agreement) they can build up a certain amount of working hours as credit which can then be taken as time off. This is something that is arranged locally with an individual’s line manager, meaning that we do not hold a central record of the total amount of time off in lieu taken by the department’s employees.

6 Aug 2019, 1:39 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office does not hold this information because time-off-in-lieu (TOIL) is not recorded centrally and is managed by individual teams, particularly overseas.

31 Jul 2019, 3:32 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (George Eustice)

Information relating to time taken off in lieu by staff is not held centrally and to obtain it would incur disproportionate costs.

Defra is committed to the wellbeing of its people and offers a flexible working policy. Employees at grades AA through to grade 6 may operate using flexi time. This allows employees to accumulate credit for time worked beyond their contracted hours. Credited hours may then be taken at a later date, subject to business need. Staff are permitted to build up and carry over 3 days each 4 week period.

30 Jul 2019, 4:30 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

This information is not held centrally.

BEIS is committed to maintaining working hours for all workers that comply with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998 (WTR). The provisions of the WTR are incorporated into BEIS's terms, conditions and policies. Our Working Time policy is published on our intranet and accessible to all staff.

Line Managers are responsible for ensuring that staff are aware of the hours they are required to work and the arrangements for taking appropriate breaks so that working time is complied with. Managers are also responsible for monitoring the working hours of their staff. Any time off in lieu taken because of excess hours worked is agreed at a local level between an employee and their line manager.

BEIS operates a variety of flexible working approaches where, subject to the needs of their team and the business, individuals can agree working hours/patterns with their manager which enable them to maintain their work/life balance.

BEIS follows the Civil Service Wellbeing Strategy - ensuring the good health and wellbeing of our staff is a priority for us. We have a range of support in place for our employees which includes the delivery of an ongoing programme of in-house health and wellbeing events and access to employee assistance programmes. BEIS promotes good mental health for all and has trained in-house Mental Health First Aiders. We have also delivered a tranche of “Wellbeing Confident Leadership” training to around 69% of our Senior Civil Servants to enable them to create a working environment which recognises the importance of individual wellbeing and how this might be affected by working patterns and practices.

29 Jul 2019, 12:16 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in her Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Will Quince)

DWP offers a Flexible Working Hours (FWH) policy which allows employees to accrue additional hours worked as a flexi credit that can then be taken as time off in lieu.

The FWH policy is managed locally and DWP does not hold central records of how much time off in lieu has been taken by employees, therefore the information could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

26 Jul 2019, 11:45 a.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The information is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost via an extensive clerical exercise.

25 Jul 2019, 10:39 a.m. Cabinet Office: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contractors employed by the Cabinet Office have been paid more than £750 per day in the last two years.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

From July 2019, Ministers have introduced an enhanced approvals process where all business cases with rates of £750 per day and above will require ministerial approval.

The information regarding the number of contractors employed by the Cabinet Office in the last two years with a day rate of more than £750 is not held centrally and could not be provided without incurring disproportionate cost.

25 Jul 2019, 10:04 a.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Mrs Heather Wheeler)

Time Off in Lieu (TOIL) is agreed locally, subject to business needs and line manager approval. The Department does not hold centrally managed records of TOIL for the period in question. TOIL forms just one of the options where conditioned hours are exceeded; those who use the flexi system can choose to credit hours under this policy, and overtime may be paid where agreed in advance with line management.

The Department ensures that the requirements of the Working Time Regulations of 1998 as regards civil service working hours are adhered to and has a commitment to the well-being of our staff which aims to ensure that everyone has a good work/life balance. We want to create a working environment that allows people to flourish and thrive through positive, supportive relationships which recognise the importance of individual wellbeing, and how this may be affected by working patterns and practices. The commitment of our Senior Civil Service cadre to the wellbeing of their staff is demonstrated by the fact that 85 per cent have completed the Wellbeing Confident Leadership Training.

24 Jul 2019, 2:51 p.m. Department for Transport: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

We do not keep a central record of time off in lieu (TOIL) taken through flexible working patterns; this is managed locally.

24 Jul 2019, 2:22 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in her Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

This information could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Time Off in Lieu is offered as an alternative to paid overtime where an individual works beyond conditioned hours or on days they would not normally be required to work.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) ensures compliance with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998 in respect of civil servants' working hours and it is the responsibility of all line managers to ensure employees are not working excessive hours in line with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998.

The MOD is also committed to ensuring the wellbeing of staff and take action to ensure staff are able to maintain a satisfactory work/life balance

23 Jul 2019, 5:16 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) does not hold any central data on the amount of time off in lieu taken by employees in each of the past five years. Any time of in lieu granted is locally managed and not recorded, in accordance with MoJ’s Flexible Working Policy.

23 Jul 2019, 2:07 p.m. Department for International Development: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Dr Andrew Murrison)

DFID works on a flexible working hours scheme, which allows staff to build up a credit of time which can be used to take time off (flexi-leave). To compensate for working extra hours, staff may be paid overtime or take time off in lieu.

The below table shows all flexi leave recorded for each of the last 5 years, from July 2014 to June 2019. This data includes only full days or half days and not shorter timespans (e.g. a couple of hours), and it cannot be determined that all flexi leave taken has been recorded.

Time frame

No. of flexi days recorded

Jul 14 to Jun 15

3,272.5

Jul 15 to Jun 16

3,235.5

Jul 16 to Jun 17

3,674.5

Jul 17 to Jun 18

4,949.0

Jul 18 to Jun 19

5,076.0

Total

20,207.5

23 Jul 2019, 12:30 p.m. Attorney General: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Attorney General, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Attorney General’s Office offers a flexi time policy to support time off in lieu on an individual basis. Flexi time is individually agreed with line managers to maintain working hours in line with the Working Time Regulations 1998. As there is no central record of working hours, the Attorney General’s Office has no accurate way to estimate the amount of time off in lieu taken by staff in each of the last five years without disproportionate cost.

22 Jul 2019, 5:10 p.m. Department for Education: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The information requested is not held centrally.

In the department, a voluntary ‘flexi-scheme’ is available to all employees who are responsible for ensuring their hours of attendance are recorded accurately. Managers are responsible for ensuring that employees are not working excessive hours. If an employee accrues extra hours they may, with the agreement of their manager, take time off. Managers and employees have an obligation to ensure that working patterns are in accordance with the working time regulations.

The department is committed to the wellbeing of its staff and around 90% of our senior civil servants have received Wellbeing Confident Leader training. The department has mental health first aiders, fair treatment ambassadors and a wellbeing network who all work to help prioritise staff wellbeing at work.

22 Jul 2019, 4:22 p.m. Home Office: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much time off in lieu has been taken staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Time off in lieu taken by staff is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost, these arrangements are processed and monitored locally.

22 Jul 2019, 3:24 p.m. Treasury: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The information requested is not centrally available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. It is the responsibility of line managers to ensure employees are not working excessive hours.

HM Treasury operates a flexible working hours scheme which allows staff to take time off in lieu at a later date if they work over agreed working hours, within agreed limits, and ensuring compliance with the Working Time Regulations 1998. Where it is not appropriate or possible to take time off in lieu of hours worked, staff may be paid for these additional hours at plain time rate, in line with our overtime policy.

It is in the interests of the health, safety and wellbeing of our staff that work in excess of the normal hours of duty in a week should not be consistently required. We are keen to ensure that all staff enjoy a good work life balance and are currently upskilling our Senior Civil Service in managing staff wellbeing – as of December 2018 we had already achieved 78% attendance. It is with this in mind that we strongly recommend that time off in lieu be taken in the event of working excess hours. However, it is recognised that from time to time, this may be unavoidable.

22 Jul 2019, 2:29 p.m. Cabinet Office: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the names of the firms his Department has hired contractors from in each of the last three years.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The information for 2016/17 is not held centrally and could not be provided without incurring disproportionate cost.

Cabinet Office hired contractors from the following firms in 2017/18 and 2018/19:

2017/18
Allen Lane Ltd
Brook Street UK Ltd
Capita
Capita Business Services Ltd
Capita Resourcing Ltd
CDG Ltd
Cedar Recruitment Ltd
Certes Computing Ltd
CGI IT UK Ltd
Cloud Technology Solutions
Code iT Recruitment
Computer Network Defence Ltd
Costain Ltd
DF Press Ltd
DLA Piper UK LLP
DMSG Ltd
E Synergy Solutions Ltd
EP90group Ltd
Ergon Ltd
Experian Ltd
Experienced Management Consultants Limited
Green Park Interim And Executive Ltd
Harris Management Consultancy Ltd
Hays
Hays Specialist Recruitment Ltd
Hydrogen International Ltd
Informed Solutions
Ixydo Ltd
J Squared Business Consulting Ltd
Kainos Software Ltd
KPMG LLP
LA International
LA International Computer Consultants Ltd
Law Morgan Limited
Layer 7 IT Security
M4 Managed Services International Ltd
Medway Consulting
Mercator IT Solutions Ltd
Methods Business & Digital Technology Ltd
Methods Digital Ltd
Michael Page UK Ltd
Morgan Law
Mott Macdonald
NCC Services Ltd
North Highland Ltd
Office Angels Ltd
Optimum Fleet Ltd
PA Consulting Services Ltd
Parasol Ltd
Parity Professionals Ltd
Parity Resources Ltd
Parity Solutions Ltd
Pertemps
Project Workout Ltd
Reed
Reed Specialist Recruitment
Rethink Recruitment Solutions Ltd
Robertson Bell Ltd
Sanderson Government & Defence Ltd
Smart Sourcing Plc
Softwire Technology Ltd
Sopra Steria Recruitment Ltd
The ID Crowd Ltd
The Light Machine
Thoughtworks Ltd
Triad Group Plc
Trustmarque Solutions Ltd
Turner & Townsend Project Management
Two & A Half Bears Ltd
Venn Group Ltd
VMA Global Resourcing Group
Yes And

2018/19
Airbus Defence & Space Ltd
Alesto Ltd
Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd
Allen Lane Ltd
Badenoch & Clark Ltd
Bindmans LLP
Bishop Lloyd & Jackson Solicitors
Brook Street UK Ltd
Capita
Capita Business Services Ltd
Cedar Recruitment Ltd
Certes Computing Ltd
Chillmark Consulting Ltd
Cloud Technology Solutions
Code iT Recruitment
Company X Consulting Ltd
Computer Network Defence Ltd
Convivio Team Ltd
Costain Ltd
Cragg Ross Dawson Ltd
Deep Digital Ltd
Deighton Pierce Glynn
Deloitte LLP
DF Press Ltd
DMSG Ltd
E Synergy Solutions Ltd
Edinburgh Innovations Ltd
EP90group Ltd
Ergon Ltd
Ernst & Young LLP
Experian Ltd
Experienced Management Consultants Limited
Fuel Recruitment
Goodman Masson Ltd
Green Park Interim & Executive Ltd
Hardwicke
Harris Management Consultancy Ltd
Harvey Nash Plc
Hays Specialist Recruitment Ltd
Hodge Jones & Allen LLP
I C Consultants Ltd
Improvement & Development Agency
Infosec
Inquisito Ltd
Integral Commercial Services Ltd
Interserve Facilities Management Ltd
ITN Solicitors
Ixydo Ltd
Janes Solicitors
Jobvite Inc

Kainos Software Ltd
LA International
LA International Computer Consultants Ltd
Layer 7 IT Security
Lucid Support Services Ltd
M4 Managed Services International Ltd
Methods Business And Digital Technology Ltd
Methods Digital Ltd
Michael Page UK Ltd
Michael Standing
Montagu Evans LLP
Morgan Law
Mott Macdonald
MyCSP Ltd
Neil Hudgell Ltd
Optimum Fleet Ltd
Parity Professionals Ltd
Parity Resources Ltd
Parity Solutions Ltd
Pepperscape Consulting
Pertemps
Quo Imus Ltd
Reed
Robertson Bell
Robertson Bell Ltd
Rsm Risk Assurance Service LLP
Sanderson Government & Defence Ltd
Shared Services Connected Ltd
Smart Sourcing Plc
Softwire Technology Ltd
Sopra Steria Recruitment Ltd
Steve Mullins Consulting
Sutherland Global Services Uk Ltd
Talent International UK Ltd
The ID Crowd Ltd
The Light Machine
Thoughtworks Ltd
Torero Abecassis Empis & Cowlard Ltd
Triad Group Plc
Value Dynamics 2007 Ltd
Waldegrave House Ltd T/A Mandala Leaders

22 Jul 2019, 2:26 p.m. Cabinet Office: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

This information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

22 Jul 2019, 1:13 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department for Exiting the European Union is committed to the wellbeing of its staff and ensuring that staff maintain a work-life balance. The Department has a range of flexible working policies in place to avoid excess working hours and complies with the EU Working Time Directive.

If there are occasions when staff have to work extra hours, they may be able to claim overtime or time off in lieu for the additional hours worked. Working hours are managed locally with line managers and no central records are held of excess working hours that are not paid as overtime.

22 Jul 2019, 10:25 a.m. Department for International Trade: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in his Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

The Department for International Trade (DIT) has a Flexi-time policy, available for the use of all delegated grades and accessible on the Digital Workspace. This policy and the Department are compliant with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998 in respect of civil servants’ working hours.

This policy allows DIT staff to take time off in lieu where they have worked extra hours. This is managed locally between employees and their line managers, whose responsibility it is to ensure that their staff are not working excessive hours.

Data on time off in lieu is not held centrally.

DIT is committed to supporting the wellbeing of all its members of staff and has appropriate policies in place to support this, alongside a departmental Health and Wellbeing Plan.

22 Jul 2019, 10:11 a.m. Northern Ireland Office: Working Hours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how much time off in lieu has been taken by staff in her Department in each of the last five years.

Answer (John Penrose)

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

The Northern Ireland Office is committed to ensuring the wellbeing of their staff in support of a healthy work/life balance. The Department has an active Wellbeing Network and line managers are aware of their responsibilities for ensuring that their team members do not work excessive hours.

18 Jul 2019, 9:22 a.m. Temporary Employment: Pay Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons the rate of pay which requires approval for temporary staff was set at £750 per day in his Departments announcement of 4 July.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

Ministerial approval has been set at £750 per day as a control mechanism to consistently achieve value for money, provide greater transparency and to ensure that all other resourcing options have been considered.

17 Jul 2019, 1:18 p.m. High Speed Two: Freedom of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of freedom of information requests received by HS2 Limited were resolvable requests withheld in full for (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018 and (e) the first quarter of 2019.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

From 2015 up to the end of first quarter of 2019, HS2 Ltd received 1,224 Freedom of Information (FOI) and Environmental Information Regulations (EIR) requests. Where an exemption (FOI) or an exception (EIR) applied, all of the requested information was withheld on 239 occasions. The proportion of resolvable requests withheld in full for each period is as follows: (a) 2015, 12% (b) 2016, 19% (c) 2017, 25% (d) 2018, 19% and (e) first quarter of 2019, 24%.

16 Jul 2019, 3:21 p.m. High Speed Two: Freedom of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what percentage of freedom of information requests received by HS2 Limited were fulfilled within the 20-day deadline in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018 and (e) the first quarter of 2019.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

From 2015 up to the end of first quarter of 2019, HS2 Ltd responded to 79 per cent of the Freedom of Information (FOI) and Environmental Information Regulations (EIR) requests it received within the 20 working day deadline.

Year

Number of requests

% of FOI received fulfilled within the 20-day deadline

2015

226

77%

2016

219

95%

2017

284

92%

2018

354

77%

In the first quarter of 2019 HS2 Ltd has received 141 FOI request with 40% fulfilled within the 20-day deadline. This is an increase of 83 per cent in the number of requests received, coupled with an increase in complexity, this has led to a number of requests taking longer to process. HS2 Ltd recognises that its performance needs to improve. It is implementing a number of measures, including increasing resources, to alleviate the issue.

16 Jul 2019, 3:21 p.m. High Speed Two: Freedom of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many freedom of information requests were received by HS2 Limited in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018 and (e) the first quarter of 2019.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

From 2015 up to the end of first quarter of 2019, HS2 Ltd responded to 79 per cent of the Freedom of Information (FOI) and Environmental Information Regulations (EIR) requests it received within the 20 working day deadline.

Year

Number of requests

% of FOI received fulfilled within the 20-day deadline

2015

226

77%

2016

219

95%

2017

284

92%

2018

354

77%

In the first quarter of 2019 HS2 Ltd has received 141 FOI request with 40% fulfilled within the 20-day deadline. This is an increase of 83 per cent in the number of requests received, coupled with an increase in complexity, this has led to a number of requests taking longer to process. HS2 Ltd recognises that its performance needs to improve. It is implementing a number of measures, including increasing resources, to alleviate the issue.

16 Jul 2019, 2:42 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Freedom of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons 31.2 per cent of freedom of information requests received by his Department were not fulfilled within the 20-day deadline in 2018.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) the 20 working day deadline for response to requests for information may be extended in order to consider the balance of public interest regarding disclosure of held information.

In 2018, 82% of requests received by the Department were answered within the statutory 20-day deadline or with a permitted extension. In the first quarter of 2019, 68% of requests were answered within the 20-day deadline or with a permitted extension.

The complexity and diverse nature of the Department means that individual requests may require the involvement of more than one area of the Department and/or consultation with key stakeholders. Regrettably this can sometimes lead to delays in the Department’s ability to providing a timely response.

The Department remains committed to improving the number of requests answered within the statutory deadline and is working closely with officials across the Department.

16 Jul 2019, 2:42 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Freedom of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason only 55.4 per cent of FOI requests received by his Department in the first quarter of 2019 were met within the 20-day deadline.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) the 20 working day deadline for response to requests for information may be extended in order to consider the balance of public interest regarding disclosure of held information.

In 2018, 82% of requests received by the Department were answered within the statutory 20-day deadline or with a permitted extension. In the first quarter of 2019, 68% of requests were answered within the 20-day deadline or with a permitted extension.

The complexity and diverse nature of the Department means that individual requests may require the involvement of more than one area of the Department and/or consultation with key stakeholders. Regrettably this can sometimes lead to delays in the Department’s ability to providing a timely response.

The Department remains committed to improving the number of requests answered within the statutory deadline and is working closely with officials across the Department.

12 Jul 2019, 1:53 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in her Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Will Quince)

The DWP does not expect its employees to work unpaid overtime.

12 Jul 2019, 12:20 p.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Jake Berry)

The Department has not made an assessment of unpaid overtime. The Department has a number of policies in place to recognise the occasional circumstances in which staff might work more than their conditioned hours. These include the flexi-credit system in which staff can accrue flexi hours to allow time off at a later point should they choose to enrol in the flexi policy. They also have the chance to take TOIL (time off in lieu) for any additional time worked. Approved overtime is agreed with managers in advance and remunerated in line with our overtime policy.

The Department ensures that the requirements of the Working Time Regulations of 1998 as regards civil service working hours are adhered to and has a commitment to the well-being of our staff which aims to ensure that everyone has a good work/life balance. We want to create a working environment that allows people to flourish and thrive through positive, supportive relationships which recognise the importance of individual wellbeing, and how this may be affected by working patterns and practices. The commitment of our SCS cadre to the wellbeing of their staff is demonstrated by the fact that 85 per cent have completed the Wellbeing Confident Leadership Training.

12 Jul 2019, 9:49 a.m. Scotland Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (David Mundell)

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland encourages flexible working and uses flexible working policies to enable staff to have working patterns that suit both individual and business needs. Arrangements are in place for monitoring hours worked; line mangers are responsible for ensuring that employees are not working excessive hours and are compliant with the Work Time Regulations.

The office is committed to the wellbeing of staff and regularly updates staff about ways to optimise their physical and mental health and wellbeing.

11 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Department for International Development: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

DFID complies with the requirements of The Working Time Regulations 1998 and supports staff wellbeing by encouraging people to work regular hours and ensures managers work with them to reprioritise work and avoid overtime. Overtime is used as a last resort to help deal with exceptional or seasonal pressures of work.

11 Jul 2019, 3:38 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate he has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not hold this information because we do not record total hours worked for any of our staff. This is managed by individual teams, particularly overseas.

Wellbeing is a key priority in the FCO, and we recognise the importance of staff maintaining a good work life balance and not regularly working beyond their conditioned hours. Wellbeing Confident Leadership workshops have already been delviered to 67 per cent of our Senior Civil Servant and Senior Management Structure staff, with the remainder expected to complete the training by the end of the year.

Where staff are consistently exceeding their conditioned hours, managers are expected to take steps to ensure that staff are not overstretched, and that they are not exceeding the limits set out in the 1998 Working Time Regulations. However, at times, staff may be asked to work above their conditioned hours to deliver priority work, and will be paid overtime in line with our overtime policies.

11 Jul 2019, 1:18 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

There has been no estimate made of the unpaid overtime worked by staff. To calculate the actual amount claimed as overtime across the service would mean requesting our contracted Shared Service provider to interrogate the SOP payroll/accounting system for payments made in every establishment and HQ building under the overtime cost code, which can only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

11 Jul 2019, 8:41 a.m. Department for Education: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Regarding the records of unpaid overtime for staff working in the department or its executive agencies, the information requested is not held centrally.

The department is committed to the wellbeing of its staff, and discourages long working hours to make sure that staff are able to maintain their work/life balance. Managers have responsibility for making sure that their staff do not work excessive hours.

10 Jul 2019, 1:27 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

We do not hold this information. The Department is committed to ensuring the wellbeing of their staff and their work/life balance, with line managers having responsibility for ensuring staff do not work excessive hours in line with the Working Time Regulations 1998 in respect of civil servants' working hours.

10 Jul 2019, 12:42 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate he has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department for Exiting the European Union is committed to the wellbeing of its staff and ensuring that staff maintain a work-life balance. The Department has a range of flexible working policies in place to avoid excess working hours and complies with the EU Working Time Directive. If there are occasions when staff have to work extra hours, they may be able to claim overtime or time off in lieu for the additional hours worked.

Working hours are managed locally with line managers and no central records are held of excess working hours that are not paid as overtime.

10 Jul 2019, 10:57 a.m. Northern Ireland Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what estimate she has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in her Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (John Penrose)

The Northern Ireland Office offers a flexible working scheme to all staff, including time off in lieu and paid overtime is available if operationally required. No estimate of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in the last 24 months has been made.

10 Jul 2019, 10:54 a.m. Wales Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Office of the Secretary of State encourages flexible working and uses flexible working policies to enable staff to have working patterns that suit both individuals’ and the Department’s needs. The Department has arrangements in place for monitoring hours worked and line managers are responsible for ensuring that employees are not working excessive hours and are compliant with the Working Time Regulations.

The Department is committed to the wellbeing of staff and regularly informs them about wellbeing-related topics, including maintaining good physical and mental health.

9 Jul 2019, 3:08 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate she has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in her Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has made no estimate of unpaid overtime, as this information is not collected. However, it is the responsibility of all line managers to ensure employees are not working excessive hours, in line with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998.

The MOD is committed to the wellbeing of its staff, and to ensure staff are able to maintain their work/life balance.

9 Jul 2019, 1:20 p.m. Department for Transport: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

Neither the central department nor its executive agencies hold this information. The Department has a policy in place to support both paid overtime and flexi-time working for grades below Senior Civil Service. Any additional hours that are recorded are either paid via payroll as overtime or taken as time off in lieu. Staff are not required or expected to work unpaid overtime.

9 Jul 2019, 1:18 p.m. Cabinet Office: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Information about unpaid overtime is not held. Cabinet Office encourages staff and their Line Managers to adopt positive work/life balance arrangements which includes flexible working hours and working from home whilst ensuring business needs are met. But this is managed at a local level within Business Groups where it is the responsibility of line managers to ensure their staff are not working excessive hours and comply with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998.

8 Jul 2019, 4:53 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

Information relating to unpaid overtime worked by staff is not held centrally and to obtain it would incur disproportionate costs.

8 Jul 2019, 4:47 p.m. Leader of the House of Commons: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Leader of the House, what estimate he has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The Office of the Leader of the House of Commons is supported by Cabinet Office staff, and I refer the Hon. member to question 272747 and the answer to be provided by the Department. Claimed overtime for staff in the Office of the Leader of the House of Commons is paid in accordance with the Department’s procedures. Information on unpaid overtime is not held.

8 Jul 2019, 4:45 p.m. Treasury: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the total amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

HM Treasury operates a flexible working hours scheme which allows staff to take time off if they work longer hours during the week.

It is in the interests of the health, safety and wellbeing of our staff that work in excess of the normal hours of duty in a week should not be consistently required. We are keen to ensure that all staff enjoy a good work life balance and it is with this in mind that we strongly recommend that time off in lieu be taken in the event of working excess hours. However, it is recognised that from time to time, this may be unavoidable.

Where it is not appropriate or possible to take time off in lieu of hours worked, staff are paid for these additional hours at plain time rate, in line with our overtime policy.

8 Jul 2019, 4:02 p.m. Attorney General: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Attorney General, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Attorney General’s Office does not pay overtime, however the department does offer a flexi time policy to support time off in lieu on an individual basis. Flexi time is individually agreed with line managers to maintain working hours in line with the Working Time Regulations 1998. As there is no central record of working hours, the Attorney General’s Office has no accurate way to estimate any potential unpaid overtime worked by staff in the last 24 months without disproportionate cost.

8 Jul 2019, 3:06 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

BEIS does not keep a record of unpaid overtime worked in the Department.

There may be occasions when employees have to work more than their conditioned hours. In these circumstances staff below the Senior Civil Service are be able to claim overtime or time off in lieu for the additional hours that have been worked.

8 Jul 2019, 11:04 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Margot James)

The department has made no assessment of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in the last 24 months, and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

DCMS has a commitment to ensure that employees maintain a healthy work-life balance, and that the working hours of our staff are compliant with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998. All employees have the opportunity to request to work flexi hours, meaning that (with line manager agreement) they can vary the time of their arrival and departure, and that they can take time off for extra hours worked.

8 Jul 2019, 9:24 a.m. Department for International Trade: Overtime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

This information is not centrally held.

Line managers have a responsibility for ensuring that staff are not working excessive hours, and the department is compliant with the requirements of the Working Time Regulations 1998 in respect of civil servants' working hours.

DIT is committed to supporting the wellbeing of all its members of staff. The department has a Stress Policy that introduced the provision of Mental Health First Aiders who can provide a range of support to both employees and managers, including access to our Employee Counselling Service. In January 2019, the department launched the Health & Wellbeing Plan, which includes activity to train senior leaders in Wellbeing Confidence.

4 Jul 2019, 9:59 a.m. Political Parties: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2017 to Question 268970, whether his Department received proposals from the Electoral Commission on the implementation of section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Electoral Commission set out their concerns and recommendations for implementation in their 2013 report ‘A regulatory review of the UK’s party and election finance laws: Recommendations for change’.

2 Jul 2019, 3:32 p.m. Cabinet Office: Ministers Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the transparency data entitled Cabinet Office ministerial meetings January to March 2019, published on 21 June 2019, if he will publish the (a) organisations and (b) individuals that attended (i) Roundtable discussion on Digital Transformation in Government on 12 February 2019; (ii) Roundtable on digital innovation in government on 17 January 2019; (iii) Discussion on Strategic Approach to Public Appointments on 21 January 2019; (iv) Roundtable on digital innovation in government, 24 January 2019; (v) Discussion of ongoing Civil Service Compensation scheme negotiations on 28 January 2019; (vi) Discussion on Strategic Approach to Public Appointments on 28 January 2019; (vii) Discussion of ongoing Civil Service Compensation scheme negotiations on 6 February 2019; (viii) Discussion on Public Appointments Events on 6 February 2019; (ix) Roundtable discussion on Workforce issues across the Public Sector on 12 February 2019; (x) Discussion on government outsourcing and innovation on 12 February 2019; (xi) Discussion on the work of the Government Digital Service on 19 February 2019; (xii) Discussion on Digital Accessibility on 19 February 2019; and (xiii) Discussion on Govtech and digital innovation in government on 26 February 2019.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Ministers regularly meet with a large number of external stakeholders as part of their normal duties.

The information on attendees at meetings as set out in the transparency data publication of 21 June 2019 is proportionate to the nature and depth of the engagement. In line with this approach we do not always publish lists of every attendee at larger roundtables and instead provide a general description of who was present and the names of the host organisation(s) where applicable.

Meetings (i), (ii), (iv) and (xiii) fall into this category. Meetings (i) and (xiii) were roundtables organised and hosted by third party organisations to which I was invited and actively contributed as a guest. Meetings (ii) and (iv) were roundtables organised by the Government Digital Service with the support of host organisations. A more detailed overview of the attendees at these roundtables is now set out below based upon records of who was invited; this may differ slightly from who attended on the day.

For meetings (iii), (v), (vi), (vii), (viii), (ix), (x), (xi) and (xii), the published data already provides the name of every organisation(s) or individual(s) who attended the meetings.

Meeting (i) - Roundtable discussion on Digital Transformation in Government on 12 February 2019

  • The Spectator
  • TechUK
  • Global Sourcing Association UK
  • Amazon Web Services
  • PUBLIC
  • Transport for London
  • Bob Blackman MP
  • Alan Mak MP
  • Baroness Neville-Rolfe DBE CMG
  • Lord O'Shaughnessy
  • Matt Warman MP

Meeting (ii) - Roundtable on digital innovation in government on 17 January 2019

  • Cisco
  • CBI
  • Capita plc
  • Dentons
  • Oracle
  • HP
  • Atos
  • Capgemini
  • Atkins Global
  • BT
  • Upside Projects
  • CGI
  • Mastercard
  • Fluxx
  • Costain
  • Amey
  • Eaton
  • Blue Prism
  • IBM
  • Sodexo
  • Redbull
  • Accenture

Meeting (iv) - Roundtable on digital innovation in government, 24 January 2019

  • University of Edinburgh
  • City of Edinburgh Council
  • Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce
  • East Lothian Council
  • West Lothian Council
  • Codebase
  • Young Scot
  • The Data Lab
  • Scotland IS

Meeting (xiii) - Discussion on Govtech and digital innovation in government on 26 February 2019

  • Microsoft
  • Sensyne Health
  • Adzuna
  • Onward
  • Salesforce
  • Epsilon Partners
  • Mustard Seed
  • M&G Prudential
  • TechUK
  • Balderton Capital
1 Jul 2019, 4:41 p.m. Senior Civil Servants: Education Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of senior civil servants that were educated at (a) Oxford and (b) Cambridge University.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not currently hold comprehensive and accurate information on the proportion of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) who were privately educated, nor of the educational background of civil servants.

1 Jul 2019, 4:40 p.m. Civil Servants: Education Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on the educational background of civil servants.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not currently hold comprehensive and accurate information on the proportion of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) who were privately educated, nor of the educational background of civil servants.

1 Jul 2019, 4:40 p.m. Senior Civil Servants: Private Education Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the senior civil service that were privately educated.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not currently hold comprehensive and accurate information on the proportion of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) who were privately educated, nor of the educational background of civil servants.

1 Jul 2019, 9:32 a.m. Political Parties: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has received representations from the Electoral Commission on the workability of section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable, and the Conservative Government continues to hold this view.

During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC).

An individual’s tax status is subject to confidentiality between them and HMRC. It may therefore be difficult or impossible for the political party and the Electoral Commission to accurately determine whether a donor meets the permissibility test set out section 10 in the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.

The Government also has a principled objection to the measures:

  • The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations. There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK.

  • If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association.

  • Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections.

Notwithstanding, as I stated in my previous answer, the Government has announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider recommendations on tackling loopholes in relation to foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies which are not properly operating in the UK.

More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.

1 Jul 2019, 9:32 a.m. Political Parties: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2019 to Question 266672 on Political Parties: Finance, for what reason the Government considers Section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009 to be unworkable.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable, and the Conservative Government continues to hold this view.

During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC).

An individual’s tax status is subject to confidentiality between them and HMRC. It may therefore be difficult or impossible for the political party and the Electoral Commission to accurately determine whether a donor meets the permissibility test set out section 10 in the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.

The Government also has a principled objection to the measures:

  • The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations. There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK.

  • If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association.

  • Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections.

Notwithstanding, as I stated in my previous answer, the Government has announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider recommendations on tackling loopholes in relation to foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies which are not properly operating in the UK.

More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.

27 Jun 2019, 2:50 p.m. Kier Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he (a) has carried out or (b) plans to carry out under section 40 of the Small Business and Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 an investigation into the promptness of payment by Kier of the subcontractors in its public sector supply chain.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Section 40 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 requires certain public sector contracting authorities to give reasonable assistance to investigations by the Cabinet Office’s Public Procurement Review Service. The Public Procurement Review Service investigates concerns raised by suppliers about public procurement practice, including late payment. It has not carried out and has no plans to carry out an investigation into the promptness of payment by Kier.

27 Jun 2019, 1:59 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he (a) has carried out or (b) plans to carry out under section 40 of the Small Business and Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 an investigation into the promptness of payment by Interserve of the subcontractors in its public sector supply chain.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Section 40 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 requires certain public sector contracting authorities to give reasonable assistance to investigations by the Cabinet Office’s Public Procurement Review Service. The Public Procurement Review Service investigates concerns raised by suppliers about public procurement practice, including late payment. It has not carried out and has no plans to carry out an investigation into the promptness of payment by Interserve.

27 Jun 2019, 1:54 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Interserve has cancelled any public sector contracts since January 2019.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We are not aware of Interserve cancelling any public sector contracts.

26 Jun 2019, 3:12 p.m. Interserve: Insolvency Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to conduct an investigation into the effect of Interserve's entry into administration on that company's creditors.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The effect of Interserve Plc’s administration on creditors is an issue for the administrators who will advise of repayment prospects. The administrators have a legal duty to report confidentially to the Insolvency Service about the conduct of the directors.

25 Jun 2019, 11:15 a.m. Kier Group: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assurances Kier has given to the Government that Kier's financial situation will not affect its ability to fulfil the public sector contracts it holds.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We continue to monitor the financial health of all of our strategic suppliers, including Kier

We remain in close communication with Kier’s management and will continue to discuss
their proposed strategy.

24 Jun 2019, 4:25 p.m. Political Parties: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the Government has not issued a commencement order for Section 10 of the Political Parties Act 2009, in relation to non-resident donors.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

Successive Governments have considered section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009 to be unworkable

There is already a robust legal framework in place to ensure only individuals that are registered on the electoral register and organisations that carry out business in the UK can
make donations to political organisations in the UK

In May this year, the Government announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider
recommendations on foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies.

24 Jun 2019, 2:42 p.m. Kier Group: Redundancy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assurances his Department has received from Kier that any job losses will not affect public services or projects delivered by Kier.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We monitor the financial health of all of our strategic suppliers, including Kier. We remain in close communication with Kier’s management and will continue to discuss their proposed strategy. Kier has a large number of contracts across the private and public sector and we are confident they can continue to deliver quality public services.

24 Jun 2019, 2:41 p.m. Kier Group: Redundancy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions the Government has had with Kier on the effect of job redundancies at Kier on delivery of public services by that company.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We continue to monitor the financial health of all of our strategic suppliers, including Kier. We remain in close communication with Kier’s management and will continue to discuss their proposed strategy. Kier has a large number of contracts across the private and public sector and we are confident they can continue to deliver quality public services.

24 Jun 2019, 2:39 p.m. Kier Group: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions his Department has had with Kier on the financial situation of that company.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We remain in close communication with Kier’s management and will continue to discuss their proposed strategy. We continue to monitor the financial health of all of our strategic suppliers, including Kier. Kier has a large number of contracts across the private and public sector and we are confident they can continue to deliver quality public services.

24 Jun 2019, 2:38 p.m. Kier Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the new rules to prevent government suppliers from winning government contracts if they do not pay their suppliers on time are now in force; and whether Kier's recent payment performance falls below the standards expected by those rules.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

From 1 September, in government procurements that are over £5m per annum and subject to the Public Contract Regulations 2015, suppliers will need to demonstrate good payment with their subcontractors. Suppliers that cannot demonstrate a fair, effective and responsible approach to payment in their supply chain should expect to be excluded from the procurement process for major government contracts.

The payment performance of all large businesses, including Kier and its relevant corporate entities, is available at www.gov.uk/check-when-businesses-pay-invoices.

Kier has a large number of contracts across the private and public sector and we are confident they can continue to deliver quality public services.

24 Jun 2019, 2:37 p.m. Kier Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Kier has indicated to his Department that it plans to terminate any of the public sector contracts it holds.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

We remain in close communication with Kier’s management and will continue to discuss their proposed strategy. Our priority is always to protect the continuity of public services.

Kier has a large number of contracts across the private and public sector and we are confident they can continue to deliver quality public services.

20 Jun 2019, 1:33 p.m. Private Finance Initiative Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the value of PFI contracts in operation by region.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The value of PFI contracts in operation by region can be found in the PFI and PF2 summary data published annually by HM Treasury and the Infrastructure and Projects Authority. The latest publication can be found at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/private-finance-initiative-and-private-finance-2-projects-2018-summary-data.

5 Jun 2019, 4:29 p.m. Public Sector: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what criteria his Department uses to monitor progress against the Government's target of releasing surplus public sector land for at least 160,000 homes.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Public Land for Housing Programme Handbook (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/public-land-for-housing-programme-2015-to-2020-handbook) sets out the approach for monitoring the progress of the release of land. In order for a site to contribute to the 160,000 homes target it must provide evidence against the following criteria:

1. A conditional contract, development agreement or building licence with a private sector partner, housing association/registered provider or local authority (for the purpose of house building) is signed or freehold transfer takes place (whichever is sooner) and;

2. There is planning certainty that the site will be developed for housing.

5 Jun 2019, 9:51 a.m. One Public Estate Programme: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants work on the One Public Estate programme; and what the staffing budget is for that programme.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

One Public Estate is a programme delivered in partnership by the Office of Government
Property, within Cabinet Office, and the Local Government Association. The programme
currently employs 29 members of staff across the two organisations

The Office of Government Property employs 12 civil servants within the One Public Estate
programme, of which two are employed at 0.5 full time equivalent (FTE), equating to a total of 11 FTE posts. In addition, the programme is currently recruiting two vacant Office of Government Property posts.

The total staffing and IT costs for the One Public Estate programme in 2018/19 were
£1,882,195. The total staffing budget for 2019/20 is in the process of being confirmed.

5 Jun 2019, 9:51 a.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 May 2019 to Question 254140, how many instances there have been of consultant lobbying firms listing a code of conduct in their entry to the Register that have failed to meet the test that the code is relevant, as defined by the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 established it is the role of the Registrar to keep and publish the Registrar of consultant lobbyists, in which third party lobbyists declare the names of their clients, and whether or not they subscribe to a relevant code of conduct.

The Registrar has a duty to monitor compliance, and the power to undertake enforcement action against non-compliance. Therefore, it is for the Registrar to determine whether to launch any consultation into codes of conduct and the scope of such a consultation. I understand the Registrar is currently finalising the exact scope of the proposed consultation and will publish further details on the ORCL website when the consultation is launched.

It is also for the independent Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to determine whether a code of conduct a registrant wishes to declare on the Register is 'relevant'. It is for the Registrar to determine whether to make known information about where a code of conduct has failed to meet the test of relevance, and such queries should be directed towards the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists.

5 Jun 2019, 9:51 a.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 May 2019 to Question 254140, for what reasons the Registrar is launching a consultation on codes of conduct.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 established it is the role of the Registrar to keep and publish the Registrar of consultant lobbyists, in which third party lobbyists declare the names of their clients, and whether or not they subscribe to a relevant code of conduct.

The Registrar has a duty to monitor compliance, and the power to undertake enforcement action against non-compliance. Therefore, it is for the Registrar to determine whether to launch any consultation into codes of conduct and the scope of such a consultation. I understand the Registrar is currently finalising the exact scope of the proposed consultation and will publish further details on the ORCL website when the consultation is launched.

It is also for the independent Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to determine whether a code of conduct a registrant wishes to declare on the Register is 'relevant'. It is for the Registrar to determine whether to make known information about where a code of conduct has failed to meet the test of relevance, and such queries should be directed towards the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists.

5 Jun 2019, 9:51 a.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 May 2019 to Question 254140, what the scope will be of the consultation launched by the Registrar into codes of conduct.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 established it is the role of the Registrar to keep and publish the Registrar of consultant lobbyists, in which third party lobbyists declare the names of their clients, and whether or not they subscribe to a relevant code of conduct.

The Registrar has a duty to monitor compliance, and the power to undertake enforcement action against non-compliance. Therefore, it is for the Registrar to determine whether to launch any consultation into codes of conduct and the scope of such a consultation. I understand the Registrar is currently finalising the exact scope of the proposed consultation and will publish further details on the ORCL website when the consultation is launched.

It is also for the independent Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to determine whether a code of conduct a registrant wishes to declare on the Register is 'relevant'. It is for the Registrar to determine whether to make known information about where a code of conduct has failed to meet the test of relevance, and such queries should be directed towards the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists.

4 Jun 2019, 9:13 a.m. Cabinet Office: Departmental Responsibilities Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish a list of the guidance and regulations that his Department has issued across Government that are active.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The guidance and regulations documents that have been issued and published by Cabinet Office can be found at GOV.UK.

30 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his Departments policy is on providing prospective partners different EOI submission dates for the opportunity to partner the National College Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College of Creative Industries (NCCI) has undertaken a structure and prospects appraisal to identify potential partners. Submission dates were set so that every prospective partner had the same opportunity: 5 working days to submit their expression of interest to the NCCI.

NCCI has 6 studio spaces which are shared between the learners and commercial clients on a timetable which enables training and work experience for the learners and a commercial space for the local community and commercial clients. The hire of studio spaces is part of the income that the college receives, along with the funding for students and the levy payments from employers for apprentices.

A process evaluation of the National College programme, including NCCI, is underway and is due to be published by the end of the year.

Data supplied by the college’s own records shows that all learners (167 learners over the last 12 months, although the breakdown data by month is not available) have undertaken work-based learning opportunities on commercial projects as an essential component of their qualifications. To clarify, the college is based in the Backstage Centre, which is a commercial production, rehearsal and training venue owned by the college.

30 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the studio space occupied by the National College of Creative Industries (a) is hired out to commercial clients and (b) comprises an income-generating business.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College of Creative Industries (NCCI) has undertaken a structure and prospects appraisal to identify potential partners. Submission dates were set so that every prospective partner had the same opportunity: 5 working days to submit their expression of interest to the NCCI.

NCCI has 6 studio spaces which are shared between the learners and commercial clients on a timetable which enables training and work experience for the learners and a commercial space for the local community and commercial clients. The hire of studio spaces is part of the income that the college receives, along with the funding for students and the levy payments from employers for apprentices.

A process evaluation of the National College programme, including NCCI, is underway and is due to be published by the end of the year.

Data supplied by the college’s own records shows that all learners (167 learners over the last 12 months, although the breakdown data by month is not available) have undertaken work-based learning opportunities on commercial projects as an essential component of their qualifications. To clarify, the college is based in the Backstage Centre, which is a commercial production, rehearsal and training venue owned by the college.

30 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will commission a review of the (a) effectiveness and (b) value for money of the National College of Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College of Creative Industries (NCCI) has undertaken a structure and prospects appraisal to identify potential partners. Submission dates were set so that every prospective partner had the same opportunity: 5 working days to submit their expression of interest to the NCCI.

NCCI has 6 studio spaces which are shared between the learners and commercial clients on a timetable which enables training and work experience for the learners and a commercial space for the local community and commercial clients. The hire of studio spaces is part of the income that the college receives, along with the funding for students and the levy payments from employers for apprentices.

A process evaluation of the National College programme, including NCCI, is underway and is due to be published by the end of the year.

Data supplied by the college’s own records shows that all learners (167 learners over the last 12 months, although the breakdown data by month is not available) have undertaken work-based learning opportunities on commercial projects as an essential component of their qualifications. To clarify, the college is based in the Backstage Centre, which is a commercial production, rehearsal and training venue owned by the college.

30 May 2019, 3:22 p.m. Backstage Centre: Work Experience Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students have undertaken work-based learning opportunities on commercial projects at The Backstage Centre in each of the last 12 months.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College of Creative Industries (NCCI) has undertaken a structure and prospects appraisal to identify potential partners. Submission dates were set so that every prospective partner had the same opportunity: 5 working days to submit their expression of interest to the NCCI.

NCCI has 6 studio spaces which are shared between the learners and commercial clients on a timetable which enables training and work experience for the learners and a commercial space for the local community and commercial clients. The hire of studio spaces is part of the income that the college receives, along with the funding for students and the levy payments from employers for apprentices.

A process evaluation of the National College programme, including NCCI, is underway and is due to be published by the end of the year.

Data supplied by the college’s own records shows that all learners (167 learners over the last 12 months, although the breakdown data by month is not available) have undertaken work-based learning opportunities on commercial projects as an essential component of their qualifications. To clarify, the college is based in the Backstage Centre, which is a commercial production, rehearsal and training venue owned by the college.

24 May 2019, 11:53 a.m. Cabinet: Ministerial Responsibility Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the effect of one person occupying both the roles of National Security Adviser and Cabinet Secretary on the effectiveness of those roles.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Sir Mark Sedwill has been operating successfully as Cabinet Secretary since June 2017 and has the full confidence of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. His responsibilities incorporate those he exercised as National Security Adviser and, like his predecessors, those of the Head of the Civil Service.

23 May 2019, 4:58 p.m. Cybercrime: Public Appointments Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department made of the viability of appointing an individual with appropriate skills and experience from within the civil service before the role of Principal Cyber Security Risk Consultant was externally advertised.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Principal Cyber Security Risk Consultant is a highly specialised role focussed on the information and cyber security of the digital services GDS builds, operates and uses.

This is an interim role of 12 months. There are very few specialists able to provide the required skills and they are in high demand across HMG and the Financial Services sector on an interim basis.

After careful consideration, GDS determined that the variable nature of this work was better suited to a consultant.

23 May 2019, 1:43 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the National Audit Office's 2 May 2019 report entitled Investigation into the government’s land disposal strategy and programmes, for what reasons 176 sites from the government estate were disposed of for £1 or less.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The National Audit Office investigation into the government's land disposal strategy and programmes referenced 176 sites which were sold since 2015 for £1 or less. Details of each of these sites are already published on GOV.UK in annual Transparency Reports listing all Government land sales. The April 2018 publication reports on sales in 2015/16 and 2016/17. The January 2019 publication reports on sales in 2017/18. The common reasons for sales at £1 or less are:

  • sites where costs of remediation (for example, decontamination) are involved;
  • sites which are narrow strips of land that have no other use or value; and
  • the sale of a lease which contains a clause allowing the purchaser to buy the freehold for £1 after a set period or once certain conditions have been met

Of the 176 sites disposed of for £1 or less, 160 were owned by Homes England. Homes England inherited a number of sites from predecessor organisations which were not viable for development. Disposing of these is helping to reduce the liability of holding costs for Government.

Departments disposing of surplus land must do so in line with Managing Public Money and wider disposals guidance. They should get a Market Valuation, and are restricted from selling at lower value than a site is worth.

23 May 2019, 1:43 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the National Audit Office's 2 May 2019 report entitled Investigation into the Government’s land disposal strategy and programmes, if he will publish the 176 sites that were disposed of for £1 or less from the government estate.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The National Audit Office investigation into the government's land disposal strategy and programmes referenced 176 sites which were sold since 2015 for £1 or less. Details of each of these sites are already published on GOV.UK in annual Transparency Reports listing all Government land sales. The April 2018 publication reports on sales in 2015/16 and 2016/17. The January 2019 publication reports on sales in 2017/18. The common reasons for sales at £1 or less are:

  • sites where costs of remediation (for example, decontamination) are involved;
  • sites which are narrow strips of land that have no other use or value; and
  • the sale of a lease which contains a clause allowing the purchaser to buy the freehold for £1 after a set period or once certain conditions have been met

Of the 176 sites disposed of for £1 or less, 160 were owned by Homes England. Homes England inherited a number of sites from predecessor organisations which were not viable for development. Disposing of these is helping to reduce the liability of holding costs for Government.

Departments disposing of surplus land must do so in line with Managing Public Money and wider disposals guidance. They should get a Market Valuation, and are restricted from selling at lower value than a site is worth.

22 May 2019, 3:44 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many sites identified for sale from the government estate are currently in use.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Due to data protection reasons Cabinet Office cannot publish the names of individual purchasers of each Government site sold. We also do not monitor the number of sites reported as surplus which are still currently in operational use.

22 May 2019, 3:43 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the top ten firms by value of sales that have purchased government land and property since 2010.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Due to data protection reasons Cabinet Office cannot publish the names of individual purchasers of each Government site sold. We also do not monitor the number of sites reported as surplus which are still currently in operational use.

22 May 2019, 3:13 p.m. Government Departments: Property Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria are used to evaluate whether Government-owned land and property should be made available for purchase.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Where a Government asset no longer serves a public purpose, or that purpose can be
more efficiently realised through its transfer to private or non-government hands, a
Government Department or Arm’s Length Body may choose to sell that asset

The disposal of individual sites is a matter for each Department or Body. It is the role of the
Accounting Officer to ensure this represents value for money and is achieved in line with the Green Book, Managing Public Money and the Guide for Disposal of Surplus Land.

Departments are expected to identify land as surplus where it is no longer required for operational
purposes. Managing Public Money states that Departments should dispose of surplus sites within 3
years. In 2017 the Office of Government Property published the Guide for the Disposal of Surplus
Land, providing detailed guidance on how to plan for and execute land disposals

As part of the Government Estate Strategy 2018, the Office of Government is leading on a
Government commitment to release £5 billion land and property in 2015 - 2020.

22 May 2019, 11 a.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many workers hired through supplier resource are working on IT projects across government.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

GDS and the Cabinet Office do not hold data relating to the number of cross-government IT staff hired through supplier resource.

22 May 2019, 10:59 a.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many contingent workers are working on IT projects across government.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not hold this information. Workforce planning is primarily the responsibility of each department, to determine based on their individual operational and policy requirements.

21 May 2019, 4:37 p.m. Cabinet Office: Cybercrime Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many members of staff in his Department work on cyber security issues.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

I shall write to the honourable member with a breakdown and place a copy in the Library of both Houses ahead of Whitsun Recess.

21 May 2019, 4:10 p.m. Cabinet Office: Public Appointments Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons his Department determined that hiring a principal cyber security risk consultant was necessary.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government Digital Service (GDS) Information Assurance (IA) Team focuses on risks to the digital services that GDS builds and uses, as well as the data those services handle. GDS and Cabinet Office require specialist security support in the building and running of our own digital products and internal operations. This role will provide subject matter expertise for cyber and information security risk assessment.

21 May 2019, 4:07 p.m. Cabinet Office: Public Appointments Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what relationship the incoming Principal Cyber Security Risk Consultant will have with the National Cyber Security Centre.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

There is no direct relationship. This post is focussed on the information and cyber security of the digital services GDS builds, operates and uses. The Government has taken steps to align cyber security programmes across Government, which include

the creation of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC).

21 May 2019, 4:06 p.m. Cabinet Office: Public Appointments Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who the incoming Principal Cyber Security Risk Consultant will report to within the Cabinet Office.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The post holder will report to the Head of Information Services, Government Digital Service.

21 May 2019, 3:36 p.m. National Security Council: Disclosure of Information Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions the Cabinet Secretary has had with the representatives of the Metropolitan police on the alleged leak of information from a meeting of the National Security Council.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The Cabinet Office has cooperated fully on the leak of information from the NSC with the Metropolitan Police, who are operationally independent of Government. As made clear in his statement of the 4th May Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu stated that he had ‘spoken to the Cabinet Office’ and that he was ‘satisfied that the disclosure did not amount to a criminal offence… no crime has been committed and this is not a matter for the police’

20 May 2019, 4:18 p.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if his Department will conduct a review of the codes of conduct accepted by the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists in light of the number of registrants declaring their own self-authored code.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists is an independent office holder who is responsible for maintaining and updating the lobbying register; registrants are required to state whether they comply with a code of conduct and in accordance with the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014, the Registrar must be able to inspect any such code of conduct. The Transparency of Lobbying Act defines a “relevant” code of conduct as one which “governs the carrying on the business of consultant lobbying” and it is for the Registrar to determine whether a Code of Conduct meets this test.

The Department does not intend to undertake a review of the codes of conduct submitted by those on the register to the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists. It is for the independent Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to determine whether a code of conduct that a registrant wishes to declare on the Register is 'relevant'.

I understand that the new Registrar will shortly launch a consultation on codes of conduct.

20 May 2019, 4:17 p.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether staff at the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists are instructed to check and assess the relevancy of codes of conduct that registrants declare.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists is an independent office holder who is responsible for maintaining and updating the lobbying register; registrants are required to state whether they comply with a code of conduct and in accordance with the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014, the Registrar must be able to inspect any such code of conduct. The Transparency of Lobbying Act defines a “relevant” code of conduct as one which “governs the carrying on the business of consultant lobbying” and it is for the Registrar to determine whether a Code of Conduct meets this test.

The Department does not intend to undertake a review of the codes of conduct submitted by those on the register to the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists. It is for the independent Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to determine whether a code of conduct that a registrant wishes to declare on the Register is 'relevant'.

I understand that the new Registrar will shortly launch a consultation on codes of conduct.

20 May 2019, 3:29 p.m. Government Departments: Land Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total value is of land and property sold by the Government since 2010.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Government raised over £3.46 billion from sales of land and property between April 2010 and March 2018.

Departments are expected to identify land as surplus where it is no longer required for operational purposes. Managing Public Money states that Departments should dispose of surplus sites within 3 years. In 2017 the Office of Government Property published the Guide for the Disposal of Surplus Land, providing detailed guidance on how to plan for and execute land disposals.

As part of the Government Estate Strategy 2018, the Office of Government is leading on a Government commitment to release £5 billion land and property in 2015 - 2020.

9 May 2019, 3:03 p.m. London Capital and Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what role his Department will play in the investigation announced by the Economic Secretary on 1 April 2019 into the events at London Capital & Finance and the circumstances surrounding them.

Answer (John Glen)

This Government takes the failure of London Capital & Finance (LCF) and its impact on consumers very seriously. HM Treasury officials have been in communication with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) regarding LCF since January 2019. I wrote to the FCA on its role in regulating LCF via the following letter of 1 April 2019:

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/EST-to-Charles-Randell-FCA-010419.pdf

In this letter, I announced that I would order an investigation into the failure of LCF, using Treasury powers under section 77 of the Financial Services Act 2012. I want to make sure we have the strongest and safest financial system possible. By ordering this investigation, we will better understand the circumstances around the collapse of LCF and make sure we are properly protecting those who invest their money in the future.

The role of the Treasury in this investigation is set out in sections 77 to 82 of the Financial Services Act 2012. It is essential that the terms of the investigation are set in a way that ensures these objectives are met and take into account any issues arising from current regulatory and enforcement investigations. HM Treasury officials are working to develop these with the relevant bodies as a matter of priority. Further details on this investigation, including its duration and the reporting arrangements, will be published shortly.

9 May 2019, 3:03 p.m. London Capital and Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the investigation into the events at London Capital and Finance and the circumstances surrounding them announced by the Economic Secretary on 1 April 2019 will be completed; and whether the report of that investigation will be published.

Answer (John Glen)

This Government takes the failure of London Capital & Finance (LCF) and its impact on consumers very seriously. HM Treasury officials have been in communication with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) regarding LCF since January 2019. I wrote to the FCA on its role in regulating LCF via the following letter of 1 April 2019:

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/EST-to-Charles-Randell-FCA-010419.pdf

In this letter, I announced that I would order an investigation into the failure of LCF, using Treasury powers under section 77 of the Financial Services Act 2012. I want to make sure we have the strongest and safest financial system possible. By ordering this investigation, we will better understand the circumstances around the collapse of LCF and make sure we are properly protecting those who invest their money in the future.

The role of the Treasury in this investigation is set out in sections 77 to 82 of the Financial Services Act 2012. It is essential that the terms of the investigation are set in a way that ensures these objectives are met and take into account any issues arising from current regulatory and enforcement investigations. HM Treasury officials are working to develop these with the relevant bodies as a matter of priority. Further details on this investigation, including its duration and the reporting arrangements, will be published shortly.

9 May 2019, 3:03 p.m. London Capital and Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when his Department first had discussions with the Financial Conduct Authority on its performance in regulating the activity of London Finance and Capital.

Answer (John Glen)

This Government takes the failure of London Capital & Finance (LCF) and its impact on consumers very seriously. HM Treasury officials have been in communication with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) regarding LCF since January 2019. I wrote to the FCA on its role in regulating LCF via the following letter of 1 April 2019:

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/EST-to-Charles-Randell-FCA-010419.pdf

In this letter, I announced that I would order an investigation into the failure of LCF, using Treasury powers under section 77 of the Financial Services Act 2012. I want to make sure we have the strongest and safest financial system possible. By ordering this investigation, we will better understand the circumstances around the collapse of LCF and make sure we are properly protecting those who invest their money in the future.

The role of the Treasury in this investigation is set out in sections 77 to 82 of the Financial Services Act 2012. It is essential that the terms of the investigation are set in a way that ensures these objectives are met and take into account any issues arising from current regulatory and enforcement investigations. HM Treasury officials are working to develop these with the relevant bodies as a matter of priority. Further details on this investigation, including its duration and the reporting arrangements, will be published shortly.

1 May 2019, 9:19 a.m. Conflict, Stability and Security Fund Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his oral contribution to the November hearing of the Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy, that he could absolutely provide assurance that money from the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund is not being used to fund activities that might lead to the death of people in other countries, what assessment he has made of whether reports of the use of that funding for specialist anti-terror courts in Pakistan is incompatible with his statement.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) takes its responsibility to do no harm very seriously. All CSSF programmes comply with the UK’s domestic and international human rights obligations and have robust measures in place to protect the human rights of beneficiaries.

CSSF programmes in Pakistan have supported the reform of the criminal justice system, including the investigation and prosecution of serious crimes, in a manner compliant with human rights. For all security and justice programmes, Overseas Security and Justice Assessments (OSJAs) are used as an additional risk management process to assess and to mitigate human rights risks. OSJAs are specifically designed to improve human rights standards and strengthen the rule of law in partner countries. They also help to guide decision makers and Ministers on how to provide security assistance overseas while managing the consequences for human rights.

My Rt. Hon friend, the FCO Minister responsible for South Asia, receives regular updates on the risks associated with the Rule of Law programme’s activities. In addition, I have seen the independent OSJA audit, which included an overview of the Pakistan Rule of Law programme, and am confident that activities have been delivered in a way that is consistent with the UK’s opposition to the death penalty

30 Apr 2019, 3:58 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2019 to Question 234686 on National College Creative Industries: Students, whether his Department's policies are intended to provide equal regional representation in the intake to the National College Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department has not assessed the value for money of the apprenticeship provision of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries. However, as the College is a new institution, the department is working closely with them to monitor and review their progress against their business plan as they become established.

As with all of the National Colleges, the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries aims to have national reach and to attract students from across the country once it has become fully established.

No assessment of effectiveness or value for money has been made of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries with regard to student to staff ratio in 2018 at this time. However, further education colleges and other providers including National Colleges are subject to robust accountability arrangements that promote high standards and continual improvement, ensure value for money and help to inform learner choice.

The government publishes detailed information on the performance of providers including metrics for 16-19 study programmes, qualification achievement rates for learners aged 16 to 19 and over 19, outcome-based success measures for adult learners (based on employment and educational destinations) and employer and learner satisfaction survey results.

30 Apr 2019, 3:58 p.m. National College Creative Industries: Students Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2019 to Question 23468 on National College Creative Industries and with reference to the student to staff ratio in 2018, what assessment he has made of the (a) effectiveness and (b) value for money of staffing for the National College of Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department has not assessed the value for money of the apprenticeship provision of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries. However, as the College is a new institution, the department is working closely with them to monitor and review their progress against their business plan as they become established.

As with all of the National Colleges, the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries aims to have national reach and to attract students from across the country once it has become fully established.

No assessment of effectiveness or value for money has been made of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries with regard to student to staff ratio in 2018 at this time. However, further education colleges and other providers including National Colleges are subject to robust accountability arrangements that promote high standards and continual improvement, ensure value for money and help to inform learner choice.

The government publishes detailed information on the performance of providers including metrics for 16-19 study programmes, qualification achievement rates for learners aged 16 to 19 and over 19, outcome-based success measures for adult learners (based on employment and educational destinations) and employer and learner satisfaction survey results.

30 Apr 2019, 3:58 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2019 to Question 234682 on National College Creative Industries, what criteria his Department uses to assess the value for money of the apprenticeships made available through the National College Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department has not assessed the value for money of the apprenticeship provision of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries. However, as the College is a new institution, the department is working closely with them to monitor and review their progress against their business plan as they become established.

As with all of the National Colleges, the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries aims to have national reach and to attract students from across the country once it has become fully established.

No assessment of effectiveness or value for money has been made of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries with regard to student to staff ratio in 2018 at this time. However, further education colleges and other providers including National Colleges are subject to robust accountability arrangements that promote high standards and continual improvement, ensure value for money and help to inform learner choice.

The government publishes detailed information on the performance of providers including metrics for 16-19 study programmes, qualification achievement rates for learners aged 16 to 19 and over 19, outcome-based success measures for adult learners (based on employment and educational destinations) and employer and learner satisfaction survey results.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234690 on National College Creative Industries, which criteria were specified in the EOI document; and whether those criteria included (a) national and international initiatives, (b) engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience, (c) industry relationships and (d) relationship with the global market place.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234690 on National College Creative Industries, what criteria were used to assess the institutions.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question number 234688 on National College Creative Industries, how many applications for the opportunity to partner the National College Creative Industries have (a) been received and (b) been rejected; and when the application process will close.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234689 on National College Creative Industries, whether other formal or informal processes in addition to public advertising were used to pursue potential partners for the National College of Creative Industries.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234689 on National College Creative Industries, (a) how and (b) when the National College Creative Industries first contacted potential partners.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

30 Apr 2019, 3:56 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2019 to Question 234690 on National College Creative Industries, who was involved in the preparation of the expressions of interest application form for partnerships with the National College of Creative Industries; and who evaluated those applications.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College Creative Industries received 6 Expressions of Interest: 2 were sifted out at the Expression of Interest (EOI) stage, 1 withdrew at the shortlisting stage and 1 was sifted out following the full application stage.

The period to submit an application is now closed and the process is due to be completed in autumn 2019.

We understand that no other formal processes were employed to pursue potential partners, however the college ensured that potential interested parties were made aware of the opportunity that was advertised.

Initial contact was made with potential partners by telephone and in person over a period from 14 January 2019 up until the EOI submission date of 11 February 2019.

The EOI documentation was prepared by the steering group which included college board members with a high level of creative industries experience and Further Education (FE) Commissioner team members with FE leadership experience. The same group evaluated the applications.

The criteria was not explicitly specified in the EOI documentation but they were linked to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries vision which was set out on the front page of the EOI form. The criteria included national initiatives and reach, engagement in the development of professional standards or professional training experience and industry relationships but did not include relationship with the global market place.

5 Apr 2019, 12:34 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Technology Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many people working on the Technology Overhaul programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

​Technology Overhaul is a £120 million Information Technology programme in the Government's major projects portfolio (GMPP), aimed at transforming the way staff across the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and its overseas Posts use technology. There are currently 12 people working as contingent labour, 15 from supplier resources and 6 civil servants working on the programme.

5 Apr 2019, 12:23 p.m. Taxation: Electronic Government Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people are working on the Making Tax Digital for Business programme by (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mel Stride)

As at 28 March 2019, there were 165 civil servants in the core programme team, and another 187 internal supplier resource (who are also civil servants). The programme is further supported by a specialist mix of external IT suppliers (who have assigned 102 people on the project) and contingent labour (of 105 people). These numbers do not include ‘business as usual’ support from Operational staff in HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) e.g. on customer support and compliance.

5 Apr 2019, 12:20 p.m. Future Programme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants working on the Future Locations Programme.

Answer (Mel Stride)

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) Compliance for the Future programme has now closed. During autumn 2018 HMRC undertook a full reprioritisation of their transformation programme to release capacity and capability for EU Exit work. Given its importance to any future EU Exit scenario, HMRC decided to redeploy 170 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of project management and IT professionals from Compliance for the Future into the delivery of the Customs Declaration Service Programme and the Border Systems Programme, to support the prospects of delivery success.

5 Apr 2019, 12:17 p.m. Customs Declaration Services Programme Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants working on the customs declaration services programme.

Answer (Mel Stride)

HMRC currently has working on the Customs Declaration Service Programme; a) 70 contingent labour contractors, b) 466 IT supplier resource and c) 176 civil servants. The number of contractors and IT suppliers working on the programme has varied over time. HMRC only employs contractors when there is a clearly identifiable skills gap that it cannot fill within the existing staff resources at its disposal.

5 Apr 2019, 12:14 p.m. Revenue and Customs: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people working on the Columbus programme, formerly the Aspire Replacement Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The Columbus Programme has 12.5 people working on it comprising 7 Civil Servants, 1.5 contractors, 3 contingent labour and 1 supplier.

These figures are given in full time equivalents (FTE). Actual headcount is 13 people.

5 Apr 2019, 12:06 p.m. Taxation: Electronic Government Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants working on the making tax digital for individuals programme.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The Making Tax Digital for Individuals programme was officially closed in May 2018. However, it was recognised that a number of projects within that programme needed to be completed to avoid any potential operational issues for HMRC. The teams and the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) number of personnel that hold responsibility for the work in this area can be seen in the table below:

Team

Civil Servants

Contingent Labour

Suppliers

Project Team

9

0

0

Policy and Design Team

7.5

0

0

Technical and Digital Team

8.6

0.1

0

Suppliers

0

0

47

5 Apr 2019, 11:41 a.m. Databases: Telecommunications Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people who are working on the Communications Capabilities Development Programme by (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Communications Capabilities Development (CCD) programme closed on 31 March 2018.

The Communications Data and Lawful Intercept (CDLI) Service Partnership has been established across a number of Government Organisations to sustain and develop capabilities on an enduring basis for a wide range of stakeholders.

As of 1 April 2019 85 Civil Servants in the Home Office are directly contributing to the CDLI Service Partnership.

5 Apr 2019, 9:49 a.m. Police: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on the national law enforcement data programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The number of people working on the National Law Enforcement Data programme is made up of:
(a) contingent labour = 4
(b) supplier resource = 172
(c) civil servants = 34
(Accurate as of 1 April 2019)

The figures provided are based on the resource profile for the current stage of delivery. The resource profile of the programme will flex over time based on its delivery plan.

4 Apr 2019, 4:43 p.m. Home Office: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people working on the Technology Platforms for Tomorrow programme broken down by (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The number of people working on the Technology Platforms for Tomorrow Programme is made up of (a) 0 contingent labour (b) 53 supplier resources (c) 17 Civil Servants.

4 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people are working on the NHS.UK programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital/NHS Business Services Authority employees2

Civil servants

NHS.UK programme

9

n/a

125

0

NHS e-Referral Service

2

3

39

0

IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme

10

n/a

19

0

Source: NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority

Notes:

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources. The primary supplier for the NHS e-Referral Service provides three staff who work on site.

2NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority employees are public servants employed on NHS terms and conditions. The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital and the NHS Business Services Authority.

The figures for the NHS.UK programme and the NHS e-Referral Service represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019, to the nearest whole number.

The IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme is being delivered by the NHS Business Services Authority. The figures for this programme represent resources dedicated to the delivery of the programme and do not include NHS Business Services Authority staff who supplement delivery with specific skills. Figures for continent labour were correct at the end of March 2019. From 1 April 2019, contingent labour decreases to four, as a result of the programme moving out of the procurement/design phase and into delivery.

4 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the NHS e-Referral Service are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital/NHS Business Services Authority employees2

Civil servants

NHS.UK programme

9

n/a

125

0

NHS e-Referral Service

2

3

39

0

IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme

10

n/a

19

0

Source: NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority

Notes:

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources. The primary supplier for the NHS e-Referral Service provides three staff who work on site.

2NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority employees are public servants employed on NHS terms and conditions. The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital and the NHS Business Services Authority.

The figures for the NHS.UK programme and the NHS e-Referral Service represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019, to the nearest whole number.

The IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme is being delivered by the NHS Business Services Authority. The figures for this programme represent resources dedicated to the delivery of the programme and do not include NHS Business Services Authority staff who supplement delivery with specific skills. Figures for continent labour were correct at the end of March 2019. From 1 April 2019, contingent labour decreases to four, as a result of the programme moving out of the procurement/design phase and into delivery.

4 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the IT Infrastructure Sourcing Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital/NHS Business Services Authority employees2

Civil servants

NHS.UK programme

9

n/a

125

0

NHS e-Referral Service

2

3

39

0

IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme

10

n/a

19

0

Source: NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority

Notes:

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources. The primary supplier for the NHS e-Referral Service provides three staff who work on site.

2NHS Digital and NHS Business Services Authority employees are public servants employed on NHS terms and conditions. The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital and the NHS Business Services Authority.

The figures for the NHS.UK programme and the NHS e-Referral Service represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019, to the nearest whole number.

The IT Infrastructure Sourcing programme is being delivered by the NHS Business Services Authority. The figures for this programme represent resources dedicated to the delivery of the programme and do not include NHS Business Services Authority staff who supplement delivery with specific skills. Figures for continent labour were correct at the end of March 2019. From 1 April 2019, contingent labour decreases to four, as a result of the programme moving out of the procurement/design phase and into delivery.

4 Apr 2019, 12:08 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on developing NCA Transformation Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

In response to the question, the number of people working on developing the NCA Transformation programme are 155 civil servants, 104 professional services and 38 contingent labour. This is based on the Resource Model as of 27/03/2019.

3 Apr 2019, 4:32 p.m. Occupational Pensions Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people working on the Automatic Enrolment Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Guy Opperman)

Automatic Enrolment has transformed workplace pension’s savings. To date, in excess of 10million eligible workers have been automatically enrolled, by over 1.4million employers. A link to the 2017 Automatic Enrolment Review can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/668971/automatic-enrolment-review-2017-maintaining-the-momentum.PDF

The current resourcing is 26 full time equivalent civil servants and this headcount consists of programme management, policy, analytical and stakeholder partnering expertise.

3 Apr 2019, 2:01 p.m. Broadband Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people working on the broadband delivery programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Margot James)

We do not hold specific data as to how many people are currently working on delivering broadband across the areas as stated in the question. Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) also works with several other Government departments on delivering broadband including HM Treasury, Department of Education, Department for Health and Social Care, Department for Transport, DEFRA and BEIS plus arms length bodies such as Ofcom.

3 Apr 2019, 2:01 p.m. Radio Frequencies Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people working on the 700 MHz Clearance Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Margot James)

We do not hold specific data as to how many people are currently working on delivering broadband across the areas as stated in the question. Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) also works with several other Government departments on delivering broadband including HM Treasury, Department of Education, Department for Health and Social Care, Department for Transport, DEFRA and BEIS plus arms length bodies such as Ofcom.

3 Apr 2019, 1:03 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, for what reason potential changes are being proposed to phase 2b of the High Speed Two route.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

3 Apr 2019, 1:03 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, what are the scale of the changes proposed in the potential changes to phase 2b of the High Speed Two route.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

3 Apr 2019, 11:24 a.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the CSC Local Service Provider Delivery Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital employees2

Civil servants

CSC Local Service Provider Delivery programme

0

n/a

8

0

NHSmail 2 programme

3

n/a

22

0

Data Processing Services (formerly National Data Services Development programme)

3

n/a

35

0

Health and Social Care Network

7

n/a

52

0

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

The figures represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019 (to the nearest whole number).

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources.

2NHS Digital employees are public servants employed on National Health Service terms and conditions.

The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital.

3 Apr 2019, 11:24 a.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the NHSmail 2 programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital employees2

Civil servants

CSC Local Service Provider Delivery programme

0

n/a

8

0

NHSmail 2 programme

3

n/a

22

0

Data Processing Services (formerly National Data Services Development programme)

3

n/a

35

0

Health and Social Care Network

7

n/a

52

0

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

The figures represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019 (to the nearest whole number).

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources.

2NHS Digital employees are public servants employed on National Health Service terms and conditions.

The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital.

3 Apr 2019, 11:24 a.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the National Data Services Development Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital employees2

Civil servants

CSC Local Service Provider Delivery programme

0

n/a

8

0

NHSmail 2 programme

3

n/a

22

0

Data Processing Services (formerly National Data Services Development programme)

3

n/a

35

0

Health and Social Care Network

7

n/a

52

0

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

The figures represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019 (to the nearest whole number).

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources.

2NHS Digital employees are public servants employed on National Health Service terms and conditions.

The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital.

3 Apr 2019, 11:24 a.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the Health and Social Care Network are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Programme

Contingent labour

Supplier resource1

NHS Digital employees2

Civil servants

CSC Local Service Provider Delivery programme

0

n/a

8

0

NHSmail 2 programme

3

n/a

22

0

Data Processing Services (formerly National Data Services Development programme)

3

n/a

35

0

Health and Social Care Network

7

n/a

52

0

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

The figures represent full time equivalents assigned to the programme or service in March 2019 (to the nearest whole number).

1Contracts with suppliers are for the delivery of a service rather than resources.

2NHS Digital employees are public servants employed on National Health Service terms and conditions.

The figures include those staff employed on a permanent or fixed term basis within NHS Digital.

2 Apr 2019, 7:50 p.m. City Remembrancers Office Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what information he holds on which Bills the City Remembrancer has been consulted on in each year since 2010.

Answer (Tom Brake)

Discussions have taken place between officials in the House of Commons Service and the Remembrancer about the following Bills on the same basis that discussions take place as a matter of course between those officials and the promoters of Private Bills and their Parliamentary Agent: The City of London (Various Powers) Bill and the City of London Corporation (Open Spaces) Bill. The City of London (Various Powers) Bill proceedings of the committee hearings may be viewed here:

https://services.parliament.uk/Bills/2010-12/cityoflondonvariouspowershl/committees/houseofcommonsunopposedbillcommitteeonthecityoflondonvariouspowersbillhl201314.html

The City of London Corporation (Open Spaces) Bill proceedings may be viewed here:

https://services.parliament.uk/Bills/2017-19/cityoflondoncorporationopenspaces/committees/houseofcommonsopposedbillcommitteeonthecityoflondoncorporationopenspacesbill201617.html

2 Apr 2019, 7:43 p.m. City Remembrancers Office Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what information he holds on how many times the City Remembrancer has been consulted on Bills in each year since 2010.

Answer (Tom Brake)

The House of Commons Commission does not hold such records. The House of Commons does not initiate Bills, and as such does not consult others on Bills. Procedural and other advice about the passage of Bills may be sought from officials of the House of Commons by the Remembrancer in the same way as by other Roll A Parliamentary Agents.

2 Apr 2019, 7:40 p.m. City Remembrancers Office Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what information he holds on the number of times the City Remembrancer has met with hon. Members in each year since 2010.

Answer (Tom Brake)

The House of Commons Commission does not hold records on such meetings, other than meetings of Committees on Private Bills attended by the Remembrancer.

The City Remembrancer has been involved in the promotion of two private bills since 2010 on behalf of the City of London: City of London (Various Powers) Bill in 2013 and the City of London Corporation (Open Spaces) Bill in 2017. 

The City of London (Various Powers) Bill was referred to an unopposed bill committee which met on 16 July 2013. The Committee members were Mr Lindsay Hoyle, Mr Adrian Bailey, Sir Peter Bottomley, Teresa Pearce and Craig Whittaker. The proceedings of the committee hearings may be viewed here:

https://services.parliament.uk/Bills/2010-12/cityoflondonvariouspowershl/committees/houseofcommonsunopposedbillcommitteeonthecityoflondonvariouspowersbillhl201314.html

The City of London Corporation (Open Spaces) Bill opposed bill committee comprised Melanie Onn, Kevin Hollinrake, Julian Knight and Marie Rimmer and met on 15 and 22 November 2017. The proceedings of the committee may be viewed here:

https://services.parliament.uk/Bills/2017-19/cityoflondoncorporationopenspaces/committees/houseofcommonsopposedbillcommitteeonthecityoflondoncorporationopenspacesbill201617.html

2 Apr 2019, 4:52 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As at 27th March 2019 there are (a) 33 contingent labour, (b) supplier resource we cannot provide a response to this because our Suppliers provide services in a number of ways and as we are contracting for outcomes, the Supplier is responsible for assessing how they resource up to deliver this and (c) 356 civil servants currently working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform.

There is no allocation of workforce specific to Reform Re-provisioning unless by Re-provisioning the reference is to the Reform Programme as a whole in which case the above answers apply.

2 Apr 2019, 4:52 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform Re-provisioning are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As at 27th March 2019 there are (a) 33 contingent labour, (b) supplier resource we cannot provide a response to this because our Suppliers provide services in a number of ways and as we are contracting for outcomes, the Supplier is responsible for assessing how they resource up to deliver this and (c) 356 civil servants currently working on developing HM Courts & Tribunals Service Reform.

There is no allocation of workforce specific to Reform Re-provisioning unless by Re-provisioning the reference is to the Reform Programme as a whole in which case the above answers apply.

2 Apr 2019, 4:43 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on developing the IT Transformation Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The number of people working on the Technology Platforms for Tomorrow Programme is made up of (a) 0 contingent labour (b) 53 supplier resources (c) 17 civil servants

2 Apr 2019, 3:50 p.m. NHS: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people working on the Procurement Transformation Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

The numbers of contingent labour working on the Procurement Transformation Programme have fluctuated over the lifecycle of the programme in line with the different levels of requirements needed for procurement work and then moving into transition, with delivery and specific project and contractual milestones needing specialist skillsets. Current contingent labour numbers are 74 as at 29 March 2019.

Supplier resource is agreed based on work packages and costs, not headcount. There are multiple suppliers including public sector bodies and they are required to deliver the work on time and to agreed contractual cost. The programme has no view on how many resources the supplier requires to complete the work.

The programme currently has 11 civil servants working in key positions on the programme with programme director and Senior Responsible Officer included in these numbers as at 29 March 2019.

2 Apr 2019, 3:50 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on developing Digital Services at the Border are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The exact number of contingent labour, supplier resource and Civil Service staff within this programme varies dependent on the specific expertise required during the lifecycle of the programme. Contingent labour and supplier resource staff are used to provide specific, time-limited expertise, from a pool of specialists offering skills that the Civil Service can draw from when and as needed, rather than employing these specialists on a permanent basis including during periods when their skills are not needed.

2 Apr 2019, 3:43 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on the Smarter Working Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Smarter Working Programme closed at the end of July 2018. All staff working on the programme have now been redeployed.

2 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, whether the potential changes to phase 2b of the High Speed Two route will affect the (a) eastern leg and (b) western leg of that route.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

2 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, what are the potential changes to phase 2b of the High Speed Two route.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

2 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line: Hemsworth Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, whether the potential changes to phase b of the High Speed Two route will affect (a) residents, (b) property, (c) business and (d) transport links in Hemsworth constituency.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

2 Apr 2019, 2:51 p.m. High Speed 2 Railway Line Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the letter of 20 March 2019 from the Prime Minister to Midland Connect, whether details of the potential changes to phase 2b of the High Speed Two route are publicly available.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

As part of the process to prepare the legislation for Phase 2b we intend to consult on aspects of the HS2 Phase 2b plans this year to inform our plans. This work is ongoing and as changes are ready, they will be published in consultations where appropriate, during the course of the year.

2 Apr 2019, 1:12 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing the Future IT Sourcing Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Technology Transformation Programme, formerly known as Future IT Sourcing Programme, closed in November 2018 and thus has no staff attached to it. The programme delivered updated hardware and software to approximately 40,000 users within the MoJ.

2 Apr 2019, 12:42 p.m. Cabinet Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people working on developing the Office for National Statistics Census Transformation Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

2 Apr 2019, 12:21 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people working on the Local Land Charges Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

As of 26th March, the Programme has the following full-time equivalents:

Contingent Labour – 2

Supplier Resource – 59

Civil Servants - 66.

2 Apr 2019, 10:39 a.m. Heathrow Airport Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people working on the airport capacity programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Heathrow Expansion Programme (formerly known as the Airport Capacity Programme) has the equivalent of 55.3 full time civil servants currently working on the programme. The programme does not currently employ any contingent labour.

The civil servant team is supported by a number of suppliers that support the Government on a range of legal, commercial and financial matters.

1 Apr 2019, 4:47 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing Criminal Justice System Common Platform are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

As at 27 March 2019, HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) employed

(a) 8 contingent labour.

(b) You asked us to provide you with the amount of supplier resource working on reform. We currently contract with a number of suppliers to provide service to us in a number of different ways. Predominantly we contract with suppliers for outcome based deliverables and as such the supplier is responsible for assessing how many resources they need to deliver. This can be flexed and therefore we are unable to provide you with an exact number of supplier resources working across the Crime Programme.

(c) 60 civil servants are currently working on developing the Crime Programme.

1 Apr 2019, 3:06 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people working on the Defra Unity Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

As of 27 March 2019 the Defra Unity Programme employed:

(a) Contingent Labour = 49.40 FTE

(b) Supplier Resource 6.90 FTE

(c) Civil Servants = 3.90 FTE

29 Mar 2019, 2:27 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people working on GOV UK Verify are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As of March 2019, there are a) 9.5 contingent labour and c) 76.1 civil servants (in Full Time Equivalent Values). There is currently no supplier resource.

29 Mar 2019, 2:21 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people are on the Common Technology Services Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As of March 2019, there are a) 4.0 contingent labour, b) 5.6 supplier resource and c) 6.6 civil servants (in Full Time Equivalent Values).

29 Mar 2019, 2:16 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people working on the Government as a platform programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As of March 2019, there are a) 3.0 contingent labour, b) 1.0 supplier resource and c) 84.7 civil servants (in Full Time Equivalent Values)

29 Mar 2019, 2:11 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people working on the ISSC2 are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Within the Cabinet Office Government Shared Services team, approximately 22 civil servants and 2.6 contractors support the delivery of technological, commercial and service aspects of ISSC2. We do not collect data on supplier side resource.

29 Mar 2019, 2:06 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on New Style of Information Technology (Base) are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Ministry of Defence has the following personnel working on New Style of Information Technology (Base):

17 people are contingent labour and 59 people are civil servants.

Information on supplier resource could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

29 Mar 2019, 2:05 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on developing the Future IT Sourcing Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Ministry of Defence does not recognise the term 'Future IT Sourcing' Programme.

29 Mar 2019, 2:04 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on developing New Style of Information Technology Deployed are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Ministry of Defence has the following personnel developing New Style of Information Technology Deployed:

  • 77 people are contingent labour
  • 133 people are supplier resource
  • 16 people are civil servants
29 Mar 2019, 2:04 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on developing Contracting, Purchasing and Finance are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

At present there are nine civil servants and one supplier resource working on developing the latest release of Contracting, Purchasing & Finance. There is no contingent labour at this time.

28 Mar 2019, 6:38 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing the Criminal Justice System Exchange Re-provisioning programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Criminal Justice System Exchange Re-provisioning programme completed in September 2017. There are no staff working on this programme.

28 Mar 2019, 5:27 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people working on developing the NOMS Digital Transformation Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The NOMS Digital Transformation Programme (actually known as the NOMS Digital and Change Programme) constituted of a number of parts, the final one of which, Digital Prisons, was officially confirmed as closed down by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) in February 2019. There are no staff currently working on this programme.

28 Mar 2019, 5:04 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people working on the FOXHOUND Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

FOXHOUND is a Cabinet Office-led, cross-government IT programme to develop and deploy a new secure capability for managing sensitive information, including that which is classified up to and at SECRET. As a classified programme it would not be appropriate to provide details of the scale and resource the Programme engages. That said, the Programme is led by civil servants and the capability has been developed in-house, drawing on contractor resource only where absolutely necessary. The development and delivery costs are competitive set against the more traditional outsourcing approach.

28 Mar 2019, 4:17 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on developing the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The number of people working on the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme is (a) contingent labour: 34.2; supplier resource: 126.8; and civil servants: 50.6. The numbers reflect that some individuals do not work full-time.

28 Mar 2019, 3:59 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on developing the Disclosure and Barring Service are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) publish year-end workforce data in their Annual Reports and Accounts (see link below page 44).

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/726580/DBS_ARA_Annual_Report_2017.18.pdf

(a) Contingent labour - from April 2018 to March 2019 – the DBS employ be-tween 10-15 Full Time Equivalents (FTE).

(b) Supplier Resource – this is a managed service in line with Service Level Agreements, which operates flexibly, depending upon business require-ments.

(c) DBS staff as of the 28th Feb 2019 was 939 FTE. This includes Fixed Term Appointments (FTA) and permanent employees.

Staff at the DBS are known as ‘public servants’ as of the 1st December 2012, when the DBS became a non-departmental public body (NDPB).

28 Mar 2019, 3:56 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on developing MODnet Evolve are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Ministry of Defence has the following personnel developing MODNet Evolve:

  • 2 people are contingent labour
  • 0 people are supplier resource
  • 5 people are civil servants

Please note in addition to the numbers above there are two technical support work packages that support the programme on an outcome only basis. These are not counted as contingent labour as individuals are not paid on a time and materials basis. There are around 26 people that support these work packages.

28 Mar 2019, 3:55 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people working on developing the Wildcat Programme are (a) contingent labour, (b) supplier resource and (c) civil servants.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Wildcat programme is currently in the in-service phase. At present the Wildcat Delivery Team consists of 82 civil servants and one contingent labour resource. It also comprises 440 supplier resources, which includes subcontractors. Project team numbers can fluctuate depending on demand.

28 Mar 2019, 2:54 p.m. Government Departments: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which projects within the Government Major Project Portfolio are categorised as ICT projects.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Data on projects within the Government Major Project Portfolio (GMPP) is published annually, most recently in July 2018. GMPP projects are categorised as ICT based on the main element of the project but there will be other projects with an ICT component. As of July 2018 the 29 projects within the GMPP categorised as ICT projects are as follows:

IT Infrastructure Sourcing Programme

NHS e-Referral Service

Echo 2 Programme

Digital Services at the Border

Future Beyond Line Of Sight

New Style of Information Technology (Base)

CJS Common Platform

Local Land Charges (LLC) Programme

Government as a Platform

Gov UK Verify

DEFRA UNITY PROGRAMME

Health & Social Care Network

CUSTOMS DECLARATION SERVICES (CDS) Programme

Making Tax Digital for Business

Technology Platforms for Tomorrow

Metis Programme

Immigration Platform Technologies (IPT)

National Law Enforcement Data Programme

Criminal Justice System Exchange Re-provisioning

Future IT Sourcing Programme (FITS)

IT Transformation Programme

Foxhound Programme

NHSmail 2

National Data Services Development Programme

Technology Overhaul

Columbus (formerly Aspire Replacement Programme)

Communications Capabilities Development Programme

Home Office Biometrics Programme

Shared Services (ISSC2) Evolve

28 Mar 2019, 8:42 a.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what firms and institutions by region the National College Creative Industries has partnered with since its inception.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College for Creative and Cultural Industries does not currently deliver its provision through any other partners. It works with a large number of employers in the sector to develop its offer. Regarding the regional breakdown of those institutions involved in each stage of the selection process, Yorkshire and the Humber and the West Midlands both have one expression of interest and London and the South East both have two expressions of interest.

The opportunity to partner with the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries was only advertised on the college’s website.

The criteria used to evaluate expressions of interest were based on the headings within the Expressions of Interest application form, which was completed by interested institutions.

28 Mar 2019, 8:42 a.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will provide a regional breakdown of those firms and institutions that are currently competing to partner with the National College Creative Industries at each stage of the selection process.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College for Creative and Cultural Industries does not currently deliver its provision through any other partners. It works with a large number of employers in the sector to develop its offer. Regarding the regional breakdown of those institutions involved in each stage of the selection process, Yorkshire and the Humber and the West Midlands both have one expression of interest and London and the South East both have two expressions of interest.

The opportunity to partner with the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries was only advertised on the college’s website.

The criteria used to evaluate expressions of interest were based on the headings within the Expressions of Interest application form, which was completed by interested institutions.

28 Mar 2019, 8:42 a.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the opportunity to partner with the National College Creative Industries was publicly advertised beyond the College’s own website.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College for Creative and Cultural Industries does not currently deliver its provision through any other partners. It works with a large number of employers in the sector to develop its offer. Regarding the regional breakdown of those institutions involved in each stage of the selection process, Yorkshire and the Humber and the West Midlands both have one expression of interest and London and the South East both have two expressions of interest.

The opportunity to partner with the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries was only advertised on the college’s website.

The criteria used to evaluate expressions of interest were based on the headings within the Expressions of Interest application form, which was completed by interested institutions.

28 Mar 2019, 8:42 a.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the specific criteria used by the steering group to evaluate expressions of interest from potential partners with the National College Creative Industries was published prior to the submission deadline.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The National College for Creative and Cultural Industries does not currently deliver its provision through any other partners. It works with a large number of employers in the sector to develop its offer. Regarding the regional breakdown of those institutions involved in each stage of the selection process, Yorkshire and the Humber and the West Midlands both have one expression of interest and London and the South East both have two expressions of interest.

The opportunity to partner with the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries was only advertised on the college’s website.

The criteria used to evaluate expressions of interest were based on the headings within the Expressions of Interest application form, which was completed by interested institutions.

25 Mar 2019, 5:16 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total staff number is for the National College Creative Industries (formally National College for the Creative and Cultural Industries) for each year since its creation.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The number of further education (FE) students and apprentices who have graduated and been recruited from the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below on FE student and apprenticeship starts and completions. As the apprenticeships last 12 months, some students are still due to complete for this year and next year. The data for this table has been supplied from the college’s own records.

Academic year 2016/17

Academic year 2017/18

Academic year 2018/19

FE student starts

9

20

28

FE student completions

9

14

1

Apprenticeship starts

40

53

38

Apprenticeship completions

27

8

0

The college does not have destination data available for students in 2016/17. However, out of the FE students who completed in academic year 2017/18, 8 are working in the industry and the remainder have gone onto to further education or higher education.

The student intake according to region and gender is in the table below. Detailed information on

the number of students from low income background is currently not available.

Number of students

East of England

63

London

85

North East

1

North West

3

South East

20

South West

4

West Midlands

6

Yorks and Humber

6

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

Gender

Number

Female

86

Male

102

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

The government has not provided funding to the Backstage Centre. Funding provided to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries since its incorporation is set out in the table below, where details of the funding covers financial years from April to March.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Capital funding

£50,000

£195,449

£174,525

-

£419,974

Revenue support funding

-

-

-

£275,000

£275,000

Working capital loan

-

-

£650,000

£600,000

£1,250,000

Total

£50,000

£195,449

£824,525

£875,000

£1,944,974

The number of total staff per year since the creation of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below, which includes temporary placements, apprentices and part time staff.

Calendar Year

Staff number

2017

20

2018

22

2019

16

25 Mar 2019, 5:16 p.m. National College Creative Industries: Backstage Centre Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what amount of funding from the public purse has been provided to the (a) National College Creative Industries, (b) National College for the Creative and Cultural Industries and (c) The Backstage Centre in each year since their creation.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The number of further education (FE) students and apprentices who have graduated and been recruited from the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below on FE student and apprenticeship starts and completions. As the apprenticeships last 12 months, some students are still due to complete for this year and next year. The data for this table has been supplied from the college’s own records.

Academic year 2016/17

Academic year 2017/18

Academic year 2018/19

FE student starts

9

20

28

FE student completions

9

14

1

Apprenticeship starts

40

53

38

Apprenticeship completions

27

8

0

The college does not have destination data available for students in 2016/17. However, out of the FE students who completed in academic year 2017/18, 8 are working in the industry and the remainder have gone onto to further education or higher education.

The student intake according to region and gender is in the table below. Detailed information on

the number of students from low income background is currently not available.

Number of students

East of England

63

London

85

North East

1

North West

3

South East

20

South West

4

West Midlands

6

Yorks and Humber

6

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

Gender

Number

Female

86

Male

102

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

The government has not provided funding to the Backstage Centre. Funding provided to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries since its incorporation is set out in the table below, where details of the funding covers financial years from April to March.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Capital funding

£50,000

£195,449

£174,525

-

£419,974

Revenue support funding

-

-

-

£275,000

£275,000

Working capital loan

-

-

£650,000

£600,000

£1,250,000

Total

£50,000

£195,449

£824,525

£875,000

£1,944,974

The number of total staff per year since the creation of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below, which includes temporary placements, apprentices and part time staff.

Calendar Year

Staff number

2017

20

2018

22

2019

16

25 Mar 2019, 5:16 p.m. National College Creative Industries: Students Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of the National College Creative Industries’ former students are now employed in a relevant industry.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The number of further education (FE) students and apprentices who have graduated and been recruited from the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below on FE student and apprenticeship starts and completions. As the apprenticeships last 12 months, some students are still due to complete for this year and next year. The data for this table has been supplied from the college’s own records.

Academic year 2016/17

Academic year 2017/18

Academic year 2018/19

FE student starts

9

20

28

FE student completions

9

14

1

Apprenticeship starts

40

53

38

Apprenticeship completions

27

8

0

The college does not have destination data available for students in 2016/17. However, out of the FE students who completed in academic year 2017/18, 8 are working in the industry and the remainder have gone onto to further education or higher education.

The student intake according to region and gender is in the table below. Detailed information on

the number of students from low income background is currently not available.

Number of students

East of England

63

London

85

North East

1

North West

3

South East

20

South West

4

West Midlands

6

Yorks and Humber

6

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

Gender

Number

Female

86

Male

102

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

The government has not provided funding to the Backstage Centre. Funding provided to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries since its incorporation is set out in the table below, where details of the funding covers financial years from April to March.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Capital funding

£50,000

£195,449

£174,525

-

£419,974

Revenue support funding

-

-

-

£275,000

£275,000

Working capital loan

-

-

£650,000

£600,000

£1,250,000

Total

£50,000

£195,449

£824,525

£875,000

£1,944,974

The number of total staff per year since the creation of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below, which includes temporary placements, apprentices and part time staff.

Calendar Year

Staff number

2017

20

2018

22

2019

16

25 Mar 2019, 5:16 p.m. National College Creative Industries: Students Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the background of student intake is for the National College Creative Industries by (a) region, (b) gender and (c) the number of students from low income backgrounds.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The number of further education (FE) students and apprentices who have graduated and been recruited from the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below on FE student and apprenticeship starts and completions. As the apprenticeships last 12 months, some students are still due to complete for this year and next year. The data for this table has been supplied from the college’s own records.

Academic year 2016/17

Academic year 2017/18

Academic year 2018/19

FE student starts

9

20

28

FE student completions

9

14

1

Apprenticeship starts

40

53

38

Apprenticeship completions

27

8

0

The college does not have destination data available for students in 2016/17. However, out of the FE students who completed in academic year 2017/18, 8 are working in the industry and the remainder have gone onto to further education or higher education.

The student intake according to region and gender is in the table below. Detailed information on

the number of students from low income background is currently not available.

Number of students

East of England

63

London

85

North East

1

North West

3

South East

20

South West

4

West Midlands

6

Yorks and Humber

6

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

Gender

Number

Female

86

Male

102

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

The government has not provided funding to the Backstage Centre. Funding provided to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries since its incorporation is set out in the table below, where details of the funding covers financial years from April to March.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Capital funding

£50,000

£195,449

£174,525

-

£419,974

Revenue support funding

-

-

-

£275,000

£275,000

Working capital loan

-

-

£650,000

£600,000

£1,250,000

Total

£50,000

£195,449

£824,525

£875,000

£1,944,974

The number of total staff per year since the creation of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below, which includes temporary placements, apprentices and part time staff.

Calendar Year

Staff number

2017

20

2018

22

2019

16

25 Mar 2019, 5:16 p.m. National College Creative Industries Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) further education and (b) apprenticeship students have (i) graduated and (ii) been recruited from the National College Creative Industries (formally the National College for the Creative and Cultural Industries) for each year since its creation.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The number of further education (FE) students and apprentices who have graduated and been recruited from the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below on FE student and apprenticeship starts and completions. As the apprenticeships last 12 months, some students are still due to complete for this year and next year. The data for this table has been supplied from the college’s own records.

Academic year 2016/17

Academic year 2017/18

Academic year 2018/19

FE student starts

9

20

28

FE student completions

9

14

1

Apprenticeship starts

40

53

38

Apprenticeship completions

27

8

0

The college does not have destination data available for students in 2016/17. However, out of the FE students who completed in academic year 2017/18, 8 are working in the industry and the remainder have gone onto to further education or higher education.

The student intake according to region and gender is in the table below. Detailed information on

the number of students from low income background is currently not available.

Number of students

East of England

63

London

85

North East

1

North West

3

South East

20

South West

4

West Midlands

6

Yorks and Humber

6

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

Gender

Number

Female

86

Male

102

It should be noted that the data is supplied by the college’s own records for academic years 2016/17 to 2018/19.

The government has not provided funding to the Backstage Centre. Funding provided to the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries since its incorporation is set out in the table below, where details of the funding covers financial years from April to March.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Total

Capital funding

£50,000

£195,449

£174,525

-

£419,974

Revenue support funding

-

-

-

£275,000

£275,000

Working capital loan

-

-

£650,000

£600,000

£1,250,000

Total

£50,000

£195,449

£824,525

£875,000

£1,944,974

The number of total staff per year since the creation of the National College for Creative and Cultural Industries is set out in the table below, which includes temporary placements, apprentices and part time staff.

Calendar Year

Staff number

2017

20

2018

22

2019

16

5 Mar 2019, 3:49 p.m. Interserve: Pay Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the contracted hourly rate is for Interserve staff working in the Cabinet Office.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Interserve FM Limited provide a range of services to the Cabinet Office including cleaning, security, and catering. All outsourced facilities management staff are paid the National Living Wage or above.

5 Mar 2019, 3:16 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer of 25 February 2019 to Question 223140 on Home Office: Staff, what the definition is of Supplier resource costs; which costs are covered by that heading; and what the value is of each of those categories of costs.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We define supplier resource costs as the total cost of the suppliers engaged to deliver outcomes and deliverables in support of the Immigration Platform Technology programme (IPT). Supplier resource costs in totality comprise the price of each individual supplier contract awarded.

The contract price, essentially the ‘cost’ to us as the customer, will be made up of a number of different components including (but not limited to) manpower costs, general and administrative costs, physical infrastructure, IT infrastructure, taxation and profit. As our suppliers are contracted through competitive government frameworks on a ‘per outcome’, ‘per unit’ or ‘per day’ basis, we have no visibility of the categorised breakdown of such components. However we have broken down the costs to show the capital (CDEL) and resource (RDEL) expenditure splits across the 4 IPT workstreams as below:

IPT PROGRAMME

Rdel

Cdel

Full Year Forecast

Total (£m)

SUPPLIER RESOURCE COSTS

Caseworking (Atlas)

30%

68%

67%

29,482

Identity & Data

14%

11%

11%

5,053

Person Summary

0%

5%

5%

2,221

System Team

56%

15%

17%

7,474

TOTAL SUPPLIER RESOURCE COSTS

100%

100%

100%

44,230

28 Feb 2019, 4:28 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 187307 on Home Office: ICT, if he will publish the roles of the 352 contingent staff.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The following roles apply to the 7 contingent staff; Digital Delivery Manager Senior x2, Programme Director, Digital Senior Business Designer, Head of Communications, Programme Manager x2.

28 Feb 2019, 4:26 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 187307 on Home Office: ICT, how many of those 352 contingent staff were employed by his Department for (a) zero to three, (b) three to six, (c) six to 12 and (d) more than (i) 12 and (ii) 24 months.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The figure of 352 contingent staff provided also included those staff classed as supplier resource. Of the 352, 7 are classed as contingent labour and of these 1 has been employed (b) 3-6, 3 have been employed (d) more than (i) 12 and 3 have been employed (d) more than (ii) 24 months.

28 Feb 2019, 4:25 p.m. Home Office: Employment Agencies Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 187307 on Home Office: ICT, if he will publish the agencies used to secure the 352 contingent staff; and how much money his Department spent with each of those agencies in relation to securing staff for the Common Platform programme since the start of that project.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

It is not possible to split the 7 members of staff who class as contingent labour into a specific part of the IPT programme as they work across the programme and not one area such as the Common Data platform.

Of the 7 staff the total contract cost applies to each of the following agencies: Badenoch and Clark £577,503.96; Alexander Mann Solutions £520,999.23; Hays Specialist Recruitment £463,058.13; The Artful Recruiter £237,952.00; Reed Specialist Recruitment £280,493.09. Please note this is the total cost of the contract assuming employment to the fixed contract end date.

26 Feb 2019, 3:11 p.m. Cabinet Office: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much money has been spent from the public purse on services provided by (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald as recorded by his Department's spend analytic in each of the last five years.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Departmental spend over £25,000 is routinely published on Gov.UK.

25 Feb 2019, 5:02 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 187307 on Home Office: ICT, what estimate he has made of the annual cost to the public purse of the 352 people classed as contingent labour.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Immigration Platform Technologies programme is made up of a number of different resource types. There are civil servants, contingent labour who are brought in through the Public Sector Resourcing (PSR) framework agreement, and suppliers who are contracted through other Crown Commercial Services Framework agreements (GCloud and DOS).

Our response to the previous Question, combined contingent labour and suppliers, which has given an inaccurate and misleading response to the initial enquiry. The breakdown of these respective costs is as follows:

Contingent labour costs represent a £0.22m full year cost

Civil Servant costs represent a £1.12m full year cost

Supplier resource costs are £44.23m full year cost

25 Feb 2019, 5:01 p.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 February 2019 to Question 187307 on Home Office: ICT, what estimate he has made of the annual cost to the public purse of (a) agency fees and (b) direct staff cost for the 352 people classed as contingent labour.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The amount paid as agency fees is included in day rates of individuals and so not possible to extrapolate

21 Feb 2019, 3:01 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy holds a contact register detailing all live contracts with a whole life value of over £100K. The data from this register shows a contract value of;

(a) Deloitte £155,960;

(b) Slaughter and May £0;

(c) Mott MacDonald £5,293,380.

20 Feb 2019, 5:55 p.m. Government Departments: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of February 14, 2019 to Question 219297 on Government Departments: Consultants, if he will provide a total government consultancy spend figure for each of the companies listed in his answer for the financial year in which they are listed.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 and wider public sector contracts above the value of £25,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

20 Feb 2019, 10:53 a.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department has not held contracts with any of the three named companies in either of the past two financial years (17/18, 18/19 YTD).

19 Feb 2019, 5:41 p.m. Seaborne Freight Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost to the public purse was of the (a) award and (b) cancellation of the contract between his Department and Seaborne Freight.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

Combined costs of external legal, financial and project assurance advice on all three freight contracts including legal advice up to the end of December 2018 were approximately £800,000. Subsequent costs up to termination cannot yet be derived as contracts are still live and invoices pending.

19 Feb 2019, 5:22 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the value of contracts held by her Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

a.Deloitte –

The contract named DWP ADMS Transition Partner Service was valued at £7,608,816 and the term was 19 Feb 2016 to 18 Feb 2018.

The contract named Provision of consultancy for DWP estates PMO requirement was valued at £2,000,000 and the term was 14 Feb 2017 to 9 Feb 2018.

The contract named Consultancy for organisational design for DWP Finance Group was valued at £444,200 and the term is 8 Jul-2018 to 31 Mar 2019.

The contract named Digital Organisation Transformation Support was valued at £2,500,000 and the term is 30 Apr-2018 to 30 Apr 2019.

b. Slaughter and May – £0

c.Mott Macdonald - £0

19 Feb 2019, 5:02 p.m. Department for International Trade: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

Details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are

published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published after 26 February 2015

can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search. The Department has awarded four contracts to Deloitte in the last two years with a total value of £3,481,009. No contracts have been awarded to either Slaughter and May or Mott MacDonald.

19 Feb 2019, 4:55 p.m. Department for Transport: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The value of contracts held with the three parties is as follows:

DELOITTE

SLAUGHTER & MAY

MOTT MACDONALD

DfTc

£6,809,729.00

£1,600,000.00

£5,407,887.00

DVSA

£13,289,462.00

Nil

Nil

MCA

Nil

Nil

Nil

VCA

Nil

Nil

Nil

DVLA

£3,200,000.00

Nil

Nil

TOTAL

£23,299,191.00

£1,600,000.00

£5,407,887.00

This information relates to the central department and four of its executive agencies (Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA), Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA), Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA)). In each case, the contract totals relate to multiple contracts.

19 Feb 2019, 4:53 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

Authority to enter into contracts is devolved to directorates and departments within the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London as well as the global network of overseas missions. To provide the requested data would incur disproportionate cost.

19 Feb 2019, 4:17 p.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Margot James)

Details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

19 Feb 2019, 2:30 p.m. Seaborne Freight Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the contract signed between his Department and Seaborne Freight for the provision of ferry services in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal included provision for compensation for that company in the event that a deal for the UK to leave the EU is agreed.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

No. Nor was any compensation payable for termination of the contract.

19 Feb 2019, 2:29 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Department’s contracts register shows that the Department has had the following contracts with these suppliers in the last two years:

Supplier

Contract Value (including VAT)

Deloitte – 3 contracts:

Contract 1

£280,450

Contract 2

£1,695,000

Contract 3

£70,000

Slaughter and May – 1 contract

£3,248,560

Mott Macdonald – 1 contract Note: Mott Macdonald act as agents to manage the Fleming Grants Programme Fund, which includes a management fee for these services.

£235,000,000

19 Feb 2019, 1:48 p.m. Seaborne Freight Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to award the contract formerly held by Seaborne Freight to a new firm.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

The Department continues to investigate options for promoting freight capacity for the eventuality of a no-deal exit with constriction on the Dover and Channel Tunnel routes.

19 Feb 2019, 1:34 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Since January 2011, details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on the Government’s Contracts Finder. Contracts published prior to 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive. Those published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

19 Feb 2019, 12:15 p.m. Treasury: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May, and (c) Mott MacDonald in the last two years.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

Details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. ​Contracts published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

18 Feb 2019, 4:17 p.m. Department for International Development: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what the value of contracts held by her Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The below table shows the value of contracts awarded to (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald in the last two years for programme delivery.

Supplier

No. of contracts Awarded in 17/18 and 18/19

Current Contract Value

Mott MacDonald Ltd

9

£147,944,151

Deloitte Consulting Pvt Ltd Co.

1

£2,243,338

Slaughter and May

0

0

18 Feb 2019, 12:34 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (George Eustice)

Details of central Government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

14 Feb 2019, 5:22 p.m. Home Office: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The total value of contracts, active during the last 2 years, with the following suppliers are:


a) Deloitte - £54.4m
b) Slaughter and May - £0
c) Mott MacDonald - £2.4m

14 Feb 2019, 4:36 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether officials in his Department were present at the financial rescue talks between Interserve and its lenders.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government is a customer of Interserve, not a director or shareholder of the company. This is a matter to be resolved between Interserve and its lenders. No officials were present at the financial rescue talks between Interserve and its lenders.

14 Feb 2019, 4:35 p.m. Government Departments: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2019 to Question 215097, what the top five consultancy firms were by spend for each of the financial years and figures provided in that Answer.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The requested information is below, based on unaudited total reported spend.

2013/14

PA Consulting Group Ltd

Deloitte LLP

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

McKinsey & Company

KPMG LLP

2014/15

PA Consulting Group Ltd

Deloitte LLP

McKinsey & Company

AWE Plc

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

2015/16

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

McKinsey & Company

Deloitte LLP

Qinetiq Group Plc

Adam Smith International Ltd

2016/17

Leidos Holdings Inc

BAE Systems Plc

Adam Smith International Ltd

McKinsey & Company

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

2017/18

Leidos Holdings Inc

BAE Systems Plc

Landmarc Support Services Ltd

Qinetiq Group Plc

CH2M Hill

Additionally, departments publish spend over £25,000 on a monthly basis as part of its transparency data routine publication, which includes named supplier details.

14 Feb 2019, 4:34 p.m. Department for Education: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

As a requirement of the Public Contract Regulations 2015 and in line with the Procurement Policy Note 07/16 legal requirement to publish on Contract Finder, the Department for Education publishes details of awarded contracts on the Contracts Finder website. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

14 Feb 2019, 3:56 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Consultants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the value of contracts held by his Department with (a) Deloitte, (b) Slaughter and May and (c) Mott MacDonald is in the last two years.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

In the last two years, the value of the contracts held by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) with Deloitte was £58.948 million, and those with Mott MacDonald totalled £120.275 million.

The MOD has held no contracts with Slaughter and May within the last two years.

Information about the contracts that we place with industry is available on GOV.uk as part of our MOD Trade, Industry and Contracts statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index

In addition, MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website, which is available on GOV.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder

14 Feb 2019, 1:11 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, under which section of the Civil Service Code is civil service support to the Alternative Arrangements Working Group permissible.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

Ministers, including myself, have been meeting a wide range of MPs in various groups and other stakeholders to discuss the Government’s approach to EU Exit. This has included discussion of alternative arrangements to the backstop, following Parliament’s indication of support for such a position.

The Civil Service supports the Government in developing and implementing its policies. In this context, it is proper for civil servants to support Ministers in conducting these meetings. No support has been extended to backbench MPs, or other individuals or groups outwith Government.

13 Feb 2019, 4 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants will be transferred from the Department for Education to the Department for Exiting the European Union.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

I refer the honourable gentleman to the answer of 7 February 2019.

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-questions-answers/?page=1&max=20&questiontype=AllQuestions&house=commons%2clords&uin=216138

13 Feb 2019, 3:59 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government took to mitigate (a) actual and (b) perceived conflicts of interests of attendees of the 4 February 2019 meeting of the Alternative Arrangements Working Group.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

These meetings are part of routine Ministerial meetings hosted by a Minister with the support of the Civil Service, therefore taking place in accordance with the Ministerial Code. The normal guidelines and principles concerning Ministerial meetings apply.

11 Feb 2019, 5:08 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether the provision of civil service support to the Alternative Arrangements Working Group complies with the Civil Service Code.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

Ministers, including myself, have been meeting a wide range of MPs in various groups and other stakeholders to discuss the Government’s approach to EU Exit. This has included discussion of alternative arrangements to the backstop, following Parliament’s indication of support for such a position.

The Civil Service supports the Government in developing and implementing its policies. In this context, it is proper for civil servants to support Ministers in conducting these meetings. No support has been extended to backbench MPs, or other individuals or groups outwith Government.

11 Feb 2019, 4:59 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether copies of the Institute for Economic Affairs' report entitled, Plan A+: creating a prosperous post-Brexit UK, were distributed at meetings of the the Alternative Arrangements Working Group.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

No.

11 Feb 2019, 4:58 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether opposition MPs have been invited to join the Alternative Arrangements Working Group.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

It is for the backbench MPs making up the ‘Alternative Arrangements Working Group’ to determine that group’s composition. Since the Meaningful Vote the Government has been engaging with MPs from across the House and stands ready to engage with any MPs who have proposals on alternative arrangements.

11 Feb 2019, 4:56 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether Shanker Singham has attended any of the meetings of the Alternative Arrangements Working Group.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

Transparency details of my meetings, including details of those in attendance will be released in the normal way in due course.

11 Feb 2019, 4:55 p.m. Alternative Arrangements Working Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, if he will publish the names of the non-civil servant attendees at each of the meetings of the Alternative Arrangements Working Group.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

Transparency details of my meetings will be released in the normal way in due course.

8 Feb 2019, 12:46 p.m. Department for Education: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effect the delivery of his Department's policy streams of preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The government, including the department, is accelerating no deal preparations to make sure that the country is prepared for every eventuality.

The Civil Service is focused on delivering the government’s most pressing priorities, so it is only sensible that we make use of the resources and expertise that we have available to make sure that the UK is prepared for all Brexit scenarios on exit day.


8 Feb 2019, noon Adoption and Free Schools Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many civil servants in his Department work on the (a) free school and (b) adoption policy streams; and how many civil servants worked on those streams in June 2016.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Civil servants working within the Free Schools Directorate are responsible for the policy development and the delivery of the free schools programme. They are supported by civil servants working within the Free Schools Capital Division, who are responsible for finding sites and buildings, and refurbishing existing buildings for new free schools. The Free Schools Programme is predominantly delivered by central government, with tightly prescribed responsibilities for local authorities. As of 5 February 2019, there are approximately 290 full-time equivalent civil servants working in the Free Schools Directorate and within the Free Schools Capital Division (which sits in the Operations Directorate). In June 2016, there were slightly fewer civil servants working within Free Schools Directorate and the Free Schools Capital Division.

As of 5 February 2019, there are approximately 15 full-time equivalent civil servants working on adoption policy in the Social Care, Mobility and Disadvantage Directorate. In June 2016, there were approximately 20 full-time equivalent civil servants working on adoption policy in the Social Care, Mobility and Disadvantage Directorate. These civil servants are responsible for national adoption policy. The majority of the delivery of adoption policy is carried out by the local adoption agencies in each top tier local authority, based on the statutory requirements.

7 Feb 2019, 2:55 p.m. Scotland Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, pursuant to the Corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251 on Government Departments: Staff, how many civil servants in his department were working (a) part and (b) full time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (i) June 2016 and (ii) December 2018.

Answer (David Mundell)

None. The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high risk projects in which the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland has a facilitating role.

7 Feb 2019, 2:10 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Secondment Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many civil servants from his Department have been seconded to the Department for Exiting the European Union since 1 January 2019.

Answer (David Rutley)

Defra can confirm that no staff have been seconded to DExEU since 1 January 2019.

7 Feb 2019, 1:28 p.m. Department for International Trade: Redundancy Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many redundancies there have been from his Department's trade promotion offices since April 2018.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

There have been no UK civil servants from DIT or UKEF who have been made redundant since April 2018, as per the provisions of the Civil Service Compensation Scheme, a statutory scheme made under the Superannuation Act 1972.

This does not include locally engaged staff employed by the FCO overseas who work on DIT's objectives.

7 Feb 2019, 12:33 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Secondment Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has plans to second a portion of its workforce to the Department for Exiting the European Union over the next six weeks.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Civil Service is focused on delivering the government’s most pressing priorities, so it is only sensible that we make use of the resources and expertise we have available to make sure that the UK is prepared for all Brexit scenarios on exit day. This includes departments sharing staff and working together on joint projects.

As part of the co-ordinated exercise, the department will second staff mostly to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and HM Revenue and Customs. The actual numbers are yet to be determined.

7 Feb 2019, 12:33 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Secondment Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of staff from his Department that will be seconded to the Department for Exiting the European Union to prepare for UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Civil Service is focused on delivering the government’s most pressing priorities, so it is only sensible that we make use of the resources and expertise we have available to make sure that the UK is prepared for all Brexit scenarios on exit day. This includes departments sharing staff and working together on joint projects.

As part of the co-ordinated exercise, the department will second staff mostly to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and HM Revenue and Customs. The actual numbers are yet to be determined.

7 Feb 2019, 8:50 a.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Secondment Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many (a) current and (b) former civil servants have been seconded to work at his Department since its creation.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department continues to recruit talent from across the civil service, the wider public sector and the private sector. In answer to (a) over 500 civil servants are currently on loan to DExEU from other government departments, and (b) fewer than 5 former civil servants have been seconded to work in DExEU.

7 Feb 2019, 8:47 a.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what the current total headcount is of his Department's workforce.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The number of staff employed by the Department for Exiting the European Union is published, each month, on gov.uk as part of our transparency reporting. It can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/department-for-exiting-the-european-union-monthly-workforce-management-information-for-2017-and-2018

6 Feb 2019, 4:22 p.m. Borders: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has made an estimate of the value of the loss of trade the would result from border IT systems not being ready from the date that the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The government’s objective is to ensure that movement through the border is as frictionless as possible. Departments have done significant work to ensure that the IT systems for the border are ready for the day that the UK leaves the EU, and have contingency plans in place for the unlikely event that they are not. Government therefore does not expect loss of trade as a consequence of delays in UK border IT system readiness.

6 Feb 2019, 3:17 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office did not have an allocation for expenditure relating to the UK leaving the EU for the 2016/17 financial year.

For the 2017/18 financial year no expenditure on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU was recorded.

Figures for 2018/19 will be available once the Home Office’s Annual Report and Accounts are audited by the National Audit Office and laid before Parliament.

5 Feb 2019, 4:48 p.m. Government Departments: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the estimated increase is in the total cost of projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio that is attributed to pressures on Departments from preparations for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not hold this information centrally.

5 Feb 2019, 11:37 a.m. Cabinet Office: Public Expenditure Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, to what does the expense area Civil Service Group in the Cabinet Office spend data for December 2018 refers.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Civil Service Group (CSG) is a management unit within the Cabinet Office. It is responsible for strengthening and transforming the Civil Service as it tackles an increasingly complex set of challenges. This includes responsibility for Civil Service Strategy, embedding the vision for ‘A Brilliant Civil Service’, and implementing the cross-government Functional model. In delivering these activities CSG provides direct support to the Cabinet Secretary and the Chief Executive of the Civil Service & Permanent Secretary of the Cabinet Office.

4 Feb 2019, 6:05 p.m. Cabinet Office: Public Expenditure Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, to what does the expense area ERG Civil Service Talent in the Cabinet Office spend data for November 2018 refer.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Civil Service Talent is a directorate within Civil Service HR, focussing on attracting, retaining and developing talented people from diverse backgrounds to create a Brilliant Civil Service.

Teams within Civil Service Talent deliver accelerated development programmes and offer executive recruitment services for roles within the Senior Civil Service.

4 Feb 2019, 11:56 a.m. Wales Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, pursuant to the Corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251 on Government Departments: Staff, how many civil servants in his Department were working (a) part and (b) full time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (i) June 2016 and (ii) December 2018.

Answer (Alun Cairns)

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high-risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two-time points will refer to different sets of projects.

My Office works with lead Government departments on a range of major project investments in Wales in non-devolved sectors. The Office has no civil servants working full-time on the GMPP and does not record the number of staff engaged part-time on supporting these projects.

1 Feb 2019, 2:46 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and therefore the comparison refers to different sets of projects and a different mix of in-house and supplier resources


At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 288 officials at the Ministry of Justice were working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018-19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), 727 officials at the Ministry of Justice were working on GMPP projects.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are directly in the employment of the Crown or Civil Service, local government or Arms’ Length Body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded members of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public Servants.

1 Feb 2019, 11:09 a.m. Department for Education: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Anne Milton)

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016/17), 201.3[1] civil servants in the Department for Education (DfE) were working on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP).

The GMPP data for December 2018 (Quarter 3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. However, to provide a comparator, at the end of September 2018 (the latest submitted data at the end of the Quarter 2 reporting period 2018/19) 815.6 officials in the DfE were working on projects in the GMPP.

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high-risk projects. Direct comparisons across years should therefore be treated with caution. As projects join and leave the Portfolio throughout the year, it is likely that a comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

[1] Decimal figures denote part time working hours, as calculated by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority.

1 Feb 2019, 10:48 a.m. Home Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most com-plex and high-risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two points in time will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 411.7 FTE officials in the Home Office were working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of the Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), 481.1 FTE officials in the Home Office were working on GMPP projects.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are direct-ly in the employment of the Civil or Crown Service, local government or Arms’ Length Body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded mem-bers of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public servants.

1 Feb 2019, 8:38 a.m. Treasury: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

31 Jan 2019, 4:52 p.m. Cabinet Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Records from the IPA for Q1 16/17 (i.e. June 30th 2016) note 152.2 FTE public sector employees to be working on the following GMPP initiatives at that snapshot date: Commercial Capability Programme, FOXHOUND Programme, GOV UK Verify, Government Hubs Programme, ISSC1, ISSC2, New Property Model.

Records from both the IPA and Cabinet Office Portfolio Office for Q3 18/19 (i.e. December 31st 2018) note 286.2 FTE public sector employees to be working on the following GMPP initiatives at that snapshot date: Future Services (Pensions), Commercial Capability Programme – Expansion, Common Technology Services, Government as a Platform, Verify, Government Property Hubs Programme, Foxhound, New Property Model Programme

31 Jan 2019, 4:07 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the Government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 199 officials in BEIS were working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are directly in the employment of the Civil or Crown Service, local government or Arms’ Length Body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded members of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public servants.

31 Jan 2019, 3:48 p.m. Department for Transport: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 320 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) public sector employees were reported as working on the Department for Transport’s GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of the Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), 361 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) public sector employees were reported as working on the Department for Transport’s GMPP projects.

Given the different nature of the projects and programmes within the Department for Transport, some of the FTE figures include public sector employees in the relevant arms-length-body.

31 Jan 2019, 3:38 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (George Eustice)

Defra provides quarterly data to The Infrastructure and Projects Authority on its Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) projects including the full time equivalent (FTE) number of public servants and contractors working on those projects.

Defra had four projects in the GMPP in 2016. These included TEAM2100, Thames Tideway Tunnel and CAP Delivery, which are no longer part of the GMPP. The only Defra project remaining on the portfolio is UnITy.

Data for Q3 (December) 2018 is not yet available so we have provided Q2 (September) data instead.

Based on information available we can confirm the following figures:

  • Q2 (September) 2016: 93.9 public sector FTE and 186.2 external contractor FTE working across the four projects making a total of 280.1 FTE.
  • Q2 (September) 2018: 5.6 public sector FTE and 61 external contractor FTE working on UnITy making a total of 66.6 FTE.

These figures do not include public sector staff from outside core project teams.

31 Jan 2019, 3:08 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in her Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

The Government Major Project’s Portfolio (GMPP) is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016, 845 full time equivalents Civil Servant Project Delivery Professionals were working on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in the Department for Work and Pensions.

At the end of December 2018, 675 full time equivalents Civil Servant Project Delivery Professionals were working on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in the Department for Work and Pensions.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are directly in the employment of the Civil or Crown Service, local government or Arms’ Length Body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded members of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public servants.

The data supplied covers Project Delivery Professionals staff paid for from cost centres associated with the GMPP programmes at the dates specified. Other public sector employees will be involved in the delivery of the programmes in some capacity.

31 Jan 2019, 3:06 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

The Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) is responsible for overseeing negotiations to leave the EU and establishing the future relationship between the UK and EU. There are currently no DExEU staff who work in the Government Major Projects Portfolio, as was the case in June 2016, as the projects which comprise the suite of EU Exit projects are not managed under the Government Major Projects Portfolio.

31 Jan 2019, 1:58 p.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Jake Berry)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), there were no officials in the Department for Communities and Local Government, my Department's predecessor, working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of the Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), there were no officials in the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government working on GMPP projects.

31 Jan 2019, 12:01 p.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Civil Servants Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Margot James)

The GMPP is a continually evolving portfolio of the government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 58.8 officials in DCMS were working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of the Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), 127.5 officials in DCMS were working on GMPP projects.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are directly in the employment of the Civil or Crown Service, local government or Arms’ Length Body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded members of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public servants.

30 Jan 2019, 5:44 p.m. Department for International Development: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in her Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The number of Civil Servants in DFID that were working on Government Major Programmes in June 2016 and December 2018 are as follows;

June 2016: 6 Full-time and 2 Part-time.

December 2018: 4 Full-time and 4 Part-time.

30 Jan 2019, 5:40 p.m. Attorney General: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Attorney General’s Office had no civil servants working part or full time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in June 2016 or December 2018.

30 Jan 2019, 4:04 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The number of full-time equivalent staff working on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio was 11.8 in June 2016 and 18.1 in December 2018.

30 Jan 2019, 3:37 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) is a continually evolving portfolio of the government's most complex and high-risk projects. In June 2016, the Ministry of Defence was working on 33 projects which are part of the GMPP, and for December 2018 this figure was 35.

There will have been a number of civil servants working on these projects, either directly or indirectly, at any one time. This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

30 Jan 2019, 2:51 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) is a continually evolving portfolio of the Government’s most complex and high risk projects. Direct comparisons of the GMPP across years should therefore be treated with caution. Projects join and leave the GMPP throughout the year and it is therefore likely that a simple comparison across two time points will refer to different sets of projects.

At the end of June 2016 (i.e. the end of the Quarter 1 reporting period for 2016-17), 561.67 officials in the Department and its arm’s length bodies were working on GMPP projects.

GMPP data for December 2018 (Q3 2018/19) has not yet been cleared and finalised. At the end of September 2018 (i.e. the latest submitted data, at end of the Quarter 2 reporting period for 2018-19), 304 officials in the Department and its arm’s length bodies were working on GMPP projects.

This data refers to public sector employees, defined as those who are directly in the employment of the Civil or Crown Service, local government or arm’s length body at the relevant snapshot date, including seconded members of staff who join the team as Civil, Crown or Public servants.

29 Jan 2019, 2:03 p.m. Department for International Trade: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

No Departmental projects have been included within the Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) since it was founded on 14 July 2016. As such, no civil servants were working on GMPP projects on the dates referred to.

29 Jan 2019, 11:22 a.m. Natural Gas: Kazakhstan Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2019 to Question 210025, whether Project Santiago involves the participation of consultants employed by any of the Big Four.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

There is a core team of nine civil servants leading Project Santiago. This is supplemented with expertise from across central government departments and external subject matter experts as appropriate. Project Santiago has been a joint programme, working across central government departments and industry, including wider public bodies.

29 Jan 2019, 11:21 a.m. Natural Gas: Kazakhstan Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2019 to Question 210025 on, how many civil servants work in Project Santiago.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

There is a core team of Civil Servants leading Project Santiago, numbering nine (9). This is supplemented with expertise from across central government departments and external subject matter experts as appropriate. Project Santiago has been a joint programme, working across central government departments and industry, including wider public bodies.

28 Jan 2019, 3:49 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, pursuant to the corrected Answer of 22 January 2019 to Question 206251, how many civil servants in his Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (John Penrose)

No civil servants in my Department were working part or full-time on projects in the Government Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

24 Jan 2019, 5:51 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many summary risk assessments the Crown Representative to Interserve has produced in the last 12 months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

It is the responsibility of contracting authorities to carry out appropriate due diligence checks on potential suppliers when they are contracting out, to ensure that those suppliers are able to deliver the public services for which they are contracted. The Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy is not of itself relevant to the conduct of procurement activities. If contracting authorities approach Cabinet Office to request advice on their procurements, however, Cabinet Office provides whatever assistance they are able to.
24 Jan 2019, 5:50 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether information provided in the summary risk assessments produced by Crown Representatives are made available to public sector bodies considering procuring with strategic suppliers.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

It is the responsibility of contracting authorities to carry out appropriate due diligence checks on potential suppliers when they are contracting out, to ensure that those suppliers are able to deliver the public services for which they are contracted. The Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy is not of itself relevant to the conduct of procurement activities. If contracting authorities approach Cabinet Office to request advice on their procurements, however, Cabinet Office provides whatever assistance they are able to.
22 Jan 2019, 3:34 p.m. Bill Dodwell Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Department's press release entitled The Chancellor and the Office of Tax Simplification announce Bill Dodwell as new Tax Director, published on gov.uk on 10 January 2019, whether the newly appointed Tax Director of the Office of Tax Simplification was approached about the role while he was still under contract with Deloitte.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The Chancellor of the Exchequer was pleased to appoint Bill Dodwell as Tax Director of the OTS, with effect from 14th January 2019. The OTS will continue to offer valuable advice on simplifying the tax system under his leadership.

The contract in question was a short-term consultancy agreement which was terminated on Monday 7th January 2018.

21 Jan 2019, 1:12 p.m. Honours Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether in the past 24 months the Queen has declined any of the the Forfeiture Committee’s recommendations for the forfeiture of a person's honour.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

Recommendations that the recipient of an honour should forfeit their award are made by the independent Honours Forfeiture Committee, which refers its recommendations, via the Prime Minister, to Her Majesty The Queen, acting on the advice of Her Ministers. In the past two years, the Forfeiture Committee’s recommendations that forfeiture should take place have all been approved.

17 Jan 2019, 4:22 p.m. Office of Tax Simplification: Public Appointments Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many candidates in addition to Bill Dodwell were interviewed for the role of Tax Director of the Office of Tax Simplification.

Answer (Mel Stride)

A number of strong applications were received for the position of Tax Director of the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS) and four candidates were interviewed.

The appointment was made on merit.

17 Jan 2019, 3:14 p.m. Government Departments: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which government strategic suppliers have provided living wills.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Serco, Capita, Sopra Steria, Engie and Interserve have all volunteered to pilot the use of “living wills”.

17 Jan 2019, 3:11 p.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the previous holder of the role of Crown Representative to Small and Medium-sized Enterprises left that role.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Emma Jones left her role as SME Crown Representative at the end of 2018. The appointment of a new SME Crown Representative has been finalised and an announcement of the appointment will be made soon.

17 Jan 2019, 10:35 a.m. Armed Forces Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the military planners sent to Departments to prepare for the UK leaving the EU without a deal are answerable to the Ministers of those Departments.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Military planners have been seconded from the Ministry of Defence to other government departments to assist those departments with planning and coordination activity in preparation for the UK leaving the EU. While, these planners will remain under the full command of their Ministry of Defence single service chiefs during their secondment, the tasks that they will undertake while seconded will be directed by the host department, and will be based on that department's needs as overseen by Ministers.

15 Jan 2019, 12:33 p.m. Cabinet Office: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many individual firms received at least one payment of an invoice from his Department after a 30-day period in the first two quarters of 2018-19.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The number of individual firms who received at least one payment of an invoice from the Cabinet Office after a 30-day period, in each quarter of 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 is set out below.

2016/17

Quarter 1

76

Quarter 2

75

Quarter 3

96

Quarter 4

101

2017/18

Quarter 1

75

Quarter 2

104

Quarter 3

150

Quarter 4

195

2018/19

Quarter 1

227

Quarter 2

197

In the same period, the number of suppliers paid has increased from 491 in Q1 of 16/17 to 900 in Quarter 1 of 2018/19.

The move to a new shared service platform in May 2017 presented a number of operational issues. We have been working hard to rectify the underlying issues and have implemented a number of improvements as part of a coordinated programme of work. These has led to improvements in our payment performance data with December data showing 82% of invoices paid within 5 days.

15 Jan 2019, 12:33 p.m. Cabinet Office: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many individual firms received at least one payment of an invoice from his Department after a 30-day period in each quarter of 2016-17.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The number of individual firms who received at least one payment of an invoice from the Cabinet Office after a 30-day period, in each quarter of 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 is set out below.

2016/17

Quarter 1

76

Quarter 2

75

Quarter 3

96

Quarter 4

101

2017/18

Quarter 1

75

Quarter 2

104

Quarter 3

150

Quarter 4

195

2018/19

Quarter 1

227

Quarter 2

197

In the same period, the number of suppliers paid has increased from 491 in Q1 of 16/17 to 900 in Quarter 1 of 2018/19.

The move to a new shared service platform in May 2017 presented a number of operational issues. We have been working hard to rectify the underlying issues and have implemented a number of improvements as part of a coordinated programme of work. These has led to improvements in our payment performance data with December data showing 82% of invoices paid within 5 days.

15 Jan 2019, 12:32 p.m. Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the total estimated expenditure is for all Departments for contingency planning for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

HM Treasury has allocated over £4.2 billion of additional funding to departments and the Devolved Administrations for EU exit preparations so far. This breaks down as:

  • £412m of additional funding over the spending review period for the Department for Exiting the European Union, Department for International Trade and the Foreign & Commonwealth Office at Autumn Statement 2016.

  • £286m of additional funding for 17/18 (a full breakdown of which can be found in Supplementary Estimates 17/18). https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679738/PU2137_Supplementary_estimates_web.pdf.

  • Over £1.5bn of additional funding for 18/19. A full breakdown of the allocations can be found in the Chief Secretary’s Written Ministerial Statement, HCWS540, laid on the 13th March (https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-03-13/HCWS540/)

  • Over £2bn of additional funding for 19/20. A full breakdown of the allocations can be found in the Chief Secretary’s Written Ministerial Statement, HCWS1205, laid on the 18th December (https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-12-18/HCWS1205/)

15 Jan 2019, 12:32 p.m. Cabinet Office: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many individual firms received at least one payment of an invoice from his Department after a 30-day period in each quarter of 2017-18.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The number of individual firms who received at least one payment of an invoice from the Cabinet Office after a 30-day period, in each quarter of 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 is set out below.

2016/17

Quarter 1

76

Quarter 2

75

Quarter 3

96

Quarter 4

101

2017/18

Quarter 1

75

Quarter 2

104

Quarter 3

150

Quarter 4

195

2018/19

Quarter 1

227

Quarter 2

197

In the same period, the number of suppliers paid has increased from 491 in Q1 of 16/17 to 900 in Quarter 1 of 2018/19.

The move to a new shared service platform in May 2017 presented a number of operational issues. We have been working hard to rectify the underlying issues and have implemented a number of improvements as part of a coordinated programme of work. These has led to improvements in our payment performance data with December data showing 82% of invoices paid within 5 days.

15 Jan 2019, 11:25 a.m. Cabinet Office: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many new staff members his Department plans to recruit for the purpose of contingency planning for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Departments continually review workforce plans, reprioritise and assess changing needs, which includes identification and cessation of non-priority work where appropriate. We have accelerated our plans, and at the same time, the Civil Service as a whole is working to ensure that EU Exit Implementation is carried out to high quality without impacting public service delivery across the whole of government. The Cabinet Office has staff working on EU exit implementation for a range of scenarios in the interests of preparedness, however the percentage of time spent on exiting the EU without a deal is not recorded or easily accessible.

Cabinet Office are currently looking to increase the numbers of staff trained to be part of the Civil Contingencies Secretariat to form a flexible pool to be used if and when required. This work is ongoing and the number of staff who will be part of this work is not yet available.

14 Jan 2019, 4:59 p.m. Cabinet Office: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many representations his Department received from its suppliers on late payments in the 2017-18 financial year.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office does not hold this information centrally.

14 Jan 2019, 3:57 p.m. Midland Metropolitan Hospital: Carillion Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the quality and extent of the completed work done by Carillion at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital; and what assessment he has made of whether the work completed by Carillion was commensurate with the £205 million the company received to carry out that work.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

Prior to the liquidation of Carillion, there were difficulties associated with the Mechanical, Engineering and Plant (MEP) design of the Midland Metropolitan Hospital which meant that the Trust was already expecting an 11-month delay to completion, although it is understood that these design issues were largely resolved at the point Carillion went into liquidation in January 2018. However less than 10% of the MEP had been installed as the fit out had barely commenced at that point.

The Trust will be using independent technical advisers and experts to review the overall work to date on the Midland Metropolitan Hospital as part of the programme of work to complete the new hospital.

The independent technical advisor to the lenders to the Private Finance Initiative consortium assessed and certified this valuation of £205 million a few days prior to Carillion going into liquidation.

14 Jan 2019, 3:54 p.m. Midland Metropolitan Hospital: Finance Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of Carillion's collapse on the budget for the Midland Metropolitan Hospital.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

The current estimate of the cost to complete the new Midland Metropolitan Hospital for Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, to be funded from public capital provided by the Department, is £358 million (including VAT) over the financial years 2019/20 to 2021/22. The Department is also providing £27 million for an early works contract to continue building works this year.

11 Jan 2019, 11:57 a.m. Infrastructure and Projects Authority Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will provide a list of projects (a) overseen by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority and (b) with Infrastructure and Projects Authority involvement that have had their delivery date delayed in the last 12 months .

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) is a constantly evolving group of the most complex and strategically significant projects and programmes across government. In 2017/18, the GMPP included 133 projects and programmes, across 16 Departments and agencies.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) publishes an Annual Report on the GMPP each year, alongside consolidated data and narratives, which include project end dates. Any changes to project end dates are reflected in subsequent annual reports.

See the IPA 2017/18 Annual Report here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/infrastructure-and-projects-authority-annual-report-2018.

See the IPA 2016/17 Annual Report here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/infrastructure-and-projects-authority-annual-report-2017

11 Jan 2019, 11:37 a.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants were working on projects in the Major Projects Portfolio in (a) June 2016 and (b) December 2018.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP) comprises the most complex and strategically significant projects and programmes across government. The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) supports the successful delivery of these projects through direct support, independent assurance reviews and by leading the project delivery profession across government.

In line with the Government's major projects transparency policy, decisions on the release of data Data on the number of civil servants working on GMPP projects in individual government departments is a matter for them not held centrally. However, the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff working at the IPA from 2016/17 is below:

Financial Year

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Number of FTE

148

182

177

11 Jan 2019, 11:27 a.m. Crown Commercial Service: Amazon Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any of the meetings between the Crown Commercial Service and Amazon Web Services prior to the awarding of the Government contract to Amazon Web Services to host the primary components of the Crown Marketplace were attended by Amazon Web Services employees who were civil servants or in an advisory role to the Government.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

No meetings were held with Amazon Web Services (AWS) outside of the formal contract award process. There was no consultation with, or involvement by AWS, regarding these requirements, nor are any AWS employees contracted to the Crown Commercial Service.

The contract was awarded as a call-off from the CCS G-Cloud Commercial Agreement against CCS’ Technical Architecture requirements.

The contract itself is for hosting alone and represents just 5% of the total investment cost of developing digital access to CCS’ products and services. No development work or support services are provided by AWS in relation to the services that are hosted.

11 Jan 2019, 11:25 a.m. Crown Commercial Service: Amazon Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any other firms had bid to win the contract awarded to Amazon Web Services to host the primary components of the Crown Marketplace.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This contract was a direct award under the G-Cloud 10 commercial agreement. As such, no suppliers ‘bid’ for this contract; an assessment of suppliers’ service offerings was made following a compliant search through the Digital Marketplace. A contract was awarded to the supplier whose services best fit CCS’ needs, in accordance with the G-Cloud guidance.

11 Jan 2019, 11:22 a.m. Crown Commercial Service: Amazon Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the implications of giving Amazon Web Services the role of hosting the Crown Marketplace on the ability of the parent company and subsidiaries of Amazon to win contracts on the Marketplace.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The award of this contract does not afford Amazon Web Services (AWS) - or any parent or subsidiary company of AWS - any unfair advantage in any future commercial opportunity in relation to the Crown Marketplace, or any other Crown Commercial Service (CCS) commercial agreement.

The build of the Crown Marketplace is agnostic to the hosting platform and can be "lifted and shifted" to other cloud platforms if necessary. The hosting of any service is in no way linked to either the development capabilities or future offerings that will be placed on the Crown Marketplace.

8 Jan 2019, 12:37 p.m. Electoral Register: Pilot Schemes Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any of the Voter ID Pilot authorities present at the meeting with the Minister for the Constitution in August 2018 raised objection to the pilots.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The British public deserves to have confidence in our democracy.

The success of the voter ID pilots in May 2018 proves that voter ID is a reasonable and proportionate measure and voters were fully aware of the changes on polling day.

That view was shared by the voter ID pilot authorities who attended a meeting in July. All pilot local authorities are volunteers. No pilot authority has raised an objection and the Government continues to work closely and collaboratively with pilot authorities from 2018 and those who have volunteered to pilot voter ID at this year’s May elections.

7 Jan 2019, 5:43 p.m. Department for Transport: Fraud Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to page 21 of the Cross-Government Fraud Landscape Annual Report 2018, to what incident or incidents the £111.2 million for detected error refers.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The total figure almost entirely refers to a planned payment of £110.5 million being made by the Core Department to Network Rail, which was processed in error by Arvato, the Department for Transport’s Shared Services provider. A bank account number was incorrectly transposed on the payment request and as the bank account number did not exist, the payment was put into a holding account. The error was detected promptly by the Department: appropriate action was taken to secure funds and the payment was then correctly made to Network Rail on the same day with no financial loss to the Department. As a result of the error, both the Core Department and Arvato have reviewed and tightened its payment process to avoid similar errors in the future.

The remaining £0.7 million of errors relate to miscellaneous items in the Driver & Vehicle Licensing Agency and Maritime & Coastguard Agency. Again, no losses were incurred.

7 Jan 2019, 4:27 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Fraud Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of the Cross-Government Fraud Landscape Annual Report 2018, to what incident or incidents the £88.2 million for detected fraud in his Department refers.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) takes the risk of fraud, bribery and corruption seriously and is fully committed to delivering a robust counter-fraud and corruption capability. MOD is the only Department that has fully met all the functional standards set by the Cabinet Office for Government, followed by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs which has met them for internal fraud only.

To better understand the value of fraud allegations being reported to MOD, a review of values attributed to new allegations received was undertaken. MOD has developed a Nominal Offence Value framework based on historic values of fraud experienced. The Nominal Offence Value is used when no valuation is available at the time of reporting. This approach has been reviewed and approved by the Cabinet Office Prevention Panel (an independent panel of cross Government experts).

The £88.2 million refers to 861 separately reported incidents. It includes cases with an estimated value based upon the MOD's Nominal Offence Value framework.

7 Jan 2019, 4:23 p.m. Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether staff at the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists are instructed to cross-reference information from published ministerial meetings data with that provided by companies on the register in their returns.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 requires the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists to maintain and update the register of which requires consultant lobbyists to declare on whose behalf they are lobbying.

7 Jan 2019, 1:13 p.m. Institute of Economic Affairs Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists plans to publish all documents relating to its concluded investigation into the Institute of Economic Affairs.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists operates independently of Government. It is for the Registrar to determine whether to publish information obtained as part of investigations to determine whether the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014 has been breached.

18 Dec 2018, 4:15 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, on what date the strategic supplier Interserve was classified with a red risk rating.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Supplier risk ratings are not published by Government.

18 Dec 2018, 4:11 p.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants are employed in the Public Procurement Review Service.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

There are 5 civil servants employed in the Public Procurement Review Service. We continue to keep resourcing under review to ensure the service meets customer needs.

12 Dec 2018, 5:19 p.m. Public Sector: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Public Contract Regulations 2015, how many times the Crown Crown Commercial Service identified in the last 12 months that contracting authorities failed to include in contracts provisions that any payment due from the contracting authority to the contractor is to be made no later than the end of a period of 30 days from the date on which the relevant invoice is regarded as valid and undisputed.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Public Procurement Review Service have not identified any cases that do not have the standard 30-day payment terms in public sector contracts.

Through the Public Contract Regulations 2015, it is required that these payment terms are passed down the supply chain. Public sector buyers must also publish annually on their payment performance.

12 Dec 2018, 3:03 p.m. Attorney General: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Attorney General, whether his Department holds data on the proportion of contracts issued by (a) his Department and (b) contractors to his Department that include provisions to impose that any payment due to a subcontractor be made no later than 30 days from the date on which the relevant invoice is regarded as valid and undisputed as required by the Public Contract Regulations 2015.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) keeps a central database of contracts it issues. All contracts issued since 2015 that permit subcontracting have contained such provisions.

The Government Legal Department (GLD), Attorney General’s Office (AGO), HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) and Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) do not centrally hold this data. To calculate or estimate this would involve a manual check of contracts held and this would incur disproportionate cost.

For future exercises with an anticipated contract value above £5 million per annum, the CPS will apply the requirements of Procurement Policy Note 04/18 (published 29 November 2018). This requires departments to include ‘prompt payment’ questions in the selection of future suppliers.

6 Dec 2018, 4:37 p.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many spot checks on procurement documents have been carried out by the Public Procurement Review Service in the last 12 months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

There have been 278 spot checks completed in the last 12 months.

6 Dec 2018, 4:35 p.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of staff shortages on the performance of the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Government is confident that the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists is effectively delivering upon his statutory responsibilities and that the Office is working well in enacting the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014.

The Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists operates independently of Government, and under the Transparency of Lobbying Act 2014, ‘may make arrangements with the Minister or other persons for staff to be seconded’ to the Office. The Government is confident that there are no staff shortages in the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists and that the current arrangements for staffing in the office are in line with the governing legislation.

6 Dec 2018, 4:33 p.m. Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists: Standards Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if his Department will conduct a review of the performance of the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Government is confident that the Office of the Registrar of Consultant Lobbyists is effectively delivering upon its statutory responsibilities and working well in enacting the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014. The Registrar operates independently of Government and it is the responsibility of the Registrar to maintain the lobbying register and to ensure that consultant lobbyists are compliant with their statutory responsibility to declare on whose behalf they are lobbying.

5 Dec 2018, 4:36 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has received representations from the the Crown Commercial Service on the financial health of the strategic supplier Interserve.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office maintains an ongoing dialogue with the Cabinet Office, including the Crown Commercial Service (CCS), in relation to the ongoing management of all major suppliers, including Interserve, accessed through CCS frameworks.

As set out in the Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy, supplier risk ratings are not published by Government but are made available by the Cabinet Office to in scope organisations on request.​

5 Dec 2018, 4:34 p.m. Metropolitan Police: Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department is making contingency plans in the event that Interserve is unable to continue to provide traffic management services on behalf of the Metropolitan Police.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Operational policing, including contract management and business continuity, matters at the Metropolitan Police are the responsibility of the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime and the Commissioner.

5 Dec 2018, 11:41 a.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of the spot checks on procurement documents carried out by the Public Procurement Review Service in the last 12 months revealed non-compliance with public procurement regulations.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Spot checks undertaken in the last 12 months have been targeted where we were aware that a contracting authority had previously not complied with a part of public procurement regulations, and where contracting authorities are not advertising tender opportunities on Contracts Finder appropriately.

We had 100% compliance when following up with the contracting authority applying a recommendation we had previously made from our investigation. We had a 82.25% success rate following intervention with a contracting authority which was not advertising tender opportunities on all the correct portals.

5 Dec 2018, 11:39 a.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of the the spot checks on procurement documents carried out by the Public Procurement Review Service in the last 12 months resulted in the Crown Commercial Service providing guidance to the relevant contracting authority.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Spot checks undertaken in the last 12 months have been targeted where we were aware that a contracting authority had previously not complied with a part of public procurement regulations, and where contracting authorities are not advertising tender opportunities on Contracts Finder appropriately.

Therefore the majority of spot checks undertaken in the last 12 months have resulted in the Public Procurement Review Service providing guidance to the relevant contracting authority at some point. We did not provide guidance on the spot checks that were classed as following up recommendations from our investigations, these contract authorities had already received the guidance in the form of a recommendation.

5 Dec 2018, 11:37 a.m. Pubic Sector: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's press release of 29 November 2018 entitled Crack down on suppliers who don’t pay on time, whether identification of late payment by public sector contractors will include payment information from Crown Commercial Service investigations.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Large suppliers are already required by law to publish their payment records every 6 months on Gov.uk. Departments will be able to use these records as part of the assessment to ensure the criteria is met. These are published here https://www.gov.uk/check-when-businesses-pay-invoices

If a business is unable to demonstrate that they are meeting the core standard of paying 95% of invoices within 60 days over the previous two six month periods and cannot explain why or show evidence of significant remedial action taking place, then they may be excluded from the process and not be able to win that opportunity. Decisions will be taken on a case by case basis.

Companies are also required to demonstrate they have procedures for resolving disputed invoices promptly, and that systems are in place to ensure those in supply chains are paid within agreed contractual terms.

5 Dec 2018, 11:35 a.m. Public Sector: Procurement Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Public Procurement Review Service's spot checks on procurement documents apply to the contracting authority only.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The spot checks on procurement documents only apply to contracting authorities within the public sector.

5 Dec 2018, 11:33 a.m. Public Sector: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's press release of 29 November 2018 entitled Crack down on suppliers who don’t pay on time, whether he plans to allocate additional resources to the Crown Commercial Service to improve identification of poor payment practices.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office regularly reviews staff numbers to ensure that teams are adequately resourced.

5 Dec 2018, 11:32 a.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's press release of 29 November 2018 entitled Crack down on suppliers who don’t pay on time, which mechanism his Department plans to use to prohibit firms with poor payment practices winning government contracts.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

If a business is unable to demonstrate that they are meeting the code’s core standard of paying 95% of invoices within 60 days over the previous two six month periods and cannot explain why or show evidence of significant remedial action taking place, then they may be excluded from the process and not be able to win that opportunity. Decisions will be taken on a case by case basis.

Companies are also required to demonstrate they have procedures for resolving disputed invoices promptly, and that systems are in place to ensure those in supply chains are paid within agreed contractual terms.

Large suppliers are already required by law to publish their payment records every 6 months on Gov.uk. Departments will be able to use these records as part of the assessment to ensure the criteria is met. These are published here https://www.gov.uk/check-when-businesses-pay-invoices

5 Dec 2018, 10:33 a.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's press release New 'Social Value' contracts to revolutionise government procurement published on 19 November 2018, what steps is the Crown Commercial Service is taking to obtain from Interserve the key organisational information that he said could have smoothed the management of the liquidation of Carillion.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Government will obtain the kind of information which could have smoothed the management of the Carillion insolvency by introducing living wills. Interserve is one of the suppliers who have volunteered to pilot the use of living wills.


5 Dec 2018, 10:32 a.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the written evidence submitted by Interserve to the Public Accounts Committee on 6 June 2018, Strategic Suppliers SSU0003, whether Crown Representatives are able to discuss issues relating to contracts not yet awarded with strategic suppliers.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Crown Representatives work with Strategic Suppliers to understand their bid pipeline, and to get market perspectives on particular types of service. Once specific procurements have begun, Crown Representatives do not engage with suppliers on those procurements.

4 Dec 2018, 5:56 p.m. Carillion: Insolvency Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 3 September 2018 to Question 168999, if he will expedite the completion and publication of the investigation into the collapse of Carillon by the Official Receiver.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

A specialist investigation team was set up by the Official Receiver on the making of the winding-up order and, at the request of the Secretary of State for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy, the investigation into the company including analysis of company records, interviews with directors and close liaison with other investigating authorities is being expedited.

4 Dec 2018, 4:57 p.m. Department for Education: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has issued contracts in the last two years that do not include provisions to impose that any payment due from the contracting authority to the contractor under the contract is to be made no later than 30 days from the date on which the relevant invoice is regarded as valid and undisputed as required by the Public Contract Regulations 2015.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The information is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

However, all of the Department’s model contracts contain clauses which require the Department to pay invoices within 30 days of receipt. Any correctly submitted invoice that is not paid within 30 days will be subject to the provisions of the Late Payment of Commercial Debt (Interest) Act (1998).

3 Dec 2018, 4:34 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the value is of all public sector (a) contracts and (b) joint contracts held by Interserve.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This information is already publicly available on Contracts Finder.

3 Dec 2018, 4:32 p.m. Carillion Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has provided training or other instruction to the Crown Representatives intended to ensure learning from the collapse of Carillion.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Crown Representatives fulfil an important role in a wider system of assurance and supplier relationship management and participate in regular sharing of knowledge and best practice. We continually review the Crown Representatives through feedback mechanisms. We have reviewed the portfolio and allocation of Strategic Suppliers, have recently appointed new Crown Representatives and new Strategic Suppliers to the programme and have changed Crown Representative and others to new suppliers where appropriate.

3 Dec 2018, 4:30 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Crown Commercial Service has plans to issue guidance to public sector bodies on the financial risks associated with contracting with Interserve.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

It is the responsibility of contracting authorities to carry out appropriate due diligence

checks on potential suppliers and financial monitoring on existing suppliers when they are contracting out, to ensure that those suppliers are able to deliver the public services for which they are contracted.

The Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy is not of itself relevant to the conduct of procurement activities. If contracting authorities approach Cabinet Office to request advice on their procurements, however, Cabinet Office provides assistance where requested and available.

3 Dec 2018, 4:28 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if his Department will take steps to accelerate the creation of a living will to be delivered by Interserve.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster announced on 19 November, Interserve is one of the suppliers who have volunteered to pilot the use of “living wills”. The companies piloting “living wills” will provide them in the coming weeks.

3 Dec 2018, 4:28 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when Interserve is planned to provide a living will for his Department.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster announced on 19 November, Interserve is one of the suppliers who have volunteered to pilot the use of “living wills”. The companies piloting “living wills” will provide them in the coming weeks.

3 Dec 2018, 4:26 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the conclusion in the letter of the Chairs of the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and Work and Pensions Committees of 4 September 2018, on Carillion, that the current system of monitoring suppliers was not able to identify or prevent the precarious state of Carillion and its decline and collapse, what extraordinary steps his Department is taking to monitor the financial health of Interserve.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government already continually monitors the financial health of its strategic suppliers and has appropriate plans in place in relation to the risk of those companies. These plans are commercially sensitive and confidential. We do not believe that any strategic supplier is in a similar situation to Carillion.

This monitoring also enables Government to assess suppliers’ ability to deliver the services which they hold contracts for.

The company’s current intentions are a matter for the company itself.

3 Dec 2018, 4:26 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will direct the Crown Commercial Service to undertake a review of the ability of Interserve to deliver services guaranteed under its public sector contracts.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government already continually monitors the financial health of its strategic suppliers and has appropriate plans in place in relation to the risk of those companies. These plans are commercially sensitive and confidential. We do not believe that any strategic supplier is in a similar situation to Carillion.

This monitoring also enables Government to assess suppliers’ ability to deliver the services which they hold contracts for.

The company’s current intentions are a matter for the company itself.

3 Dec 2018, 4:23 p.m. Government Departments: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken since January 2018 to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Crown Representatives.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Crown Representatives fulfil an important role in a wider system of assurance and supplier relationship management and participate in regular sharing of knowledge and best practice. We continually review the Crown Representatives through feedback mechanisms. We have reviewed the portfolio and allocation of Strategic Suppliers, have recently appointed new Crown Representatives and new Strategic Suppliers to the programme and have changed Crown Representative and others to new suppliers where appropriate.

The Crown Representatives are part time and are fully supported by a full time Markets and Suppliers team which comprises a number of relationship managers and business analysts.

3 Dec 2018, 4:21 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Crown Commercial Service is taking to ensure that Interserve managers pass on relevant and accurate information to Crown Representatives.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Cabinet Office regularly engages with all Strategic Suppliers to ensure that Government is receiving relevant and accurate information on suppliers’ health and their ability to deliver on their contracts. This work is led through the Strategic Partnering Programme in the Markets and Suppliers team in the Government Commercial Function.

3 Dec 2018, 4:19 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings the Crown Commercial Service has had with representatives of Interserve to discuss significant material concerns relating to that company.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Crown Commercial Service holds quarterly meetings with the company as part of a regular governance process for framework suppliers. In addition to regular CCS and departmental (or contract authority) meetings, the Cabinet Office Markets and Suppliers team meets regularly with all the strategic suppliers as part of their supplier relationship management programme.

29 Nov 2018, 5:20 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the current risk designation is Interserve; and whether that designation has changed in the last 12 months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As set out in the Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy, supplier risk ratings are not published by Government.

29 Nov 2018, 5:17 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Crown Commercial Service has issued advice to (a) public and (b) third sector organisations that are entering into procurement contracts with Interserve on the financial health of that company.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

It is the responsibility of contracting authorities to carry out appropriate due diligence checks on potential suppliers when they are contracting out, to ensure that those suppliers are able to deliver the public services for which they are contracted.

The Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy is not of itself relevant to the conduct of procurement activities. If contracting authorities approach Cabinet Office to request advice on their procurements, however, Cabinet Office provides whatever assistance they are able to.

As set out in the Strategic Supplier Risk Management Policy, supplier risk ratings are not published by Government, but performance related and financial information is made available to in-scope organisations on request

29 Nov 2018, 4:57 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings the Crown Commercial Service have had with Interserve in the last six months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Crown Commercial Service holds quarterly meetings with the company as part of a regular governance process for framework suppliers. In addition to regular CCS and departmental (or contract authority) meetings, the Cabinet Office Markets and Suppliers team meets regularly with all the strategic suppliers as part of their supplier relationship management programme.

29 Nov 2018, 4:56 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Crown Commercial Service is involved in the discussions on Interserve's proposed deleveraging plan, set to be announced in early 2019.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government continually monitors the financial health of its strategic suppliers and has appropriate plans in place in relation to the risk of those companies. These plans are commercially sensitive and confidential. We do not believe that any strategic supplier is in a similar situation to Carillion.

The company’s current intentions are a matter for the company itself.

29 Nov 2018, 4:56 p.m. Interserve Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Crown Commercial Service has made an assessment of the potential cost to the public purse of the collapse of Interserve.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government continually monitors the financial health of its strategic suppliers and has appropriate plans in place in relation to the risk of those companies. These plans are commercially sensitive and confidential. We do not believe that any strategic supplier is in a similar situation to Carillion.

The company’s current intentions are a matter for the company itself.

28 Nov 2018, 9:45 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Margot James)

DCMS spend on consultancy fees for work relating to EU Exit totals £1.2m since July 2016. The suppliers of this work are PricewaterhouseCoopers and ICF Consultancy, as well as individual contractors.

15 Nov 2018, 2:52 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy spent £3.68m on EU Exit consultancy services for the period October 2017 to September 2018. Prior to October 2017 expenditure was aggregated as part of the Department’s overall consultancy spend and cannot be reported separately.

15 Nov 2018, 2:50 p.m. Attorney General: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Attorney General, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Attorney General’s Office has not incurred any spending on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

The Attorney General’s Office publishes spend over £25,000 on a monthly basis as part of its transparency data routine publication which is accessible here.

13 Nov 2018, 5:45 p.m. National Cyber Security Centre Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Question 61 of oral evidence given on 25 June 2018 to the Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy by Mr Ciaran Martin, what the specific campaigns are that form the duties of communications specialists in the National Cyber Security Centre.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The communications specialists in the National Cyber Security Centre take the expert technical advice from the organisation and turn it into clear, accessible and usable advice and guidance, setting out the simple steps that organisations and citizens can take to protect themselves.

Between 1 September 2017 and 31 August 2018 95 blogs and 134 pieces of guidance were published. This work is carried out in partnership with government and the private sector and a dedicated NCSC engagement team to amplify reach.

12 Nov 2018, 5:47 p.m. Treasury: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The Treasury does not hold this data in a way that would allow us to extract the information requested from existing accounting records or central searchable databases. Therefore to locate, retrieve and extract this data would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold

12 Nov 2018, 5:19 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Ministry of Justice has not incurred any expenditure on consultancy related to EU Exit from July-16 to date.

12 Nov 2018, 3:38 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how much her Department has spent on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Mr Shailesh Vara)

The Department has spent £16,902 on consultancy fees since July 2016 for work related to the UK leaving the EU. This work covered research into many aspects of the economy in Northern Ireland, and only a portion of this work related directly to the impact of EU Exit.

12 Nov 2018, 3:11 p.m. Scotland Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (David Mundell)

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland has not incurred any spend on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

9 Nov 2018, 3 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (David Rutley)

Defra, along with other Departments, publishes spend over £25,000 on a monthly basis as part of its transparency data routine publication which is accessible here:

https://data.gov.uk/dataset/91072f06-093a-41a2-b8b5-6f120ceafd62/spend-over-25-000-in-the-department-for-environment-food-and-rural-affairs

9 Nov 2018, 11:31 a.m. Department for International Trade: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

The Department for International Trade (DIT) was created in July 2016 following the result of the EU referendum and was specifically established as part of the government's EU exit strategy. Given the Department's objectives it is not possible to identify which elements of these are specifically related to EU Exit.

The amount spent on consultancy, which relates to the provision of objective advice to the Department relating to strategy, structure, management or operations in pursuit of its purposes and objectives is published in DIT's annual report and accounts and can be accessed using the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/department-for-international-trade-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018

9 Nov 2018, 10:46 a.m. Department for Education: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department has not spent money on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the European Union.

9 Nov 2018, 10:34 a.m. Wales Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales has spent nothing on consultancy fees in relation to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

8 Nov 2018, 2:31 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

The Ministry of Defence publishes spend over £25,000 on a monthly basis as part of its transparency data routine publication which is accessible at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/751545/Annex_B_Expenditure_over_25000_30-09-2018

8 Nov 2018, 12:43 p.m. Cabinet Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Cabinet Office publishes spend over £25,000 on a monthly basis as part of its transparency data routine publication which is accessible here.

8 Nov 2018, 12:39 p.m. National Cyber Security Centre: Staff Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many communications specialists are employed at the National Cyber Security Centre; and what the total salary cost of those specialists is.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Around a third of the approximately 850 people currently employed by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) have outward-facing advisory roles, as part of the NCSC’s remit to provide expert, trusted guidance to help protect all sectors of the economy and members of the public. This includes around 25 communications specialists, who work in partnership with other communications specialists across government and the private sector. For reasons of National Security, we are unable to provide further breakdown of staff numbers and costs.

8 Nov 2018, 12:32 p.m. Department for Transport: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Chris Grayling)

The Department for Transport has spent a total of £54,282 on external consultancy work relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

8 Nov 2018, 11:53 a.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Suella Braverman)

The department spent a total of £3,377,000 in the period to 31 March 2018 on consultancy fees, as published in the audited Departmental Annual Report and Accounts. Expenditure recorded on departmental financial systems for the current financial year totals £728,000. The final audited expenditure will be published in the relevant Annual Report and Accounts in due course.

8 Nov 2018, 10:29 a.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

This information is not held centrally and to compile it would incur disproportionate cost. The FCO's expenditure on professional services and consultancy will be published in the annual report and accounts. Contracts awarded over £10,000 are reported on Contracts Finder.

7 Nov 2018, 12:56 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The question has been interpreted as requesting information regarding the level of consultancy spend by the core Department, as recorded in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts.

The definition employed for capturing consultancy services spend is in line with HM Treasury guidance on the preparation of Annual Report and Accounts in which consultancy services are defined as “the provision to management of objective advice relating to strategy, structure, management or operations of an organisation, in pursuit of its purposes and objectives. Such advice will be provided outside the ‘business-as-usual’ environment when in-house skills are not available and will be time-limited. Consultancy may include the identification of options with recommendations, or assistance with (but not the delivery of) the implementation of solutions.”

Subsequently consultancy spend is recorded on the basis of this definition. As such we are only able to report against this in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts, rather than on the basis of any different interpretation or perspective, such as reporting spend on consultancy by specific programmes such as European Union Exit.

The Department’s expenditure on consultancy services, for each of the last two financial years is as follows:

Financial Year

Consultancy Services (£000’s)

2017-18

12,402

2016-17

4,485

7 Nov 2018, 12:27 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much her Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

Since July 2016 the Department has not incurred any costs as a result of consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU.

6 Nov 2018, 4:34 p.m. Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Crown Commercial Service's Transparency data, CCS prompt payment data 2018-19, whether the aggregated totals figure of 196.88 per cent for the percentage of invoices paid within five days is correct; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Crown Commercial Service fully complies with all regulatory requirements set out in Section 113(7) of the Public Contracts Regulations (2015).

The Crown Commercial Service will remove “aggregated totals” fields from future prompt payment data publications.

6 Nov 2018, 4:21 p.m. Universal Credit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, to what extent the Behavioural Insights Team was involved in designing the technical infrastructure for universal credit.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The Government’s Behavioural Insights Team has not been involved in designing the technical infrastructure for Universal Credit Full Service, as there is a specific user researcher team in DWP that takes care of this element.

The design of the Universal Credit Full Service is based around user-centred design, which is an iterative design process in which designers focus on users of the service and their needs in each phase of the design process.

6 Nov 2018, 4:19 p.m. Government Departments: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Crown Commercial Service collects data on the payment practices of SMEs holding contracts with central government.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This information is not held centrally.

Government strongly encourages businesses to report poor payment practice and instances of late payment, including late payment through the supply chain, in public sector contracts to the Mystery Shopper service in the Cabinet Office

6 Nov 2018, 4:07 p.m. Cabinet Office: Pay Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total value is of the payroll commitments of the staff transferred from HMRC to his Department in the last 12 months.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)


The information is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost to the Cabinet Office.

6 Nov 2018, 3:30 p.m. Department for International Development: Brexit Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much her Department has spent on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The Department for International Development has not spent any money on consultancy fees relating to the UK leaving the EU since July 2016.

6 Nov 2018, 3:10 p.m. Government Digital Service: Conditions of Employment Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 29 October 2018 to Question 183247 on Government Digital Service: Staff, how many of the 751 people employed by the Government Digital Service are off payroll workers.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government Digital Service (GDS) currently has 45 off payroll (interim) workers in addition to the 751 employees outlined in the previous response.

6 Nov 2018, 2:58 p.m. Government Departments: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many SMEs were awarded government contracts in the 2017-2018 financial year.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Since January 2011, details of central government contracts, above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

Contract award notices must include the SME status of the winning supplier, in accordance with Procurement Policy Note 07/16.

6 Nov 2018, 2:56 p.m. Government Departments: Contracts Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of SMEs contracted by central government to provide goods and services pay the living wage.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This information is not held centrally.

The government is determined to ensure that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum and Living Wage (NMW) receives it. Anyone who feels they have been unpaid NMW should contact the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) helpline on 0300 123 1100 or via the online complaints form at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pay-and-work-rights-complaints

6 Nov 2018, 2:54 p.m. Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012 Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to this Department's press release entitled Government announces major changes to rebuild trust after Carillion, published on 25 June 2018, what progress he has made on reforming the Public Services Public Services )(Social Value) Act 2012.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Cabinet Office is currently leading work with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to implement a package of measures for the future of social value and procurement, as set out in Government’s Civil Society Strategy. This includes training for government commercial staff to ensure that all major procurements in central government explicitly evaluate and report on their social value. Further information will be published in due course.

This is an extension of the application of the Social Value Act across central government departments, rather than legislative changes to the Act itself.

6 Nov 2018, 2:52 p.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU on the ability of Government contractors to pay invoices submitted by subcontractors within 30 days.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

Regulation 113 of the Public Contracts Regulations contains statutory guidance for contracting authorities and suppliers on paying undisputed invoices in 30 days down the supply chain.

This will be preserved under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act when the UK leaves the European Union, with relevant adjustments necessary to ensure legal operability. This will give legal certainty and continuity to businesses and contracting authorities on day one of exit.

6 Nov 2018, 2:50 p.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's press release of 10 April 2018, New changes to encourage small businesses to apply for government contracts, what progress he is making on excluding suppliers from major Government procurements if they cannot demonstrate fair and effective payment practices with subcontractors.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

On the same day as the referenced press release, the Cabinet Office announced a consultation to gather views on whether it would be appropriate to exclude suppliers from major government procurements if they cannot demonstrate a fair, effective and responsible approach to payment in their supply chain management. This consultation closed on 5 June. We have been reviewing responses and will publish the outcome shortly.

In the meanwhile, Government strongly encourages businesses to report poor payment practice and instances of late payment in public sector contracts, including late payment through the supply chain, to the Mystery Shopper service in the Cabinet Office.

6 Nov 2018, 2:37 p.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason his Department has not published the data on Cabinet Office prompt payment for (a) the third and second quarter of the 2017-2018 financial year and (b) the first and second quarter of the 2018-2019 financial year under procurement policy.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

Cabinet Office moved to a new shared service platform in May 2017, which required a significant volume of complex data transfer between the old and new platforms. A number of issues were identified which called into question the accuracy of payment performance data, so the Department suspended prompt payment reporting until assured data was available. This has now been achieved, and we plan to publish the outstanding data shortly.

5 Nov 2018, 5:14 p.m. PA Consulting Group Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the nature of the recent work was for his Department for which PA Consulting received £220,000.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

The Cabinet Office recently published a set of transparency data on gov.uk which details expenditure totalling approximately £1.6m for the expense area of ‘Central EU Exit Consultancy’.

Established in April 2018, 'Central EU Exit Consultancy’ refers to a set of contracts that enables government departments to secure resource quickly for critical work on the preparations and implementation of EU exit.

The work by PA Consulting was under this Central EU Exit Consultancy arrangement the nature of which was to support two Departments: (1) DExEU Business Readiness Communications Team and (2) Border Force Operational Readiness Portfolio Management Office.

5 Nov 2018, 5:02 p.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of government contractors pay invoices submitted by subcontractors within 30 days as required by The Public Contracts Regulations 2015.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This information is not held centrally.


Government strongly encourages businesses to report poor payment practice and instances of late payment in public sector contracts, including late payment through the supply chain, to its Mystery Shopper service.

5 Nov 2018, 5 p.m. Government Departments: Billing Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of Government contractors that employ over 250 people have signed up to the Prompt Payment Code.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

This information is not held centrally.

However, a list of signatories to the Prompt Payment Code can be viewed at the following link: http://ppc.promptpaymentcode.org.uk/ppc/ppc_signatory.a4d

The majority of government’s strategic suppliers are signatories to the Code and payment practices of government’s largest suppliers are regularly monitored to ensure that they are in line with the aims of prompt payment policy. While the Prompt Payment Code is voluntary, any new strategic supplier to government is encouraged to sign up.

5 Nov 2018, 4:58 p.m. Cabinet Office: Facebook Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's transparency data entitled Expenditure over £25,000 - September 2018, if he will list the marketing goods and services that were purchased from Facebook under transaction number 20000547.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The total cost of Facebook invoice 2000547 was £44,219.20. The costs incurred refer to three pieces of activity bought via the Cabinet Office’s credit account with Facebook between 1 - 13 July 2018. They were:

Description of advertising activity

Total cost on invoice

Video content explaining the government’s 12 principles for negotiating with the European Union.

£40,000.00

Video content explaining the government’s announcement of over £20 billion extra a year in real terms by 2023/4 for the NHS

£3,944.39

Content promoting UK Government services available in Scotland, by the Scotland Office

£274.81

1 Nov 2018, 5:31 p.m. Borders: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the total cost will be of developing the 12 critical IT systems required at the border after the UK has left the EU.

Answer (Mel Stride)

While we remain confident that we will secure a positive and mutually beneficial deal with the EU, there remain a number of border-related projects that have to be delivered in the unlikely event of no deal being agreed. Some of these projects were initiated before the UK decided to leave and so are not exclusively EU exit related.

The information requested is not held centrally, however, the 12 border-related projects listed in the NAO report are all at different stages of development with a number part of wider programmes. As such, it would not be possible to attach a single overarching cost at this time.

1 Nov 2018, 4:37 p.m. Borders: Digital Technology Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people working on the Digital Services at the Border programme are classed as contingent labour.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The exact number of contingent labour staff within the Programme varies dependent on the specific expertise required during the lifecycle of the Programme. Contingent Labour staff are used to provide specific, time-limited expertise, from a pool of specialists offering skills that the Civil Service can draw from when and as needed, rather than employing these specialists on a permanent basis including during periods when their skills are not needed.

As at the 25th October 2018, DSAB had engaged under contract a total of 20 contingent labour contractors.

1 Nov 2018, 4:35 p.m. Home Office: Government Digital Service Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings Home Office Digital, Data and Technology has had with the Government Digital Service in the last 24 months.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government Digital Service and the Home Office meet regularly, including planned and ad hoc meetings. The Home Office is also a member of two forums managed by GDS: the Technology and Digital Leaders Group and the Functional Leaders Group.

1 Nov 2018, 4:34 p.m. Home Office: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the full criteria was for the role of Senior Responsible Owner for the Immigration Platform Technologies Programme.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The letter appointing the Immigration Platform Technologies Senior Responsible Owner is in the public domain - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-major-projects-appointment-letters-for-senior-responsible-owners

1 Nov 2018, 4:31 p.m. Home Office: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people his Department employs on the construction of the Immigration Platform Technologies programme.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are 360 working on the construction of the Immigration Platform Technologies programme.

1 Nov 2018, 4:30 p.m. Home Office: ICT Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the cost of construction for The Immigration Platform Technologies Programme.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The whole life cost from 2013/14 to 2018/19 is £265.8m.

1 Nov 2018, 4:28 p.m. United Arab Emirates: Official Visits Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether civil servants accompanied the Minister of State for the Middle East on his visit to the UAE in November 2017.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

I was accompanied by one official on my visit to the United Arab Emirates in November 2017.

1 Nov 2018, 4:26 p.m. United Arab Emirates: Official Visits Jon Trickett

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the trip to the United Arab Emirates taken by the hon. Member for North East Bedfordshire in November 2017 was taken in his official ministerial capacity.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

I attended the Sir Bani Yas Forum in the United Arab Emirates in November 2017 in my capacity as Minister for the Middle East and North Africa.​