Robert Neill Portrait

Robert Neill

Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst

Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Justice Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Justice Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (Substitute Member)
15th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Vice-Chair, Conservative Party
1st Sep 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
10th Dec 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Justice Committee
5th Nov 2012 - 11th Feb 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Planning)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Deputy Chair, Conservative Party
1st Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Justice Committee
6th Nov 2007 - 6th May 2010
Constitutional Affairs
11th Dec 2006 - 5th Nov 2007


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 7th December 2021
14:00
Justice Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences
7 Dec 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
The Rt Hon. the Lord Blunkett, former Home Secretary (2001-2004)
The Rt Hon. the Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales (2013-2017)
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Professor Graham Towl - Professor of Psychology at Durham University, and visiting clinical professor at Newcastle University
Dr Jonathan Bild - Deputy Director at Sentencing Academy
Professor Nick Hardwick - Professor of Criminal Justice at Department of Law and Criminology at Royal Holloway, University of London
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 13th December 2021
16:00
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 14th December 2021
14:00
Division Votes
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Finance (No. 2) Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 302 Conservative No votes vs 2 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 212 Noes - 306
Speeches
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

T10. I refer to my interest as chair of the all-party parliamentary group on stroke and as the husband of …

Written Answers
Thursday 30th September 2021
Buildings: Insulation
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent estimate he has made of the …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Wednesday 2nd July 2014
European Union (Referendum) Bill 2014-15
A Bill to make provision for the holding of a referendum in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar on the United …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 29th November 2021
1. Employment and earnings
11 November 2021, received £1,023 from Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, Hinkley Hub, Rugby Road, Hinckley LE10 0FR, for an …
EDM signed
Monday 13th September 2021
Emma Raducanu, 2021 US Open women's champion
That this House is delighted, amazed and inspired by the performances of Emma Raducanu in winning the US Open without …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 30th January 2018
Kew Gardens (Leases) (No. 2) Bill 2017-19
A Bill to Provide that the Secretary of State’s powers in relation to the management of the Royal Botanic Gardens, …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Robert Neill has voted in 304 divisions, and 10 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 257 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 163
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
View All Robert Neill Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Robert Buckland (Conservative)
(51 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(15 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(80 debate contributions)
Home Office
(37 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(25 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Robert Neill's debates

Bromley and Chislehurst Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government should class in-person interaction with family members and unmarried partners abroad as an essential reason to travel.


Latest EDMs signed by Robert Neill

13th September 2021
Robert Neill signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 13th September 2021

Emma Raducanu, 2021 US Open women's champion

Tabled by: Toby Perkins (Labour - Chesterfield)
That this House is delighted, amazed and inspired by the performances of Emma Raducanu in winning the US Open without losing a set; notes that she is the first qualifier in the history of tennis to win a grand slam event; congratulates Emma and all those involved in her success; …
21 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 8
Scottish National Party: 5
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Independent: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
20th December 2019
Robert Neill signed this EDM on Thursday 9th January 2020

Unsafe cladding

Tabled by: Hilary Benn (Labour - Leeds Central)
That this House notes with concern the number of people living in blocks with cladding (both ACM and HPL) which has either been identified as unsafe or has yet to be inspected; is aware that a growing number of people are currently unable to sell their homes because of this …
35 signatures
(Most recent: 12 Oct 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 22
Conservative: 4
Scottish National Party: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Green Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Robert Neill's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Robert Neill, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Robert Neill has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Robert Neill has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Robert Neill


A Bill to make provision for the holding of a referendum in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 17th October 2014

31 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent estimate he has made of the average time between an offer of funding to remediate dangerous cladding being made by his Department and a Grant Funding Agreement being signed by the applicant.

The Government acknowledges that remediation of unsafe cladding is complex and each individual project will vary in their journey through the funding application process. Detailed information on the Building Safety Fund application process and estimated timelines can be found in the Building Safety Fund application guidance available at: www.gov.uk/guidance/remediation-of-non-acm-buildings#building-safety-fund-application-process

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what the average amount spent by owners of buildings is on legal advice on their Grant Funding Agreement between the agreement being offered by his Department and the owner signing that agreement.

This information is not held by the Department.

The Government's funding covers all reasonable costs directly related to the remediation of unsafe cladding systems which may include legal fees involved with managing an application and a remediation project. This would be paid out together with other costs associated with the remediation project.

As a condition of funding, we require that all Government funding received, including for legal costs, are to be paid into an account which is for the benefit of leaseholders. This means that the funding can only be used for the remediation project, with no eligible project costs being passed onto leaseholders.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether provisions in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement allow for (a) a short supplementing agreement or a Joint Declaration and (b) other bilateral agreements.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) imposes reciprocal obligations on the Parties to the Agreement. The TCA also includes some provisions – common in international agreements of this kind – which impose specific obligations on a particular Party.

There is no general non-discrimination provision applicable to all current and future EU Member States in the TCA.

The TCA does not prohibit either the UK or EU from entering into future agreements with each other. Article COMPROV.2 of the TCA includes information on how to treat future UK-EU agreements. The UK and EU Member States are free to make bilateral agreements with each other in principle. However, whether the EU Member States can enter into an agreement with the UK depends on the subject matter and the competence position under EU law.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the provisions agreed in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement are reciprocal and include a binding non-discrimination clause covering all current and future EU member states.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) imposes reciprocal obligations on the Parties to the Agreement. The TCA also includes some provisions – common in international agreements of this kind – which impose specific obligations on a particular Party.

There is no general non-discrimination provision applicable to all current and future EU Member States in the TCA.

The TCA does not prohibit either the UK or EU from entering into future agreements with each other. Article COMPROV.2 of the TCA includes information on how to treat future UK-EU agreements. The UK and EU Member States are free to make bilateral agreements with each other in principle. However, whether the EU Member States can enter into an agreement with the UK depends on the subject matter and the competence position under EU law.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions the Government has had EU Member States on cultural exemptions for work permits for musicians and other creative professionals seeking paid work in the EU.

This government recognises the importance of our world leading creative and cultural industries. That is why the UK took an ambitious approach during negotiations that would have ensured that touring musicians, performers and their support staff did not need work-permits to perform in the EU. Regrettably, our proposals were rejected by the EU, but our door remains open if the EU wants to reconsider its position.

A bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU would require the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) to be renegotiated. The TCA is the basis of our trading relations with the EU, and this is not going to be renegotiated.

The Commission would be likely to argue that any EU-wide visa waiver agreement can only be part of a wider package with a binding non-discrimination clause and a reciprocal visa waiver agreement covering all current and future Member States. This was what the Commission proposed in the negotiations and would be incompatible with our manifesto commitment to retain control of our borders.

It should also be noted that while the EU has visa-waiver deals with some other third countries, this does not bind Member States and many continue to apply visas on paid activity, while some Member States offer the same waiver regime to those with whom they don’t have deals.

However, we will imminently be engaging with Member States to improve their guidance around their entry and work requirements. DCMS is working closely with the FCDO and other government departments on an engagement strategy with EU Member States, and DCMS Ministers will speak to our Heads of Missions in EU countries shortly. Should Member States be willing to change their rules to match the UK’s significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals, then we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of negotiating a bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU exempting touring musicians, performers, creative teams and crews from needing to obtain a visa when seeking paid work.

This government recognises the importance of our world leading creative and cultural industries. That is why the UK took an ambitious approach during negotiations that would have ensured that touring musicians, performers and their support staff did not need work-permits to perform in the EU. Regrettably, our proposals were rejected by the EU, but our door remains open if the EU wants to reconsider its position.

A bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU would require the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) to be renegotiated. The TCA is the basis of our trading relations with the EU, and this is not going to be renegotiated.

The Commission would be likely to argue that any EU-wide visa waiver agreement can only be part of a wider package with a binding non-discrimination clause and a reciprocal visa waiver agreement covering all current and future Member States. This was what the Commission proposed in the negotiations and would be incompatible with our manifesto commitment to retain control of our borders.

It should also be noted that while the EU has visa-waiver deals with some other third countries, this does not bind Member States and many continue to apply visas on paid activity, while some Member States offer the same waiver regime to those with whom they don’t have deals.

However, we will imminently be engaging with Member States to improve their guidance around their entry and work requirements. DCMS is working closely with the FCDO and other government departments on an engagement strategy with EU Member States, and DCMS Ministers will speak to our Heads of Missions in EU countries shortly. Should Member States be willing to change their rules to match the UK’s significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals, then we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will provide an emergency funding package for the performing arts sector to mitigate the costs associated with touring in Europe and new visa and work permits rules.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how creative professionals operate in the EU. UK performing artists are still able to tour and perform in the EU. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the performing arts and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. This includes producing new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress his Department has made on producing guidance for the performing arts sector on the visa and work permit requirements for each EU Member State.

While UK performing artists are still able to tour and perform in the EU, being outside the European Union means practical changes on both sides of the Channel that will require understanding and adaptation. We recognise this, and that is why we are working urgently across government to ensure guidance is clear, up to date and accessible for the performing arts sector travelling to the EU.

To date, we have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes. We will continue to enhance guidance for businesses to support travel for work purposes under our new trading relationship with the European Union, and we will publish business traveller summaries for each Member State in April. We are also developing sector specific “landing pages” for GOV.UK.

We will imminently be engaging with EU Member States to improve their guidance, specifically around their entry and work permit requirements, to ensure this is as clear and accessible as possible. Where there are issues around the clarity of Member States’ immigration rules, we will also raise these with the European Commission.

And through the DCMS-led Working Group, we are working closely with sector bodies - several of whom have already produced excellent guidance in this area - to help distil and clarify the new rules further.

7th Sep 2020
What steps his Department is taking to support the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people as they return to school as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Getting children and young people back into education, with settings devoting time to supporting wellbeing, will play a fundamental part in supporting children and young people’s mental health. The return to school will allow social interaction with peers, carers and teachers, which benefits wellbeing. The department has now published detailed plans?for all children and young people to return to full-time education from September. The guidance for schools is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

We have been working hard to ensure that all pupils and learners will return to a full high-quality education programme in September. Our £1 billion Covid catch-up package, with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020-21 academic year, will support education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place. More information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

As pupils return to school, staff need to be equipped to understand that some children and young people may be experiencing feelings in such as anxiety, stress or low mood as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, and that these are normal responses to an abnormal situation. Our Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools Advice includes information about what to look for in terms of underlying mental health issues, linked to the graduated response and the support that might be suitable. More information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mental-health-and-behaviour-in-schools--2.

From September, the Government is investing £8 million to launch the new Wellbeing for Education Return training programme, which will provide schools and colleges all over England with the knowledge and practical skills they need to support teachers, students and parents, to help improve how they respond to the emotional impact of the coronavirus pandemic. This is additional to?longer term work to improve support, including?the?new?mental health support teams that we are rolling out?across the country,?linked to schools and colleges. More information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/8m-programme-to-boost-pupil-and-teacher-wellbeing.

The department in collaboration with Public Health England and NHS England, delivered two webinars in July to provide further mental health support. The first webinar was for schools and colleges?to support?teachers in?promoting?and supporting?the?mental wellbeing?of children and young people?during the COVID-19 outbreak.?The second event was for?stakeholders?across the local system?to?support?strengthening of local partnerships?to?further?support?children and young people’s mental health as they return to school. We had around 10,000 sign up to the first webinar and around 1,300 to the second, and they are now available online for wider use.

We continue to working in partnership across education, health, the voluntary sector and local authorities to ensure that children and young people, parents and carers, and the professionals supporting them:

  • can access good-quality resources
  • are confident in supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing (as well as their own) and
  • ensure access to specialist services when they’re needed.

Access to mental health support is more important than ever during the COVID-19 outbreak. NHS mental services remain open. All NHS mental health trusts are providing 24/7 open access telephone lines to support people of all ages. The Government has also provided over £9 million to mental health charities to ensure they can continue to support people experiencing mental health challenges throughout the outbreak.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the adequacy of the availability of call handlers at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

Throughout the pandemic the DVLA’s contact centre has actively managed its operation and flexed the services for customers in line with the available resources. This has included procuring the use of an additional building to increase the number of staff able to take calls within the social distancing guidelines. Remote working has been increased with staff handling email, webchat, social media and more recently telephone customer contacts.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to reduce licensing backlogs at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The quickest and easiest way to make an application to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is by using its extensive suite of online services. There are no delays in successful online applications and customers should receive their documents within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day and industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union has led to delays for customers. Throughout the pandemic DVLA has also been working with a significantly reduced number of staff on site to ensure social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements. The current increased demand for the DVLA’s services has also contributed to delays with paper applications.

Paper driving licence applications are currently taking between six and ten weeks to process. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example if medical investigations are needed. The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found here.

The DVLA continues to explore opportunities to reduce turnaround times and has introduced new online services and recruited additional staff. The DVLA is exploring the possibility of securing extra office space to accommodate more staff to work predominantly on drivers’ medical casework and queries. This will be surge capacity accommodation and resource to help reduce backlogs while providing future resilience and business continuity.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will reinstate emergency driving tests for critical workers.

To help stop the spread of coronavirus, routine driving tests have been suspended in all areas of England, Scotland and Wales.

In England and Wales, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will respond to requests for driving tests from organisations on behalf of frontline mobile emergency workers, who require a driving licence to carry out duties in their employment role. This service is restricted to candidates working in health and social care, and public bodies providing a service in the national interest. The DVSA will contact eligible organisations.

Approved driving instructors and trainers can return to work only for the purpose of supporting a mobile emergency worker with a booked test.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to reduce delays for new licence applications and renewals at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) has a range of services available online offering quick and easy ways of transacting. The DVLA’s online services have worked well and as normal throughout the pandemic. Over 36 million online driver and vehicle transactions have been processed since March with nearly two million driving licences issued.

The DVLA’s 6,000 staff are largely based at a single site in Swansea and to adhere to Welsh social distancing requirements the number of staff onsite has been greatly reduced. This has impacted on the time taken to process applications sent by post as these have to be dealt with in person.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to maximise staff numbers whilst meeting the requirement in Wales to maintain the two-metre social distancing and ensure it remains Covid secure.

Additionally, drivers with a licence that expires between 1 February and 31 December 2020 have been given an automatic extension from the date of expiry. This means they will not need to renew their entitlement to drive until 11 months after the original expiry date.

The DVLA has also accelerated the development of additional online services to further reduce paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the availability of practical driving tests.

Since 26 August 2020, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has been making available, on a weekly basis, a limited number of practical driving test appointments for the general public to book for up to six weeks ahead. Over 69,000 practical driving tests have been booked or rescheduled since 26 August 2020.

From 14 September 2020, the DVSA will be making available over 375,000 new and rescheduled test appointments up to 21 January 2021.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
What steps the Government is taking to support stroke teams to deliver the objectives set out in the National Stroke Service Model.

The National Stroke Service Model, published by NHS England and NHS Improvement in May 2021 articulates optimal stroke delivery based upon best evidence. There are, as of 1 April, 20 integrated stroke delivery networks, which are delivering joined-up stroke pathways. The model will ensure access to specialist rehabilitation on hospital discharge that is patient-directed, giving a needs-based approach rather than time. We are supporting stroke teams to ensure they have skilled and sustainable workforce.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will publish weekly data on the number of people who test positive for covid-19 while required to quarantine in a managed quarantine hotel.

The information requested is not currently available as it is being centrally validated ahead of publication later in the year. The data will be published in a weekly format.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2021
What steps he is taking to improve (a) aftercare and (b) rehabilitation for victims of stroke.

The NHS Long Term Plan highlighted stroke community rehabilitation as an area with significant scope for improvement. NHS England and NHS Improvement are piloting higher intensity models of stroke rehabilitation at several sites around the country. In addition, investment has been made in the development of integrated stroke delivery networks, delivering improvements across the whole stroke pathway, including rehabilitation and life after stroke services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Government has made any offers of assistance to the South African Government in response to violence and unrest in that country.

The UK was concerned by the recent outbreak of violence and looting in the South African provinces of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, which sadly resulted in loss of life, injuries, and substantial damage to buildings and businesses. We welcome the South African Government's determination to restore calm and strongly support President Ramaphosa's emphasis on the importance of the rule of law. Our High Commission remains in regular contact with the South African authorities. As a long-standing friend of South Africa, the UK will continue to partner closely with the South African Government, business and civil society on a shared agenda of security, health, economic and social issues.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment the Government has made of the level of unrest in (a) KwaZulu-Natal and (b) other provinces in South Africa.

The UK was concerned by the recent outbreak of violence and looting in the South African provinces of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, which sadly resulted in loss of life, injuries, and substantial damage to buildings and businesses. We welcome the South African Government's determination to restore calm and strongly support President Ramaphosa's emphasis on the importance of the rule of law. Our High Commission remains in regular contact with the South African authorities. As a long-standing friend of South Africa, the UK will continue to partner closely with the South African Government, business and civil society on a shared agenda of security, health, economic and social issues.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with other his counterparts in the international community on the recent violence in the Galwan Valley.

On 24 June the Prime Minister expressed his concern at increased tensions between China and India. We welcome recent progress between India and China to manage tensions along their disputed border and the commitment on 5 July by Indian and Chinese Special Representatives on 'the Boundary Question' to disengage troops along the Line of Actual Control and de-escalate the border areas. We encourage both sides to maintain dialogue and continue to monitor the situation closely.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Indian counterpart on steps to de-escalate tensions with the People’s Republic of China along the Line of Actual Control; what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of progress of the disengagement agreement between the governments of India and China; and steps he is taking to monitor the political situation in that region.

On 24 June The Prime Minister expressed his concern at increased tensions between China and India. We welcome recent progress between India and China to manage tensions along their disputed border and the commitment on 5 July by Indian and Chinese Special Representatives on 'the Boundary Question' to disengage troops along the Line of Actual Control and de-escalate the border areas. We encourage both sides to maintain dialogue and continue to monitor the situation closely.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will provide further immigration guidance on inward mobility including (a) short-term visitor routes, (b) frontier workers, (c) paid permitted engagement and the roles that qualify under this, and (d) longer term engagements.

Extensive guidance is already available on gov.uk for applicants and caseworkers.

There are no plans to publish any further at the current time.

Visitor applicant guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/standard-visitor-visa

Permitted paid engagement applicant guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/permitted-paid-engagement-visa

Visitor caseworker guidance, including for permitted paid engagements, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/visit-guidance

Frontier worker applicant guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/frontier-worker-permit

Frontier worker caseworker guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/frontier-worker-permit-scheme-caseworker-guidance

Longer term engagements are covered by our work routes. Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/browse/visas-immigration/work-visas

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress has been made on the process for allocation of funding under the Shared Prosperity Fund.

The November 2020 Spending Review set out the main strategic elements of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund in a Heads of Terms. Further details will be set out in a UK-wide Investment Framework to be published later this year and funding profile for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will be set at the next Spending Review. The UK Government is providing an additional £220 million funding through the UK Community Renewal Fund to help local areas prepare for the launch of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund in 2022.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to promote access to early legal advice for divorcing couples.

We spent £1.7bn in 2019 on Legal Aid to ensure vulnerable people have access to proportionate legal advice and support and that we minimise the burden on courts and tribunals.

Legal aid is available for private family matters where an applicant is a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic abuse or child abuse, subject to the means and merits criteria. The Exceptional Case Funding scheme provides legal aid in cases which fall out of scope. It provides legal aid where without it there would be a breach, or risk of a breach of, human rights, subject to the statutory means and merits test.

But legal aid is only one part of a broader picture. As set out in our Legal Support Action plan, there are other forms of support that can help people overcome their problems, such as legal information, guidance and signposting so that everyone can access justice in a way that best meets their needs.

In April we also launched the new, two-year, £3.1m Legal Support for Litigants in Person Grant, which is designed to fund services provided at local, regional and national levels with the aim of understanding more about how they can combine to help people. This new grant funding is in addition to the more than £9m that the MoJ has invested in support for litigants in person since 2015 through our existing Litigants in Person Support Strategy.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service has established 17 Nightingale courts across England and Wales, providing 32 additional court rooms, and are recruiting more staff.

Judicial sitting days in the family court have been increased and approximately £3.5m additional funding has helped Cafcass increase staffing levels to respond to record levels of open cases.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of divorce on people's mental health; and what steps his Department is taking to help reduce that effect.

The Government has made a landmark change to the law on divorce with the Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Act 2020. We are working to implement it so that the legal process for divorce does not incentivise conflict. By making an applicant or applicants’ statement conclusive evidence of the irretrievable breakdown of a marriage or civil partnership, we are removing the need to establish conduct or separation-based facts and for the drafting of supporting particulars.

We want to encourage positive, non-confrontational approaches to resolving problems before they reach the courts. This includes separating parents who are in conflict. In December 2020, we issued a statement on behalf of the Family Justice Board that sets out our immediate and longer-term reform priorities for the family justice system. This includes testing an earlier gateway to court to offer families a more rounded assessment of the needs of children and their families, and an improved offer for non-adversarial problem solving. This Government is committed to ensuring couples and parents can navigate the family justice system and understand the different options available to resolve their disputes, including out-of-court options such as mediation where they are safe and appropriate.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of reductions in legal aid on access to professional or legal support for divorcing couples.

We spent £1.7bn in 2019 on Legal Aid to ensure vulnerable people have access to proportionate legal advice and support and that we minimise the burden on courts and tribunals.

Legal aid is available for private family matters where an applicant is a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic abuse or child abuse, subject to the means and merits criteria. The Exceptional Case Funding scheme provides legal aid in cases which fall out of scope. It provides legal aid where without it there would be a breach, or risk of a breach of, human rights, subject to the statutory means and merits test.

But legal aid is only one part of a broader picture. As set out in our Legal Support Action plan, there are other forms of support that can help people overcome their problems, such as legal information, guidance and signposting so that everyone can access justice in a way that best meets their needs.

In April we also launched the new, two-year, £3.1m Legal Support for Litigants in Person Grant, which is designed to fund services provided at local, regional and national levels with the aim of understanding more about how they can combine to help people. This new grant funding is in addition to the more than £9m that the MoJ has invested in support for litigants in person since 2015 through our existing Litigants in Person Support Strategy.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service has established 17 Nightingale courts across England and Wales, providing 32 additional court rooms, and are recruiting more staff.

Judicial sitting days in the family court have been increased and approximately £3.5m additional funding has helped Cafcass increase staffing levels to respond to record levels of open cases.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of improved early access to professional advice for divorcing couples on conflict and the mental health of those involved.

We spent £1.7bn in 2019 on Legal Aid to ensure vulnerable people have access to proportionate legal advice and support and that we minimise the burden on courts and tribunals.

Legal aid is available for private family matters where an applicant is a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic abuse or child abuse, subject to the means and merits criteria. The Exceptional Case Funding scheme provides legal aid in cases which fall out of scope. It provides legal aid where without it there would be a breach, or risk of a breach of, human rights, subject to the statutory means and merits test.

But legal aid is only one part of a broader picture. As set out in our Legal Support Action plan, there are other forms of support that can help people overcome their problems, such as legal information, guidance and signposting so that everyone can access justice in a way that best meets their needs.

In April we also launched the new, two-year, £3.1m Legal Support for Litigants in Person Grant, which is designed to fund services provided at local, regional and national levels with the aim of understanding more about how they can combine to help people. This new grant funding is in addition to the more than £9m that the MoJ has invested in support for litigants in person since 2015 through our existing Litigants in Person Support Strategy.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service has established 17 Nightingale courts across England and Wales, providing 32 additional court rooms, and are recruiting more staff.

Judicial sitting days in the family court have been increased and approximately £3.5m additional funding has helped Cafcass increase staffing levels to respond to record levels of open cases.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential benefits to the (a) public purse and (b) court system of ensuring legal aid is accessible in family law cases.

We spent £1.7bn in 2019 on Legal Aid to ensure vulnerable people have access to proportionate legal advice and support and that we minimise the burden on courts and tribunals.

Legal aid is available for private family matters where an applicant is a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic abuse or child abuse, subject to the means and merits criteria. The Exceptional Case Funding scheme provides legal aid in cases which fall out of scope. It provides legal aid where without it there would be a breach, or risk of a breach of, human rights, subject to the statutory means and merits test.

But legal aid is only one part of a broader picture. As set out in our Legal Support Action plan, there are other forms of support that can help people overcome their problems, such as legal information, guidance and signposting so that everyone can access justice in a way that best meets their needs.

In April we also launched the new, two-year, £3.1m Legal Support for Litigants in Person Grant, which is designed to fund services provided at local, regional and national levels with the aim of understanding more about how they can combine to help people. This new grant funding is in addition to the more than £9m that the MoJ has invested in support for litigants in person since 2015 through our existing Litigants in Person Support Strategy.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service has established 17 Nightingale courts across England and Wales, providing 32 additional court rooms, and are recruiting more staff.

Judicial sitting days in the family court have been increased and approximately £3.5m additional funding has helped Cafcass increase staffing levels to respond to record levels of open cases.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to raise awareness of out-of-court alternatives for couples seeking divorce.

The Government has made a landmark change to the law on divorce with the Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Act 2020. We are working to implement it so that the legal process for divorce does not incentivise conflict. By making an applicant or applicants’ statement conclusive evidence of the irretrievable breakdown of a marriage or civil partnership, we are removing the need to establish conduct or separation-based facts and for the drafting of supporting particulars.

We want to encourage positive, non-confrontational approaches to resolving problems before they reach the courts. This includes separating parents who are in conflict. In December 2020, we issued a statement on behalf of the Family Justice Board that sets out our immediate and longer-term reform priorities for the family justice system. This includes testing an earlier gateway to court to offer families a more rounded assessment of the needs of children and their families, and an improved offer for non-adversarial problem solving. This Government is committed to ensuring couples and parents can navigate the family justice system and understand the different options available to resolve their disputes, including out-of-court options such as mediation where they are safe and appropriate.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)