Jake Berry Portrait

Jake Berry

Conservative - Rossendale and Darwen

Jake Berry is not a member of any APPGs
5 Former APPG memberships
Dyslexia and Other Specific Learning Difficulties, Korea, Sailing and Marine Business, Social Integration, Tamils
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (jointly with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government)
25th Jul 2019 - 13th Feb 2020
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Jun 2019 - 25th Jul 2019
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
8th Jan 2018 - 25th Jul 2019
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government)
14th Jun 2017 - 8th Jan 2018
Finance Committee (Commons)
20th Jul 2015 - 16th Jan 2017


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Finance (No. 2) Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 301 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 307
Speeches
Tuesday 30th November 2021
Conduct of the Right Hon. Member for Uxbridge and South Ruislip

One thing that my right hon. and learned Friend has failed to mention and that I am sure he will …

Written Answers
Monday 15th November 2021
Cabinet Office: Heating
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what type of heating system …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Wednesday 22nd February 2017
Lee Valley Regional Park (Amendment) Bill 2016-17
A Bill to amend section 48(4) of the Lee Valley Regional Park Act 1966 to remove the power of the …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 15th November 2021
1. Employment and earnings
1 October 2021, received £200 from the BBC, PO Box 745, Redhill RH1 9GB, for appearing on Any Questions. Hours: …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Jake Berry has voted in 305 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Jake Berry Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kevan Jones (Labour)
(7 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(6 debate interactions)
Lyn Brown (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
(5 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(26 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(16 debate contributions)
Home Office
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jake Berry's debates

Rossendale and Darwen Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Jake Berry has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jake Berry

Jake Berry has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jake Berry, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Jake Berry has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Jake Berry has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Jake Berry


Following agreement by both Houses on the text of the Bill it received Royal Assent on 26 March. The Bill is now an Act of Parliament (law). A Bill to make provision about the inclusion at local authority meetings of observances that are, and about powers of local authorities in relation to events that to any extent are, religious or related to a religious or philosophical belief.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 26th March 2015 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend section 48(4) of the Lee Valley Regional Park Act 1966 to remove the power of the Lee Valley Regional Park Authority to raise by way of levy on any local authority whose local authority area falls outside the area defined under section 2(2) of the Act; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 22nd February 2017
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to prohibit the advertising of gambling on broadcast media before the watershed; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 1st April 2014

Jake Berry has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


24 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Department's estate is managed by the Government Property Agency and we do not hold this data. The Government Property Agency will be looking at decarbonising the Estate, as part of their wider work of their strategic asset management planning.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to respond to Question 58823 tabled by the hon. Member for Rossendale and Darwen on 19 October 2021.

A comprehensive reply on the details of government heating systems will be given to the Rt. Hon. Member in due course.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) manages approximately 30% of the government’s central estate offices and acts as a landlord to government department clients (including Cabinet Office) located within those offices. GPA is an Executive Agency of the Cabinet Office.

The majority of GPA’s properties have heating systems served by boilers. This includes the Whitehall District Heating System; a system owned and operated by GPA that distributes heating to premises in the Whitehall estate.

GPA’s newly developed assets have utilised more carbon efficient forms of heating. One such example is the new hub in Birmingham at 23 Stephenson Street which has a mechanical heat recovery ventilation system with electricity as its fuel source.

As was set out in the Heat and Buildings Strategy and the Net Zero Strategy on 19th October, we are clear that decarbonising public sector buildings will demonstrate leadership, encouraging action in other sectors as well as making a direct contribution to Net Zero. We aim to reduce direct emissions from public sector buildings by 75% against a 2017 baseline by the end of carbon budget 6.

Over £1 billion has been committed in the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme over 2020/21 and 2021/22 to support heat decarbonisation and energy efficiency in the public sector, and a further £1.425 billion will be invested over 2022/23 to 2024/25.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating at (a) Chequers, (b) Dorneywood, (c) Chevening House, (d) 10 Downing Street, (e) 11 Downing Street and (f) 1 Carlton Gardens; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Cabinet Office does not manage or occupy 1 Carlton Gardens or the Chequers, Dorneywood and Chevening Estates.

The buildings at 10 to 12 Downing Street were originally built in the 1680s, with extensive works undertaken in the Georgian era. They are Grade 1 listed. Maintaining and updating these historic buildings, whilst protecting the integrity of that heritage, presents distinct challenges.

Its primary source of heating is from the Whitehall Campus District Heating System which distributes heating to premises in the Whitehall estate.

The Downing Street estate has already taken a number of eco-friendly measures such as a full rainwater harvesting system for the gardens, and low-energy and motion detecting lighting throughout, whilst preserving the heritage of the listed buildings. It has three electric vehicle charging points.

In 2013, No.10 won an award for sustainability improvements to the building. BRE Environmental Assessment Method named it as the best for year-over-year improvements out of 800 other candidates.

The property also has a Display Energy Certificate, which is for the whole building (not just the residences). The current rating is “E”, up from “F” the previous year.

In line with the Prime Minister’s ambition for the UK to be a global leader in clean, green technology and sustainable living, the Cabinet Office is looking to build on these measures in the future. This includes exploring the scope for heat pumps when the boilers reach the end of their working life and making greater use of renewable energy sources.

As noted in the recent Heating and Building Strategy, the Government has made strong progress on reducing emissions in the Government estate by 50 per cent over 10 years through energy efficiency and green measures. The Strategy sets out a gradual fourteen-year transition to low carbon heating systems and we are investing a further £1.4 billion over the next 3 years in reducing emissions from public sector buildings.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The BEIS headquarters building in 1 Victoria Street use a diverse mix of energy including gas and solar. Like other offices across the country, as decisions are made about future energy usage in light of the Government’s Net Zero commitments, further steps to decarbonise including installing heat pumps and connecting to heat networks will be taken.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) acts as a landlord to government department clients, including Cabinet Office, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Department for International Trade, the Department for Education and others.

The majority of GPA’s properties have heating systems served by gas fired boilers. This includes the Whitehall District Heating System, which is a system owned and operated by GPA that distributes heating to premises in the Whitehall Campus from conventional fossil fuel boilers.

GPA’s newly developed assets have utilised more carbon efficient forms of heating, such as the new hub in Birmingham at 23 Stephenson Street, which has a mechanical heat recovery system with electricity as its fuel source.

GPA has started a Net Zero Offices Programme, which seeks to remove fossil fuel boilers (where they have reached end of economic life) and replace them with more environmental forms of heating such as use of air source heat pumps and, in the case of the Whitehall District Heating System, the utilisation of ground source heat pumps. The Net Zero Offices Programmes is seeking funding for its heat decarbonisation projects through applications to the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support apprentices to catch up on the training and learning that they have missed during the covid-19 to ensure that they can finish their apprenticeship fully qualified.

The department is committed to supporting apprentices and employers to safely continue with, and complete, their apprenticeship programmes. We have introduced flexibilities to ensure that apprenticeship training and assessments can continue during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Where it is not possible and practicable for the apprentice to continue training, a break in learning can be used to allow the apprentice to return to learning at a future date. It is our goal that apprentices are able to promptly resume their apprenticeship and continue to successful completion of end-point assessment. For apprentices who have taken a formal break in learning, this will result in the planned end-date for their apprenticeship being replanned upon returning to learning to take into consideration the duration in line with the length of their break.

We continue to review the flexibilities in place to ensure high-quality training can continue allowing apprentices to undertake their learning and assessments despite current operating constraints. Our guidance can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-apprenticeship-programme-response.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the legal basis is for the detention of students within halls of residence at Manchester Metropolitan University who are not displaying symptoms of covid-19 and have not tested positive for the disease.

The safety and wellbeing of staff and students in higher education (HE) is always our priority. The government is doing all it can to minimise the risks to those working and studying in our HE providers in this unprecedented situation, while mitigating the impact on education.

Students should follow the latest health advice, meaning that they should stay in their accommodation in the event that they, or anyone in their household, develops symptoms or are otherwise required to self-isolate.

Decisions on which measures to apply should be made by the local public health team, based on the information received through NHS Test and Trace. HE providers should work with Public Health England to agree on which instructions they provide to students and should ensure that students understand what is required of them if they need to self-isolate.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

Identifying opportunities to decarbonise the department’s heating systems is already underway and the following breakdown of fuel sources has already been identified.

On the 93 sites that the Department provides heating:

  • 53 are provided by gas
  • 13 by electric
  • 11 by other Government departments or local Government offices where we are a minority occupier in their buildings.
  • 8 sites covered by service charges. This is the case in many small sites where we have a small office at a point of entry.
  • 4 by oil
  • 3 by biomass
  • 1 by LPG

A number of Defra’s buildings will become part of the Government Property Agency’s (GPA) Government property model and GPA is leading net zero plans to decarbonise these buildings. Defra will support these plans where required.

The buildings that remain under Defra group Property’s remit will be decarbonised as much as possible by the department’s Spending Review plans and by bidding for funding from the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme. These plans include the deployment of air or ground source heat pumps to support or replace existing heating systems, a move towards electrical heating and a better use of building management systems to achieve zonal heating to avoid heating unoccupied parts of a building.

There is also some exploratory work underway to look at the viability of hydrogen fuel heating and power generation which could help significantly with the decarbonisation of the laboratory sites.

The department will not rely on carbon offsets as a means to decarbonise buildings, instead making the reduction of direct emissions the primary aim.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department plans to take to tackle dog attacks on livestock.

New measures to crack down on livestock worrying are to be introduced in England and Wales through the Kept Animals Bill introduced to Parliament on 8 June.

We will enhance enforcement mechanisms available to the police and expand the scope of livestock species and locations covered by the law. Improved powers will enable the police to respond to livestock worrying incidents more effectively – making it easier for them to collect evidence and, in the most serious cases, seize and detain dogs to reduce the risk of further incidents.

The scope of livestock species covered by the legislation will be extended to include animals such as llamas, emus, enclosed deer and donkeys. New locations will include roads and paths, as long as the livestock have not strayed into a road.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to protect (a) Areas Of Outstanding Natural Beauty, (b) the West Pennine Moors and other moorland areas and (c) National Parks from fires caused by the use of disposable barbecues.

We are clear that everyone should follow the Countryside Code. A key part of Government strategy is to get clear and consistent messages to the media which highlight the problem and promote better behaviour in the countryside and encourage a partnership response.

There are existing powers in legislation which can be used by authorities to regulate and prohibit the lighting of fires on Access Land in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs) and National Parks. Current ‘Byelaw’ legislation allows for local authorities to restrict and enforce the use of disposable barbecues in parks and public spaces. Government has no plans for additional legislative proposals to introduce a seasonal ban on the use of disposable barbecues.

Government is working with AONBs, National Park Authorities; and other Government departments to promote a series of guidance videos to educate users about travelling to and spending time outdoors safely in the wider countryside. This includes an updated Countryside Code which advises not to have barbeques or fires. This guidance is available at the following links:

Green space access: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-on-accessing-green-spaces-safely

The Countryside Code: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-countryside-code/the-countryside-code

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will bring forward legislative proposals for a seasonal ban on the use of disposable barbecues away from the home in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, moorland areas and National Parks to help prevent fires after prolonged periods of dry weather.

We are clear that everyone should follow the Countryside Code. A key part of Government strategy is to get clear and consistent messages to the media which highlight the problem and promote better behaviour in the countryside and encourage a partnership response.

There are existing powers in legislation which can be used by authorities to regulate and prohibit the lighting of fires on Access Land in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs) and National Parks. Current ‘Byelaw’ legislation allows for local authorities to restrict and enforce the use of disposable barbecues in parks and public spaces. Government has no plans for additional legislative proposals to introduce a seasonal ban on the use of disposable barbecues.

Government is working with AONBs, National Park Authorities; and other Government departments to promote a series of guidance videos to educate users about travelling to and spending time outdoors safely in the wider countryside. This includes an updated Countryside Code which advises not to have barbeques or fires. This guidance is available at the following links:

Green space access: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-on-accessing-green-spaces-safely

The Countryside Code: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-countryside-code/the-countryside-code

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by her Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) acts as a landlord to government department clients, including Cabinet Office, the Department for Business Energy & Industrial Strategy, the Department for International Trade, the Department for Education and others.

The majority of GPA’s properties have heating systems served by gas fired boilers. This includes the Whitehall District Heating System, which is a system owned and operated by GPA that distributes heating to premises in the Whitehall Campus from conventional fossil fuel boilers.

GPA’s newly developed assets have utilised more carbon efficient forms of heating, such as the new hub in Birmingham at 23 Stephenson Street, which has a mechanical heat recovery system with electricity as its fuel source.

GPA has started a Net Zero Offices Programme, which seeks to remove fossil fuel boilers (where they have reached end of economic life) and replace them with more environmental forms of heating such as use of air source heat pumps and, in the case of the Whitehall District Heating System, the utilisation of ground source heat pumps. The Net Zero Offices Programmes is seeking funding for its heat decarbonisation projects through applications to the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 vaccinations have been administered in each region of England up to 6 January 2020.

NHS England publishes daily data for vaccinations in England, showing the total first and second doses given to date, by region. This data is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by her Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

We currently use a range of methods to heat buildings across our estate. This includes the Whitehall District Heating System for our buildings in Whitehall, a biomass boiler powered by wood pellets for Abercrombie House, and a biomass boiler burning woodchip sourced from the Wilton Estate for Wilton Park. Work is currently underway to implement full decarbonisation plans for our portfolio, as part of our strategic asset management planning.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by his Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

The Government Property Agency (GPA) acts as a landlord to government department clients, including HM Treasury for its three offices.

The Treasury does not hold information on the heating systems used by its agencies. This information will be sought by the Department and deposited in the Libraries of the he House.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses in (a) Rossendale and Darwen, (b) Lancashire and (c) the North West have (i) applied to and (ii) been successful in their application to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

As of 30 April, £4.1 billion worth of loans to over 25,000 businesses have been issued across the UK under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS). Lenders have received over 52,000 completed applications.

At this time we cannot provide a breakdown of funding by region, as we have given lenders a temporary dispensation from uploading their data to the British Business Bank’s (BBB) system in order to let them focus on issuing new loans. This is a pragmatic step that reflects the urgency of getting loans issued. We are working with the BBB, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and lenders on regular and transparent data publication going forward.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what type of heating system is the primary source of heating in each building occupied by her Department and its agencies; and what fuel is used by those heating systems.

This information could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 137 of the National Planning Policy Framework, if he will provide guidance to Rossendale Borough Council on ensuring that all other sources of Housing and Employment Land supply have been exhausted before resorting to the release of land from the Green Belt in that organisation's Local Plan.

It is for the local authority to consider, and consult locally on, development plan policies that establish where the boundary of its Green Belt, or any development boundary of a settlement, should run. The Secretary of State appoints independent planning inspectors to assess the soundness of any revised plan submitted.

The Government revised the National Planning Policy Framework in 2018, clarifying the exceptional circumstances test for local authorities who are proposing altering the Green Belt boundary through the local plan process. Local authorities need to demonstrate that all other reasonable options for meeting identified development needs have been examined, including those criteria given in paragraph 137, and will need to consider all available evidence and local circumstances in making this assessment.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will issue guidance to (a) Rossendale Borough Council and (b) other local authorities on the release of land from the Green Belt in a Local Plan under paragraph 137 of the national planning policy framework.

The Government revised the National Planning Policy Framework in 2018, clarifying the exceptional circumstances test for local authorities who are proposing altering the Green Belt boundary through the local plan process. Local authorities need to demonstrate that all other reasonable options for meeting identified development needs have been examined, including those criteria given in paragraph 137, and will need to consider all available evidence and local circumstances in making this assessment.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will ask the Planning Inspectorate to clarify the exceptional circumstances that justify changes to green belt boundaries in the local plan creation process.

The Government revised the National Planning Policy Framework in 2018, clarifying the exceptional circumstances test for local authorities who are proposing altering the Green Belt boundary through their local plan. Local authorities need to demonstrate that all other reasonable options for meeting identified development needs have been examined, including those criteria given in paragraph 137, and will need to consider all available evidence and local circumstances in making this assessment.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what reasonable steps should be taken by a local authority to ascertain the supply of land available for housing as part of the local plan creation process.

It is essential for Local Planning Authorities to have up-to-date Local Plans, which provide a vision for their area and identify a supply of deliverable sites to address housing needs.

Each Local Planning Authority should establish the land available for housing in its area by undertaking a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment, this is set out in paragraph 67 of the National Planning Policy Framework, and more detailed Guidance is provided within the National Planning Practice Guidance website: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/housing-and-economic-land-availability-assessment.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what consideration should be made by the Planning Inspectorate of emerging neighbourhood plans during the examination phase of local plan creation.

During the examination phase, the role of a Planning Inspector is to assess whether the local plan has been prepared in line with the relevant legal requirements, and whether it meets the tests of ‘soundness’ contained in the National Planning Policy Framework. An emerging neighbourhood plan and the evidence that underpins that plan, can be considered by the inspector where relevant to the preparation of the local plan. Government planning guidance makes clear that it is important for local plans to make appropriate reference to neighbourhood plan policies or proposals.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Government plans to increase to life imprisonment the maximum penalty for people who cause death by dangerous driving and death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs.

As set out in the government’s white paper, A Smarter Approach to Sentencing, published on 16 September 2020, we will be increasing the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment. We will also create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving.

We will introduce legislation on these changes in the near future.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)