Debates between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow

There have been 13 exchanges between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow

1 Mon 14th January 2019 European Union (Withdrawal) Act
Department for International Trade
2 interactions (849 words)
2 Thu 6th December 2018 European Union (Withdrawal) Act
Department for International Trade
2 interactions (272 words)
3 Wed 18th July 2018 Govia Thameslink Franchise 6 interactions (278 words)
4 Thu 5th July 2018 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Transport
5 interactions (178 words)
5 Thu 24th May 2018 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Transport
2 interactions (42 words)
6 Thu 19th April 2018 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Transport
8 interactions (272 words)
7 Thu 1st March 2018 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Transport
2 interactions (89 words)
8 Thu 18th January 2018 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Transport
5 interactions (79 words)
9 Mon 8th January 2018 Office for Students: Appointment 12 interactions (701 words)
10 Tue 12th December 2017 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2 interactions (52 words)
11 Mon 20th November 2017 Student Loans Company 6 interactions (278 words)
12 Wed 11th October 2017 Higher Education Funding 5 interactions (335 words)
13 Tue 12th September 2017 Oral Answers to Questions
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2 interactions (65 words)

European Union (Withdrawal) Act

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Monday 14th January 2019

(1 year, 6 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for International Trade
Mr Speaker Hansard
14 Jan 2019, 8:38 p.m.

Order. A further 72 right hon. and hon. Members are seeking to catch my eye in tonight and tomorrow morning’s debate, on account of which there will have to be, with immediate effect, a five-minute limit on Back-Bench speeches. I counsel colleagues that that limit will, in all likelihood, have to be reduced in due course.

Joseph Johnson (Orpington) (Con) Parliament Live - Hansard
14 Jan 2019, 8:38 p.m.

I had never rebelled against the Government before this month. I wish to use the brief time I have to set out four reasons why I shall vote against the deal tomorrow.

First, I believe that the Government are selling this package to the House on the false premise that we are somehow going to have a trade deal in place by the end of 2020. As Sir Nick Macpherson, the former permanent secretary to the Treasury, made clear last week in a tweet, that is a highly unlikely scenario. A deal even by the end of 2022—the possible period by the end of which we will have finished the transition period—is exceptionally unlikely. In his view, it is conceivable that we will have a deal in place by the mid-2020s. It really is, as the former permanent secretary to the Treasury said, “time for some honesty” from the Government. Forget all the flowery letters that have been exchanged today. Were the Government really being straight with the House and with the country, they would come clean and admit that we will have many years of the purgatory of the backstop ahead of us.

Secondly, any trade deal that we eventually strike will be worse for the economy than our current arrangements. As the Bank of England has noted, Brexit is a unique experiment. There is no precedent for an advanced economy anywhere in the world withdrawing from a trade agreement as deep and complex as the EU. Although it is not legally binding, the political declaration does set a direction of travel for the negotiations, reflecting the Prime Minister’s red lines of ending freedom of movement and securing an independent UK trade policy. Those red lines necessarily mean that we have to leave the single market and any form of customs union, as foreshadowed by the Chequers White Paper. The political declaration accordingly prioritises “comprehensive arrangements” for goods, and scandalously neglects services, on which all we are aiming for is in effect bog-standard third-country market-access terms. We are fundamentally a services economy and our services sector is being thrown under a bus.

Let us take financial services—one of this country’s few globally competitive sectors and one that is very important to many families in Orpington. The Centre for European Reform reckons that a free trade agreement would reduce financial services exports by almost 60%. The consultancy Oliver Wyman reckons that will mean a hit to the Treasury’s revenues of around £10 billion. So much for the Brexit dividend.

Thirdly, this package leaves the deck heavily stacked against us in the negotiations that will come. The political declaration starts by giving the EU most of its goals on its strong point, which is goods exports, for which the EU had a surplus with us of £95 billion in 2017, but it offers very little to our crucial services sector, in which we had a surplus of around £28 billion. Given that we have necessarily already conceded the £39 billion financial settlement in the legally-binding withdrawal agreement, we now have little leverage left with which to secure concessions from the EU in the months to follow. If the EU chooses to play hardball with us, it will simply let the UK enter the backstop in December 2022 then wait until our services sector pressures the Government into accepting a deal—any deal—that will remove the EU’s feet from our windpipe and restore some measure of privileged market access to a sector that is so important to our economy.

Approval of this deal will lead to many years of excruciating trade negotiations—talks that will trigger waves of fury from Brexit campaigners and leave voters throughout the country at each inevitable UK concession on issues such as fisheries, Gibraltar and eventually, of course, freedom of movement itself. The package that the Prime Minister has negotiated simply sets us up to fail as a country. It is better that we all realise that now, before it is too late.

Finally, this deal is bad for our sovereignty. During the referendum, some implied that they were prepared to let Britain suffer economic damage in return for greater sovereignty and greater control. Of course, one of the great paradoxes is that the deal is remarkable in offering a double whammy: both economic harm and a loss of British sovereignty. That is one reason why many prominent Brexit campaigners are saying that this deal is worse than staying in the EU. There is now no single Cabinet position on what to do next, let alone one backed by the Conservative party or Parliament as a whole. Such is the farce that this has become that I believe we have no choice now but to go back to our constituents and ask them, reluctantly, to provide further guidance.

European Union (Withdrawal) Act

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 6th December 2018

(1 year, 8 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for International Trade
Joseph Johnson (Orpington) (Con) Parliament Live - Hansard
6 Dec 2018, 12:24 p.m.

I am very grateful to my right hon. Friend for giving way. He mentioned financial services and the impact of any Norway-style arrangement on the sector. Does he not also acknowledge that the proposed deal that the Government are putting forward is not great for financial services by any means? The sector obviously employs many of my constituents in Orpington who come into London every day to work in the City in all manner of roles. I have read the Government’s economic analysis and it shows that, over the relevant forecasting period, the financial services sector will be hit by around 6% to the effect that our trade will be 6% smaller than it would otherwise be. That is a meaningful hit to one of our most competitive industries, and we do not have many globally competitive sectors, so it baffles me why we would willingly do that.

I wish to make one further point if I may and ask another question. The agreement that the Government are putting forward will mean that we will no longer have any direct influence on the EU’s rule making with respect to financial services. It is therefore all the more important that we maintain our ability to play a full part in representing the UK’s interests in global bodies such as the Basel Committee and the International Organisation of Securities Commissions. Article 219 says that we will have to follow the EU’s position on all those bodies. [Interruption.]

Mr Speaker Hansard
6 Dec 2018, 12:19 p.m.

I think the House has captured what Jack Straw used to call the gra-vah-men of the hon. Gentleman’s point. I prefer the pronunciation gra-va-men, but there you go.

Govia Thameslink Franchise

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Wednesday 18th July 2018

(2 years ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
18 Jul 2018, 1:04 p.m.

There are a number of elements to that. I recognise that services in my hon. Friend’s constituency have not been running perfectly, by any means. Some technical operational difficulties that were Network Rail’s responsibility have been at fault. There was a signal fault between Cambridge and Royston, which was a Network Rail issue, and there was a double track-circuit failure at Foxton, which was also a Network Rail issue and which has played a particular part in the difficulties that my hon. Friend’s constituents have been experiencing today.

On her point about compensation, the package has been designed to compensate the worst-affected passengers who travel every day on season tickets bought in advance. As I said, it is similar to the compensation that was offered to Southern ticket holders following the industrial action last year. Passengers who travel less frequently can claim Delay Repay compensation for the disruption that they experience, and we encourage them to do so.

Mr Speaker Hansard
18 Jul 2018, 1:05 p.m.

The hon. Lady’s question, although comprehensive, was notably shorter than the delays about which she complained.

Break in Debate

Mr Speaker Hansard
18 Jul 2018, 1:18 p.m.

Order. Somebody says, “Irrelevant.” Well, I exercised latitude. I think that there may be a diversionary route. The link between Cumbria and Thameslink—if it exists—is tangential, but the hon. Gentleman has deployed such intellectual dexterity as he possesses, which I am sure is very considerable, to render his question orderly, in a manner of speaking.

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
18 Jul 2018, 1:18 p.m.

One link that joins these issues is the Glaister review, which is now under way. It will examine what went wrong in the run-up to the introduction of the timetable, and how it affected the hon. Gentleman’s constituency in Cumbria.

Mr Speaker Hansard

The professor has helped us, and that is very useful.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 5th July 2018

(2 years, 1 month ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Transport
Joseph Johnson Hansard

Yes, I can tell my right hon. Friend why that is. There has been a major signalling outage on the Brighton main line service, which has affected services throughout the network. Although this is the responsibility of Network Rail, the situation has affected services substantially on the Brighton main line. That is why we are investing £300 million in this route, with work starting in the coming months.

Mr Speaker Hansard
5 Jul 2018, 10:05 a.m.

The concept of a signalling outage was previously unknown to me, but I suppose that it merely reinforces one in the knowledge that one learns something new every day.

Break in Debate

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard

Labour’s policies of nationalisation would be no panacea for the challenges we face. Indeed, those challenges spring to a very large extent from the publicly owned parts of the rail industry—namely, Network Rail, the part that is in state control. We see passenger interests as best served by bringing together in partnership the very best of the public and private sectors, as the Secretary of State set out in his strategic vision for rail last November.

Mr Speaker Hansard
5 Jul 2018, 10:11 a.m.

A sentence perhaps—Mr Dan Carden.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 24th May 2018

(2 years, 2 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Transport
Mr Speaker Hansard
24 May 2018, 10:20 a.m.

Very naughty indeed!

Joseph Johnson Hansard

At the time the announcement on electrification was made, we made it clear that we would be looking at a number of schemes to invest in infrastructure and enhancements in Cardiff and Swansea. Those discussions are currently under way.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 19th April 2018

(2 years, 3 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Transport
Joseph Johnson Hansard

Simpler may be cheaper, and there may also be circumstances in which it leads to cost increases. It is important that we achieve a system that is comprehensible, in which passengers do not have to struggle for hours to work out which ticket is the right one for them. Following the 2016 fares and ticketing action plan, we introduced advance tickets for sale on the day of travel that benefit hundreds of thousands of passengers.

Mr Speaker Hansard
19 Apr 2018, 9:30 a.m.

I think we will take that as a no.

Break in Debate

Mr Speaker Hansard
19 Apr 2018, 10:11 a.m.

Before 27 July.

Joseph Johnson Hansard

We are working closely with Network Rail to ensure punctual and reliable services on the network. We are ensuring it is doing everything it possibly can to maintain and build upon the current improving levels of performance. My hon. Friend mentioned the performance targets: the operator will be required as part of the next franchise arrangements to publish on its website in relation to each reporting period its performance against the following metrics: cancellation figures, short formation figures, and now, critically, timing to three minutes, rather than the previous performance targets.

Break in Debate

Joseph Johnson Hansard
19 Apr 2018, 10:21 a.m.

This is certainly an idea worth exploring. I repeat that this is a view shared not just in this Government but in the French Government. The hon. Gentleman will recall that at the conclusion of the highly successful Anglo-French summit it was agreed that there would be a committee of wise people, a comité des sages, established to consider reviving the tradition of UK-French collaboration on a range of matters, including infrastructure projects.

Mr Speaker Hansard
19 Apr 2018, 10:21 a.m.

Well, I would call the hon. Member for Bassetlaw (John Mann) if he were here, but he isn’t, so I won’t.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 1st March 2018

(2 years, 5 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Transport
Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard

Protecting the line at Dawlish is a national priority of utmost importance and we are determined to find a permanent solution for this vital connection. Some £15 million of funding has been provided to Network Rail to take this forward and planning and development work is well under way. There will be no unnecessary delay, and we will complete this work as soon as we can within the law.

Mr Speaker Hansard
1 Mar 2018, 10:30 a.m.

It is very good to see the hon. Member for Hove back in his place. I call Mr Peter Kyle.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Thursday 18th January 2018

(2 years, 6 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Transport
Joseph Johnson Hansard

I thank my hon. Friend for his suggestion. We continue to work closely with Network Rail to ensure the impact of severe weather on the system is minimised. Across road, rail and aviation, we want our transport system moving whatever the weather.

Mr Speaker Hansard
18 Jan 2018, 10:03 a.m.

I always thought the hon. Member for Shipley (Philip Davies) had a substantial supply of grit all his own.

Break in Debate

The Minister of State, Department for Transport (Joseph Johnson) Parliament Live - Hansard

I am very happy to honour that commitment.

Mr Speaker Hansard
18 Jan 2018, 10:36 a.m.

Similarly brief, the hon. Member for Walsall North (Eddie Hughes).

Office for Students: Appointment

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Monday 8th January 2018

(2 years, 6 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard

I always listen closely to what my right hon. Friend, the Chair of the Education Committee, has to say, and I will look carefully at the article he has with him. Mr Young has expressed his regret and has apologised unreservedly for comments that, in some cases, were made in the 1980s. These are often very old writings and old pieces of work. I think that it is more helpful to Members if we focus on what he does rather than what he says. He has been a champion of students and of children with disabilities in mainstream education. He has a brother with learning disabilities and is a patron of the residential care home in which his brother lives, so we should not characterise him in the crude terms that Opposition Members have used. His deeds matter much more than the terms and the tweets that he has disowned.

Mr Speaker Hansard

Order. Using language slightly loosely, the Minister referred at the outset to how the shadow Minister had called this debate. On advice, I gently remind the House that this is not supposed to be a debate or, therefore, the occasion for speeches either from the Back Benches or the Front Benches; it is a time for pithy questions and answers, to which I know we will now return with enthusiasm.

Break in Debate

Mr Speaker Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 4:48 p.m.

The hon. Member for Manchester Central (Lucy Powell) looked almost inconsolable not to be called. It is true that I was looking in her direction at an earlier stage and might very well do so again, but it would be a pity to squander her at too early a stage of our proceeding. I am saving her up.

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 4:48 p.m.

In response to the question of the hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton (Afzal Khan), and to many other questions that might relate to individual tweets, articles or comments made by Mr Young over a long period of time, the answer is basically the same. Mr Young has acknowledged, and the Government have recognised, that much of what he said was foolish, wrong, offensive or obnoxious, and it is right that he has apologised and expressed regret for what he has said, written and done. It clearly does not reflect the values of the Office for Students or of the Government, but it is also important to recognise that, since he made many of those remarks, he has continued to make a valuable contribution to our education system, to the work of the Fulbright Commission and to the network of free schools across the country, and it is for that reason that he has been appointed to the board of the Office for Students.

Mr Speaker Hansard

I welcome the hon. Member for Morley and Outwood on her return from maternity leave, and let me say that it was a pleasure to attend her wedding.

Break in Debate

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 4:51 p.m.

My hon. Friend makes an important point about double standards, because misogyny and misogynistic attitudes are rampant on the Labour Benches, as has been acknowledged by the hon. Member for Birmingham, Yardley (Jess Phillips), who has described a persistent pattern of

“low-level non-violent misogyny”

at the top of the Labour party. It is important that Labour Members—[Interruption.] That is what she said. It is important that Labour Members do not apply double standards when addressing this question. [Interruption.]

Mr Speaker Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 4:51 p.m.

Order. I just say to the shadow Transport Secretary: sir, if you were a motor car, you would go from 0 to 60 in about five seconds. It is a discernible trait that I have discerned in you over a period of years and I wish to help you with this condition. Calm yourself. Just be a little calmer. There are many, many hours to go and there are many important developments to take place. Now, after due patience having been exercised, I call Lucy Powell.

Break in Debate

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 5:08 p.m.

As I have already said, Mr Young has been a champion of the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream education. Not only that, but outside his work with schools, he is a patron of the residential care home in which lives his brother, who has learning disabilities of his own.

Mr Speaker Hansard
8 Jan 2018, 5:09 p.m.

Order. I am looking to end these exchanges at quarter past 5, so Members need to be very brief.

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Tuesday 12th December 2017

(2 years, 7 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Joseph Johnson Hansard

The clean growth plan has been broadly and warmly welcomed. Low-carbon innovation is at the very heart of our approach to our industrial strategy, with more than £2.5 billion of Government investment from 2015 to 2021.

Mr Speaker Hansard

We have some very shy Government Back-Bench Members at this point, so I call Graham Jones.

Student Loans Company

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Monday 20th November 2017

(2 years, 8 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
20 Nov 2017, 3:55 p.m.

The new Office for Students comes into existence progressively from 1 January 2018, with its full operational existence commencing in April 2018. The Student Loans Company has its own statutory existence, independent of the Office for Students, and it will continue to carry out its vital function of ensuring that the loans we make available to remove barriers to access to higher education continue to be made available seamlessly to the students who are in need of them.

Mr Speaker Hansard

Order. I am looking at all these very academic colleagues, and of course my eye immediately focuses on Dr Roberta Blackman-Woods.

Break in Debate

Mr Speaker Hansard
20 Nov 2017, 4:02 p.m.

Order. That question is not altogether adjacent to the matter of the management and operation of the Student Loans Company. If I am being very polite to the hon. Gentleman, which I invariably am, I will say that his inquiry is at best tangential. It has at best a nodding acquaintance with the SLC, but no better than that. However, the Minister is a versatile and dextrous fellow, and I feel sure that he will be able to handle the matter eloquently and pithily.

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
20 Nov 2017, 4:01 p.m.

Thank you, Mr Speaker.

Students receive their funding indirectly from the Student Loans Company, and universities receive their funding directly from it, so it is vital that there is a strong relationship and that students feel that they are getting value for money from the funding that the SLC provides. The spirit of the Higher Education and Research Act 2017 is to promote value for money in our system, and to ensure that universities are delivering great teaching, great research and great outcomes for students.

Mr Speaker Hansard
20 Nov 2017, 4:02 p.m.

The Minister is not known as a considerable boffin for nothing.

Higher Education Funding

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Wednesday 11th October 2017

(2 years, 9 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Joseph Johnson Hansard
11 Oct 2017, 1:12 p.m.

I agree with my hon. Friend, and I find it alarming that the hon. Member for Blackpool South (Gordon Marsden) is chuntering away saying, “It’s not true.” It is true. The proportion of people from disadvantage backgrounds now going to university has increased. It is undeniably true. It is in the statistics from the Higher Education Statistics Agency and the Office for Fair Access. The number is 43% higher than it was in 2009-10. A young person is 52% more likely to go to a highly selective university than they were in 2009-10. It is extraordinary that the hon. Gentleman wants to deny it.

Mr Speaker Hansard
11 Oct 2017, 1:12 p.m.

Order. I was happy to indulge the Minister and to listen to his mellifluous tones, but as he will quickly discover as part of his apprenticeship in this place, the Minister is not responsible for the observations on “Question Time” or elsewhere of the shadow Secretary of State on this or any other matter.

Break in Debate

Mr Speaker Hansard
11 Oct 2017, 1:18 p.m.

Order. I am inordinately grateful to the hon. Gentleman, but it is procedurally improper for him to veer off the centre of the fairway, which he previously inhabited. Questions must be to the Government about the policy of the Government, not general exhortations to other Opposition parties, but I am sure if he wants to have a cup of tea in the Tea Room with the Labour Front-Bench spokesperson, there might be such an opportunity.

Joseph Johnson Parliament Live - Hansard
11 Oct 2017, 1:19 p.m.

I am grateful to the hon. Gentleman for making that point. It is true, of course, that the Labour Government in Wales have recently increased fees beyond the fee cap in England.

Bill Presented

Nuclear Safeguards Bill

Presentation and First Reading (Standing Order No. 57)

Secretary Greg Clark, supported by the Prime Minister, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Secretary David Gauke, Secretary Boris Johnson, Secretary Liam Fox and Secretary David Davis, presented a Bill to make provision about nuclear safeguards; and for connected purposes.

Bill read the First time; to be read a Second time tomorrow, and to be printed (Bill 109) with explanatory notes (Bill 109-EN).

Oral Answers to Questions

Debate between Joseph Johnson and John Bercow
Tuesday 12th September 2017

(2 years, 10 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Mr Speaker Hansard
12 Sep 2017, 11:50 a.m.

The hon. Gentleman got the word “space” in, but there is a distinction between aerospace and space. Some people might think that he was cheekily shoehorning his own preoccupation into a question to which it was not obviously entirely relevant.

Joseph Johnson Hansard
12 Sep 2017, 11:51 a.m.

None the less, I assure the hon. Gentleman that we are engaging very closely with the companies involved and will follow up on his points.