Kenny MacAskill Portrait

Kenny MacAskill

Alba Party - East Lothian

First elected: 12th December 2019


Justice Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 25th May 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice Team Member)
7th Jan 2020 - 29th Mar 2021


Scheduled Event
Friday 21st June 2024
Private Members' Bills - Main Chamber
Broadcasting (Listed Sporting Events) (Scotland) Bill: Second Reading
View calendar
Division Votes
Monday 5th February 2024
Finance Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 1 Alba Party No votes vs 0 Alba Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 39
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Israel and Gaza
Development assistance for the Occupied Palestinian Territories had already reduced from £95 million in 2013 to £26 million in 2023, …
Written Answers
Monday 4th March 2024
Refineries: Grangemouth
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has had discussions with Petroineos on …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 30th November 2023
Musselburgh Racecourse and the Racecourse Association’s Showcase Awards
That this House congratulates Musselburgh Racecourse on being crowned overall Champion Racecourse at the Racecourse Association's (RCA) Showcase Awards, as …
Bills
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Broadcasting (Listed Sporting Events) (Scotland) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to expand the list of sporting events that must be made available for broadcast by free-to-air television channels …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 1st February 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Columnist, JPI Media for The Scotsman, Orchard Brae House, 30 Queensferry Road, Edinburgh EN4 2HS. Until further notice, I receive …
EDM signed
Thursday 29th February 2024
Hosting refugees and asylum seekers: Council Tax Single Person Discount
That this House calls on the Government to amend the Council Tax (Additional Provisions for Discount Disregards) Regulations 1992, so …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 10th January 2024
Scottish Law Officers (Devolution) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to amend the Scotland Act 1998 to grant to the Scottish Parliament legislative competence in respect of the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Kenny MacAskill has voted in 388 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Kenny MacAskill Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Graham Stuart (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(18 debate interactions)
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
(13 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(37 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(35 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(22 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(19 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Kenny MacAskill's debates

East Lothian Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest East Lothian signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza

The HMRC mileage rate for reimbursing the use of private cars (e.g. for employees but also volunteers) has been fixed at 45p/mile (up to 10,000 miles) since 2011. The lack of any increase since then is a serious disincentive to volunteer drivers particularly as fuel has gone up again recently.


Latest EDMs signed by Kenny MacAskill

11th January 2024
Kenny MacAskill signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 29th February 2024

Hosting refugees and asylum seekers: Council Tax Single Person Discount

Tabled by: Mike Penning (Conservative - Hemel Hempstead)
That this House calls on the Government to amend the Council Tax (Additional Provisions for Discount Disregards) Regulations 1992, so that refugees and asylum seekers with leave to remain being hosted in their home by a person living alone are disregarded for the Council Tax Single Person Discount; and notes …
5 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 2
Labour: 2
Alba Party: 1
7th February 2024
Kenny MacAskill signed this EDM on Friday 23rd February 2024

International Court of Justice Ruling on Gaza and the UK’s duties under the Genocide Convention

Tabled by: Zarah Sultana (Labour - Coventry South)
That this House notes the ruling of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on 26 January 2024, which found that it is plausible that Israel’s ongoing attacks on the Palestinian people in Gaza are in breach of the Genocide Convention; further notes that the ICJ issued provisional measures, including ordering …
59 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Scottish National Party: 19
Independent: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Kenny MacAskill's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Kenny MacAskill, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Kenny MacAskill

Wednesday 25th January 2023

5 Adjournment Debates led by Kenny MacAskill

2 Bills introduced by Kenny MacAskill


A Bill to expand the list of sporting events that must be made available for broadcast by free-to-air television channels to include all qualifying matches played by the Scotland men’s and women’s national football teams in the World Cup and the UEFA European Football Championship; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 20th February 2024
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 21st June 2024
Order Paper number: 14
(Unlikely to be Debated - would require unanimous consent to progress)

A Bill to abolish higher standing charges for customers with pre-payment meters; to require energy companies to provide social tariffs for low income customers; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 19th October 2022
(Read Debate)

1469 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
13 Other Department Questions
7th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether she has had recent discussions with Cabinet colleagues on reducing the gender pension gap.

On the 5th June, this year, DWP published an official measure of the Gender Pensions Gap.
The Government has committed to annual reporting on this measure, which will help track efforts of government, industry, and employers to close the Gender Pensions Gap and ensure women can look forward to the retirements they’ve worked so hard for.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2023
What recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Justice on the protection of women's rights on the female prison estate.

In January we published our Female Offender Strategy Delivery Plan, including commitments on delivering both better outcomes and better physical conditions for women in custody. The Delivery Plan emphasises the importance of a trauma informed and responsive approach to effectively meet the needs of women in the female prison estate.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
20th Jul 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, how much the corporate officer of the House of Commons has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

The House has spent the following amounts on external consultants in each of the last five financial years:

FY 2017/18 - £1,024,000
FY 2018/19 - £1,360,000
FY 2019/20 - £2,530,000
FY 2020/21 - £3,701,000
FY 2021/22 - £3,232,000

The Clerk has implemented a policy governing the use of consultants including requirements for justification of the use of consultants and maximum daily rates.

The total spend on consultancy per year is consistent with analysis provided in the published House of Commons Administration Annual Report and Accounts.

The information has been compiled in the table attached showing the relevant and requested data over the last five financial years.

a) Amount paid to each consultancy contracted is provided in ‘Amount paid’ columns for each year

b) Name of each consultancy contracted is provided in ‘Consultants’ column

c) Specific matters on which they were consulted is provided in ‘Consultation matters’ columns for each year.

15th Jun 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the Members Estimate Committee, if he will publish the amount of (a) short money and (b) other additional parliamentary support funding provided to each political party on an annual basis since 2015.

Since 2016–17 it has been a requirement to publish the amounts paid for each financial year and these can be found on the Parliament website. The short money and Representative Money provided to each political party on an annual basis since 2015 can be found in the pdf attachment.

The Short Money and Representative Money allocations scheduled to be paid for the current financial year (1 April 2022 to 31 March 2023) are as follows:

Short/Representative Money Allocations 2022/2023

Party

1 April 2022 to 31 March 2023

Main Allocation

Travel Budget

Democratic Unionist Party (DUP)

£202,484.60

£5,018.85

Green Party

£187,111.20

£4,637.76

Labour Party

£6,812,568.25

£146,451.25

Liberal Democrats

£929,590.70

£23,040.69

Plaid Cymru

£110,875.00

£2,748.13

Scottish National Party (SNP)

£1,149,355.15

£28,487.72

Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)

£110,875.00

£2,748.13

Sinn Fein *

£171,032.15

£4,239.21

* Representative Money

Information on previous budget allocations for Short Money and Representative Money can also be found on the App3 tab here:

Data sheets for Library briefing on Short Money (44 KB, Excel Spreadsheet)

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps she has taken to promote equality of opportunity for young people from low income and deprived backgrounds.

I have rebooted our university access regime to focus on real social mobility.

Universities are being asked to set new targets on improving attainment in schools, reducing drop out rates and increasing degree apprenticeships.

We are also launching a new National State Scholarship for high achieving young people from lower income households, helping them to fulfil their dreams at university, at a college or in an apprenticeship.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what estimate he has made of the amount of emissions that will be produced from cruise liners berthed on the River Clyde during COP26.

To bolster the available accommodation for some of our contractors supporting the operational delivery of COP26, we have procured two ferries which will be berthed on the outskirts of Glasgow.

There will be no delegates or accredited visitors staying on the vessels.

COP26 is targeting carbon neutral using the standard PAS206. The carbon footprint analysis for this will incorporate all emissions generated from activities that are integral to hosting the event, including those of the two cruise ships.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) delegates and (b) accredited visitors that will be staying on cruise liners berthed in Glasgow and on the Clyde while attending COP26.

To bolster the available accommodation for some of our contractors supporting the operational delivery of COP26, we have procured two ferries which will be berthed on the outskirts of Glasgow.

There will be no delegates or accredited visitors staying on the vessels.

COP26 is targeting carbon neutral using the standard PAS206. The carbon footprint analysis for this will incorporate all emissions generated from activities that are integral to hosting the event, including those of the two cruise ships.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, how many cruise liners will be berthed (a) in Glasgow and (b) on the Clyde for COP26.

To bolster the available accommodation for some of our contractors supporting the operational delivery of COP26, we have procured two ferries which will be berthed on the outskirts of Glasgow.

There will be no delegates or accredited visitors staying on the vessels.

COP26 is targeting carbon neutral using the standard PAS206. The carbon footprint analysis for this will incorporate all emissions generated from activities that are integral to hosting the event, including those of the two cruise ships.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether any compensation or payment will be made to local authorities where cruise liners being used to house delegates to COP26 will be berthed.

To bolster the available accommodation for some of our contractors supporting the operational delivery of COP26, we have procured two ferries which will be berthed on the outskirts of Glasgow.

There will be no delegates or accredited visitors staying on the vessels.

COP26 is targeting carbon neutral using the standard PAS206. The carbon footprint analysis for this will incorporate all emissions generated from activities that are integral to hosting the event, including those of the two cruise ships.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether his Department will make a financial contribution to the costs incurred by the Scottish Government or City of Glasgow Council relating to the attendance of its police officers and security service staff at COP26 in Glasgow.

Accommodation and incidental costs for police officers and security staff directly involved in the delivery of COP26 will be drawn from the Cabinet Office COP26 budget.

The UK Government is working closely with the Scottish Government and Glasgow City Council across all planning for COP26. Any additional policing or security costs that are directly attributable to COP26 will be met by the UK Government.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, from which departmental or public body's budget the accommodation and incidental costs will be taken of police officers and security service staff assigned to COP26 in Glasgow.

Accommodation and incidental costs for police officers and security staff directly involved in the delivery of COP26 will be drawn from the Cabinet Office COP26 budget.

The UK Government is working closely with the Scottish Government and Glasgow City Council across all planning for COP26. Any additional policing or security costs that are directly attributable to COP26 will be met by the UK Government.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent discussions the Government has had with the Scottish Government on the implementation of the Equality Act 2010.

Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on the gov.uk website. In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much her Department has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if she will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For the last five years, The Attorney General’s Office has had a nil spend for external consultants*

Details of all Government contracts awarded from 2016 above £10,000 and £25,000 in the wider public sector are published on Contracts Finder. Each award notice provides information on the name of the supplier, value of the contract, its purpose and information on the type of awarding procedure used. Government departments, their individual agencies and Arm’s Length Bodies are required to publish all spend against individual suppliers above £25,000 on GOV.UK.

All Government Departments and their individual ALBs and agencies are required to follow the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 in awarding contracts.

* Whilst preparing this response the department have not considered the use of specialist counsel or short-term contractor contracts as consultancy.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Serious Fraud Office has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if she will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

The spend on externally contracted consultancy services for the Serious Fraud Office in each of the last five years is shown in the table below.

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

£95,000

£42,000

£0

£0

£0

Details of all Government contracts awarded from 2016 above £10,000 and £25,000 in the wider public sector are published on Contracts Finder. Each award notice provides information on the name of the supplier, value of the contract, its purpose and information on the type of awarding procedure used.

Government departments, their individual agencies and Arm’s Length Bodies are required to publish all spend against individual suppliers above £25,000 on GOV.UK.

All Government Departments and their individual ALBs and agencies are required to follow the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 in awarding contracts.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if she will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For the last five years, HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate has had a nil spend for external consultants.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Government Legal Department has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if she will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

The Government Legal Department (GLD) spent the following amounts on external consultants over the past five financial years. This information is available in the public domain and is as follows:

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

£79,000

£101,000

£144,000

£111,000

£342,000

The breakdown of this consultancy spending by each firm contracted is as follows:

Name of consultancy firm

Amount paid to firm

Specific matters on which they were consulted

North Highland

£80,000

Productivity improvements in legal activity delivery

Quo Imus Ltd

£20,000

Work on a review of shared service communications across AGO, GLD and HMCPSI

AMEO Professional Services Ltd

£99,000

Improvements to GLD's recruitment and resourcing strategy and processes

TPX Ltd

£228,000

Improvements to GLD's recruitment and resourcing strategy and processes

Ixia Consultancy Ltd

£40,000

Design work on programme to enhance GLD’s Leadership capability

Mike Curtis Reward Solutions Ltd

£137,000

Support to the development of a new pay framework for GLD

Incendium Consulting Ltd

£57,000

Provision of specialist legal market analysis to development of GLD’s future accommodation strategy

Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd

£32,000

A review of corporate services capability and design for GLD and its shared service customers

Rainmaker Solutions

£79,000

Development of cloud analytical solutions

Various

£5,000

Short-term project and consultancy support

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much the Crown Prosecution Service has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if she will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

The spend on externally contracted consultancy services for CPS in each of the last five years, as recorded in the CPS’ published accounts, is shown in the table below:

2020/21

2019/21

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

£219,000

£64,000

£0

£0

£0

Details of all Government contracts awarded from 2016 above £10,000 and £25,000 in the wider public sector are in the public domain and published on Contracts Finder. Each award notice provides information on the name of the supplier, value of the contract, its purpose and information on the type of awarding procedure used. Government departments, their individual agencies and Arm’s Length Bodies are required to publish all spend against individual suppliers above £25,000 on GOV.UK.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2021 to Question 143130, what the total legal costs were in the (a) Scottish Courts and (b) Supreme Court in respect of litigation relating to the prorogation of Parliament in 2019.

The Government defended a petition for Judicial Review in relation to the prorogation of Parliament in 2019 raised by Joanna Cherry QC MP and others in (1) the Outer House in the Court of Session, (2) the Inner House of the Court of Session, and (3) the Supreme Court where it was joined with R (on the application of Miller) (Appellant) v The Prime Minister (Respondent).

The Office of the Advocate General and Government Legal Department have determined that the total legal costs incurred by the Government in relation to the Cherry litigation in the Outer and Inner Houses of the Court of Session was £83,715 (net of VAT). The total legal costs incurred by the Government in the Supreme Court in relation to Cherry was £83,715 (net of VAT), and in relation to Miller was £142,590. These figures include Counsel fees, Government Legal Department litigator costs and court dues.

The Government also incurred £30,000 in adverse costs in relation to the Cherry proceedings. It is not possible to attribute these costs between proceedings in the different courts.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what the cost to the public purse was of the Government defending cases in the Scottish courts relating to the prorogation of Parliament in 2019.

The Government defended a petition for Judicial Review in relation to the prorogation of Parliament in 2019 raised by Joanna Cherry QC MP and others in (1) the Outer House in the Court of Session, (2) the Inner House of the Court of Session, and (3) the Supreme Court, where it was joined with R (on the application of Miller) (Appellant) v The Prime Minister (Respondent).

The Office of the Advocate General and Government Legal Department have determined that the total costs of defending this litigation were £127,062.33 (net of VAT). This figure includes Counsel fees, Government Legal Department litigator costs and court dues. The Government also incurred £30,000 in adverse costs.

25th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government's policy papers entitled (a) Summary of the UK Government Legal Position: The legality of UK military action to target Houthi facilities in Yemen on 12 January 2024, published on 12 January 2024 and (b) Summary of the UK Government Legal Position: The legality of UK military action to target Houthi facilities in Yemen on 22 January 2024, published on 23 January 2024, if the Government will publish the full legal advice on the military action of (i) 11 and (ii) 22 January 2024.

The Government published a summary of its legal position on the legality of UK military action to target Houthi facilities in Yemen on 12 January 2024. It published a further summary on 23 January 2024 following further military action, which confirmed that the legal basis for the further military action remains the same. These are available on the gov.uk website and I have placed a copy in the Libraries of the House.

We acted fully in line with international law, in self-defence and in response to a persistent threat. The strikes were limited to carefully selected targets, with maximum care taken to protect civilian lives.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
25th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Prime Minister's Oral Statement of 23 January 2024 on Action against Houthi Maritime Attacks, Official Report, column 155, when the Government plans to publish the legal advice.

The Government published a summary of its legal position on the legality of UK military action to target Houthi facilities in Yemen on 12 January 2024. It published a further summary on 23 January 2024 following further military action, which confirmed that the legal basis for the further military action remains the same. These are available on the gov.uk website and I have placed a copy in the Libraries of the House.

We acted fully in line with international law, in self-defence and in response to a persistent threat. The strikes were limited to carefully selected targets, with maximum care taken to protect civilian lives.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what procurement rules apply to a (a) devolved and (b) commissioning authority seeking to tender for the construction of lifeline ferries.

Reserved Public Procurement in the UK, as well as devolved Welsh and transferred Northern Ireland procurement, is regulated in the UK by the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, the Utilities Contracts Regulations 2016 and the Concession Contracts Regulations 2016 and, in some cases, specific rules relating to specialist sectors.

While the provisions in these main regulations extend to the whole of the UK, they do not cover procurement by devolved Scottish authorities in respect of devolved matters. Legislation governing devolved Scottish procurement includes the Public Contracts (Scotland) Regulations 2015 in combination with the Procurement Reform (Scotland) Act 2014.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department is taking steps to compile a list of public buildings affected by construction with Reinforced Autoclaved Aerated Concrete.

The Cabinet Office’s Office of Government Property is establishing a Reinforced Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Working Group. Objectives include understanding the scale of the issue, developing a register of Government buildings impacted, and sharing remedial best practices. Responsibility for safety of individual buildings remains with departments, their arms-length bodies and wider organisations.

To address property condition and safety issues such as RAAC more widely, in September 2022 the Office of Government Property established the Better Buildings programme on behalf of the Government Property Function.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on (a) the number of people working in civil service roles in each Department who are on secondment from business and (b) the sectors and industries from which those people have been seconded.

Secondments into the Civil Service from other sectors are encouraged as a means of bringing in high demand skills, enabling talented individuals from outside the Civil Service to contribute to the work of Government by sharing critical capabilities and innovative thinking for a set period of time.

Although work is ongoing to increase data flow in this area, the Cabinet Office does not at present hold detailed data on the total number of people in the Civil Service on secondment from business nor the sectors and industries from which those people have been seconded.

22nd Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2022 to Question 89037 on Julian Assange, when and what was the nature of the work that his officials were involved in.

Operation Pelican was the Metropolitan Police Service’s (MPS) response to the continued presence of Julian Assange in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, and the maintenance of a police presence in the vicinity. Officials in the Cabinet Office, along with other relevant departments, liaised on that response, the operational details of which are a matter for the MPS.

16th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether anyone employed by his Department were involved in Operation Pelican.

Seven officials in the Cabinet Office were involved in Operation Pelican.

16th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether (a) he or (b) officials in his Department have met with US officials to discuss Julian Assange.

I have not met with US officials to discuss Julian Assange.

The Government has discussed aspects of this matter as part of our routine diplomatic engagement with a number of countries, including the US. Cabinet Office officials routinely meet with US counterparts to discuss a range of issues, which may, in the past, have included Mr Assange. The Cabinet Office does not hold a central record of meetings between officials and their US counterparts.

Extradition cases are handled by the Home Office.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Government Estates Management has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

This information is not held centrally. GEM is responsible for providing solutions to specialist estates management issues across government.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Government Equalities Office has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Equality Hub has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Commissioner for Public Appointments has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Social Mobility Commission has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Senior Salaries Review Body has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Security Vetting Appeals Panel has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Crown Commercial Service has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

Spend on externally contracted consultancy services for the CCS in each of the last five years is shown in the table below.

2020/21

2019/21

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

£1,281,622

£2,199,349

£2,220,563

£3,191,422

£6,679,277

Details of all Government contracts awarded from 2016 above £10,000 and £25,000 in the wider public sector are published on Contracts Finder. Each award notice provides information on the name of the supplier, value of the contract, its purpose and information on the type of awarding procedure used. Government departments, their individual agencies and Arms Length Bodies are required to publish all spend against individual suppliers above £25,000 on GOV.UK.

All Government Departments and their individual ALBs and agencies are required to follow the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 in awarding contracts.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the House of Lords Appointments Commission has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Committee on Standards in Public Life has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Equality and Human Rights Commission has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Civil Service Commission has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Government Property Agency has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Prime Minister’s Office has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

For reporting purposes the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Property Agency, Civil Service Commission, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, Committee on Standards in Public Life, Security Vetting Appeals Panel, Senior Salaries Review Body, Social Mobility Commission, Equality Hub, Government Equalities Office, Commissioner for Public Appointments, Independent Adviser on Ministers' Interests and House of Lords Appointments Commission are an integral part of the Cabinet Office and consolidated as part of our group expenditure.

Expenditure on consultancy is published annually in our annual report and accounts and I refer the hon Member to my answer to PQ 22549 on 23 June, where our spend is outlined.

Details of consultancy contracts, including the supplier, above £10,000, are published on Contracts Finder (https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder)

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the UK Statistics Authority has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 20th July is attached and below.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Kenny MacAskill MP
House of Commons
London
SW1A 0AA

12 August 2022

Dear Mr MacAskill,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how much the UK Statistics Authority has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if we will publish a breakdown of the (a) amountpaid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted (40939).

Table 1 provides the spend on externally contracted consultancy services for the UK Statistics Authority in each of the last five years.

Table 1: Spend on externally contracted consultancy services for the UK Statistics Authority in each of the last five years

2021/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

£6,065,000

£11,207,000

£12,028,000

£6,259,000

£924,000

Details of all Government contracts awarded from 2016 above £10,000 and £25,000 in the wider public sector are published on Contracts Finder[1]. Each award notice provides information on the name of the supplier, value of the contract, its purpose and information on the type of awarding procedure used. Government departments, their individual agencies and Arm’s Length Bodies are required to publish all spend against individual suppliers above £25,000 on GOV.UK[2].

All Government Departments and their individual ALBs and agencies are required to follow the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 in awarding contracts.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Footnotes:

[1] https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder

[2] https://www.gov.uk/

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans his Department has to establish an information warfare unit; and if he will publish the (a) official title and (b) budget of such unit.

The new Government Information Cell (GIC) draws together expertise from across government including but not limited to FCDO, DCMS, MoD and CO experts in assessment and analysis and counter-disinformation. The GIC was set up to identify and counter Russian disinformation targeted at UK and international audiences.

The staff deployed into the Cell continue to be paid for by their home departments - there are no additional staffing costs. The running and programme costs are being established but will be within existing budgets, including from the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund.

15th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish (a) arrangements for reimbursement of expenses and (b) the financial terms of the retiral of the Permanent Secretary to the Scottish Government.

Upon her retirement from the Civil Service, the outgoing permanent secretary will receive payments under the terms of the Civil Service Pension Scheme. Details of all relevant payments will be published by the Scottish Government in their 2021-22 annual accounts in due course.

23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what representations he has received from the Scottish Government on the devolution of powers over the UK Civil Service in Scotland.

Significant engagement between the UK Government and the devolved administrations takes place every day. Officials working for the governments of the UK and Scotland are part of the same Civil Service and share the same culture and values, as set out in the Civil Service Code.

18th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister of the Cabinet Office, how much tax revenue was raised from the (a) North East and (b) South East region of England from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Kenny MacAskill MP
House of Commons
London
SW1A 0AA

20 October 2021

Dear Mr MacAskill,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what the tax revenues raised in Scotland were from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years (58513); and how much tax revenue was raised from the (a) North East and (b) South East region of England from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years (58514).

Tax revenues by region of the UK are published annually by the Office for National Statistics as part of the Country and Regional Public Sector Finances (CRPSF)1, and these include estimates for corporation tax and capital gains tax. Taxes on dividends are not presented separately within the CRPSF publication and are instead included within estimates of income tax. A breakdown of taxes on dividends is unavailable. I further note that corporation tax amounts quoted exclude Offshore / North Sea corporation tax. Therefore, a table showing income tax, corporation tax, capital gains tax and offshore corporation tax receipts for Scotland, the North East, and the South East for financial years 2010/11 to 2019/20 has been provided.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

1 Country and Regional Public Sector Finances

18th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the tax revenues raised in Scotland were from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Kenny MacAskill MP
House of Commons
London
SW1A 0AA

20 October 2021

Dear Mr MacAskill,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what the tax revenues raised in Scotland were from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years (58513); and how much tax revenue was raised from the (a) North East and (b) South East region of England from (a) tax on dividends, (b) corporation tax and (c) capital gains tax in each of the last 10 years (58514).

Tax revenues by region of the UK are published annually by the Office for National Statistics as part of the Country and Regional Public Sector Finances (CRPSF)1, and these include estimates for corporation tax and capital gains tax. Taxes on dividends are not presented separately within the CRPSF publication and are instead included within estimates of income tax. A breakdown of taxes on dividends is unavailable. I further note that corporation tax amounts quoted exclude Offshore / North Sea corporation tax. Therefore, a table showing income tax, corporation tax, capital gains tax and offshore corporation tax receipts for Scotland, the North East, and the South East for financial years 2010/11 to 2019/20 has been provided.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

1 Country and Regional Public Sector Finances

18th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish Gross Domestic Product on a per capita basis for the population of (a) Scotland, (b) Wales, (c) England, (d) North East of England and (e) North West of England for each year between 2000 and 2019.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Kenny MacAskill MP
House of Commons
London
SW1A 0PW

19 October 2021

Dear Mr MacAskill,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question regarding the publication of Gross Domestic Product on a per capita basis for the population of (a) Scotland, (b) Wales, (c) England, (d) North East of England and (e) North West of England for each year between 2000 and 2019 (58515).

Table 1 shows gross domestic product per head1 of population in pounds (£) for Scotland, Wales, England, North East of England and North West of England for each year between 2000 and 2019. The estimates in Table 1 are chained volume measures, which means the effects of inflation have been removed. These are often referred to as ‘real terms’ figures. Estimates in current prices, which include the effects of inflation, are also available2.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

1 ‘Per head’ is used in this release. ‘Per head’ and ‘per capita’ mean per individual of the population

2 Regional gross domestic product in current prices, along with all our other estimates of regional economic activity are available.

26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether there is a cap on the maximum amount of business rates relief that can be applied under provisions relating to subsidy controls.

The UK subsidy control regime does not put numerical limits on the amount of business rates relief that can be provided. Where business rates reliefs constitute a subsidy, public authorities providing those reliefs must consider the subsidy control principles and can provide reliefs at any level they consider to be consistent with those principles.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what the maximum level of Minimal Financial Assistance business rates relief was for local heat networks in each year since 2021.

An enterprise may receive up to £315,000 of subsidy in a three-year period through the simplified ‘minimal financial assistance’ process. This limit applies to all subsidies given through that simplified process, regardless of their purpose. No such limits apply where a public authority has considered the subsidy control principles and set up a subsidy scheme.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 4277 on Israel: Military Aid, if she will list all UK-based organisations which have supplied (a) lethal and (b) other military equipment other than medical supplies to Israel since 7 October 2023.

Exports of military goods from the UK require an export licence. HM Government published data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

The most recent publication was on 30th August 2023, and covered the period 1st January – 31st March 2023. Information covering 1st April – 30th June 2023 will be published on 16th January 2024.

Information regarding export licences granted between 7 October and end of December 2023 will be published after April 2024.

The fact that an export licence is granted, does not necessarily mean that an export takes place, as some licences may expire unused, others may expire after only partial use, and some licences may subsequently be revoked or suspended.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she plans to take to facilitate consultation with relevant stakeholders on any future trade partnership with the US; and if she will make a statement.

The UK and U.S. are expanding the work we do together across the full spectrum of our economic, technological, commercial and trade relations through the Atlantic Declaration. Discussions with the U.S. on next steps under this first-of-its-kind agreement are ongoing.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with a wide range of stakeholders including business groups, civil society and SMEs in both the UK and the U.S. on a range of trade matters.

We will also continue to update Parliament as our work develops. The Department also hosts updates on the Government’s trade agenda. These sessions are open to all MPs.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether the UK subsidy control regime precludes financial support for a direct continental ferry service by the Scottish Government.

The UK subsidy control regime is flexible and permissive. Subsidies are permitted provided that a public authority adheres to the legal process provided in the Act including the requirements of the UK's international obligations. The regime allows devolved administrations and local authorities to give subsidies that are tailored to local needs and drive economic growth. It is for individual public authorities to assess the consistency of any proposed subsidy with the regime. My officials stand ready to help all public authorities understand the regime.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether any officials in her Department have worked with the City of London Corporation on its overseas activities in the last three years.

My department does not have a team or individual dedicated to supporting the Lord Mayor of London’s overseas engagement programme. Officials from my department have provided support to individual elements of the Lord Mayor’s programme where it delivers the Government’s trade and investment objectives. On each occasion support will have been provided by DBT teams in the relevant Embassy or Consulate as a small proportion of individuals’ overall activity. We do not capture data on time or cost at that level of detail.

No Secretary of State or Ministers in DBT or DIT participated in foreign visits as part of the Lord Mayor’s overseas engagement programme in the last 3 years for which we have records. Officials will have participated as described above.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what the cost to the public purse was of her Department's work on the Lord Mayor of London’s Overseas Engagement Programme in each year since 2010.

My department does not have a team or individual dedicated to supporting the Lord Mayor of London’s overseas engagement programme. Officials from my department have provided support to individual elements of the Lord Mayor’s programme where it delivers the Government’s trade and investment objectives. On each occasion support will have been provided by DBT teams in the relevant Embassy or Consulate as a small proportion of individuals’ overall activity. We do not capture data on time or cost at that level of detail.

No Secretary of State or Ministers in DBT or DIT participated in foreign visits as part of the Lord Mayor’s overseas engagement programme in the last 3 years for which we have records. Officials will have participated as described above.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many staff in her Department work on the Lord Mayor of London's Overseas Engagement Programme.

My department does not have a team or individual dedicated to supporting the Lord Mayor of London’s overseas engagement programme. Officials from my department have provided support to individual elements of the Lord Mayor’s programme where it delivers the Government’s trade and investment objectives. On each occasion support will have been provided by DBT teams in the relevant Embassy or Consulate as a small proportion of individuals’ overall activity. We do not capture data on time or cost at that level of detail.

No Secretary of State or Ministers in DBT or DIT participated in foreign visits as part of the Lord Mayor’s overseas engagement programme in the last 3 years for which we have records. Officials will have participated as described above.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what representations her Department has made on tariffs on Scotch Whisky since 2021; on to countries.

Whisky was the UK’s largest food and drink export in 2022 valued at £6.4bn. Negotiating tariff liberalisation for UK goods with FTA partners is a priority for HMG.

By successfully concluding our accession to CPTPP, we have secured elimination over time of Malaysian tariffs of around 80% on whisky. In addition, we removed the tariff applied by Australia on UK whisky in our recent FTA, which recently came into force on 31 May 2023.

We are also currently negotiating FTAs with more markets, such as India, where we are also seeking better access for whisky.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department held a pre-negotiation consultations on the UK-Singapore bilateral investment treaty; and what are her Department's negotiating objectives for that treaty.

The Government has commenced negotiations with Singapore on a new, modern Investment Treaty.

Pre-negotiation consultation was not appropriate as these talks fulfil an existing commitment made in the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between the UK and Singapore to deepen existing mutual obligations on investment protection.

In our negotiations with Singapore, we will seek to guarantee clear standards of fair treatment to each other’s investors. Any deal we sign will be in the best interests of the British people and the United Kingdom economy.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what UK minerals his Department accepts as critical to clean technology and energy security.

In 2022 the British Geological Survey (BGS) carried out its first criticality assessment and, according to economic vulnerability and supply risk, defined a cohort of minerals with high criticality for the UK: https://www.bgs.ac.uk/download/uk-criticality-assessment-of-technology-critical-minerals-and-metals/. The Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre (CMIC) – led by the BGS – will evaluate the criticality of minerals on a regular basis, with the next assessment scheduled later this year.

In addition, the industry-led Task and Finish Group on Critical Mineral Resilience, announced as part of the Critical Minerals Strategy Refresh on 23rd March, is investigating critical mineral dependencies, vulnerabilities, and opportunities across UK industry sectors, including manufacturers for clean energy technologies.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what her Department's strategy is for the mining of UK minerals through clean technology for energy security.

To help secure the supply of critical minerals, as well as increase confidence in the UK’s energy transition, government has published a Critical Minerals Refresh, setting out our refreshed approach to delivering the Critical Minerals Strategy. The UK has pockets of mineral wealth and as home to major global mining companies has unique strengths in mineral and mining expertise, R&D, finance, and standards.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report by the British Geological Survey for UK Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre on Potential for Critical Raw Material Prospectivity in the UK, published on 17 April.

“Potential for Critical Raw Material Prospectivity in the UK” was a study undertaken by the Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre, a programme sponsored by the Department for Business and Trade and delivered by the British Geological Survey. This report delivers on the Critical Minerals Strategy’s commitment to collate geoscientific data and identify target areas of potential for critical minerals within the UK. It is a preliminary assessment, and its findings do not mean that the prospective areas identified will necessarily be targeted for exploration and mining. The Government is working with the British Geological Survey to understand next steps.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether the UK Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre holds accountability to the Scottish (a) Government and (b) Parliament.

The Government launched the Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre (CMIC) in July 2022. It is a research programme, delivered via the British Geological Survey, to provide data and analysis on supply, demand, and market dynamics of critical minerals. Funding is provided by the Department for Business and Trade. CMIC does not hold legal status as an organisation and is not accountable to either the Scottish or UK Parliaments. A Memorandum of Understanding between Government and the British Geological Survey sets out the programme’s rationale, objectives, spend profile, deliverables and governance.

Further information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uks-first-critical-minerals-intelligence-centre-to-help-build-a-more-resilient-economy .

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department plans to provide financial support to the UK battery industry to help that industry compete with international competitors, including those in the US.

The Government supports the development of an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain through the Automotive Transformation Fund (ATF). Investment through the ATF will help to develop a high-value end-to-end electrified automotive supply chain in the UK by unlocking private investment, including in gigafactories. Government is also working internationally to minimise any harmful impacts on British business and has provided a response to the US Treasury consultation on the implementation of the Inflation Reduction Act.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department has received representations from the Scottish Government on the future of Grangemouth refinery.

DESNZ Ministers have met directly with Scottish Government and remain in contact regarding Grangemouth refinery. UK Government Ministers have attended the Grangemouth Future Industries Leadership Forum in which the future of the site was discussed with Scottish Ministers.

The Department continues to work closely and regularly with officials in the Scottish Government as well as the owners of Grangemouth on the future of the site.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has had discussions with Petroineos on the potential merits of Grangemouth oil refinery transitioning to biofuel.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State met with executives at Petroineos on 23 November 2023 to discuss options for the future of the site, long term fuel security for Scotland, and consideration of jobs at the site.

The Government remains committed to energy transition projects across the UK, backing the North Sea oil and gas sector and green industries such as offshore wind and carbon capture and storage, to attract investment and create opportunities for communities in Scotland. Measures like the Forth Green Freeport include the port at Grangemouth, which will enable multiple manufacturing and green initiatives.

Any potential decisions regarding future energy projects at the site are a private commercial matter.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2024 to Question 14392 on Renewable Energy: Community Development, how much was paid in community benefits from solar by (a) region, (b) nation and (c) local authority in each year since 2015.

The Department does not hold this information.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department has made an estimate of the number of households that will be in fuel poverty in winter 2024-25 and ineligible for energy bill support.

Fuel poverty is devolved; the Department has responsibility for England. The next estimates of fuel poverty in Scotland will be published by the Scottish Government on 29th February.

Targeted energy bill support is in place across Great Britain through the Warm Home Discount (WHD), the Winter Fuel Payment and additionally the Winter Heating Payment in Scotland. The fuel poverty statistics for England published on 15th February provide analysis of how WHD eligibility across 2023 supported households that would have been in fuel poverty and other low-income households in Annex F. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fuel-poverty-statistics#2023-statistics

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 8 February 2024 to Question 3139 on Pipelines: Scotland, whether the (a) Finnart oil terminal and (b) pipeline to Grangemouth are classified as critical national infrastructure.

The Government cannot disclose which sites are classified as critical national infrastructure due to national security concerns.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what data her Department holds on the daily capacity to transport oil of the Finnart to Grangemouth pipeline.

The Department holds some historical data related to the pipeline connecting Finnart terminal and Grangemouth Refinery, however, data on refinery operations are a commercial matter for the operating company and are not published or otherwise made publicly available by the Department.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent discussions she has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) relevant stakeholders on the future of the (i) Finnart oil terminal and (ii) Finnart to Grangemouth pipeline.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State has regular meetings with Cabinet colleagues to discuss a range of issues.

Following the announcement from Petroineos on Grangemouth refinery, the Secretary of State met with Franck DeMay, Chief Executive Officer of Petroineos Refining Limited on 23 November 2023 to discuss future options for the company’s operations in the UK.

The Department’s other Ministers have continued to engage the company, local business and the Scottish Government on the matter over this time.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has made a recent assessment of the potential impact on (a) security and (b) the environment of increasing oil imports to Finnart oil terminal.

Finnart oil terminal is already used for the import of crude oil and export of oil products in considerable volumes. The announcement by Petroineos that they are developing a plan to facilitate the import of products at Finnart is designed to provide them with greater operational flexibility and allow them to continue supplying fuel products to customers.

Any assessment of environmental impacts as a result of changing functions of the oil terminal is a matter for the company to consider with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what his Department's contingency plans are for (a) Scottish domestic energy and (b) aviation fuel security in the event that (i) the Finnart pipeline is shut and (ii) Grangemouth does not have a refinery capacity.

Scotland has other infrastructure for the import of both road and aviation fuel. In most circumstances industry is able to manage disruptions to supply chains without impact to the customer. We would expect this to be the case for either of the scenarios given.

If the industry requires support, the Department can provide assistance including a reserve fleet of road tankers, which can be made available to hauliers to help them maintain supplies from more distant infrastructure.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, who is responsible for the costs of maintenance of the oil pipeline from Finnart to Grangemouth.

The Finnart pipeline is owned and operated by Petroineos. Any maintenance works and their associated costs are the responsibility of the company.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what is the status of the Finnart to Grangemouth oil pipeline; and if she will make an estimate of the potential cost to the public purse for reopening the pipeline.

As Petroineos own and operate the two pipelines between Grangemouth refinery and the Finnart terminal, they are responsible for operating and maintaining the refinery, as well as any associated costs. The current status and use of the pipeline is a matter for the company.

Public money is not being used to fund the private commercial matter of repair to this pipeline.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will publish the studies or data available on the estimated increased emissions caused by increased shipping that would result from the closure of the Grangemouth Refinery.

DESNZ officials are in regular contact with Petroineos and the Scottish Government regarding the future options for the site.

The UK has overdelivered on every target to cut emissions so far and has cut emissions far faster than any other major economy since 1990. There has been no assessment of the emissions from shipping for the import of finished fuel products to Grangemouth refinery, or of the difference in emissions between importing finished oil products and crude oil.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much North Sea oil has been refined at Grangemouth Refinery in each year since 2010.

Data on refinery operations are a commercial matter for refinery operators and are not published or otherwise made publicly available by the Department. Data on national refinery intake are available in Table 3.10 of Energy Trends: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/oil-and-oil-products-section-3-energy-trends

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what the estimated carbon emissions are from the import and export of oil in the UK.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 23 January to Question UIN 10547

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will commission a feasibility study into the creation of a new manufacturing centre of excellence supporting the manufacture of wind turbines in the Highlands of Scotland.

The Government has announced the £960 million Green Industries Growth Accelerator to support manufacturing capacity, including for offshore wind. This will enable the UK to seize growth opportunities from the transition to net zero, unlocking private investment and creating new jobs.

The Inverness and Cromarty Firth Green Freeport will act as a focal point for green growth in the Highlands, offering incentives to attract inward investment and stimulate innovation.

The Government also continues to work with industry, through the Offshore Wind Industry Council, to assess offshore wind supply chain needs and opportunities and develop a long-term Industrial Growth Plan.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions she has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues, (b) the Scottish Government and (c) manufacturers on the manufacture of wind turbines in Scotland.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State discusses a range of issues with Cabinet colleagues, Scottish Government representatives and companies, including offshore wind where relevant.

The Government has announced the £960 million Green Industries Growth Accelerator to support manufacturing capacity, including for offshore wind. This will enable the UK to seize growth opportunities from the transition to net zero, unlocking private investment and creating new jobs.

The Government works with industry and the Scottish Government, through the Offshore Wind Industry Council, to assess offshore wind supply chain needs and opportunities and develop a long-term Industrial Growth Plan.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to encourage wind turbine manufacturing in Scotland.

The Government has announced the £960 million Green Industries Growth Accelerator to support clean energy manufacturing capacity, including for offshore wind, helping unlock private investment and new jobs. The Floating Offshore Wind Manufacturing Investment Scheme is making grant funding of up to £160 million available to leverage private investment into port infrastructure to support floating offshore wind at scale.

The Contract for Difference (CfD) Administrative Strike Price for fixed bottom and floating offshore wind projects in Allocation Round 6 has risen since the previous CfD round following extensive industry engagement and supports offshore wind across the country, including in Scotland.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an estimate of the average level of household energy debt in each region.

The Government does not hold this information.

Ofgem collects energy debt and arrears data on a supplier basis and publishes statistics against several criteria but not region. Ofgem’s statistics can be found at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/debt-and-arrears-indicators

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her Department's policy is to help households that have accumulated energy debt.

The Government is continuing to support those who need it the most, with millions of households receiving up to £900 in further cost of living payments. This is in addition to established support for vulnerable and low-income households through the Winter Fuel Payment worth £250 - £600 and the £150 Warm Home Discount.

The Government expects suppliers to do all they can to support customers in debt, particularly vulnerable customers.

Ofgem has launched a consultation on options to protect the energy market and consumers from the risk of increasing debt.

www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/ofgem-explores-options-amid-rising-consumer-debt.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what information her Department holds on the number of households that have been involuntarily fitted with pre-payment meters following (a) smart meter installation and (b) remote switching.

The Government does not hold this data. The Government has always been clear on the importance of protecting energy consumers, particularly the most vulnerable. It is a matter for Ofgem as the regulator to determine when suppliers are able to restart PPM installations, in line with the conditions for restart they set out in April last year. We will continue to monitor the situation closely as installations resume to ensure Ofgem’s tough new rules are followed and lead to improved protections for consumers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an estimate of the level of carbon emissions attributable to (a) the maritime sector and (b) the import and export of oil in each year since 2010.

The Department has not produced estimates of greenhouse gas emissions specifically from the maritime sector or from the import and export of oil. However, it publishes UK territorial greenhouse gas emissions statistics where particular sources of maritime and oil industry emissions can be identified.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much refined fuel by volume has been exported from the UK in each year since 2010.

Data on exports of refined products are published monthly and are available here.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much refined fuel by volume has been imported to the UK in each year since 2010.

Data on imports of refined products are published monthly and are available here.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what data her Department holds on the (a) location of sites and (b) estimated UK capacity in each of the next five years for refining North Sea oil.

The Department published annual data on refinery nameplate capacities, along with a map of these locations, in the Crude oil and petroleum products methodology document. The Department does not collect data for estimating UK future refining capacity.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what estimate she has made of the (a) volume and (b) proportion of oil that is brought ashore by the Forties Pipeline System and transhipped overseas for refining in each year since 2010.

The UK publishes data on the proportion of the oil produced from the UK’s Continental Shelf (UKCS) that is refined within the UK. Data on the proportion that originates from the Forties Pipeline System is not separately published but the Department estimates that exports from the Forties Pipeline System over the last five years (2019 to October 2023) average 89 per cent, which is broadly in line with the published data for the UKCS as a whole.

Five year average UK and FPS disposals of crude oil and natural gas liquids, 2019 to October 2023

Destination (average 2019-Oct 2023)

FPS 5-year average

UK total 5-year average

Delivered to UK

1.4

6.5

percentage

11%

17%

Exports

11.2

32.8

percentage

89%

83%

million tonnes

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of the consistency of the (a) distribution of installed SMET2 meters and (b) level of wide area network coverage on the implementation of the smart energy savings competition.

The Smart Energy Savings (SENS) Competition was launched in 2019 and concluded in 2022. To participate, consumers needed an enrolled SMETS1 or SMETS2 meter and Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage, amongst other requirements. Interviews conducted with participants included those with different demographics and household characteristics, such as householder age, property age and income.

The competition was successful in identifying positive evidence on household energy savings from smart meter data. The results can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/smart-energy-savings-sens-competition-evaluation.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
15th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what data her Department holds on the number and proportion of smart meters operating in (a) smart and (b) non-smart mode.

Data on the number and proportion of smart meters working in smart mode and traditional mode (non-smart mode) across Great Britain can be found in the following ‘Smart Meter Statistics in Great Britain’ official statistics report:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/64ef30a2da8451000d632450/Q2_2023_Smart_Meters_Statistics_Report.pdf

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has a strategy for second generation biofuels.

The UK Government published the Biomass Strategy on 10th August 2023. The Strategy covers the role that biomass, including second generation biofuels, can play in meeting the UK Government’s net zero target.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 3974 on Electricity and Natural Gas: Prices, whether the Typical Domestic Consumption Value for England and Wales is lower than that for Scotland.

There is not a separate Typical Domestic Consumption Value (TDCV) for England, Wales, and Scotland. The TDCV is the average actual measured consumption by consumers across GB.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 3974, whether Ofgem takes into account trends in the level of fuel poverty in areas off the gas grid in determining Typical Domestic Consumption Values.

The Typical Domestic Consumption Values (TDVCs) are the average actual measured consumption by consumers across Great Britain. TDVCs are calculated on the basis of meter level data, not trends in fuel poverty in areas off the gas grid. The revised values were subject to public consultation, which may be found at www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/call-input-review-typical-domestic-consumption-values-2023

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 3974 on Electricity and Natural Gas: Prices, what steps Ofgem took to ensure that (a) geography and (b) climate were taken into consideration when updating the Typical Domestic Consumption Value.

The Typical Domestic Consumption Value is the average actual measured consumption by consumers across Great Britain. The revised values were also subject to public consultation, which may be found at www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/call-input-review-typical-domestic-consumption-values-2023.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 3974 on Electricity and Natural Gas: Prices, whether the Typical Domestic Consumption Value is assessed as being the same across Great Britain.

The Typical Domestic Consumption Value is the average actual measured consumption by consumers and is the same across Great Britain. The revised values were also subject to public consultation, which may be found at www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/call-input-review-typical-domestic-consumption-values-2023.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2023 to Question 3974 on Electricity and Natural Gas: Prices, if she will direct Ofgem to publish the information it holds on the typical domestic consumption values for each region.

It is for Ofgem to determine whether to publish typical domestic consumption values for each region.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential implications for her policies of reductions in the typical domestic consumption values for (a) gas and (b) electricity announced by Ofgem on 25 May 2023.

The setting of the Typical Domestic Consumption Values, for both gas and electricity, is a matter for Ofgem as independent regulator. Ofgem assesses and normally reviews the values every two years using updated figures to reflect observed energy consumption among households. The lowering of values this year reflects a long-term trend of reducing household consumption. The Government will continue to work closely with Ofgem and monitor household consumption, especially in the context of increased energy costs and wider cost of living pressures.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make a comparative assessment of the (a) impact of the energy price cap on domestic consumers in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020, (iii) 2021, (iv) 2022 and (v) 2023 and (b) potential impact of the cap on domestic consumers in 2024 in the context of falling energy usage.

Decisions on the price cap methodology are for independent regulator Ofgem. The cap limits the amount energy suppliers can charge for each unit of gas and electricity, as well as the maximum standing charge consumers pay for access to the grid. The law requires Ofgem to ensure the cap level reflects the underlying efficient costs of supplying energy. The default tariff cap does not reduce prices below what it costs to serve customers, including the costs of purchasing wholesale gas and electricity.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether it is her Department's policy that renewable energy projects are co-located to mitigate the impact on communities.

The Secretary of State's role is to set out the planning policy in National Policy Statements, updated versions of which were laid before Parliament and published last week, and then decide on applications on the basis of all the relevant considerations in each case. It is not the role of the Secretary of State to choose the location of a project.

Co-location is not a requirement for a planning application, but, as set out in the Government's National Policy Statements, applicants are encouraged to work collaboratively with other developers and should demonstrate good design. They should also consider opportunities to maximise co-location possibilities for their projects where this may mitigate the impact on communities or the environment.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her Department's policy is on the decommissioning of turbines and blades.

The decommissioning of all offshore wind turbines, including blades, is a legal obligation for the owners and their plans must be approved by the Secretary of State. Full removal of all offshore renewable energy installations is the default position and installations should be designed and constructed to facilitate that.

For onshore wind turbines and blades, when a local planning authority grants planning permission this will typically include conditions for decommissioning, such as returning a site to its previous state.

In both cases, all waste should be disposed of in accordance with the waste hierarchy.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her Department's policy is on water born solar panel development.

The UK has already seen floating solar PV projects, such as at the Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir. The Government welcomes more proposals, as large scale deployment of all solar types will be needed to achieve its 70GW target by 2035.

Floating solar is eligible for support under the Contracts for Difference scheme.

The joint Government/Industry Solar Taskforce is looking at further actions to unlock deployment across a wide range of solar types, including floating solar.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, for what reason Ofgem has changed the methodology for the calculation of the average use of gas and electricity.

Ofgem, the energy regulator is responsible for the methodology used in calculation of the average use of gas and electricity. There has been an observed decrease in average annual consumption across typical households, and so the Typical Domestic Consumption Value has been updated to reflect this.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the revisions to the typical domestic consumption values for (a) gas and (b) electricity announced by Ofgem on 25 May 2023, if she will have discussions with Ofgem on providing adjusted comparative figures for domestic consumers on the potential impact of the energy price cap on (a) gas and (b) electricity bills.

Ofgem have included comparisons between the 2019 and 2023 Typical Domestic Consumption Values (TDCVs) in respect of the October-December and January-March price cap periods at this link https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/increased-wholesale-energy-costs-lead-rise-price-cap. It will be for Ofgem to determine whether to make comparisons with the 2019 TDCVs for future price cap announcements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make it her policy to apply community benefit to offshore wind farms.

Offshore windfarm developers already provide a range of community benefit packages which are developed in consultation with local communities. For projects based in Scotland, developers follow the Scottish Government’s Offshore Energy Good Practice Principles when creating a community benefit package.

The Government consulted on proposals for voluntary guidance for community benefits for electricity transmission network infrastructure. The consultation proposed to introduce voluntary guidance on the appropriate levels and forms of benefits to give communities the knowledge, power and flexibility to decide what benefits they want in consultation with the project developer. The consultation stated that this should apply for onshore infrastructure developed by offshore wind.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the contract for difference scheme.

Since 2014, the Contracts for Difference scheme has proven itself highly effective at driving deployment of large-scale renewables while rapidly reducing costs. The scheme has now contracted over 30GW of new low-carbon capacity, including 20GW of offshore wind. The Government continuously reviews the scheme to ensure it remains fit-for-purpose as our electricity system evolves and we work towards our net zero ambitions. In 2022, the Government published a three-phase evaluation of the scheme, which found that the scheme was meeting its objectives. [1]

[1]https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evaluation-of-the-contracts-for-difference-scheme

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 13 November 2023 to Question 506 on Electricity Interconnectors: Scotland, if he will publish the terms of that partnership.

The new UK-Germany energy and climate partnership text was published on GOV.UK on Friday 3 November 2023. It is easily accessible through the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero home page on GOV.UK.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 13 November 2023 to Question 506 on Electricity Interconnectors: Scotland, what further projects in (a) Scotland and (b) Scottish waters are under discussion.

The Department engages with developers on potential interconnection projects. Officials are aware of two further potential interconnection projects that are seeking to connect into Scotland, these are NorthConnect and LirIC.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she plans to take steps to ensure that (a) towers and (b) blades for offshore wind farms are manufactured in the UK.

The Government recognises that the development of a competitive and sustainable supply chain is crucial to its ambition to deliver up to 50GW of offshore wind by 2030, including up to 5GW of floating offshore wind.

The Government is working with industry through the Offshore Wind Industry Council (OWIC) on priorities for supply chain development, with the aim of securing strategic investments for the offshore wind supply chain.

The UK already has significant blade manufacturing facilities for offshore wind: Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy’s facility at Hull, and Vestas’ facility on the Isle of Wight.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the Answer of 23 October 2023 to Question 203412 on Electricity: Standing Charges, whether costs are calculated according to the location of where energy is (a) produced and (b) landed.

The way in which network charges are set, including questions about how network charges reflect where energy is produced and landed, is a matter for Ofgem, as the independent regulator.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of requiring energy suppliers to credit domestic users where energy is (a) produced and (b) landed in their locality.

The way in which network charges are set, including questions about how network charges reflect where energy is produced and landed, is a matter for Ofgem, as the independent regulator.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had recent discussions with (a) energy companies and (b) the German Energy Agency on a subsea cable to transfer renewable energy from Scottish offshore windfarms to Germany.

On 3 November 2023, my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State, signed a new partnership with Germany’s Vice Chancellor, Mr Robert Habeck. The partnership reaffirmed the UK and Germany's shared ambition to net zero, and committing to enhanced cooperation on offshore wind and electricity interconnection.

Officials have also met German industry to discuss projects which are in an early stage of development.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of requiring energy providers to charge uniform standing charges for domestic users in all regions.

Ofgem, as the independent regulator, sets standing charges as part of the price cap, and standing charges include the network charges that Ofgem sets under the price controls.

Network charges vary by region to reflect the different costs of supplying consumers in each region. Ofgem carried out an assessment of moving away from regional charging and that showed that it would risk an increase in overall costs and reduce accountability to the customers being served.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 18 October 2023 to Question 201507 on Electricity: Standing Charges, what benefit OFGEM allocates to areas where energy is (a) produced and (b) landed.

The way in which network charges are set, including questions about how network charges reflect where energy is produced and landed, is a matter for Ofgem, as the independent regulator.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what (a) infrastructure costs and (b) other items OFGEM includes in the calculation of energy prices.

Wholesale and retail energy prices are a commercial matter and are set by the market.

Ofgem only calculates energy prices in so far as is necessary to set the maximum price for domestic default tariffs under the price cap.

Detail on how Ofgem calculate this can be found on their website: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/energy-price-cap-default-tariff-1-october-31-december-2023

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 18 October 2023 to Question 201507 on Electricity: Standing Charges, whether grid connections in one regional area where the energy is transmitted to another are included in the costs of the (a) transmitting and (b) receiving area.

Charging arrangements vary between transmission and distribution networks.

Transmission networks enable the bulk transfer of electricity across the country from sources of generation to local electricity distribution networks, with most costs charged on a national basis.

Transmission charges also feature a locational price signal, reflecting the costs that different users impose on the transmission network by connecting in different locations.

Local distribution networks convey electricity within a region. Distribution charges vary by Distribution Network Operator region, reflecting the different costs of running each local distribution network in a specific region and the number of consumers those costs are spread across.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 18 October 2023 to Question 201507 on Electricity: Standing Charges, how OFGEM differentiate the costs of distribution to another region from the costs to consumers within a region.

There are different costs for the high-voltage transmission network (between regions) and local low-voltage distribution networks.

The only cost within the standing charge that varies by region relates to a component of the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) costs, reflecting the different costs of each local network and the number of consumers connected to it.

Outside the standing charge, transmission network costs feature a price signal (price per unit) which reflects the costs of connection between different regions.

Scotland is a net exporter of electricity, so consumers incur lower transmission charges than most of their counterparts in England and Wales.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions she has had with Ofgem on the criteria used to decide the the regional rates and standing charges for electricity.

Ofgem have explained that electricity network charges vary by region to reflect the costs of running the network in that area and the number of consumers that those costs are spread over. Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, is responsible for overseeing the allocation of network charges to network users, and the standing charge which includes some of the distribution costs. Ofgem has previously reviewed the regional differences in network charges, and it concluded that the current cost-reflective approach has advantages and supports an efficient system where overall network costs are minimised for consumers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department has a policy on the production of green ammonia from hydrogen and renewable energy.

Decarbonised ammonia produced from low carbon hydrogen could play an important role in a future net zero energy system, including to decarbonise fertiliser production. Low carbon hydrogen and hydrogen-derived fuels like ammonia will also likely play a crucial role in decarbonising the maritime sector. Analysis commissioned by the Department for Transport estimated that by 2050 there could be 75-95TWh of demand for hydrogen-based fuels (principally in the form of ammonia) from UK domestic and international shipping.

The UK Hydrogen Strategy, published in August 2021, outlines a comprehensive roadmap for the development of the UK's low carbon hydrogen economy over the 2020s.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether renewable energy (a) brought ashore for battery storage and hydrogen and (b) not connected to the national grid is subject to grid connection charges or other imposed regulatory costs.

Charging liability depends on the exact nature of a connection arrangement, but the general expectation is that a party would not incur charges and costs associated with the licensed electricity network if it is not connected to it.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the situation in Niger on levels of supply of uranium for civil nuclear power.

Nuclear fuel and uranium for the UK generating fleet is procured by the operator, EDF Energy. EDFE have confirmed they are monitoring the situation to ensure no impact on UK supply. EDFE procure uranium from a variety of mining operators in a number of countries, including Niger, Kazakhstan, Canada and Australia.

Whilst the UK is not dependent on Niger for nuclear fuel, we recognise the importance of international security of supply of uranium and the Government is committed to working closely with industry, fuel suppliers and our international partners to achieve this.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent discussions he has had with the (a) devolved administrations, (b) fuel poverty organisations, (c) energy supply companies and (d) other relevant stakeholders on making the Ofgem Code of Practice for the involuntary installation of pre-payment meters mandatory.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations.

These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8th November and therefore become mandatory.

The Code of Practice and current pause on involuntary prepayment meter installations that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had recent discussions with Ofgem on making the Code of Practice for the involuntary installation of pre-payment meters mandatory.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations.

These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8th November and therefore become mandatory.

The Code of Practice and current pause on involuntary prepayment meter installations that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will request data from Ofgem on (a) the number of customers subject to the involuntary installation of a pre-payment meter, (b) the proportion customers who were given a £30 credit per meter or a non disconnection period equivalent to that amount in each of the last three years; and he will request a breakdown by (i) energy supply company for (A) England, (B) Scotland, (C) Wales and (D) Northern Ireland and (ii) UK parliamentary constituency.

The independent regulator Ofgem collects and publishes a range of data on pre-payment meters (PPMs), including the numbers of households that have been remotely switched to PPMs. Data is not available at parliamentary constituency level.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations. These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8th November and therefore become mandatory. The Code of Practice and current pause on involuntary prepayment meter installations that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will request data from Ofgem on the number of people who (a) have gone off supply at the point of pre-payment meter installation, (b) have had involuntary pre-payment meters installed, (c) were given compensation as a result and (d) were returned to a non pre-payment method of payment in each of the last three years; and if he will request a breakdown of this data by (i) energy supply company for (A) England, (B) Scotland, (C) Wales and (D) Northern Ireland and (ii) parliamentary constituency.

The independent regulator Ofgem collects and publishes a range of data on pre-payment meters (PPMs), including the numbers of households that have been remotely switched to PPMs. Data is not available at parliamentary constituency level.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations. These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8th November and therefore become mandatory. The Code of Practice and current pause on involuntary prepayment meter installations that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many involuntary installations there have been since the introduction of the Code of Practice for the involuntary installation of pre-payment meters by each energy supply company in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland and in each constituency.

The independent regulator Ofgem collects and publishes a range of data on pre-payment meters (PPMs), including the numbers of households that have been remotely switched to PPMs. Data is not available at parliamentary constituency level.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations. These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8th November and therefore become mandatory. The Code of Practice and current pause on involuntary prepayment meter installations that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when he expects the Ofgem Code of Practice for the involuntary installation of pre-payment meters to become mandatory.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations. These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8 November and therefore become mandatory. The Code of Practice that all suppliers have agreed to remain in place in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he plans to ask Ofgem for each energy supply company how many (a) fines are issued and (b) enforcement actions taken as a result of breaches to the Code of Practice for the involuntary installation of pre-payment meters once it becomes mandatory.

On 13 September Ofgem published its decision on new rules for suppliers in relation to involuntary prepayment meter installations. These rules will be implemented into supplier licence conditions on 8 November and therefore become mandatory. The Code of Practice that all suppliers have agreed to remains in place in the meantime. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State will continue to monitor the behaviour of suppliers and regulators going forwards and won't hesitate to intervene if necessary.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2023 to Question 198279 on Energy: Meters, what information her Department holds on how many households with SMETS 1 meters are awaiting either adaption to operating in smart mode or upgrade to SMETS2.

Information about the number of SMETS1 meters enrolled onto the smart metering network is available as part of official quarterly statistics reporting:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-june-2023

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2023 to Question 198279 on Energy: Meters, what progress reports her Department has received from companies responsible for ensuring that all households with a SMETS 1 meter will have it operating in smart mode or replaced with SMETS2 meter by 31 December 2023.

Information about the number of SMETS1 meters enrolled onto the smart metering network is available as part of official quarterly statistics reporting:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-june-2023

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether uranium from Niger is used in UK nuclear power plants.

The sourcing of fuel for the UK's operational civil nuclear power plants is a commercial decision for the plant operator, which in all instances is EDF.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September 2023 to Question 197604 on Energy: Prices, what steps her Department plans to take to support households in those areas that will not be covered by the smart metre rollout.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) provides Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage for smart meters to at least 99.25% of premises across Great Britain. The DCC is also obligated under its licence conditions to explore solutions to increase the overall level of coverage even further.

Ofgem is responsible for regulating the DCC against these obligations.

The DCC is currently developing a business case exploring solutions, including an option for using already available internet-connected Consumer Access Devices to provide smart services, which require a broadband connection. The Department expects to receive initial proposals from DCC shortly for review.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September 2023 to Question 197604 on Energy: Prices, what steps she is taking to help ensure households can connect smart metres to central recording service where current wi-fi technology does not support such communications.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) provides Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage for smart meters to at least 99.25% of premises across Great Britain. The DCC is also obligated under its licence conditions to explore solutions to increase the overall level of coverage even further.

Ofgem is responsible for regulating the DCC against these obligations.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent guidance her Department has issued to energy suppliers on upgrading older generation SMETS1 smart meters.

All first generation SMETS1 meters should be operating in smart mode by the end of 2023, substantively as a result of energy suppliers enrolling these into the national communications infrastructure as required under their Licence Conditions. Ofgem is responsible for regulating energy suppliers against their enrolment obligations.

Enrolment into the national communications infrastructure enables automatic billing, but also allows SMETS1 consumers to get the best deal by switching without losing smart services.

The Department does not hold data on the number of SMETS1 meters by Local Authority.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether it remains her Department's policy that all older generation SMETS1 smart meters should send information directly to suppliers so that customers can be billed automatically.

All first generation SMETS1 meters should be operating in smart mode by the end of 2023, substantively as a result of energy suppliers enrolling these into the national communications infrastructure as required under their Licence Conditions. Ofgem is responsible for regulating energy suppliers against their enrolment obligations.

Enrolment into the national communications infrastructure enables automatic billing, but also allows SMETS1 consumers to get the best deal by switching without losing smart services.

The Department does not hold data on the number of SMETS1 meters by Local Authority.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether it remains his Department's policy to have all old generation SMETS1 smart meters operating in smart mode by the end of 2023.

All first generation SMETS1 meters should be operating in smart mode by the end of 2023, substantively as a result of energy suppliers enrolling these into the national communications infrastructure as required under their Licence Conditions. Ofgem is responsible for regulating energy suppliers against their enrolment obligations.

Enrolment into the national communications infrastructure enables automatic billing, but also allows SMETS1 consumers to get the best deal by switching without losing smart services.

The Department does not hold data on the number of SMETS1 meters by Local Authority.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what information her Department holds on how many households in each local authority have a SMETS1 smart electricity meter.

All first generation SMETS1 meters should be operating in smart mode by the end of 2023, substantively as a result of energy suppliers enrolling these into the national communications infrastructure as required under their Licence Conditions. Ofgem is responsible for regulating energy suppliers against their enrolment obligations.

Enrolment into the national communications infrastructure enables automatic billing, but also allows SMETS1 consumers to get the best deal by switching without losing smart services.

The Department does not hold data on the number of SMETS1 meters by Local Authority.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what information her Department holds on how many households in each local authority have a SMETS1 smart electricity meter that has been adapted to operate in smart mode.

All first generation SMETS1 meters should be operating in smart mode by the end of 2023, substantively as a result of energy suppliers enrolling these into the national communications infrastructure as required under their Licence Conditions. Ofgem is responsible for regulating energy suppliers against their enrolment obligations.

Enrolment into the national communications infrastructure enables automatic billing, but also allows SMETS1 consumers to get the best deal by switching without losing smart services.

The Department does not hold data on the number of SMETS1 meters by Local Authority.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has made an assessment of the potential effect on the availability of low and fixed-price tariffs for energy consumers of the proposed closure of the Control Weather System Switch operated by SSEN.

While the setting of tariffs is a commercial matter for suppliers, customers on default tariffs are protected by Ofgem’s price cap.

The phase-out of the radio teleswitch service (RTS) for Economy 7 and 10 meters is a matter for Ofgem and electricity suppliers. I understand that suppliers are required to contact customers to arrange to upgrade their meter and replace it with a smart meter, so that they can continue to access the same tariffs.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, which organisation (a) designed and (b) commissioned the second generation of smart meter mesh networks.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) was responsible for leading the design, build test and implementation of the overall end-to-end solution for second generation meters. Mesh based solutions were chosen by Telefonica (now Virgin Media O2) and Arqiva who are service providers contracted to DCC to supplement their primary wide area network technologies to meet their coverage obligations.

The mesh technology is installed and commissioned by energy suppliers (as part of a smart meter installation) as directed by the Data and Communications Company’s Wide Area Network coverage checker.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what mesh pilot system field tests were conducted within the defined repeater installations in each constituency; and what signal strengths were obtained.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) is obligated under licence to provide coverage to 99.25% of premises in Great Britain. Ofgem is responsible for regulating the DCC against its obligations.

We do not hold information about the signal strengths obtained during field tests.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make it her policy to (a) consult on options for a new approach to consumer protection in the energy market from April 2024 and (b) include as an option in that consultation a social energy tariff targeted at low-income and vulnerable households.

As set out in the autumn statement, we are exploring the best approach to consumer protection, as part of wider retail market reforms. The government continues to monitor the situation and will keep options under review, including with respect to the most vulnerable households.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to Answer of 20 July 2023 to Question 194577, whether he will take steps to require energy providers not to put households which have been unable to transfer from a Radio Teleswitching System to a Smart Meter on higher tariffs.

Discussions are underway with industry and the relevant Radio Teleswitching System (RTS) service providers to secure the ongoing operation of RTS into 2025. Nonetheless, the Government expects energy suppliers to upgrade households with RTS to smart meters as soon as possible, so they can access smart meter benefits in good time, including a broader range of competitive multi rate tariffs.

Households should contact their energy supplier to arrange their smart meter installation and discuss individual tariff arrangements, as suppliers are best placed to advise based on knowledge of individual circumstances.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2023 to Question 193254 on Energy: Meters, whether it is the obligation of the householder to arrange for the switchover from Radio Teleswitching Services to Smart Meter.

Energy suppliers will engage their Radio Teleswitching Service (RTS) customers to arrange their smart metering upgrades. However, to benefit from smart meters at the earliest opportunity, RTS users should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible to book their installation.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2023 to Question 193254 on Energy: Meters, whether customers will have access to low cost tariffs who through no fault of their own have been unable to transfer from a Radio Teleswitching System to a Smart Meter

Households will need to liaise with their energy supplier to understand the default tariff arrangements for those without smart meters after 31 March 2024, as this will vary according to individual circumstances.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of using financial incentives to encourage radio teleswitch meter users to transfer to smart meters.

The Government expects that by transferring to smart meters, Radio Teleswitch Service users will be able to access a better range of competitive, flexible and dynamic tariffs, that reward them for using electricity away from peak times, or when there is excess clean electricity available.

In addition, smart meter enabled energy savings mean a typical household on a dual fuel tariff on average will currently save £46 annually.

Energy suppliers are responsible for the financial incentives they offer to their customers, and the effectiveness of such approaches is a matter for individual companies.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of transferring responsibility for the installation of smart meters from energy suppliers to energy infrastructure companies.

The decision to proceed with an energy supplier-led rollout, supported by a central communications infrastructure, was taken following a wide assessment of options and extensive stakeholder consultation in 2009.

The Government concluded that this approach would have more consumer benefits as suppliers had existing, direct relationships with their customers, unlike energy infrastructure companies and it avoided the costs of changing responsibility for metering services.

The Government consider that this remains the right approach for the installation of smart meters and changing it at this stage would slow down rollout progress considerably, reducing the resultant benefits for consumers and the energy system.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many households in each region have meters on the Wide Area Network.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) is obligated under the conditions of its licence to provide Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage to at least 99.25% of premises across Great Britain. There are currently 27.4 million meters connected to the WAN across Great Britain. The Government do not hold this data by region.

Energy suppliers are obligated under the conditions of their licences to take all reasonable steps to ensure their customers’ smart meters are functional. This includes replacing meters that have reached the end of their life or have been found to be faulty. The Government do not hold data on how many meters on the WAN have been replaced since 2021.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many household meters on the Wide Area Network have been replaced in each year since 2021.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) is obligated under the conditions of its licence to provide Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage to at least 99.25% of premises across Great Britain. There are currently 27.4 million meters connected to the WAN across Great Britain. The Government do not hold this data by region.

Energy suppliers are obligated under the conditions of their licences to take all reasonable steps to ensure their customers’ smart meters are functional. This includes replacing meters that have reached the end of their life or have been found to be faulty. The Government do not hold data on how many meters on the WAN have been replaced since 2021.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has a strategy for replacement of meters on the Wide Area Network.

The Data Communications Company (DCC) is obligated under the conditions of its licence to provide Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage to at least 99.25% of premises across Great Britain. There are currently 27.4 million meters connected to the WAN across Great Britain. The Government do not hold this data by region.

Energy suppliers are obligated under the conditions of their licences to take all reasonable steps to ensure their customers’ smart meters are functional. This includes replacing meters that have reached the end of their life or have been found to be faulty. The Government do not hold data on how many meters on the WAN have been replaced since 2021.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if his Department will make representations to Norway on that country's decision not to proceed with a sub sea cable between Scotland and Norway.

The UK and Norway have a bilateral treaty on electricity interconnection which underpins the close cooperation on further interconnection between the UK and Norway. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uknorway-agreement-on-cross-border-trade-in-electricity-and-cooperation-on-electricity-interconnection-ts-no182021

National Grid Ventures and Statnett jointly own an electricity interconnector, North Sea Link, between Great Britain and Norway (1.4 GW) which has been in operation since October 2021.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department is participating in work on a proposed sub sea energy cable from Scotland to Norway.

The UK and Norway have a bilateral treaty on electricity interconnection which underpins the close cooperation on further interconnection between the UK and Norway. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uknorway-agreement-on-cross-border-trade-in-electricity-and-cooperation-on-electricity-interconnection-ts-no182021

National Grid Ventures and Statnett jointly own an electricity interconnector, North Sea Link, between Great Britain and Norway (1.4 GW) which has been in operation since October 2021.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 10 July 2023 to Question 192438 on Energy: Meters, whether her Department expects the smart meter roll-out to reach all households before the radio teleswitching service is turned off.

The Government expects energy suppliers to upgrade households with Radio Teleswitching Services to smart meters by 31 March 2024, so they can continue to benefit from multi rate tariffs. Households with Radio Teleswitching Systems should engage their energy suppliers to arrange their smart metering installations as soon as possible to help facilitate this.

Households will need to liaise with their energy supplier to understand the default tariff arrangements for those without smart meters after 31 March 2024, as this will vary according to individual circumstances.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 10 July to Question 192438 on Energy: Meters, what tariffs will be available to people without smart meters after 31 March 2024.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 193247.

The Government expects energy suppliers to upgrade households with Radio Teleswitching Services to smart meters by 31 March 2024, so they can continue to benefit from multi rate tariffs. Households with Radio Teleswitching Systems should engage their energy suppliers to arrange their smart metering installations as soon as possible to help facilitate this.

Households will need to liaise with their energy supplier to understand the default tariff arrangements for those without smart meters after 31 March 2024, as this will vary according to individual circumstances.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 3 July to Question 191670 on Energy: Meters, whether her Department plans to extend access to the radio teleswitching service for households that have not had a smart meter installed by 31 March 2024.

Radio Teleswitching Service (RTS) is an industry led system, and discussions are underway with the relevant RTS service providers to secure the ongoing operation of RTS into 2025.

Smart meters are the natural technology upgrade for RTS. Energy suppliers are in the process of contacting consumers using RTS to upgrade to smart meters, which provide a range of flexible and dynamic tariffs to consumers, rewarding them for using electricity away from peak times. All smart meters can support tariffs which charge different prices throughout the day and night.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 3 July to Question 191670 on Energy: Meters, whether her Department plans to take steps to provide access to (a) dynamic and (b) off-peak tariffs for people who have not had a smart meter installed when the radio teleswitching service is withdrawn.

Radio Teleswitching Service (RTS) is an industry led system, and discussions are underway with the relevant RTS service providers to secure the ongoing operation of RTS into 2025.

Smart meters are the natural technology upgrade for RTS. Energy suppliers are in the process of contacting consumers using RTS to upgrade to smart meters, which provide a range of flexible and dynamic tariffs to consumers, rewarding them for using electricity away from peak times. All smart meters can support tariffs which charge different prices throughout the day and night.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he plans to set an affordable rate of repayment for households that are in debt to their energy companies.

Ofgem rules, including an Ability to Pay Principle, obligate suppliers to provide support for those struggling to pay their bills by setting up appropriate repayment plans based on a customer’s ability to pay, and by directing the customer to further support services. Ofgem has recently consulted on proposals to ensure suppliers intervene as early as possible to offer support where customers have fallen behind with bills. This consultation closed on 1 June, and Ofgem will announce its response in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he plans to introduce a new social energy tariff before winter 2023.

As set out in the autumn statement, we are exploring the best approach to consumer protection from April 2024, as part of wider retail market reforms.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many and what proportion of households have had smart meters installed as of 28 June 2023, broken down by each local authority; and if he will publish that data on an annual basis in each of the next five years.

The Department has recently published a map of installations broken down by local authority in its Q1 2023 statistics report, which can be accessed at www.gov.uk by searching for ‘Smart meters March 2023’.[1]

Updated annual data on smart meter installation progress broken down by each local authority will next be published in Q1 2024.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-march-2023

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what plans he has to modernise dynamically teleswitched meters; and whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of changes to those meters on energy price charging.

The smart metering system in Great Britain has been designed to enable a range of flexible and dynamic tariffs that reward energy consumers for using electricity away from peak times, or when there is excess clean electricity available.

Suppliers are in the process of contacting consumers using the Radio Teleswitching Service (RTS) to encourage them to upgrade to smart meters. This upgrade will ensure continued access to ‘time of use’ tariffs, including Economy 7. All smart meters can support tariffs which charge different prices throughout the day and night.

The RTS will remain operational until at least 31st March 2024.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending the responsibilities of the Civil Nuclear Constabulary to include offshore wind infrastructure in (a) territorial waters and (b) the exclusive economic zone.

Armed policing is used to protect only the most critical infrastructure. I am unable to comment on specific security measures at specific sites. The security measures at critical energy sites are implemented as a result of expert advice on the most effective measures that are proportionate to the threat and the type of infrastructure to be protected.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what additional critical national infrastructure he plans for the Civil Nuclear Constabulary to protect in the Energy Bill.

Armed policing is used to protect only the most critical infrastructure. I am unable to comment on specific security measures at specific sites. The security measures at critical energy sites are implemented as a result of expert advice on the most effective measures that are proportionate to the threat and the type of infrastructure to be protected.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding his Department has allocated to carbon capture utilisation and storage projects through the Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage Infrastructure Fund in Scotland since that fund was launched in March 2020.

The £1bn CCS Infrastructure Fund (CIF) forms part of a package of Government support to provide industry with the certainty required to deploy CCUS at pace and at scale. On 15 March 2023 my Rt hon Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an unprecedented up to £20 billion investment in the early development of CCUS. The Government has committed to setting out a vision for the CCUS sector that will support net zero ambitions and raise investor confidence.

Since its launch the Government has committed up to £40m of the CIF to support early-stage design work in industrial clusters via the Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge (IDC) Fund. UKRI announced the outcome of the challenge in March 2021 allocating a total of £171m, including £31m in funding for Scotland’s net zero infrastructure (offshore and onshore). The majority of CIF will be allocated through the ongoing Cluster Sequencing process.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what criteria his Department used to allocate expenditure to projects through the Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage Infrastructure Fund.

The CIF will primarily be allocated through the Cluster Sequencing process to contribute to the capital costs of the T&S network and ICC projects. To maximise participation, diversity and resilience in the Cluster Sequencing process, the Government has also committed up to £40m of the CIF to support early-stage design work in industrial clusters via the existing Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge (IDC) Fund.

The eligibility and assessment criteria for Phase 1 and 2 of the Cluster Sequencing Process are published within the Phase 1 and Phase 2 guidance. Clusters and projects were assessed against several criteria including deliverability, emissions reduction potential, economic benefits, cost considerations, and learning and innovation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent (a) representations he has received from and (b) discussions his Department has had with the Scottish Government on the potential role of depleted oil and gas fields with secure geological storage for the delivery of carbon capture utilisation and storage.

The Government is engaging with the Scottish Government on the development and implementation of all aspects of CCUS. Typically, CO2 will be stored in geological formations offshore, within depleted oil or gas fields or saline aquifers.

The UK’s transport and storage facilities have the potential to become strategic national assets. With an estimated 78 billion tonnes of theoretical CO₂ storage capacity in the UK Continental Shelf.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding was allocated from the Energy Transformation Fund (a) in total and (b) to projects in Scotland in each year of its operation.

The £289m Industrial Energy Transformation Fund (IETF) supports industrial sites located in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. To date, the Government has allocated funding across five competitive application windows. Allocations by financial year are as follows:

2020-2021, £22m

2021-2022, £26.2m

2022-2023, £119.6m

These figures do not include funding for projects that have chosen to withdraw from the programme. Further IETF allocations will be made once funding decisions for the final window of Phase 2 have concluded in Summer this year.

Scottish sites are supported by the Scottish IETF. The £34m SIETF budget is administered by the Scottish Government, and we do not hold the data on annual allocations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an estimate of the number of households which use the natural gas network in (a) the UK, (b) Great Britain, (c) Scotland, (d) England, (e) Wales and (f) Northern Ireland.

Data on the number of domestic gas meters in Great Britain, Scotland, England and Wales are published annually in subnational gas consumption statistics. Gas meters are classified as domestic or non-domestic based on a consumption threshold which means that some smaller commercial properties will be classified as domestic.

Data on the number of domestic gas meters in Northern Ireland are published annually in subnational gas consumption statistics in Northern Ireland. Gas meters are classified as domestic or non-domestic based on a profile marker which indicates if the meter relates to a domestic or non-domestic consumer.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an announcement on the allocation of Track 2 status for carbon capture utilisation and storage projects.

The Government has launched Track-2 of the Carbon Capture Usage and Storage (CCUS) cluster sequencing process which aims to establish two CCUS clusters, contributing to the ambition to capture 20-30 mega-tonnes of CO2 per year across the economy by 2030.

The expression of interest application window for Track-2 has now closed. The Government will provide an update on next steps in the summer.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of Scotland's Statutory Independent Undertakings converting curtailed wind energy to hydrogen.

The Government views hydrogen as an important component of the future energy system to provide low carbon flexibility as it integrates more intermittent renewables. Excess renewable electricity can be used to produce hydrogen. This could have a range of potential uses. Hydrogen could generate power when there is less wind or sun, for transport and industry or potentially heating buildings.

Further evidence is required on whether gas networks can be converted to use 100% hydrogen. This includes independent gas networks operated as Statutory Independent Undertakings. The Government is working with industry and regulators to build the necessary evidence base.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding his Department allocated to the Carbon Capture Storage and Utilisation Infrastructure Fund in each year since 2020; and how much funding was allocated to each project through that fund.

The 2021 Spending Review confirmed the following allocation for the Carbon Capture Usage and Storage (CCUS) Infrastructure Fund (£ bn current prices).

FY20/21

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

FY24/25

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.3

0.4

The £1 billion CIF allocation at SR21 is spread over a longer period than as announced at Spending Review 2020 reflecting information received from project developers in the CCUS clusters. The Government has committed up to £40m of the CIF to support early-stage design work in industrial clusters via the Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge (IDC) Fund. The majority of CIF will be allocated through the ongoing Cluster Sequencing process. The Hynet and East Coast Clusters have been confirmed as track 1 clusters for the mid-2020s and will be taken forward into Track-1 negotiations for support through the relevant business models, including CIF.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent discussions he has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues, (b) the Scottish Government and (c) local authorities on planning consent of (i) production sites, (ii) storage sites and (iii) pipelines for hydrogen projects.

No such discussions have taken place. This department is responsible for energy planning decisions under the Planning Act, which does not cover Scotland. Decisions in Scotland are for the Scottish authorities. The deciding minister for planning decisions does not discuss particulars of live planning cases outside the proper planning process.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what (a) recent discussions he has had with and (b) representations he has received from the Scottish Government on the potential use of carbon capture utilisation and storage for producing blue hydrogen and meeting the Government's net zero targets.

Scotland has a key role to play in the development of a UK hydrogen economy, including through carbon capture utilisation and storage (CCUS) enabled hydrogen. The UK and Scottish Government engage regularly on hydrogen policy developments at both official and ministerial level.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had recent discussions with the Scottish Government on the potential role that existing oil and gas infrastructure will have in the delivery of his carbon capture, utilisation and storage policies.

The Government is engaging with the Scottish Government on the development and implementation of all aspects of CCUS, including the re-purposing of oil and gas infrastructure. The Government’s proposed update to Change of Use Relief through the Energy Bill seeks to remove potential barriers to re-purposing, and is in large part a direct consequence of the positive engagement held with the Acorn CCUS project in Scotland.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much capital expenditure has been allocated to (a) developers and (b) investors in electrolytic hydrogen projects through the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund in Scotland since that scheme was launched in July 2022.

In March 2023, the Government announced the first 15 successful applicants to Strands 1 and 2 of the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund (NZHF). Four are Scottish projects, in Inverness, East Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Kintore, which have been awarded a total of £11.7 million in development and capital grant funding.

The Government also announced the 20 shortlisted projects entering due diligence in the first electrolytic hydrogen allocation round, which will offer capital and revenue support from the NZHF and Hydrogen Production Business Model. Five of the shortlisted projects are based in Scotland and the Government aims to award contracts to successful projects in Q4 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much revenue support has been allocated to (a) developers and (b) investors in electrolytic hydrogen projects through the hydrogen production business model in Scotland since that scheme was launched in July 2022.

In March 2023, the Government announced the first 15 successful applicants to Strands 1 and 2 of the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund (NZHF). Four are Scottish projects, in Inverness, East Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Kintore, which have been awarded a total of £11.7 million in development and capital grant funding.

The Government also announced the 20 shortlisted projects entering due diligence in the first electrolytic hydrogen allocation round, which will offer capital and revenue support from the NZHF and Hydrogen Production Business Model. Five of the shortlisted projects are based in Scotland and the Government aims to award contracts to successful projects in Q4 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 2 May 2023 to Question 182699 on Alternative Fuel Payments, whether the Meter Point Administration Numbers provided to suppliers included (a) second and (b) holiday home owners.

The Government determined if a Meter Point Administration Numbers (MPANs) was eligible by taking a list of all domestic MPANs and removing those which are in on gas grid postcodes or where the local area predominantly uses electricity for heating, as defined by the most recent Census in their area.

For technical and data handling reasons, the Government did not ascertain the address associated with each MPAN, and could therefore not determine the primary residence status of each property.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 2 May 2023 to Question 182699 on Alternative Fuel Payments, whether the guidance to suppliers included directions on payments to (a) potential and (b) existing (i) second and (ii) holiday homes.

The guidance does not include any specific detail regarding second homes and holiday homes.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department provided guidance to energy suppliers on the disbursement of first domestic alternative fuel payments to (a) home owners and (b) second homer owners.

For the main Alternative Fuel Payment scheme, energy suppliers were obliged to pay customers during February, for which Government produced a list of eligible Meter Point Administration Numbers (MPANs) and told electricity suppliers to pay those customers. Guidance to suppliers on how this process should be completed was published on January 23rd and is available here:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-alternative-fuel-payment-afp-scheme-in-great-britain-guidance-for-electricity-suppliers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 24 April 2023 to Question 181618 on Alternative Fuel Payments: Second Homes, whether he has made an assessment of the potential risk of Alternative Fuel Payments being made to suppliers and paid directly to consumers without verification checks.

The Alternative Fuel Payment scheme is being delivered by suppliers. Suppliers were obliged to pay customers during February, for which Government produced a list of eligible Meter Point Administration Numbers (MPANs) and told electricity suppliers to pay those customers. Guidance to suppliers on how this process should be completed was published on January 23rd and is available here: www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-alternative-fuel-payment-afp-scheme-in-great-britain-guidance-for-electricity-suppliers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what data he holds on the number and proportion of households that have not had an Alternative Fuel Payment applied by their energy supplier on the basis that they are (a) holiday or (b) second home owners.

Electricity suppliers, who delivered the automatic enrolment element of the scheme, recently provided MPAN-level delivery data to Government. Transparency data will be published in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether operators of (a) AirBnB and (b) holiday homes are eligible for the £150 non-domestic alternative fuel payment.

Operators of Airbnb and holiday homes in Great Britain are eligible for the £150 Non-domestic Alternative Fuel Payment if they are situated in an off gas grid postcode, have a non-domestic contract with their electricity supplier, and have an active and energised electricity meter with positive energy usage. Each customer is eligible for one payment per unique address.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to Answer of 24 April to Question 181618 on Alternative Fuel Payments: Second Homes. what information his Department holds on how many such claims for Additional Fuel Payment to a local authority have (a) been rejected and (b) given rise to a prosecution.

Data is still being collected regarding the Alternative Fuel Payment Alternative Fund, and the Department will be publishing transparency data in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether vouchers that are re-issued as lost or expired are counted separately within the tables provided for payments made under the Energy Bills support scheme.

Suppliers report on a monthly basis how many vouchers have expired that month. They also report how many vouchers they have reissued each month. Reissued vouchers are not factored into 'payments delivered' in the publication tables, this covers only the first time a supplier makes an EBSS payment. The transparency data on Energy Bills Support Scheme GB payments made by electricity suppliers to customers and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-payments-made-by-electricity-suppliers-to-customers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 17 April to Question 175730 on Alternative Fuel Payments: Second Homes, if he will publish details of the checks which are conducted on applications for Alternative Fuel Payments to ensure that claims from second homeowners or holiday homes are not accepted.

Applicants are asked to self-declare when making an application whether an address given is their primary residence. Local Authorities are required to check this self-declaration against their Council Tax records.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 17 April to Question 175730 on Alternative Fuel Payments: Second Homes, what steps he has taken to ensure that no claims for Alternative Fuel Payments have been made for (a) second and (b) holiday homes.

The Government have required applicants to self-declare when making an application to the Alternative Fund whether an address given is their primary residence. The Department has provided guidance to Local Authorities regarding steps which should be taken in regard to verification. If at any stage a Local Authority is aware that property was not the primary resident of the address at the time of the application, then this is treated as suspected fraud.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to his letter of 30 January 2023 to all Members of Parliament, whether he plans to publish data received in response to the request for the release of supplier data on the number of warrant applications that suppliers have made to force entry to homes to install meters.

Following a request from the Secretary of State, all suppliers have provided data on warrants. The Government has published this data, showing that over 94,000 prepayment meters were forcibly installed under warrant last year. More information can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/news/just-three-energy-suppliers-making-up-over-70-of-all-forced-installation-of-prepayment-meters.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to his letter of 30 January 2023 to all Members of Parliament, what response he received to the request for the release of supplier data on the number of warrant applications that suppliers have made to force entry to homes to install meters.

Following a request from the Secretary of State, all suppliers have provided data on warrants. The Government has published this data, showing that over 94,000 prepayment meters were forcibly installed under warrant last year. More information can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/news/just-three-energy-suppliers-making-up-over-70-of-all-forced-installation-of-prepayment-meters.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many applications for an Alternative Fuel Payment have been rejected because they are for second or holiday homes.

Data is still being collected regarding the Alternative Fuel Payment Alternative Fund, and the Department will be publishing transparency data in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the level of take up of Alternative Fuel Payment vouchers in each local authority.

Electricity suppliers, who deliver the automatic enrolment element of the Alternative Fuel Payment scheme, recently provided MPAN-level delivery data to Government. Transparency data will be published in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether officials in his Department were approached by Crown Estates Scotland for guidance prior to the granting of the ScotWind offshore licences.

The Department was not approached for guidance. Seabed leasing in Scottish waters is the responsibility of Crown Estate Scotland.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if his Department will take steps to publish the data it holds on Alternative Fuel Payments being claimed by owners of (a) second and (b) holiday homes.

The Government will not be publishing data on Alternative Fuel Payments being claimed by second homeowners or holiday homes, as the Government has taken the decision to only allow people to apply to the AFP Alternative Fund for their main homes.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what his Department's policy is on the use of funds available from unredeemed vouchers in the Energy Bills Support Scheme when it ends in June 2023.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme has delivered £400 to assist households with energy costs this winter. The Government encourage traditional prepayment meter users to redeem their vouchers and apply the credit to their meter as soon as possible. Vouchers have been sent each month, between October and March, via text, email or post by electricity suppliers. Vouchers that have expired or been damaged or lost can be reissued by suppliers on request from the customer. All vouchers must be redeemed by 30 June 2023.

Following the closure of the Scheme, all unused funds will be returned to HM Treasury.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will take steps for the value of unredeemed vouchers under the Energy Bills Support Scheme to be made available for organisations working to help tackle fuel poverty.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme has delivered £400 to assist households with energy costs this winter. The Government encourage traditional prepayment meter users to redeem their vouchers and apply the credit to their meter as soon as possible. Vouchers have been sent each month, between October and March, via text, email or post by electricity suppliers. Vouchers that have expired or been damaged or lost can be reissued by suppliers on request from the customer. All vouchers must be redeemed by 30 June 2023.

Following the closure of the Scheme, all unused funds will be returned to HM Treasury.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether unredeemed vouchers under the Energy Bills Support Scheme will be redeemable by those people entitled to them after June 2023.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme has delivered £400 to assist households with energy costs this winter. The Government encourage traditional prepayment meter users to redeem their vouchers and apply the credit to their meter as soon as possible. Vouchers have been sent each month, between October and March, via text, email or post by electricity suppliers. Vouchers that have expired or been damaged or lost can be reissued by suppliers on request from the customer. All vouchers must be redeemed by 30 June 2023.

Following the closure of the Scheme, all unused funds will be returned to HM Treasury.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing funding from the public purse to cover the standing charge for prepayment meters.

The standing charge reflects the on-going costs that fall on a supplier to provide and maintain a live supply to a customer’s premises.

As announced in the Spring Budget 2023, the Government will remove the premium paid by households using prepayment meters by bringing their charges in line with comparable direct debit customers until the Energy Price Guarantee (EPG) ends. This measure will eliminate the premium paid by households on prepayment meters, which is worth around £45 per year.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what the operational costs are for (a) pre-payment energy meters that require (i) card or coin and (ii) remote payment and (b) standard smart meters on direct debit.

In setting the level of the price cap, Ofgem calculates the costs of metering and payment methods, and produces price cap levels for credit meters paying by direct debit and for prepayment meters. This also takes account of different network costs across the network regions. Ofgem’s calculations can be found at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/default-tariff-cap-level-1-april-2023-30-june-2023.

The Government has announced that the cost differential between customers paying by direct debit and prepayment customers will be covered through the Energy Price Guarantee from 1 July this year, saving a comparable prepayment meter customer £45 a year on average.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether standing charges will remain on pre-payment meters.

Standing charges are a matter for energy suppliers. The standing charge reflects the ongoing costs that fall on a supplier to provide and maintain a live supply to a customer’s premises.

As announced in the Spring Budget 2023, the Government will remove the premium paid by households using prepayment meters by bringing their charges in line with comparable direct debit customers until the Energy Price Guarantee (EPG) ends. This measure will eliminate the premium paid by households on prepayment meters, which is worth around £45 per year.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) oil production and (b) exploration rigs are working in the North Sea and west of Shetland.

There are currently 342 oil and gas production facilities in the North Sea and West of Shetland, of which 297 are fixed platforms. The exact locations of these can be found via the North Sea Transition Authority’s offshore interactive map via:

www.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=f4b1ea5802944a55aa4a9df0184205a5.

According to Westwood Energy RigLogix service, there are currently 31 mobile oil and gas drilling rigs located in the North Sea and West of Shetland. Of these, 19 are currently either on active operations or moving to location, seven are awaiting deployment, and five are in shipyards undergoing inspection, maintenance, or modification.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2023 to Question 138404 on Energy: Meters, whether any sanctions will apply to companies that have force-fitted prepayment meters in households; and if he will provide guidance to consumers with such meters on their (a) rights and (b) options for recourse.

Ofgem is responsible for enforcement of licence conditions. Ofgem is undertaking a further compliance review and will determine any sanctions.

Information on consumer rights and options for recourse can be found at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/information-consumers/energy-advice-households/check-prepayment-meter-rules.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January to Question 120157, what financial support the Government has provided to (a) the operators of Hawthorn Pit and (b) Drax for the cabling from Peterhead and Torness.

Financial support for network infrastructure projects, including the Peterhead and Torness projects, is regulated by Ofgem as the independent energy regulator through the ‘RIIO’ price controls. While the government engages with Ofgem and network operators regularly, decisions on network investment are a matter for Ofgem. The Government welcomes strategic transmission network projects and their acceleration to support the 2030 offshore wind ambition, as set out in Ofgem’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment framework.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2023 to Question 120157 on Electricity Generation: Infrastructure, what the estimated value is of the 5 TWh of energy.

The value of electricity can be estimated using recent wholesale electricity prices, which are published regularly on Ofgem’s website. It is worth noting that wholesale electricity prices have been volatile over recent years and vary by season. Wholesale electricity prices for 2030 would be more challenging to estimate accurately, though current prices could be used as a proxy. Alternatively, retail prices could be used to derive the retail value of electricity. These are published by the Government and can be found in table 4 on this link.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 24 January 2023 to Question 127911 on Electricity Generation: Infrastructure, if he will make an estimate of the value of (a) 35 TWH as of 7 February 2023 and (b) 124 TWH in 2030.

The value of electricity can be estimated using recent wholesale electricity prices, which are published regularly on Ofgem’s website. It is worth noting that wholesale electricity prices have been volatile over recent years and vary by season. Wholesale electricity prices for 2030 would be more challenging to estimate accurately, though current prices could be used as a proxy. Alternatively, retail prices could be used to derive the retail value of electricity. These are published by the Government and can be found in table 4 on this link.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department holds information on the number of (a) energy suppliers and (b) contractors hired by energy suppliers undertaking forced installations of prepayment meters; and what recent estimate he has made of the number of households that have had prepayment meters forcibly installed by energy suppliers in the latest period for which data is available.

The Government has published a 5-point plan to tackle bad behaviour by energy suppliers. This includes a call for suppliers to stop the practice of forced prepayment switching and look at how else they can support those struggling to pay their bills. The Government has also demanded that suppliers share the number of warrants they’ve applied for in recent months and plans to publish the findings.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make it his policy to require energy companies to replace prepayment meters that have been forcibly installed with credit meters.

The Government has set out its 5-point plan regarding prepayment meters and Ministers will keep the House updated on its progress. Ofgem has launched a new prepayment meter investigation, in response to the 5-point plan: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/letter-jonathan-brearley-secretary-state-business-energy-and-industrial-strategy-tackling-inappropriate-energy-supplier-prepayment-meter-practices.

Prepayment meters (PPMs) allow customers to pay for energy on a pay-as-you-go basis and serve an important function by helping the avoidance of debt and court action. Ofgem has stringent rules on the force-fitting of prepayment meters and is responsible for ensuring licensed energy suppliers comply with those rules. Ofgem publishes details of its compliance and enforcement action on its website at: www.ofgem.gov.uk/energy-policy-and-regulation/compliance-and-enforcement.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when his Department first became aware of the forced instalment by energy companies of energy pre-payment meters.

Ofgem’s license conditions currently allow energy suppliers to force fit prepayment meters (PPMs) as a last resort.

The Government's 5-point plan on PPMs forms part of a wider effort to ensure that energy users are protected at this challenging time. Additionally, Ofgem has asked suppliers to pause the installation of PPMs under warrant until they have assured Ofgem that they are following all relevant regulations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a compensation scheme for households who have had prepayment meters forcibly installed in their homes.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero has written to domestic energy suppliers asking them to share what steps they are taking to identify consumers who may have had a Pre-payment meter installed inappropriately, and confirm that where such customers are identified, appropriate action will be taken. All domestic suppliers have been asked to pause the installation of pre-payment meters under warrant until they have assured Ofgem that they are compliant with all relevant regulations and obligations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that providers of broadband social tariffs apply the same (a) discount levels and (b) eligibility criteria to those tariffs.

The Government recognises that this is a difficult time for households across the country who are struggling with their bills due to the rise in the cost of living.

Social tariffs are offered on a voluntary basis by 27 telecommunications providers and are available in 99% of the UK for the around 5 million eligible households on Universal Credit as well as other means-tested benefits. The design of broadband and mobile social tariffs, including pricing, speeds, and eligibility, are decided by individual operators, and this has resulted in a good range of offers for people to choose from.

The Government does not currently have plans to intervene in the telecommunications market to prescribe the make-up of social tariffs. We recognise that low-income households need help with their bills now and any legislative proposal will take time to design and deliver and may cause operators to withdraw their existing social offers. In December 2023, Ofcom’s Pricing Trends report showed 380,000 households were taking up a social tariff. This is an increase of almost 160% since their September 2022 report. We continue to work closely with Ofcom to monitor market provision and stand ready to act if necessary.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what data his Department holds on a potential correlation between properties being off the gas grid and having poor access to broadband.

Across Great Britain in 2021, an estimated 15 percent of domestic properties were not connected to the gas grid. This equates to around 4,393,000 properties. The devolved administrations have a higher percentage of properties not connected to the gas grid as in Scotland and Wales it is 19% each, compared to 15% in England.

Ofcom Connected Nations 2022 states that around 80,000 premises (0.3%) in the UK do not have access to a decent broadband service via either a fixed or wireless network. This figure continues to decrease year on year (down from 123,000 the previous year). The devolved administrations have a higher percentage of premises eligible for the broadband Universal Service Obligation (USO) as in Scotland and Wales 0.7% of premises are eligible, compared to 0.15% in England.

While the Department does not have data to show whether properties that are not connected to the gas grid are the same as those eligible for the broadband USO, we know that Scotland and Wales are disproportionately affected in both cases.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2022 to Question 120157 on Electricity Generation: Infrastructure, how much energy is being transmitted from north to south through existing infrastructure.

As set out in the National Grid ESO Future Energy Scenario publication, approximately 35TWh of electricity was expected to flow from Scotland to the rest of Great Britain in 2021, which compares to an expectation of 124TWh in 2030.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of households which are not connected to the gas grid in (a) the UK, (b) Great Britain, (c) Scotland, (d) England, (e) Wales and (f) Northern Ireland.

BEIS publishes estimates of the number of domestic properties not connected to the gas network for Great Britain by country, English regions and local authority. This includes properties where a gas grid connection is possible but no connection has been made. For Northern Ireland, data on gas connections is available via the Annual Retail Energy Market Monitoring Report.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the number of households not connected to the gas grid in (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland a by (i) local authority and (ii) constituency.

BEIS publishes estimates of the number of domestic properties not connected to the gas network for Great Britain by country, English regions and local authority. This includes properties where a gas grid connection is possible but no connection has been made. Equivalent data is available at Lower layer Super Output Area(LSOA) and Middle layer Super Output Area(MSOA) levels, but not by constituency. For Northern Ireland, data on gas connections is available via the Annual Retail Energy Market Monitoring Report.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will obtain and publish data on the (a) number and (b) percentage of energy non-direct debit customers who pay by cash, cheque or over the phone in (i) the UK, (ii) Great Britain, (iii) England, (iv) Scotland, (v) Wales and (vi) Northern Ireland as of 1 January 2023; and if he will provide that data by (A) local authority and (B) parliamentary constituency.

The Department does not have access to customer or supplier data.

The regulator, Ofgem, monitors and enforces compliance with the licence obligations on suppliers. Suppliers are required to ensure that their billing and payment arrangements are effective and fair, and that any differences in price between payment methods are cost-reflective.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his most recent estimate is of (a) the average standard charge for energy customers and (b) the amount by which that charge has risen over the last 12 months.

According to recent data, the overall average fixed costs for standard electricity was £88.57 per year in 2021. This increased to £144.62 per year in 2022.

For more information, please follow this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/annual-domestic-energy-price-statistics

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with (a) Ofgem, (b) energy companies, (c) consumer organisations, (d) organisations advocating against fuel poverty, (e) organisations which advocate on behalf of older people and (f) other relevant stakeholders on setting a limit to the standing charges which can be charged by energy companies.

The Department meets regularly with a range of stakeholder to discuss energy retail market issues. Decisions about standing charges are a commercial matter for energy suppliers. The standing charge is a fixed charge that suppliers pass on to their customers to cover the cost of providing a live supply. One component of the standing charge cost relates to transmission and distribution charges, which have recently increased due to the Supplier of Last Resort (SoLR) levy. The Government, together with Ofgem, is looking at reforms to ensure financial resilience in the energy retail market.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations he has received on (a) the forced installation of prepayment meters and (b) the practice of self-disconnection by those households unable to afford to load credit onto prepayment meters.

The Department receives a number of representations about a range of issues relating to energy markets.

The energy regulator Ofgem has rules in place that restrict the force-fitting of a prepayment meter (PPM) on customers who are in debt, except as a last resort. Forcible installations of PPMs for the most vulnerable customers have been banned by Ofgem since 2017.

Ofgem rules also require energy suppliers to take all reasonable steps to identify prepayment meter customers who are self-disconnecting and provide appropriate support.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will host a summit of (a) energy companies, (b) Ofgem and (c) other relevant stakeholders to discuss (i) the forced installation of prepayment meters and (ii) the practice of self-disconnection by those households unable to afford to load credit onto prepayment meters.

I will be hosting a roundtable with suppliers, Ofgem, Energy UK and Citizens Advice to discuss the issue of prepayment meters and self-disconnection this week.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of households who were left without power in the last 12 months as a result of running out of credit on their prepayment meter in (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland; and if he will provide a breakdown by (i) local authority and (ii) parliamentary constituency.

Ofgem only holds data for smart meters in prepayment mode that have disconnected, Ofgem does not hold data for traditional prepayment meter disconnections. One of the benefits of smart prepayment over traditional prepayment meters is the ability for energy suppliers to know when customers have gone off supply, and so offer timely support. Smart prepayment also enables consumers to track their balance easily, so they do not unknowingly run out of credit.

Ofgem holds data for Q1 – Q3 2022. The number of smart meters that disconnected at least once across this period are provided in the table below.

Q1 2022

Q2 2022

Q3 2022

Scotland

49,874

68,646

66,305

England

399,975

511,692

518,881

Wales

60,725

79,797

74,947

Ofgem does not collect data at the local authority or parliamentary constituency level.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the financial costs to vulnerable families and households arising from (a) the forced installation of prepayment meters and (b) the practice of self-disconnection by those households unable to afford to load credit onto prepayment meters.

There are strict Ofgem rules in place to protect prepayment meter customers. Suppliers are required to identify PPM customers who are self-disconnecting and to offer short-term support through emergency and friendly-hours credit as well as to offer additional support credit to PPM customers in vulnerable situations who have self-disconnected or self-rationed. Suppliers must also support all customers who are facing financial difficulties through the inclusion of Ability to Pay principles in the supply licence.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with (a) energy companies and (b) Ofgem on (i) the forced installation of prepayment meters and (ii) the practice of self-disconnection by those households unable to afford to load credit onto prepayment meters.

The Department meets regularly with Ofgem and energy suppliers to discuss energy retail market issues. As my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State set out in the House, officials are working on measures to support PPM consumers and we will act as soon as possible to tackle this issue.

Ofgem has rules in place that restrict the force-fitting of a prepayment meter (PPM) on customers who are in debt, except as a last resort. Suppliers must assess whether installing a PPM, including the remote switching of a smart meter, is safe and reasonably practicable for the customer. This assessment should include identifying any vulnerability.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that energy companies adhere to Ofgem guidance that prepayment meters should not be forcibly installed in households which include a person with (a) a disability and (b) a long term health condition.

BEIS Ministers and officials regularly hold discussions with Ofgem and energy suppliers on a range of issues relating to the energy markets.

Forcible installations of prepayment meters for vulnerable customers have been banned by Ofgem since 2017. In addition, Ofgem has recently undertaken a Market Compliance Review assessing how suppliers support customers in vulnerable situation. Ofgem has started compliance engagement with suppliers and asked them to take action to address the weaknesses that have been identified.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of households with a prepayment meter include a person with (a) a disability and (b) a long term health condition.

Neither the Government nor Ofgem hold this data. Ofgem has strict rules in place that mean whenever suppliers install a prepayment meter, they must verify that it is safe and reasonably practicable to do so. This should include consideration of whether a customer’s vulnerability would make a prepayment meter inappropriate, for example where medical equipment is required.

Ofgem conducted a review assessing how suppliers support customers in vulnerable situations, including assessing suppliers’ processes for installing prepayment meters. To drive improvements, Ofgem has started compliance engagement with suppliers and required them to take action to address the weaknesses that have been identified. The Government expects suppliers to comply fully with their obligations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of households with a prepayment meter include a person who (a) is aged under 16 and (b) is aged over 60.

Neither the Government nor Ofgem hold this data. Ofgem has strict rules in place that mean whenever suppliers install a prepayment meter, they must verify that it is safe and reasonably practicable to do so. This should include consideration of whether a customer’s vulnerability would make a prepayment meter inappropriate, for example where medical equipment is required.

Ofgem conducted a review assessing how suppliers support customers in vulnerable situations, including assessing suppliers’ processes for installing prepayment meters. To drive improvements, Ofgem has started compliance engagement with suppliers and required them to take action to address the weaknesses that have been identified. The Government expects suppliers to comply fully with their obligations.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in (a) the UK, (b) Great Britain, (c) England, (d) Scotland, (e) Wales and (f) Northern Ireland have a prepayment meter; and if he will provide a breakdown by (i) local authority and (ii) parliamentary constituency.

Ofgem is the regulator for the GB energy market. According to Ofgem's figures for Q3 2022, there were 4,069,814 domestic prepayment meter customers in GB. Ofgem's figures provide a breakdown by nation with 3,322,511 prepayment meter customers in England, 497,943 in Scotland and 249,360 in Wales. Data is not available at the local authority or parliamentary constituency level.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to obtain information on the number of prepayment meters in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland.

Ofgem is the regulator for the GB energy market. According to Ofgem's figures for Q3 2022, there were 4,069,814 domestic prepayment meter customers in GB. Ofgem's figures provide a breakdown by nation with 3,322,511 prepayment meter customers in England, 497,943 in Scotland and 249,360 in Wales. Data is not available at the local authority or parliamentary constituency level.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to prevent the forced installation of prepayment meters.

The independent energy regulator Ofgem has rules in place that restrict the force-fitting of a prepayment meter on customers who are in debt, except as a last resort. Prepayment meters can help reduce the risk of customers entering, or exacerbating, debt. Ofgem rules require energy suppliers to only offer a prepayment service where it is safe and reasonably practicable to do so.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations he has received on the potential merits of setting a limit to the extra charges, in addition to the regular bill, which can be charged by energy companies on the bills of non-direct debit customers who pay by cash, cheque or over the phone.

BEIS Ministers and officials regularly receive representations on a range of issues relating to energy markets.

Rules set by Ofgem mean suppliers can only charge more for one payment method than another if the price differential is cost reflective. Non-direct debit customers who prefer to receive paper energy bills by post cost more to serve than those with direct debit arrangements. Suppliers also incur charges for these customers to pay their energy bills by cash and cheque at facilities such as the Post Office or Paypoint.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of households that have both (a) legacy pre-payment meters and (b) rely on alternative fuels in (i) Scotland and (ii) the UK.

In Scotland in Q3 2022, there were 497,943 customers on prepayment meters, of which 203,484 are smart meters and 294,459 are traditional meters.

In the UK in Q3 2022, there were 4,069,814 customers on prepayment meters, of which 2,041,635 are smart meters and 2,028,179 are traditional meters.

170,000 homes are using alternative fuel for heating in Scotland and over 1.2m homes do so across Great Britain as a whole.

The Government does not hold data on how many households have both.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance his Department has provided to energy suppliers on the provision of the £200 Alternative Fuel Payment to households.

In advance of households receiving the Alternative Fuel Payment in February, the Department has been working at pace with stakeholders including energy suppliers. The Department has shared draft guidance for the scheme, which will be published in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the number of households that have legacy prepayment meters in (a) Scotland and (b) the UK.

Ofgem is the regulator for the GB Energy Market. According to Ofgem figures for Q3 2022, there were 294,459 traditional prepayment meters in Scotland and 2,028,179 in GB.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of people eligible for fuel vouchers have taken them up in (a) Scotland and (b) the UK in the latest period for which data is available.

By 1 December 2022, 99% of vouchers had been issued to customers with traditional prepayment meters under the Energy Bills Support Scheme, and 66% had been redeemed. Vouchers are valid for three months and so the Government expects this figure to rise. The Government has not yet published geographical data. Data covering December will be published shortly. Monthly updates can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-payments-made-by-electricity-suppliers-to-customers.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the announcement in November 2021 that two 2GW high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electricity ‘superhighways’ will be established between Torness and Hawthorn Pit (Scotland to England Green Link 1) and between Peterhead and Drax (Scotland to England Green Link 2), what estimate he has made of the amount of energy that will be transferred via these links each year; and whether his Department plans to make payments to (a) the Scottish Government or (b) Scottish communities in relation to the scheme.

The Government welcomes strategic network projects such as the Torness and Peterhead links, and their acceleration to support 2030 offshore wind ambition, as set out in in Ofgem’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment framework. National Grid ESO estimates that these links will facilitate the transmission of an additional 5 TWh of energy from North to South in their first year.

Following a commitment in the British Energy Security Strategy, the Government is also looking to consult on community benefit options for communities hosting transmission network infrastructure.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what provision will be made under the Energy Bills Discount scheme for businesses dependent on unregulated fuels.

As per the current Energy Bill Relief Scheme, those receiving gas or electricity delivered over public networks from non-licensed providers will also benefit from comparable support under the further schemes if necessary. The Government is seeking evidence from organisations unable to access the EBRS because they are non-licensed providers of energy or provide energy to businesses in non-standard ways. The Government welcomes energy providers’ responses by the closing date of 20 January 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the annual amount of energy that will be to be transmitted by the electricity superhighways from Torness and Peterhead in Scotland to Hawthorn Pit and Drax in England.

Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, uses the price control process to determine the amount of funding allocated for network infrastructure projects, including the Torness and Peterhead projects. This includes regulating the cost of their build, ownership, operation and maintenance. The Government welcomes such strategic network projects and their acceleration to support the 2030 offshore wind ambition, as set out in Ofgem’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment framework. National Grid ESO estimates that these links will facilitate the transmission of an additional 5 TWh of energy from north to south in their first year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department will (a) operate and (b) meet the maintenance costs of the electricity superhighways from Torness and Peterhead in Scotland to Hawthorn Pit and Drax in England.

Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, uses the price control process to determine the amount of funding allocated for network infrastructure projects, including the Torness and Peterhead projects. This includes regulating the cost of their build, ownership, operation and maintenance. The Government welcomes such strategic network projects and their acceleration to support the 2030 offshore wind ambition, as set out in Ofgem’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment framework. National Grid ESO estimates that these links will facilitate the transmission of an additional 5 TWh of energy from north to south in their first year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department will provide funding for the construction of the electricity superhighways from Torness and Peterhead in Scotland to Hawthorn Pit and Drax in England.

Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, uses the price control process to determine the amount of funding allocated for network infrastructure projects, including the Torness and Peterhead projects. This includes regulating the cost of their build, ownership, operation and maintenance. The Government welcomes such strategic network projects and their acceleration to support the 2030 offshore wind ambition, as set out in Ofgem’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment framework. National Grid ESO estimates that these links will facilitate the transmission of an additional 5 TWh of energy from north to south in their first year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 29 November 2022 to Question 95943 on the Energy Charter Treaty, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the findings of France’s High Council on Climate’s Report on the Modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty, published in October 2022.

The UK has been closely monitoring the situation surrounding the Energy Charter Treaty’s modernisation process, including the positions taken by other Contracting Parties. The Government will continue to do so as part of its engagement with the Treaty’s modernisation process.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the compatibility of the UK’s membership of the Energy Charter Treaty with commitments made under the Paris Agreement.

The UK has been an advocate for the Energy Charter Treaty modernisation on the basis that the modernised Treaty would be compatible with the Paris Agreement. The UK is monitoring developments on the modernisation process, including the positions taken by other Contracting Parties.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a Microgeneration Scheme Certificate is required to access a Smart Energy Generation payment.

Under the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG), generators using solar, wind and micro-combined heat and power (CHP) installations up to 50kW are required to demonstrate that their installation and installer are suitably certified to be eligible to receive SEG payments from a supplier. This may be a Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) certificate, but the SEG also recognises that other schemes may be equivalent to MCS. Further details about the SEG eligibility requirements can be found at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/smart-export-guarantee-guidance-generators

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department records the number of people who are on the Priority Services Register.

The Government does not record this data however Ofgem, as the regulator, does. According to Ofgem’s statistics, as of 31st December 2021, 7,352,529 and 6,266,228 consumers were on the Priority Services Register for electricity and gas respectively.

Ofgem requires all suppliers to provide a Priority Services Register for vulnerable consumers with additional, non-financial needs. Those on a Priority Service Register are offered a range of services relating to safety, access, and communication free of charge.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will impose a moratorium on people on the Priority Services Register being put on energy pre-payment meters.

Prepayment meters enable customers to budget and can help reduce the risk of entering, or exacerbating, debt. When installing a prepayment meter, suppliers must consider whether this is appropriate for the specific customer, including whether this is safe and practical.

Ofgem also requires suppliers to maintain a Priority Services Register for vulnerable consumers with additional, non-financial needs. Those on a Priority Service Register are offered a range of free services relating to safety, access, and communication.

Whether a consumer is on the Priority Services Register is not necessarily relevant to whether a prepayment meter is appropriate for a specific customer.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people on the Priority Services Register are on energy pre-payment meters.

Ofgem collects data separately on the number of individuals on the priority service register (PSR) and the number on pre-payment meters. As of the 31st December 2021, 7,352,529 and 6,266,228 of consumers were on the PSR for electricity and gas respectively. In Q2 2022, 4,171,948 and 3,247,403 were on a pre-payment meter for gas and electricity respectively.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department has provided on the cost of energy for businesses reliant on LPG or unregulated fuels.

The Government announced on 21st September that it will provide support to non-domestic properties using alternative fuels. Further information will be provided shortly.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps with Ofgem to require power suppliers to not (a) encourage and (b) force customers to accept a prepayment meter.

Ofgem rules restrict the force fitting of a prepayment meter to repay debt except as a last resort. Ofgem’s License Conditions require suppliers to consider all options for appropriate debt management. This can include installing a prepayment meter, but suppliers have to consider whether this is safe and practicable, including whether a prepayment meter is appropriate for the specific customer.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to instruct OFGEM to declare a moratorium on energy pre-payment meters.

Prepayment meters enable customers to control and budget for the amount they spend and help mitigate the risk of going into, or exacerbating, existing debt.

Ofgem’s Licence Conditions require suppliers to consider all options for appropriate debt management. This can include installing a prepayment meter but suppliers have to consider whether this is safe and practicable, including whether a prepayment meter is appropriate for the specific customer. Ofgem rules restrict the imposition of a prepayment meter on those in arrears, except as a last resort.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish a list of projects that have been supported by the Longer Duration Energy Storage £68 million grant programme.

The Government announced the winners of Phase 1 of the Long Duration Energy Storage Programme on 3 May 2022. Details of Phase 1 projects can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/longer-duration-energy-storage-demonstration-lodes-competition

Details of projects successful in progressing to Phase 2 will be announced on completion of a competitive down-selection process and commercial due diligence processes. Successful ‘Stream 1’ projects are expected to be announced in early 2023 and successful ‘Stream 2’ projects will be announced in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether any of the hydrogen projects announced in the Growth Plan 2022 will be located in Scotland.

The Growth Plan sets out the infrastructure projects that government will prioritise for acceleration, across transport, energy, and digital infrastructure. The list includes projects up and down the country and shows the UK government’s commitment to growth.

The list is not exhaustive, and the Government will be looking at acceleration opportunities right across the portfolio.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to Answer of 23 September to Answer 51991, what checks were carried out to ensure voluntary commitments to sourcing UK supply chain work were made.

For all relevant projects covered by the North Sea Transition Deal, the North Sea Transition Authority uses the well-established Supply Chain Action Plan process to track and monitor these commitments to local content. Supply Chain Action Plans were introduced in 2018 to provide evidence that operators were deriving as much value as possible from their projects through open engagement with suppliers. The guidance was further updated earlier this summer to take account of the North Sea Transition Deal and Net Zero commitments.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to Answer of 23 September to Question 51992, whether a list of onshore sites used in decommissioning has been (a) complied and (b) made publicly available.

This Department has not compiled a list of onshore sites used in decommissioning. Offshore oil and gas operators are required to report on progress whilst decommissioning installations or pipelines. On completion of a decommissioning project a close out report will be submitted to the Department detailing how the work has been executed. These reports detail which onshore site was used for decommissioning and are publicly available on our website https://www.gov.uk/guidance/oil-and-gas-decommissioning-of-offshore-installations-and-pipelines.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he will take to support community-owned solar farms.

Through UK-wide growth funding schemes, the Government is enabling local areas to achieve net zero goals in ways that best suit their needs. Community energy projects, including solar farms, are encouraged within these schemes.

Ofgem also supports community energy projects and is now welcoming applications from community interest groups, co-operative societies, and community benefit societies to the Industry Voluntary Redress Scheme.

Given the level of support already available, the Government has no current plans to take further steps to support the development of community-owned solar farms.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, in the context of constraint costs and grid capacity issues, whether he plans to provide support to long-duration energy storage technologies.

In April 2022, this Government, in the British Energy Security Strategy, committed to ensuring the deployment of sufficient large scale long duration electricity storage to balance the overall system by developing appropriate policy to enable investment by 2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department will take in the event an energy supplier declines to install smart meters in their customers' homes.

The Government wants as many homes and small businesses as possible to be able to benefit from smart meters.

In order to drive continued rollout momentum, the Government has introduced minimum annual installation targets for energy suppliers. Energy suppliers are also obligated to take all reasonable steps to install a smart meter where a meter is fitted for the first time or when an existing meter needs to be replaced.

These licence conditions are regulated by the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem), which has a range of enforcement tools at its disposal.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of how many and what proportion of households have a smart meter installed in each local authority as of 10 October 2022.

The Government’s official statistics on the rollout of smart meters are available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/smart-meters-statistics. These statistics are based on data from energy suppliers provided at Great Britain-level only.

The rollout is making good progress, with more than half of energy meters in Great Britain now smart. At end June 2022 there were 29.5 million smart and advanced meters in homes and small businesses across Great Britain, including 27.8 million smart meters in domestic properties.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for how many hydrogen schemes his Department (a) is providing support and (b) plans to provide support.

The Government’s Net Zero Hydrogen Fund will provide up to £240m to develop and construct new production plants, and the Hydrogen Business Model will provide revenue support to production projects.

The first joint allocation round for electrolytic hydrogen projects seeking support under both schemes closed on 12 October. Four CCUS-enabled hydrogen projects have also been shortlisted to proceed to the due diligence stage of the Phase-2 Cluster Sequencing process.

The Government has also committed to design, by 2025, new business models for hydrogen transport and storage infrastructure, and is currently consulting on these.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which hydrogen schemes in Scotland his Department has identified for government support.

We intend to deliver the Hydrogen Business Model and Net Zero Hydrogen Fund (NZHF) on a UK-wide basis. Projects will be selected on a competitive basis.

The Acorn project in Aberdeenshire, which includes hydrogen facilities, is a reserve Track-1 cluster.

We note the Scottish Government’s intention that funding available from the Emerging Energy Technologies Fund for hydrogen production will be complementary to, not duplicative of, the NZHF.

Government is also supporting industry to deliver projects that use hydrogen, including the H100 project in Fife, Levenmouth, which aims to trial the use of 100% hydrogen for heat in around 300 homes.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department will require energy suppliers to replace pre-paid energy meters with smart meters.

Energy suppliers are already obligated to take all reasonable steps to install a smart meter where a meter is fitted for the first time or when an existing meter needs to be replaced.

Smart meters can operate in credit or prepayment mode. Most recent figures showed 13% of all smart meters were in prepayment mode, broadly in line with the overall levels of prepayment meters in the market.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Energy Price Guarantee announced on 8 September 2022, what steps he plans to take to ensure that amounts paid to energy suppliers accurately reflect actual energy use for each relevant period.

The Government is engaging with energy suppliers, industry payment bodies, and Ofgem to ensure that suppliers are accurately compensated for their actual energy usage during the Energy Price Guarantee’s reconciliation period. The Government has considered which data flows will most accurately reflect total energy use and will publish more details in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which North Sea installations are in the process of being decommissioned as of September 2022; and at which yards that work is being conducted.

At present approximately 94 decommissioning projects have been approved, all of which are at various stages of execution from onshore planning to offshore removal works. The decommissioning programme often does not include the location of onshore work but must make a commitment to select appropriately licenced contractors and sites to perform the dismantlement work.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's policy is on the decommissioning of North Sea oil and gas installations; and whether his Department is taking steps to help ensure that (a) direct and (b) supply chain jobs in this sector are based in the UK.

The Government requires that decommissioning of offshore oil and gas installations is undertaken in accordance with relevant UK and international regulatory obligations. The policy is underpinned by the principles of achieving a clear seabed, and those who benefited from exploitation or production of hydrocarbons bear responsibility for decommissioning, through decommissioning programme consultation and approval.

As part of the North Sea Transition Deal agreed between the Government and offshore oil and gas sector in 2021, the sector has set a voluntary target of 50% UK content, including capital investment for oil and gas decommissioning projects, and 30% for locally provided technology.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what energy support costs have been offered to users of biomass.

The use of biomass in the electricity sector is already supported by the Contracts for Difference Scheme, the Renewables Obligation Scheme and Feed in Tariff Scheme.

In the heat sector, the Government has recently consulted on a proposal temporarily to suspend the wood pellet quality requirements for the Renewable Heat Incentive to help increase the availability of pellets.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will set out the basis of assessment for any discretionary funding being provided by way of energy support costs.

The Government is committed to ensuring all households receive equivalent levels of support for their energy bills.

In June 2022, the Government announced the Energy Bills Support Scheme which will provide £400 to all households, including those using alternative fuels, starting in October 2022.

The Government will also provide an additional payment of £100 to households across the UK who are not able to receive support for their heating costs through the Energy Price Guarantee. This might be because they live in an area of the UK that is not served by the gas grid and is to compensate for the rising costs of alternative fuels, such as heating oil.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the energy support costs provided for unregulated fuels will be (a) discretionary funding or (b) provided in full.

The Government is committed to ensuring all households receive equivalent levels of support for their energy bills.

In June 2022, the Government announced the Energy Bills Support Scheme which will provide £400 to all households, including those using alternative fuels, starting in October 2022.

The Government will also provide an additional payment of £100 to households across the UK who are not able to receive support for their heating costs through the Energy Price Guarantee. This might be because they live in an area of the UK that is not served by the gas grid and is to compensate for the rising costs of alternative fuels, such as heating oil.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on external consultants in each of the last five years; and if he will publish a breakdown of the (a) amount paid to each consultancy contracted, (b) name of each consultancy contracted and (c) specific matters on which they were consulted.

All Department’s consultancy costs including details of the provider are published on gov.uk here. Further transactions will be published during 2022.

The information requested on the specific matters consulted is not held centrally and can only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the UK engaging in a coordinated withdrawal from the Energy Charter Treaty alongside other European nations.

The Government considers that it is important to remain a Party to the Energy Charter Treaty and support its modernisation, as the Government believes that a renegotiated Energy Charter Treaty will remain valuable in supporting clean energy investment in the future.

The Government welcomes the role of the Energy Charter Treaty in ensuring consistent legal protection for UK investors operating abroad. This allows UK companies, investing in countries that have signed the Treaty, to enjoy more protection for their assets, including those involved in renewable energy production.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he considered putting a price cap on the sums to be paid in the recent offshore wind auction; and for what reason a decision was taken not to do so.

Seabed leasing rounds are the responsibility of The Crown Estate and Crown Estate Scotland. It is for them to set the parameters and run the rounds. The Government is not involved in the process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to tackle the abuse of Scottish Limited Partnerships by organised crime organisations.

The Government outlined its proposals for limited partnership reform in December 2018 in response to a consultation (link here). The reforms will modernise Limited Partnership law, helping to tackle illicit activity and the abuse of Scottish Limited Partnerships. The proposals include tightening registration requirements, requiring limited partnerships to demonstrate a firmer connection to the United Kingdom, increasing transparency requirements, and enabling the Registrar to strike from the register limited partnerships which are dissolved, or which are no longer carrying on business. The Government will be reforming the relevant legislation through the forthcoming Economic Crime and Transparency Bill.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations his Department has received from the Scottish Government on Scottish Limited Partnerships.

Officials have had an active dialogue with counterparts from the Sottish Government and most recently met on 2 March 2022 to discuss Scottish Limited Partnerships. I anticipate that they will have further exchanges on this subject in due course.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of Scottish limited partnerships set up in each year since 2015.

The official statistics on companies and the total size of the register are made publicly available online by Companies House. The most recent data can be found in this link here and show that 5,706 limited partnerships were incorporated in Scotland in 2015/16, 4,932 in 2016/17, 2,689 in 2017/18, 751 in 2018/19, 657 in 2019/20 and 591 in 2020/21.

22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 21 April 2022 to Question 154422, on Offshore Industry and Shipping: Pay, whether he plans to extend the scope of the National Minimum Wage Act 1999 to the offshore renewables sector operating beyond the limits of UK territorial waters but within the UK Exclusive Economic Zone.

We are committed to making this country the best place in the world to work and grow a business, this includes business in the renewables sector as it is crucial to our target to reach Net Zero by 2050.

We will continue to consider and review the needs of the renewable energy sector and take action when appropriate.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 April 2022 to Question 148402 on Energy: Prices, whether it is technically possible to equalise charges between standard and pre-payment meters; and if he will vary the Supply Licence Conditions referred to accordingly.

This is a regulatory matter for Ofgem.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to allow Peoples Energy to recommence as approved domestic fuel supplier when it comes out of administration,.

Decisions on licensing are for the independent regulator, Ofgem.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many suppliers are operating in the domestic energy market supplying (a) electricity and (b) gas as of 28 March 2022.

Information on the supply market and licenced suppliers can be found at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/retail-market-indicators.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the special measures approved for the administration of Bulb energy were made available to other suppliers in financial difficulties.

When an energy supplier becomes insolvent, Ofgem has to the power to either appoint a Supplier of Last Resort (SoLR) or seek consent from the BEIS Secretary of State to apply for an energy supply company administration order (SAR). This is a judgment for Ofgem, who take into account the specifics of the failed supplier and the circumstances in the supply market at the time.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will direct OFGEM to ensure a pricing system for domestic energy supply that does not see those on pre-paid meters paying a higher rate.

The Price Cap protects 4 million pre-payment meter customers, ensuring those customers pay a fair price for their energy. The costs of managing prepayment meters compared to standard meters are higher due to the different metering requirements and different payment systems. Supply Licence Conditions, as enforced by Ofgem, stipulate charges must reflect the cost to the supplier.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has received any formal requests from the Scottish Government seeking to have unregulated fuels capped or rises restricted.

The UK Government has not received representations from the Scottish Government on unregulated fuels such as heating oil.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations he has received from the Scottish Government on unregulated fuels such as heating oil.

The UK Government has not received representations from the Scottish Government on unregulated fuels such as heating oil.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 7 March 2022 to Question 132379 on Energy: Consumption, if he will make an estimate of levels of energy consumption of domestic fuel in October 2022 compared to October (a) 2020, (b) 2019 and (c) 2018.

Monthly outturn data showing domestic electricity consumption are available at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1056669/ET_5.5_FEB_22.xlsx.

Data on domestic gas consumption are published on a quarterly basis only and are available at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1053835/ET_4.1_DEC_21_v2.xlsx.

The Department does not publish forecasts of monthly consumption for either electricity or gas.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 7 March 2022 to Question 133308 on Energy: Disconnections, for what reason his Department does not record data on levels of disconnection by (a) region and (b) UK nation.

It is the regulator, Ofgem and not BEIS’s responsibility to monitor energy supply companies’ performance in the energy retail market. Standard Licence Condition 32 in the supply licence requires energy suppliers to submit information to Ofgem, Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland on their dealings with gas and electricity customers in a variety of areas and includes data on disconnections carried out by the licensee. The data is published on Ofgem’s Customer Service portal on its website at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/customer-service-data.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
Suggested redraft: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 March 2022 to Question 126893 on Energy: Disconnections, which body is responsible for recording disconnection rates; and what criteria that body uses to determine disconnection rates.

It is the regulator, Ofgem and not BEIS’s responsibility to monitor energy supply companies’ performance in the energy retail market. Standard Licence Condition 32 in the supply licence requires energy suppliers to submit information to Ofgem, Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland on their dealings with gas and electricity customers in a variety of areas and includes data on disconnections carried out by the licensee. The data is published on Ofgem’s Customer Service portal on its website at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/customer-service-data.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 March 2022 to Question 126893 on Energy: Disconnections, what data his Department holds on (a) energy supply to and (b) consumption of energy by (i) region and (ii) UK nation.

Electricity consumption in the nine English regions and each UK nation (Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) is published annually in subnational electricity consumption statistics. Gas consumption in the nine English regions and each UK nation (Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) is published annually in subnational gas consumption statistics.

Total energy consumption in the nine English regions and each UK nation is published annually in subnational total final energy consumption. This includes road transport and residual fuels, in addition to electricity and gas.

Total supply of energy in the UK is published annually in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics and quarterly in Energy Trends.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information or data his Department records and collates on households that are dependent on oil or LPG and other non-regulated fuels.

The principal source of information on households off the gas grid is the English Housing Survey and its equivalent surveys in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, which provide data on heating system types and other household characteristics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/english-housing-survey

https://gov.wales/household-estimates

https://www.gov.scot/collections/scottish-house-condition-survey/

https://www.communities-ni.gov.uk/publications/northern-ireland-housing-statistics-2020-21.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to introduce regulation for unregulated fuels used for domestic heating including oil, LPG, solid fuel and biofuel.

Network utilities, such as the gas and electricity markets, are considered natural monopolies, characterised by high fixed costs. The heating oil, LPG and solid fuel markets do not share these characteristics, and so are not regulated by Ofgem.

The Government keeps the operation of consumer markets under review, but there are no plans for new regulation of these markets.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department and its agencies have to track data regarding domestic fuel use in response to the rise in energy prices.

The Government is committed to ensuring that support is provided to help consumers deal with the impact of high wholesale energy costs.

UK Energy use is regularly published at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-trends. This covers energy trends that focus on the supply and demand of coal, oil, gas, electricity and renewables in the United Kingdom.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department collects on fuel and energy use by individual households.

The Department collects meter point electricity and gas consumption data. This meter point data is published annually in subnational electricity and gas consumption statistics. The data also forms part of the National Energy Efficiency Data-Framework, which provides electricity and gas consumption estimates for different property and household characteristics, and estimated consumption savings arising from installation of different energy efficiency measures.

Departmental estimates of domestic consumption are available in Table C9 of Energy Consumption in the UK. These estimates are based on the total amount of energy consumed in the UK divided by the number of households (for electricity consumption) and the number of gas customers (for gas consumption).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 March 2022 to Question 126893, what the most recent data is that his Department holds on self disconnection by (a) region and (b) UK nation.

Data from Ofgem’s most recent Consumer Engagement Survey, published in April 2021, is displayed by the number of hours of disconnection nationally across Great Britain, not by region or UK nation.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of whether energy consumption is likely to increase or decrease by October 2022.

The UK’s energy consumption has been on a long-term downward trend as a result of improved energy efficiency and structural changes to the economy. This trend will continue as the economy transitions towards net zero emissions by 2050. Shorter-term fluctuations in energy consumption are highly weather dependent - energy consumption is lower in the spring and summer and then rises in the autumn and winter. Domestic energy consumers in Great Britain will receive a £200 discount on their energy bills this Autumn, part of the Government’s £9.1 billion package of support to help households with rising energy bills.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department holds data on the number of households potentially self-disconnecting from power supplies through non-usage as a result of the cost of energy.

The Regulator Ofgem monitors prepayment meter customers’ experiences with the energy market. Ofgem’s most recent Consumer Engagement Survey, published in April 2021, suggested that 21% of prepayment meter customers households had temporarily been disconnected from their supply. This report is available online at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/consumer-survey-2020-update-consumer-engagement-energy

The Price Cap continues to ensure that 22 million households, including the 4 million who use a pre-payment meter, pay a fair price for their energy.

In addition, Ofgem’s new licence conditions rules protect Prepayment Meter customers at risk of self-disconnection and include requirements on suppliers to offer emergency and friendly-hours credit to all these customers and to offer additional support credit to customers in vulnerable circumstances.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations his Department has received from the Scottish Government regarding the appointment of board members of OFGEM.

Ofgem is the British energy regulator and so this remains a reserved matter. The Chair and non-executive members of the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority are appointed by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what role devolved (a) legislatures and (b) Administrations have in regard to the appointment of board members of OFGEM.

Ofgem is the British energy regulator and so this remains a reserved matter. The Chair and non-executive members of the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority are appointed by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department holds with the devolved (a) legislatures and (b) Administrations relating to the appointment of board members of OFGEM.

Ofgem is the British energy regulator and so this remains a reserved matter. The Chair and non-executive members of the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority are appointed by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether one of the board members of OFGEM has dedicated responsibility for regulatory matters relating to Scotland.

This is a matter for the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority board. The Government is not aware that any member has a particular focus for regulatory matters relating to Scotland.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to (a) reduce or (b) abolish standing charges on household power bills.

The setting of tariffs is a commercial decision for energy suppliers. Since 2016, suppliers have been able to offer a greater range of tariffs to accommodate different customer needs, including tariffs with a low or even zero standing charge.

The payment of a standing charge reflects the fixed costs of providing and maintaining supply, regardless of energy usage, including meter rental, meter readings, accounting and billing and maintenance of the energy network. Tariffs with a low or zero standing charge attract a much higher unit rate to ensure these fixed supply costs are met.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, wat steps he will take to help tackle mortality caused by fuel poverty.

The Government recognises the link between fuel poverty and ill health. Energy efficiency improvements remain the best way to tackle fuel poverty in the long term. Fuel poverty is a devolved matter, and support for low income and vulnerable households is available through schemes such as the Local Authority Delivery Scheme and the Energy Company Obligation. Financial support for energy bills is available nationally through the Warm Home Discount, Cold Weather Payment and Winter Fuel Payment.

In addition, a new package of support to help households with their energy bills was announced on the 3 February. This includes a £200 discount on household energy bills this Autumn for domestic electricity customers in Great Britain; a £150 non-repayable rebate on Council Tax bills for all households in Council Tax Bands A-D in England; and an additional £144 million of discretionary funding for Local Authorities to support households who are not eligible for the Council Tax rebate.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a social energy tariff on household energy bills.

The Government replaced Social Tariffs in the energy sector with the Warm Home Discount Scheme from 2011. The Warm Home Discount scheme provides £140 in data matched, targeted support and from 2022/23 this will provide £150 to an extra 780,000 households, with around 2.7million households to receive support every year.

The Government is very aware of the difficulties that consumers have experienced as a result of the rise in energy prices. My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a new package of support to help households with their energy bills on 3 February. This includes a £200 discount on household energy bills this Autumn for domestic electricity customers in Great Britain; a £150 non-repayable rebate on Council Tax bills for all households in Council Tax Bands A-D in England; and an additional £144 million of discretionary funding for Local Authorities to support households who are not eligible for the Council Tax rebate.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what selection criteria are used for appointing the board members of OFGEM.

When appointing a member to the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority board, careful consideration is given by the Chair and Ministers to ensure the Board holds the relevant knowledge and experience to be an effective governance body.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations his Department has received from the Scottish Government or any of its agencies on the creation of subsea cables transmitting offshore wind energy from Scotland to England.

Under the scope of the Offshore Transmission Network Review, National Grid ESO is currently working on a Holistic Network Design which will provide a national blueprint for how the offshore and onshore electricity network needs to evolve to facilitate UK 2030 offshore wind targets. Officials from Scottish Government, Marine Scotland and Crown Estate Scotland, as well as relevant statutory national bodies, are all directly involved in the Review and sit on its various governance fora.

The provision and regulation of network assets, including subsea cables, is a matter for Ofgem in its role as regulator, in conjunction with network operators. Officials engage regularly with the Scottish Government on electricity network matters.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the revenue that Scotland or Scottish communities will receive from offshore wind energy as a result of Scotland being cabled to England.

Offshore wind projects in Scotland pay rent to Crown Estate Scotland, which in turn pays its profits into the Scottish Consolidated Fund. In Financial Year 2020/21, Crown Estate Scotland’s revenue from its Marine portfolio (which also includes non-offshore wind activities) was £8.9 million.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what records are kept on breaches of employment regulations in the offshore sector.

The Government is committed to the protection of workers’ rights for those in offshore employment.

The vast majority of employment rights in the UK are enforced by individuals through employment tribunals. The state enforces certain specific rights (national minimum wage, regulations on employment businesses, employment agencies, and certain labour providers involved in shellfish gathering and fresh produce supply). The relevant enforcement body in each area will take any action necessary to protect the workers within their remit, and to ensure that the records kept by employers, employment agencies, employment business, and labour providers meet the requirements of their respective legislation.

The right to the national minimum wage is enforced by HMRC. Since 2015, the Government has ordered employers to repay £100m to 1 million workers who had been underpaid. Businesses employing offshore workers may come under several Companies House sectors. The Low Pay Commission does not determine offshore workers as being at high risk of underpayment.

5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure the protection of workers' rights where offshore businesses seek to transition from oil and gas to renewables.

The Government is committed to the protection of workers’ rights for those in offshore employment. In 2020, the Government extended minimum wage entitlement to seafarers on domestic voyages. The Government expects all employers to comply with UK employment law.

5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what (a) records are kept and (b) action is taken against employers in the offshore sector who breach employment law.

The Government is committed to the protection of workers’ rights for those in offshore employment.

The vast majority of employment rights in the UK are enforced by individuals through employment tribunals. The state enforces certain specific rights (national minimum wage, regulations on employment businesses, employment agencies, and certain labour providers involved in shellfish gathering and fresh produce supply). The relevant enforcement body in each area will take any action necessary to protect the workers within their remit, and to ensure that the records kept by employers, employment agencies, employment business, and labour providers meet the requirements of their respective legislation.

The right to the national minimum wage is enforced by HMRC. Since 2015, the Government has ordered employers to repay £100m to 1 million workers who had been underpaid. Businesses employing offshore workers may come under several Companies House sectors. The Low Pay Commission does not determine offshore workers as being at high risk of underpayment.

5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will set out what support and resources are provided to a local authority in the event that a nuclear power station is to close.

Following a decision by EDF to close one of their nuclear power stations, which would be taken in consultation with the Office for Nuclear Regulation, the first phase of closure is defueling, and this takes several years with continued use of EDF’s uniquely experienced teams, and specialist supply chain companies, preserving jobs in a local community. A closure decision by EDF does not result in any specific additional support or resource being provided for the local authority in which the power station is located.

Following the defueling phase for the seven EDF-owned Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor power stations (all of which are due to close by 2028), each station will transfer to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority to deliver the subsequent decommissioning activity. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority has a duty to ensure that decommissioning activities benefit local communities and provide a beneficial legacy once decommissioning work is completed.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he will take to ensure employee and worker rights are supported in the plans for transition from oil and gas to renewables in the offshore work force.

The Government is committed to the protection of workers’ rights for those in offshore employment. In 2020 the Government extended minimum wage entitlement to seafarers on domestic voyages. The Government expects all employers to comply with UK employment law.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent communications he has received from the Scottish Government on offshore oil and gas developments other than on the Cambo field.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not received any direct communications from the Scottish Government on offshore oil and gas developments other than on the Cambo field recently.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department plans to take to help ensure that sites in the UK are used for oil and gas installation decommissioning.

The North Sea Transition Deal includes a commitment from industry for 50% of decommissioning spend to be within the UK. The Supply Chain and Exports Taskforce, that reports to the North Sea Transition Forum, is currently working to ensure all necessary support and guidance is in place to enable this commitment to be met.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on which body monitors wage rates in the offshore wind sector; and whether data is recorded on that matter.

All workers in UK territorial seas are entitled to employment rights, including the minimum wage. In 2020 the Government extended minimum wage entitlement also to seafarers on domestic voyages. The Government expects that all employers will comply with UK employment law.

The Government uses the Annual Survey of Hourly Earnings (ASHE) to estimate minimum wage underpayment by sector. Offshore renewables workers are not well defined by any single standard industry classification (SIC) code and may come under several sectors, e.g. manufacturing or electricity generation. The Low Pay Commission does not define offshore renewables workers as a low-paying sector and therefore we do not expect there to be a large number of low paid workers within the sector.

16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what requirements are placed on operators to ensure that workers in the offshore wind sector are subject to UK employment law and rights.

All workers in UK territorial seas are entitled to employment rights, including the minimum wage. In 2020 the Government extended minimum wage entitlement also to seafarers on domestic voyages. The Government expects that all employers will comply with UK employment law.

The Government uses the Annual Survey of Hourly Earnings (ASHE) to estimate minimum wage underpayment by sector. Offshore renewables workers are not well defined by any single standard industry classification (SIC) code and may come under several sectors, e.g. manufacturing or electricity generation. The Low Pay Commission does not define offshore renewables workers as a low-paying sector and therefore we do not expect there to be a large number of low paid workers within the sector.

16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to ensure that workers' rights are protected as the North Sea transitions from oil and gas to renewables.

All workers in UK territorial seas are entitled to employment rights, including the minimum wage. In 2020 the Government extended minimum wage entitlement also to seafarers on domestic voyages. The Government expects that all employers will comply with UK employment law.

The Government uses the Annual Survey of Hourly Earnings (ASHE) to estimate minimum wage underpayment by sector. Offshore renewables workers are not well defined by any single standard industry classification (SIC) code and may come under several sectors, e.g. manufacturing or electricity generation. The Low Pay Commission does not define offshore renewables workers as a low-paying sector and therefore we do not expect there to be a large number of low paid workers within the sector.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received from the Scottish Government on Scottish Ports and their ownership by companies owning larger and potentially competitor ports in England.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with the Scottish Government on a number of issues. Responsibility for investigating individual and market-wide competition issues falls to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the UK’s independent competition authority. The CMA has discretion to conduct market studies and investigations as it considers most appropriate.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has been made of the effect on competition policy of port operators in Scotland being subsidiaries of larger port companies in England.

Under competition law, responsibility for investigating individual and market-wide competition issues falls to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the UK’s independent competition authority. The CMA, which works independently from BEIS, has discretion to investigate competition cases which it considers most appropriate according to its prioritisation principles. Concerns about a market and evidence that features of a market may prevent, restrict or distort competition in UK markets can be submitted to the CMA via the following page: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/tell-the-cma-about-a-competition-or-market-problem.

28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to introduce support for the paper and print industries as result of rising energy prices to ensure the sustainability of print media businesses including magazine and specialist publishers.

The Department continues to engage constructively with energy intensive industries to further understand and to assess the possibility of offering help to mitigate the impacts of high global gas prices. Our priority is to ensure that costs are managed and that supplies of energy are maintained.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the impact on the sustainability of print media businesses as a result of rising energy costs for the energy-intensive paper and print industries.

The Department continues to engage constructively with energy intensive industries to further understand and to assess the possibility of offering help to mitigate the impacts of high global gas prices. Our priority is to ensure that costs are managed and that supplies of energy are maintained.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the impact of rising energy costs for energy-intensive paper and print industries, and resultant costs for businesses supplied by those industries, on the sustainability of print media businesses.

The Department continues to engage constructively with energy intensive industries to further understand and to assess the possibility of offering help to mitigate the impacts of high global gas prices. Our priority is to ensure that costs are managed and that supplies of energy are maintained.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the costs that will be incurred from projects to be supported by the Nuclear Energy (Finance) Bill.

Nuclear power is an important part of an affordable, low carbon electricity system which is better protected against the volatility of global gas prices.

Under the Regulated Asset Base (RAB) funding model enabled by the Nuclear Energy (Finance) Bill, consumers would pay an allowed revenue during the construction period of a new nuclear project, which would be an average of less than £1 a month on a typical dual fuel energy bill.

However, we estimate that use of the RAB model will lower the cost of capital and ultimately save consumers more than £30bn on their bills for each new large-scale station, compared with existing funding mechanisms. The Bill’s impact assessment is available here. Granting a RAB licence would also be contingent on a project satisfying a detailed value for money assessment.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timeframe is for the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets to conclude its internal review of Transmission Network Use of System charges.

BEIS officials are engaging with Ofgem on its call for evidence on possible transmission charging reforms, to understand how any decisions can help support delivery of a secure, net zero energy system at lowest cost to consumers. The call for evidence was published on 1 October 2021, and is available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/tnuos-reform-call-evidence. It runs until 12 November 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets on its internal review of Transmission Network Use of System charges.

BEIS officials are engaging with Ofgem on its call for evidence on possible transmission charging reforms, to understand how any decisions can help support delivery of a secure, net zero energy system at lowest cost to consumers. The call for evidence was published on 1 October 2021, and is available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/tnuos-reform-call-evidence. It runs until 12 November 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations his Department has received from the Scottish Government on Transmission Network Use of System charges.

BEIS Ministers and officials are in regular contact with colleagues in the Scottish Government on a range of energy related matters, including transmission charges.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of Transmission Network Use of System charges on the (a) investment and (b) operational decisions made by companies on the location of offshore renewable energy projects.

Transmission charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator, and it published a call for evidence on 1 October 2021 on possible transmission charging reforms. The Department is engaging closely as Ofgem progresses this work, to understand the implications of any decisions for different users, including offshore renewable energy projects.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the average zonal tariff across charging zones arising from Transmission Network Use of System charges is in (a) Scotland, (b) England and (c) Wales for each year since 2016.

National Grid Electricity System Operator publishes a report setting out a five year forecast of the tariff by geographic charging zone arising from Transmission Network Use of System charges, the latest version of which is available at: https://www.nationalgrideso.com/document/191116/download. This covers the period 2022/23 to 2026/27.

It publishes a report setting out final tariffs for each year, usually in the January preceding the start of a charging year in April. These reports are available at: https://www.nationalgrideso.com/industry-information/charging/transmission-network-use-system-tnuos-charges.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the projected average zonal tariff across charging zones arising from Transmission Network Use of System charges in (a) Scotland, (b) England and (c) Wales is in each year from (i) 2021 to (ii) 2024.

National Grid Electricity System Operator publishes a report setting out a five year forecast of the tariff by geographic charging zone arising from Transmission Network Use of System charges, the latest version of which is available at: https://www.nationalgrideso.com/document/191116/download. This covers the period 2022/23 to 2026/27.

It publishes a report setting out final tariffs for each year, usually in the January preceding the start of a charging year in April. These reports are available at: https://www.nationalgrideso.com/industry-information/charging/transmission-network-use-system-tnuos-charges.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the basis is for the selection of the carbon capture and storage sites; and if he will publish any scoring mechanisms used.

The purpose of Phase-1 of the Cluster Sequencing process was to identify clusters which are best-suited to deployment in the mid-2020s window, these will be sequenced onto Track-1.

Clusters were selected through a transparent and objective assessment process. The details of this were published in May in the Phase 1 documents: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cluster-sequencing-for-carbon-capture-usage-and-storage-ccus-deployment-phase-1-expressions-of-interest.

Clusters submitted a range of detailed information on their structure, estimated costs and benefits, and technical project plans. To be eligible, clusters had to meet three eligibility criteria: that they could be operational by 2030, are located within the UK, and meet our definition of a CCUS cluster. These eligibility criteria were designed to reflect government targets and ambitions, to promote decarbonisation across the UK and to reflect the inherent interdependency of the CCUS chain.

Five clusters met the eligibility criteria and were taken forwards into the detailed assessment stage where they were scored against five criteria, as set out in the Phase-1 launch document: deliverability, emissions reduction potential, economic benefits, cost considerations, and learning and innovation. Scoring was informed by robust, specialist-led scrutiny of the cluster submissions. The clusters selected to be sequenced onto Track-1 were those with the highest combined weighted scores across the criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what criteria is used for the selection of carbon capture and storage sites.

The purpose of Phase-1 of the Cluster Sequencing process was to identify clusters which are best-suited to deployment in the mid-2020s window, these will be sequenced onto Track-1.

Clusters were selected through a transparent and objective assessment process. The details of this were published in May in the Phase 1 documents: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cluster-sequencing-for-carbon-capture-usage-and-storage-ccus-deployment-phase-1-expressions-of-interest.

Clusters submitted a range of detailed information on their structure, estimated costs and benefits, and technical project plans. To be eligible clusters had to meet three eligibility criteria: that they could be operational by 2030, are located within the UK, and meet our definition of a CCUS cluster. These eligibility criteria were designed to reflect government targets and ambitions, to promote decarbonisation across the UK and to reflect the inherent interdependency of the CCUS chain.

Five clusters met the eligibility criteria and were taken forwards into the detailed assessment stage where they were scored against five criteria, as set out in the Phase-1 launch document: deliverability, emissions reduction potential, economic benefits, cost considerations, and learning and innovation. Scoring was informed by robust, specialist-led scrutiny of the cluster submissions. The clusters selected to be sequenced onto Track-1 were those with the highest combined weighted scores across the criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations his Department received from the Scottish Government in support of the application for a carbon capture and storage site to be supported at Peterhead.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy hold regular meetings with counterparts in the devolved administrations to discuss energy and decarbonisation policy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many oil production licences he has issued in each year between 2004 and 2020; and how many such licences are under consideration in the current year.

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) issue licences to search and bore for, and get, petroleum in the seabed and subsoil under the area.

These figures are publicly available from the Oil and Gas Authority and in historic annual reports.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications he has received for an oil exploration licence in the North Sea in each calendar year between 2014 and 2021; and how many and what proportion of those applications were (a) approved and (b) rejected.

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) issue licences to search and bore for, and get, petroleum in the seabed and subsoil under the area.

These figures are publicly available from the Oil and Gas Authority and in historic annual reports.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the increase in volume of natural gas required to decarbonise the UK supply system by substitution with natural gas-derived hydrogen.

On 19th October, the Government published its Heat and Buildings Strategy, where it commits to a decision by 2026 on the potential role for hydrogen in the gas grid. Low carbon hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways, and the Government intends to develop further detail on the role of different production technologies in our hydrogen production strategy by early 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what sources his Department uses when reporting gaseous emissions allocated to Scotland prior to those statistics being integration within the statistics for the UK as a whole.

The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory estimates annual air quality and greenhouse gas pollutant emissions for the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether her Department plans to take steps to support a transition from using animals in scientific research to human specific research methods to ensure parity between the research methods used in the UK and those in other countries.

The use of animals in research is carefully regulated and remains important in ensuring new medicines and treatments are safe.   At the same time, the Government believes that animals should only be used when there is no practicable alternative and it actively supports and funds the development and dissemination of techniques that replace, reduce and refine the use of animals in research (the 3Rs).  This is achieved primarily through funding for the National Centre for the 3Rs, which works nationally and internationally to drive the uptake of 3Rs technologies and ensure that advances in the 3Rs are reflected in policy, practice and regulations on animal research.  The NC3Rs is widely recognised as being world leading, supporting research and innovation that provides researchers in academia and industry with technologies that are more predictive, cost-effective and humane than current animal models.

Since the NC3Rs was launched it has committed £100 million through its research, innovation, and early career awards to provide new 3Rs approaches for scientists in academia and industry to use. This includes almost £27 million in contracts through its CRACK IT Challenges innovation scheme to UK and EU-based institutions, mainly focusing on new approaches for the safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and chemicals that reduce the use of animals.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the annual statistics of scientific procedures on living animals in Great Britain for 2020, if she will take steps to ensure that the number of procedures continues to decrease and are replaced with human-relevant methods.

The use of animals in research is carefully regulated and remains important in ensuring new medicines and treatments are safe.   At the same time, the Government believes that animals should only be used when there is no practicable alternative and it actively supports and funds the development and dissemination of techniques that replace, reduce and refine the use of animals in research (the 3Rs).  This is achieved primarily through funding for the National Centre for the 3Rs, which works nationally and internationally to drive the uptake of 3Rs technologies and ensure that advances in the 3Rs are reflected in policy, practice and regulations on animal research.  The NC3Rs is widely recognised as being world leading, supporting research and innovation that provides researchers in academia and industry with technologies that are more predictive, cost-effective and humane than current animal models.

Since the NC3Rs was launched it has committed £100 million through its research, innovation, and early career awards to provide new 3Rs approaches for scientists in academia and industry to use. This includes almost £27 million in contracts through its CRACK IT Challenges innovation scheme to UK and EU-based institutions, mainly focusing on new approaches for the safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and chemicals that reduce the use of animals.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the strategies of his Department to increase the number of commercial service providers or research laboratories skilled in New Approach Methodologies (NAMs) data interpretation to deliver the Government’s commitment to reduce and replace animal testing.

We recognise how data from New Approach Methodologies (NAMs) could be used for regulatory decision-making to enable a shift away from using animals in testing.

The commercial capability in this area is increasing and, for example, UK companies such as XCellR8 have developed OECD test guideline compliant NAMs assays for use in skin sensitisation studies.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to (a) prioritise and (b) progress on delivering the recommendations of the 2015 Innovate UK NAT Roadmap.

The recommendations in the Non-Animal Technologies (NATs) roadmap continue to be delivered. For example, the NC3Rs CRACK IT programme which is accelerating the development and commercialisation of NATs.

There is ongoing work led by the NC3Rs to review the impact of the £7m invested as part of the NATs programme for commercial feasibility and collaborative R&D projects. The findings of this review will be used to inform future activities in this area.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his strategy is for delivering onshore employment from offshore wind development; and what effect that strategy will have on Scotland.

The Government published its 10-point plan to build back better in November 2020. This increased the target for offshore wind to 40GW by 2030 and included £160m to support ports and the manufacturing supply chain across the UK. Allocation Round 4 of the Contract for Difference scheme will open later this year, with the aim of up to doubling the renewable energy capacity delivered from the previous round.

In addition, we will imminently be publishing our revised Supply Chain Plan policy guidance and questionnaire, to align developers plans more closely with government priorities, including consequences for non-delivery of commitments.

We have created the largest global market in offshore wind which alongside our actions set out above could deliver up to 60,000 jobs by 2030, right across the United Kingdom.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the efficacy of the evidential basis for guidance on frequently replacing newspapers and magazines in section 5.2 of his Department’s close contact services guidance entitled, Working safely during coronavirus (COVID-19) for England at the same time as evidence for lifting legal covid-19 restrictions is reviewed.

We continue to keep the guidance for working safely during COVID-19 in close contact services under constant review. Guidance will be updated in advance of step 4.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to review his Department's guidance for close contact services in England entitled Working safely during coronavirus (COVID-19), updated on 18 May 2021, that reading materials are replaced frequently; and whether that guidance will be updated when step 4 of the covid-19 roadmap is implemented.

We continue to keep the guidance for working safely during COVID-19 in close contact services under constant review. Guidance will be updated in advance of step 4.

27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations she has received from the Scottish Government on devolving employment legislation.

While employment law is a reserved matter under the Scotland Act 1998, we continue to work with the Scottish Government respecting their unique settlements to ensure we build a strong economy across the United Kingdom.

Ministers and officials from both the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Work and Pensions hold regular meetings with counterparts in the devolved administrations to discuss various employment-related issues, including regular reviews of the legislative framework. We will update Parliament accordingly when there are plans to review legislation.

25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent representations his Department has received from the Scottish Government on transmission charges.

BEIS Ministers and officials are in regular contact with colleagues in the Scottish Government on a range of energy related matters, including transmission charges. I know the Scottish Government has also been engaging closely with Ofgem, which oversees transmission charging as the independent energy regulator. Ofgem is currently progressing a review of network charging arrangements. All parties recognise the significant role that transmission charges play in the Net Zero transition, and Ofgem is taking this into account in its consideration of these matters.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) Heat Batteries and (b) other A+ rated efficient innovative space-saving thermal stores will be included in the Green Homes Grant as (i) secondary measures to enable the effective and efficient utilisation of (A) air source and ground source heat pumps and (B) solar energy for hot water purposes, (ii) primary measures where they replace poorly-insulated hot water cylinders and (iii) primary measures where they replace inefficient night storage heaters or fossil-fuelled boilers for space heating.

Heat batteries are not eligible. Thermal stores as essential ancillary items for low-carbon heating, such as ground and air source heat pumps and solar thermal are eligible. Thermal stores are not eligible as primary measure where replacing fossil-fuelled boilers or night storage heaters for space heating.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he will take steps to preclude employers from entering into consultations on redundancy while furloughing those staff.

Employment law continues to apply to those furloughed on the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, alongside protection rights for workers, including the existing redundancy consultation periods for employers.

An employer has a statutory duty to consult when they propose to dismiss 20 or more employees in a single establishment within a rolling 90-day period. If the employer proposes to dismiss 100 or more employees in a single establishment the minimum consultation period is 45 days.

The employer is entitled to start to furlough employees who have agreed to participate in the furlough scheme before or in parallel to conducting any collective consultation which is required, as long as consultation takes place in good time and, in any event, within the statutory minimum periods before any dismissals take effect.

Consultation must be undertaken with a view to reaching agreement, although sometimes agreement may not be possible. The consultation must seek to reach agreement on ways to avoid redundancies, or to reduce or mitigate their impact.

The requirement for a minimum period of consultation is accompanied by the need to notify my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State of potential large scale redundancies so that Government can help assist redundant staff either through payments from the National Insurance Fund, universal credit or finding alternative local job opportunities.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the annual statement on emissions required under the Climate Change Act 2008.

The Annual Statement of Emissions for 2018 was laid in Parliament on 21st April 2020 and can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/annual-statement-of-emissions-for-2018.

17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, in what statistical form and on what statistical basis he plans to present UK carbon emission reduction targets and results.

The UK follows the agreed international approach for estimating and reporting greenhouse gas emissions under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, which is for countries to report the emissions produced within their territories.

Under the Climate Change Act, we are required to publish, by the end of March each year, the Annual Statement of Emissions which reports to Parliament the UK’s latest progress against carbon budgets.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February 2020 to Question 13075, on Fireworks: Sales, when the Office for Product Safety and Standards plans to publish its evidence base; what evidence that organisation plans to gather in Scotland; and from whom in Scotland that organisation plans to gather evidence.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) work on the fireworks evidence base is ongoing and will be published in due course.

OPSS is engaging with officials in the Scottish Government about their consultation and Fireworks Action Plan for Scotland. Any evidence that has emerged from that consultation will be considered as part of the wider fireworks evidence base.

OPSS invited evidence from a range of stakeholders across the UK including those in Scotland such as the Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of devolving powers on the regulation of the sale of fireworks to the Scottish Parliament; and if she will take steps to devolve those powers.

Under the Scotland Act 1998 the regulation of the sale and supply of goods and services to consumers and product safety and liability are reserved matters. The regulation of fireworks for these purposes is covered by the Fireworks Regulations 2004 and the Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015, which are the responsibility of this Department. The use and discharge of fireworks is devolved to the Scottish Government which has powers to impose certain restrictions on the use of fireworks. The Scottish Government has legislated in this area through the Fireworks (Scotland) Regulations 2004. There are no plans to devolve this matter further.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) has been talking to officials in the Scottish Government about the recent consultation on fireworks undertaken by the Scottish Government. The outcomes of that consultation are being considered as part of OPSS’ work on a fireworks evidence base. This will build a full picture of the data around fireworks in order to identify what, if any, further action is appropriate.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans she has to bring forward legislative proposals to restrict the sale of fireworks.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is developing a fact-based evidence base on the key issues that have been raised around fireworks including restricting the sale of fireworks. The evidence base is considering data on noise and disturbance, anti-social behaviour, non-compliance, environmental impact, and the impact on humans and animals. This will build a full picture of the data around fireworks in order to identify whether, and what, further action is appropriate.

27th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2024 to Question 15373 on BBC Scotland, whether representations were made on extending the list of free-to-air matches to include Scottish (a) men's and (b) women's international (i) European and (ii) World cup qualifying fixtures.

As outlined previously, Ministers and officials regularly receive representations from the Scottish Government on a range of issues. Members of the Scottish Government have raised the issue of Men’s football matches directly with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Sports policy is devolved. The Government’s view therefore remains that it would be for the Scottish Government to comprehensively evaluate whether there is currently the right balance between Scottish rights holders' ability to generate sufficient income to reinvest in Scottish sport, and access for Scottish audiences to those sporting events. The UK Government would then take those considerations into account.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what representations she has received from the Scottish Government on the governance of BBC Scotland.

Ministers and officials regularly receive representations from the Scottish Government on a range of issues.

The BBC Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions, including Scotland. The BBC Board is responsible for ensuring the BBC delivers these Charter obligations.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has (a) received representations from and (b) had discussions with her counterpart in the Scottish Government on ensuring that Scottish (i) men's and (ii) women's international football matches are shown on free-to-air TV.

The Government believes that certain sporting events of national interest should be shown on free-to-air television rather than behind a paywall, so that they can be enjoyed by as wide an audience as possible. That is why we have the listed events regime.

The Government believes that the current list strikes an appropriate balance, and has no current plans to undertake a full review of the events on the list.

Sports policy is devolved, and it would be for the Scottish Government to comprehensively evaluate whether there is currently the right balance between Scottish rights holders' ability to generate sufficient income to reinvest in Scottish sport, and access for Scottish audiences to those sporting events. The UK Government would then take those considerations into account.

We have regular engagement with our Scottish counterparts on a range of issues.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what representations her Department has received from the Scottish Government on the potential merits of additional devolution of powers to and further input from Scotland.

My Department has not received any formal representations from the Scottish Government on this matter.

The UK Government is committed to devolution and to working constructively with the devolved administrations.

My Department ensures it receives input from, and its work is impactful in Scotland, both with the Scottish Government and directly with an increasing proportion of DCMS staff based in Scotland. Regular formal and informal engagement takes place with the administration and other Scottish bodies and organisations.

I look forward to continuing the valued and positive working relationship that we have with the Scottish Government. It supports and strengthens our digital, media, creative, cultural and sport sectors which benefits people in both Scotland and across the UK.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has had discussions with or issued guidance to the Performing Rights Society on their issuing of claims for payment from publicans and others for performance rights when premises were closed as a result of the covid-19 lockdown.

Neither the Secretary of State at this Department, nor Ministers at the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy have had discussions with PRS for Music or issued guidance on this matter. The Government is aware that PRS for Music put in place measures at the start of the pandemic to ease licensing requirements at the time. The Government was not involved in these: licensing matters are private and commercial arrangements between PRS for Music and its licensees.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what requests he has received from the Scottish Government on the devolution of powers in whole or in part over broadcasting.

The Government has not received any requests from the Scottish Government on the devolution of powers in whole or in part over broadcasting.

The UK government is committed to showcasing the importance of the UK’s broadcasters as part of a stronger, global Britain.

Broadcasting is a reserved matter and there are a number of well established structures in place such as the Advisory Committee for Scotland which ensures that Ofcom, the UK’s independent communications regulator which regulates UK broadcasting, takes into account the interests and views of people living in Scotland.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has entered into any memoranda of understanding with the Scottish (a) Government and (b) Parliament on the (i) operation of the BBC and (ii) appointment to the BBC's Board of Governors.

The UK Government has not entered into a memoranda of understanding with the Scottish government or parliament in relation to the operation of the BBC, or appointments to the BBC Board.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent of government, and the UK government has no say in the BBC’s day-to-day operations. The BBC Charter requires the BBC to represent, reflect and serve audiences, taking into account the needs of diverse communities of all the UK nations and regions, including Scotland. The BBC Board is responsible for ensuring the BBC delivers these Charter obligations.

The Chair and Nations Members of the BBC Board are appointed by Her Majesty the Queen, via Order in Council, following a fair and open competition. This includes the BBC Board Member for Scotland. As per the BBC Charter, no appointment shall be made for the BBC Board member for Scotland without the agreement of the Scottish Ministers.

All other appointments are made by the BBC.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much Government funding has been awarded to the racing industry to support race horse welfare and race horse upkeep during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 17 April 2020, the Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) and Racing Foundation agreed an immediate cash flow and hardship support package to support racing, of which HBLB contributed £20m and the Racing Foundation £8m. The Racing Foundation’s funding supported participants such as jockeys and trainers directly, while the HBLB provided grants and capital loans to courses. HBLB has also increased its contributions to prize money by 50% during the pandemic to mitigate lower amounts made available by courses due to Covid. As well as funding welfare projects directly, HBLB’s contributions to prize money enable the industry to maintain fixture lists and field sizes, which in turn facilitates investment in equine welfare.

On 19 November 2020 the Government announced a rescue package worth £300 million to help major spectator sports including horse racing which were affected by the coronavirus pandemic. As a summer sport, horse racing is also expected to benefit from a further £300m for the recovery package across all sports including horseracing that was announced in the recent budget.

9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the revenue accruing to the public purse from ticket sales for Festival UK 2022.

There are no plans to sell tickets for any events in Festival UK 2022.

9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much of the £120 million budget for Festival UK 2022 he plans to allocate to (a) Scotland, (b) the Queen's Platinum celebrations, (c) the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham and (d) Coventry City of Culture.

£120 million has been announced for Festival UK 2022. There are Barnett allocations to Scotland and the other home nations from the £120 million budget, which is administered by HM Treasury. None of this funding has been allocated to The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations, the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, or Coventry City of Culture.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will undertake a risk assessment of the potential increase in unregulated betting activity on sport as a result of the Gambling Commission’s affordability proposals.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the estimated costs are of holding Festival UK 2022.

The announced budget for the Festival UK 2022 is £120 million, which includes the Barnett share to the devolved nations.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to his Answer to the Oral Question asked by the hon Member for East Lothian on 10 December, Official Report, col 980, what assessment the Government made of the level of exposure of people under the age of 18 to alcohol marketing (a) on social media and (b) online more widely.

The Government is committed to working with industry to address concerns over any irresponsible promotions, advertising and marketing relating to alcohol, particularly to ensure that children and young people are suitably protected.

Material in the Committee of Advertising Practice and Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice Codes relating to the advertising and marketing of alcohol products is exceptionally robust, recognising the social imperative of ensuring that alcohol advertising is responsible and in particular that children and young people are suitably protected.

The government is committed to making the UK a safe place to be online. The Online Advertising Programme was established in order to foster fair, transparent and ethical online advertising that works for citizens, businesses and society as a whole.

The Programme is currently reviewing evidence from the relevant literature, stakeholder engagement and responses to its recent Call for Evidence. This Call for Evidence is focussed on ensuring standards about the placement and content of advertising can be effectively applied and enforced online so that consumers have limited exposure to harmful or misleading advertising.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with representatives from the Horserace Betting Levy Board on the (a) value of, (b) timeframe for applications to and (c) transparency of the Racing Relief Fund.

Following the British Horseracing Authority’s (BHA) decision to suspend racing on 18 March 2020, DCMS officials have been in regular discussions with the Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) regarding support to British racing during the coronavirus outbreak.

These discussions did not focus on the details of the Racing Relief Fund, which is an industry-led initiative led by the Racehorse Owners Association, with support from the Racing Foundation, in which the HBLB has no administrative or financial role.

The £2.5 million fund was announced as part of the HBLB and Racing Foundation’s £28 million cashflow and support package announced on 17 April. This support package was developed collaboratively and it was agreed that the HBLB would focus on support for racecourses and the Racing Foundation on support for participants, both human and equine.

The Racing Relief Fund is designed to meet the welfare needs of horses whose owners are suffering financial hardship. The scheme will provide up to £2.5 million of grants to assist with the costs of looking after horses in racing stables and in rehoming centres.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on how many occasions has (a) he, (b) officials from his Department and (c) other Government representatives have met the British Horseracing Authority to hold discussions on (i) race horse welfare during the covid-19 outbreak and (ii) the financial effect of covid-19 on the ability of race horse owners to ensure the welfare of those horses.

Following the suspension of racing on 18 March 2020, DEFRA, which leads on horse welfare, worked with the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) on a weekly basis to quickly agree guidance for the care of racehorses during this lockdown period in line with social distancing.

DCMS officials have also been in regular communication with the BHA and the Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) regarding the economic impacts of Covid on the industry and the measures being taken to uphold horse welfare. The BHA has also taken part in regular calls with the Minister for Sport, Tourism and Heritage and representatives of the sporting sector on these issues and the resumption of racing and other sports behind closed doors.

The government has provided enhanced support to the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors, which includes the racing industry, given the acute impacts of COVID-19 on those sectors. A range of measures to support all businesses were made available, including business rates relief, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme. The government has provided access to £10k grants to 700,000 small and medium enterprises who are currently eligible for Small Business Rates Relief or Rural Rates Relief.

On 17 April, the HBLB and Racing Foundation agreed an immediate £22 million cash flow and hardship funding package to support racing. The HBLB has reported on these packages on a weekly basis with the main racing bodies including the BHA.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) classrooms and (b) schools have been closed due to issues with the use of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete in the last 12 months.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

Responsibility for ensuring the safety and condition of school buildings lies with the responsible bodies, such as Local Authorities, trusts, and voluntary aided bodies.

The Department has sent a questionnaire on Reinforced Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (RAAC) to all responsible bodies in England, asking them to provide information on RAAC in their estates. Responses from the questionnaire will allow the Department to better understand the prevalence of RAAC across schools and ensure the correct support is in place to meet the responsible bodies’ needs. The questionnaire remains open for responsible bodies to respond to, and the Department is still collecting this information.

The Department provides support to schools and responsible bodies and has allocated over £15 billion since 2015 to keep schools safe and operational. This includes £1.8 billion committed this financial year, informed by consistent data on the school estate. In addition, the Department’s School Rebuilding Programme will transform 500 schools over the next decade, prioritising schools in poor condition.

Where the Department is notified of a significant safety issue with a school building that cannot be managed within local resources, the Department considers additional support on a case by case basis. The Department provides advisory support to schools that have closed to minimise the effect and ensure continuity of education for pupils.

19th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the (a) discount levels and (b) eligibility criteria that water companies must apply to social tariff schemes.

All water companies currently have social tariffs in place to support customers who struggle to pay their bill. Existing schemes provided more than £206 million of support to 1,363,839 vulnerable customers across England and Wales in 2022-23. This ensured bill reductions of £151 on average and up to £313 for those struggling the most.

The Government does not set the eligibility criteria, nor the level of support provided in these schemes. Statutory guidance requires companies to balance their support for low-income households against the interests of other customers who largely fund social tariffs via cross-subsidies. Therefore, companies must demonstrate that their customer base supports the level of cross-subsidy they apply to fund their social tariff schemes.

To ensure the best support to customers, the Government continues to work with the industry to explore options to improve the present social tariff arrangements and welcomes the planned household charging trials in 2024-25 and during the 2025-30 Price Review period.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the annually-negotiated cod quota tonnage was for UK fishing vessels in Norwegian waters for each year since 2016; and what proportion of that quota was allocated to Scottish-registered vessels.

The cod quotas available to UK fishing vessels in Norwegian waters fall in two categories: first, quotas in the North Sea (or ICES Areas 4), and second, quotas in the Norwegian Exclusive Economic Zone & the Fisheries Protection Zone around Svalbard (relevant waters of ICES Areas 1, 2a and 2b). It is important to note that cod quotas can vary significantly from one year to the next, depending on fluctuations in the biological health of the stock.

Table 1 sets out the total North Sea cod quota available to the UK since 2016. In practice, the UK has been able to fish up to 100% of that quota in Norwegian waters, with the exception of 2021, when the UK had no access to Norwegian waters to fish that stock.

Table 1:

Year

Tonnes

2016

13,107

2017

15,275

2018

16,808

2019

11,464

2020

5,732

2021

5,824

2022

5,934

2023

9,882

2024

11,613

Table 2 sets out the total cod quota available to the UK in the Norwegian Exclusive Economic Zone & the Fisheries Protection Zone around Svalbard since 2016. By definition, all of that quota must be fished in Norwegian waters.

Table 2:

Year

Tonnes

2016

12,523

2017

15,158

2018

14,437

2019

13,280

2020

13,373

2021

5,500

2022

7,050

2023

5,964

2024

4,844

Scottish Producer Organisations hold approximately 65% of the Fixed Quota Allocation (FQA) units for the quota in Table 1, and no FQA units for the quota in Table 2.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his Department's publication entitled Plant biosecurity strategy for Great Britain (2023 to 2028), published on 9 January 2023, what progress his Department has made on exploring new biosecurity measures for high-risk tree imports.

Plant health import controls already include a ban on the highest risk trees (over 30 species are prohibited for import from outside Europe including many native species), and the phytosanitary certification of trees which are permitted for import.

In 2022 Defra concluded a consultation seeking views on additional biosecurity measures for high-risk trees. An analysis of responses indicates broad support from stakeholders for further action in this area.

We are currently exploring opportunities to strengthen controls through further prohibitions and enforced holding in isolation for prescribed periods of time post import, while continuing to take a risk-based approach. This work includes examining the effectiveness, practicality and operational costs to industry and government of a variety of measures, to identify those which provide suitable biosecurity benefits. More rigorous consultation with industry will be undertaken prior to the implementation of any measures.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were imported under the Balai Directive in each month of (a) 2022 and (b) 2023; and from which country did these dogs originate.

The information requested is provided in the attachment to this answer.

It is a true reflection of the information that we have access to at this time. This information is drawn from external systems not directly controlled by the department.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs travelled to the UK under the Pet Travel Scheme via (a) sea, (b) tunnel and (c) air in each year between 2013 and 2022.

The total number of dogs that travelled under the pet travel scheme is as follows:

Year

Air

Sea

Tunnel

Total

2018

17,783

118,043

177,170

312,996

2019

19,302

114,706

174,396

308,404

2020

16,353

38,813

131,463

186,629

2021

17,389

39,578

108,904

165,871

2022

17,885

95,493

169,531

282,909

This is a summary of dogs entering Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme via an approved route. It does not include pet animals that enter other parts of the UK (such as Northern Ireland or the Channel Islands) or pet animals that enter Great Britain from other parts of the UK. It does not include any animals that enter Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme from the Republic of Ireland (as these movements do not need to follow an approved route).

The data regarding the Pet Travel Scheme covers pets entering Great Britain and is based on information provided by checkers employed by approved carriers of pet animals.

Please note that we do not hold any data prior to 2018.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what data his Department holds on the number of migrant labourers working in the pelagic fleet.

The Department does not hold information on the number of migrant labourers working on pelagic vessels. The Seafish Industry Authority regularly conducts employment surveys of the fishing sector and these reports can be found on their website. Of the pelagic vessels that responded to the most recent survey, none reported migrant workers on their vessels.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been imported under the Pet Travel Scheme in each month in 2023.

Month

Total number of dogs

January

18840

February

14838

March

15790

April

24722

May

20738

Data is still being collated from pet carriers for June 2023 therefore this data is not currently available.

This is a summary of animal entering Great Britain under the Pet Travel scheme via an approved route. It does not include pet animals that enter other parts of the UK (such as Northern Ireland or the Channel Islands) or pet animals that enter Great Britain from other parts of the UK. It does not include any animals that enter Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme from the Republic of Ireland (as these movements do not need to follow an approved route).

The data regarding the Pet Travel Scheme covers pets entering Great Britain and is based on information provided by checkers employed by approved carriers of pet animals. This data can be subject to change as often data from carriers can be received late.

7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to consult on changes to the non-commercial importation of live animals.

There are no policy changes to the imports of non-commercial live animals. Importers from EU member States and EFTA countries currently benefit from a transitional period. At the end of the transitional period, we will be operating a global model for goods from the European Union and the rest of the world based on risk.

The Draft Target Operating Model (TOM) published by the Government on 5th of April does not apply to non-commercial movements of pet animals defined by Regulation 576/2013. Later in 2024, we will expect these pet animals to be checked at designated points of entry while commercial movements of animals will be subject to veterinary checks at Border Control Posts.

5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to announce the charges to be levied under the extended producer responsibility scheme for packaging; and if she will make a statement.

Work is ongoing to deliver our Extended Producer Responsibility scheme and we are continuing to engage closely with manufacturers, retailers, and packaging companies on the design of the scheme.

We will continue to work with industry as we finalise plans to ensure that the scheme will deliver our environmental goals.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the information provided to businesses on preparing for the extended producer responsibility scheme for packaging.

To help businesses prepare, guidance and an obligation checker have been published on gov.uk. We are also running regular Business and Local Authority Readiness Forums to relay key information and answer key questions.

We are committed to continuing to work with businesses closely to ensure the quality of the guidance and information we provide. We will continue to review and update this information taking into account feedback provided to us.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of delaying the implementation of (a) reporting requirements and (b) charges under the extended producer responsibility scheme for packaging.

Work is ongoing to deliver our Extended Producer Responsibility scheme and we’re continuing to engage closely with manufacturers, retailers, and packaging companies on the design of the scheme.

We will continue to work with industry as we finalise plans to ensure that the scheme will deliver our environmental goals.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations she has received from (a) the Scottish Government, (b) its Executive Agencies and (c) its Non Departmental Public Bodies on which areas to designate as Highly Protected Marine Areas.

The Scottish Government has the powers to designate MPAs and HPMAs in Scottish inshore waters (up to 12 nautical miles from the coast). The designation of MPAs and HPMAs in offshore waters (more than 12 nautical miles from the coast) are reserved to the UK Government and we work closely with the Scottish Government on matters related to the offshore area. No representation have been received from Scottish Government or others regarding which areas to designate as HPMAs

13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been imported under the Pet Travel Scheme since December 2019.

Year

Total number of Dogs

Dec 2019 only

21,013

2020

186,629

2021

165,871

2022

282,909

This is a summary of animals entering Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme via an approved route. It does not include pet animals that enter other parts of the UK (such as Northern Ireland or the Channel Islands) or pet animals that enter Great Britain from other parts of the UK. It does not include any animals that enter Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme from the Republic of Ireland (as these movements do not need to follow an approved route).

The data regarding the Pet Travel Scheme covers pets entering Great Britain and is based on information provided by checkers employed by approved carriers of pet animals. This data can be subject to change as often throughput data from carriers can be received late.

13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been imported under the Balai Directive since December 2019.

Year

Number of dogs imported under the Balai Directive (EU)

December 2019

2,938

2020

60,189

2021

72,766

2022

37,284

2023 (to May 2023)

15,152

This information is drawn from the external TRACES and IPAFFS online systems not directly controlled by the department.

TRACES (Trade Control and Expert System)

IPAFFS (Import of products, animals, food and feed system)

13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether her Department plans to consult on the proposed Target Operating Model for non-commercial imports of live animals.

Under the Target Operating Model, the requirements for the movement of non-commercial pets to/from GB will not change. Requirements can be found here on Gov.uk.

25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has any statutory responsibilities for highly-protected marine areas in Scottish waters that are outside the limit of the territorial sea.

The Scottish Government has the powers to designate MPAs and HPMAs in the Scottish inshore waters (up to 12 nautical miles from the coast). The designation of MPAs and HPMAs in offshore water (more than 12 nautical miles from the coast) are reserved to the UK Government.

18th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps she has taken to help tackle labour shortages in food and drink supply chains.

This Government is committed to ensuring that the farming sector has the labour it needs to support food security, including supporting domestic workers and skills, and investment in automation.

We commissioned the Independent Review into Labour Shortages in the Food Supply Chain to consider how we can further support this, and look forward to receiving the report by the summer.

As set out at the recent UK Farm to Fork Summit, we will make 45,000 Seasonal Worker visas available for 2023 and 2024, with an additional 10,000 if needed.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cases of Echinococcus Multilocularis were reported in each year from 2011 to 2022.

From the 1st January 2021 to the 31st December 2022 there have been no cases of Echinococcus multilocularis detected in the UK fox population, based on annual, randomised, opportunistic testing for fox carcases to give a 95% confidence of detecting 1% prevalence.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cases of Brucella Canis were reported between February 2022 and March 2023.

From 1st February 2022 to 31st March 2023 (inclusive) there have been a total of 75 cases (comprising a total of 104 positive dogs). We consider a case to be a single epidemiological event. Each event may involve 1 or more dogs. For example, many cases are just 1 dog (imported rescue dog) while another case may involve a breeder with a number of dogs where more than 1 dog is infected.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential zoological impact of illegally imported dogs on the indigenous dog population.

We regularly undertake risk assessments on zoonotic pathogens associated with the trade of commercial dogs or movement of pet dogs to inform our risk management. For example, we have been working on assessments of Echinococcus multilocularis, tick borne diseases, Brucella canis, Leishmaniasis and dog-mediated rabies. The data on illegal dogs are very difficult to gather, therefore our risk assessments assume non-compliance with the existing requirements for imports. Some of these assessments are focussed on the risk to public health and others on the risk to animal health. For pathogens which are not zoonotic and are not notifiable, as infection does not have a significant impact on the health of the dog, there is no reason for government intervention and therefore we have not undertaken specific assessments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to launch a public consultation on the introduction of the regulation of rehoming activities for (a) animal sanctuaries and (b) rehoming organisations in 2023.

The Action Plan for Animal Welfare includes commitments to pursuing the licensing of animal sanctuaries, rescue and rehoming centres including for cats, dogs and horses. Defra has been engaging with relevant organisations to understand their views and the possible impacts of regulating the sector. Any proposals to bring forward licensing regulations will be subject to a consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to improve animal welfare standards in (a) animal sanctuaries and (b) rehoming organisations.

The Action Plan for Animal Welfare includes commitments to pursuing the licensing of animal sanctuaries, rescue and rehoming centres including for cats, dogs and horses. Defra has been engaging with relevant organisations to understand their views and the possible impacts of regulating the sector. Any proposals to bring forward licensing regulations will be subject to a consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cats were commercially imported into Great Britain in each year since 2018.

Year

Total number of commercially imported cats

2018

3,809

2019

5,286

2020

6,768

2021

11,134

2022

7,312

This information is drawn from external TRACES and IPAFF systems, which are not directly controlled by the department.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cats were commercially imported into Great Britain in each month in 2022.

Month

Total number of cats commercially imported

January

645

February

797

March

789

April

635

May

512

June

453

July

584

August

488

September

613

October

595

November

591

December

610

This information is drawn from external TRACES and IPAFF systems, which are not directly controlled by the department.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cats were imported into the UK through the Pet Travel Scheme in each month in 2022.

2022

Total number of Non-Commercial Cats

January

2587

February

1886

March

1707

April

2310

May

1903

June

2161

July

2354

August

3915

September

7855

October

3059

November

2222

December

2332

The data regarding the Pet Travel Scheme covers pets entering Great Britain and is based on information provided by checkers employed by approved carriers of pet animals.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were commercially imported into Great Britain in each month of 2022.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 12 January to PQ 119251.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the (a) current and (b) future (i) prevalence and (ii) impact of ash dieback.

Ash dieback is a fungal disease of ash trees that was first detected in Great Britain in 2012. It can be spread by infected planting material but is also capable of spreading naturally up to 75km through airborne spores. The disease is now present in all counties, but levels of infection differ at a local level. The impact of the disease varies by tree age, provenance, climate and site factors such as soil type and the presence of secondary pathogens like honey fungus. The disease progresses more quickly in young or stressed trees in ash dominated woodlands, and mortality rates of up to 85% have been recorded in some plantations. Fewer symptoms are observed on ash trees growing in open spaces.

There are an estimated 125 million ash trees in UK woodlands and up to 60 million ash trees outside of woodlands. 1-5% of these trees will be naturally tolerant to the disease and the Government planted the UK’s first archive of 3000 tolerant ash trees in 2020, raising the possibility of a future breeding programme for tolerant ash. Local effects on landscapes will be gradual, and tolerant trees and other tree species are expected to naturally repopulate sites and replace susceptible trees over time. The total cost of ash dieback to the UK has been estimated at £14.6 billion over the next 100 years, based on the cost of dealing with the immediate impacts of the disease, replanting and the future loss of ecosystem services.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial support her Department plans to provide to (a) local authorities and (b) other agencies to help tackle ash dieback.

The Occupiers’ Liability Act imposes a duty of care on landowners to manage their tree stock. Council budgets for the care and management of trees on their land are determined by individual Local Authorities, but Defra provides grants such as the Local Authority Treescapes Fund, to support the restoration of landscapes degraded by ash dieback. Since 2021, this scheme has provided nearly £8m to 153 Local Authorities to plant trees outside of woodlands across 77 projects in England, and the scheme will be reopening for new applications imminently. For private landowners, grants are routinely available under the Countryside Stewardship Scheme and the tree health pilot to help manage dangerous ash alongside roads, carry out ecological surveys and restock with other species.

Government has produced a range of guidance to help landowners manage their ash, including an Ash Dieback Toolkit for Local Authorities which has been downloaded nearly 20,000 times.

9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were commercially imported each month into Great Britain in 2022.

Month

Total number of dogs commercially imported in 2022

January

5228

February

5322

March

5572

April

3533

May

2606

June

2396

July

2544

August

1806

September

2785

October

2753

November

2836

December

3509

This information is drawn from external systems not directly controlled by the department.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were imported into the UK through the Pet Travel Scheme in each month in 2022.

Month

Total number of dogs

January

18,840

February

13,479

March

10,020

April

24,315

May

20,678

June

26,092

July

27,579

August

49,565

September

30,903

October

24,395

November

13,434

December

20,102


This is a summary of animals entering Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme via an approved route. It does not include pet animals that enter other parts of the UK (such as Northern Ireland or the Channel Islands) or pet animals that enter Great Britain from other parts of the UK. It does not include any animals that enter Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme from the Republic of Ireland (as these movements do not need to follow an approved route). Additionally, this data is based upon reports supplied by pet checkers operating approved routes, and not all pet checkers have submitted their final reports for 2022; the month of December in particular has a number of gaps in the data thus far provided. We are continuing to chase pet checkers for these missing figures but have yet to receive definitive responses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 29 September to Question 48499 on Dogs: Imports, if his Department will publish the number of dogs imported into the UK from each country outlined in that Answer in (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022.

Below are tables to show the countries of origin of commercial dog imports. The data for 2020 is for UK, and the data for 2021 and 2022 (up to the 31/08/2022) is Great Britain only. We do not hold data for Northern Ireland for 2021 and 2022.

This information is drawn from external TRACES and IPAFFs systems, which are not directly controlled by the department.

EU imports

2020

Rest of World Imports

2020

Country Of Origin

Dogs

Country Of Origin

Dogs

Austria

6

Antigua and Barbuda

1

Belgium

13

Argentina

30

Bulgaria

222

Australia

118

Croatia

153

Bahrain

95

Cyprus

4246

Barbados

8

Czech Republic

135

Belarus

50

Denmark

2

Bermuda

4

Estonia

21

Bosnia and Herzegovina

1636

Finland

7

Brazil

120

France

33

Canada

76

Germany

103

Cayman Islands

6

Greece

563

Colombia

12

Hungary

5065

Costa Rica

9

Ireland (Rep. of)

5814

Egypt

26

Italy

243

Ethiopia

3

Latvia

5

French Polynesia

1

Lithuania

99

Hong Kong

69

Malta

5

India

29

Netherlands

38

Indonesia

2

Poland

3945

Israel

13

Portugal

343

Japan

8

Romania

32525

Jordan

3

Slovakia

106

Kenya

26

Slovenia

5

Korea (South)

29

Spain

6475

Kuwait

12

Sweden

15

Lebanon

10

Switzerland

1

Macao

2

Total

60188

Malawi

1

Malaysia

25

Mauritius

85

Mexico

51

Namibia

3

New Zealand

40

North Macedonia

566

Nigeria

3

Oman

8

Peru

5

Philippines

1

Qatar

43

Russia

713

Saudi Arabia

9

Serbia

40

Singapore

58

South Africa

519

Sri Lanka

2

Taiwan

7

Tajikistan

1

Thailand

18

Turkey

375

Turks and Caicos

1

UAE

164

Uganda

2

Ukraine

3

Uruguay

5

USA

1592

Viet Nam

15

Zimbabwe

11

Total

6764

EU Imports

2021

Rest of World Imports

2021

Country

Dogs

Country of origin

Dogs

Austria

22

Argentina

17

Belgium

78

Australia

345

Bulgaria

1093

Bahamas

1

Croatia

2003

Bahrain

55

Cyprus

3758

Barbados

22

Czechia

221

Belarus

1

Denmark

719

Bermuda

12

England

72

Brazil

125

Estonia

23

Canada

167

Finland

8

Cayman Islands

15

France

411

China

174

Germany

76

Colombia

12

Greece

1017

Costa Rica

13

Hungary

4517

Ecuador

2

Iceland

1

Egypt

41

Italy

296

Ethiopia

4

Latvia

512

Guam

3

Lithuania

678

Hong Kong

161

Luxembourg

2

India

96

Malta

3

Indonesia

2

Netherlands

152

Israel

12

Northern Ireland

2

Jamaica

2

Norway

3

Japan

12

Poland

5593

Jordan

13

Portugal

500

Kenya

43

Republic of Ireland

6658

Kuwait

30

Romania

38081

Lebanon

36

Scotland

1

Macao

1

Slovakia

291

Malawi

2

Slovenia

7

Malaysia

71

Spain

5909

Mauritius

3

Sweden

49

Mexico

11

Switzerland

8

Mozambique

2

Wales

1

Namibia

3

(blank)

1

Nepal

1

Grand Total

72766

New Zealand

92

Nigeria

2

Oman

14

Panama

2

Peru

25

Philippines

1

Qatar

179

Russian Federation

261

Saudi Arabia

27

Serbia

2

Singapore

141

South Africa

1522

South Korea

60

Taiwan

4

Thailand

48

Turkey

148

Ukraine

6

United Arab Emirates

499

United States of America

966

Vietnam

2

Zimbabwe

22

Grand Total

5533

EU Imports to 31/08/2022

2022

Rest of World Imports to 31/08/2022

2022

Country Of Origin

Dogs

Country Of Origin

Dogs

Austria

5

Albania

1

Belgium

25

Algeria

1

Bulgaria

1248

Australia

295

Croatia

1742

Bahrain

84

Cyprus

1982

Barbados

13

Czech Republic

108

Bermuda

10

Denmark

216

Brazil

65

England?

35

Brunei

2

Estonia

13

Canada

90

Finland

5

Cayman Islands

11

France

68

Chile

5

Germany

90

China

101

Greece

254

Colombia

7

Hungary

1766

Costa Rica

5

Isle of Man

2

Dominican Republic

1

Ireland (Rep. of)

4528

Ecuador

1

Italy

184

Egypt

13

Latvia

309

Fiji

1

Lithuania

297

Hong Kong

25

Luxembourg

1

India

108

Malta

0

Indonesia

1

Netherlands

84

Israel

5

Northern Ireland

13

Japan

6

Norway

7

Jordan

4

Poland

1242

Kenya

24

Portugal

237

Korea (South)

44

Romania

8698

Kuwait

10

Slovakia

127

Lebanon

16

Slovenia

1

Malaysia

32

Spain

3348

Mauritius

13

Sweden

10

Mexico

16

Switzerland

2

Namibia

2

UK

4

New Zealand

82

Total

26651

Nigeria

1

Oman

1

Panama

2

Peru

4

Philippines

7

Qatar

56

Russia

21

Saint Lucia

1

Saudi Arabia

17

Singapore

66

South Africa

557

Sri Lanka

3

Taiwan

1

Thailand

30

Turkey

57

UAE

233

Uganda

5

Ukraine

2

USA

416

Vietnam

1

Zimbabwe

9

Total

2584

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September 2022 to Question 40929 on Dogs: Imports, if he will publish a breakdown of the countries of origin of the dogs commercially imported into the UK from abroad in (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022.

Below are tables to show the countries of origin of commercial dog imports. The data for 2020 is for the UK, while the data for 2021 and 2022 (up to 31 August 2022) is for Great Britain only. We do not hold data for Northern Ireland for 2021 and 2022.

This information is drawn from external TRACES and IPAFF systems not directly controlled by the department.

Country Of Origin from EU 2020

Country Of Origin from Rest of World 2020

Austria

Antigua and Barbuda

Belgium

Argentina

Bulgaria

Australia

Croatia

Bahrain

Cyprus

Barbados

Czech Republic

Belarus

Denmark

Bermuda

Estonia

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Finland

Brazil

France

Canada

Germany

Cayman Islands

Greece

Colombia

Hungary

Costa Rica

Ireland (Rep. of)

Egypt

Italy

Ethiopia

Latvia

French Polynesia

Lithuania

Hong Kong

Malta

India

Netherlands

Indonesia

Poland

Israel

Portugal

Japan

Romania

Jordan

Slovakia

Kenya

Slovenia

Korea (South)

Spain

Kuwait

Sweden

Lebanon

Switzerland

Macao

Malawi

Malaysia

Mauritius

Mexico

Namibia

New Zealand

Nigeria

North Macedonia

Oman

Peru

Philippines

Qatar

Russia

Saudi Arabia

Serbia

Singapore

South Africa

Sri Lanka

Taiwan

Tajikistan

Thailand

Turkey

Turks and Caicos

UAE

Uganda

Ukraine

Uruguay

USA

Vietnam

Zimbabwe

Country Of Origin from EU 2021

Country Of Origin from Rest of World 2021

Austria

Argentina

Belgium

Australia

Bulgaria

Bahamas

Croatia

Bahrain

Cyprus

Barbados

Czechia

Belarus

Denmark

Bermuda

Estonia

Brazil

Finland

Canada

France

Cayman Islands

Germany

China

Greece

Colombia

Hungary

Costa Rica

Iceland

Ecuador

Italy

Egypt

Latvia

Ethiopia

Lithuania

Guam

Luxembourg

Hong Kong

Malta

India

Netherlands

Indonesia

Northern Ireland

Israel

Norway

Jamaica

Poland

Japan

Portugal

Jordan

Republic of Ireland

Kenya

Romania

Kuwait

Slovakia

Lebanon

Slovenia

Macao

Spain

Malawi

Sweden

Malaysia

Switzerland

Mauritius

Mexico

Mozambique

Namibia

Nepal

New Zealand

Nigeria

Oman

Panama

Peru

Philippines

Qatar

Russian Federation

Saudi Arabia

Serbia

Singapore

South Africa

South Korea

Taiwan

Thailand

Turkey

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United States of America

Viet Nam

Zimbabwe

Country Of Origin from EU 2022

Country Of Origin from Rest of World 2022

Austria

Albania

Belgium

Algeria

Bulgaria

Australia

Croatia

Bahrain

Cyprus

Barbados

Czech Republic

Bermuda

Denmark

Brazil

Estonia

Brunei

Finland

Canada

France

Cayman Islands

Germany

Chile

Greece

China

Hungary

Colombia

Isle of Man

Costa Rica

Ireland (Rep. of)

Dominican Republic

Italy

Ecuador

Latvia

Egypt

Lithuania

Fiji

Luxembourg

Hong Kong

Netherlands

India

Northern Ireland

Indonesia

Norway

Israel

Poland

Japan

Portugal

Jordan

Romania

Kenya

Slovakia

Korea (South)

Slovenia

Kuwait

Spain

Lebanon

Sweden

Malaysia

Switzerland

Mauritius

Mexico

Namibia

New Zealand

Nigeria

Oman

Panama

Peru

Philippines

Qatar

Russia

Saint Lucia

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

South Africa

Sri Lanka

Taiwan

Thailand

Turkey

UAE

Uganda

Ukraine

USA

Vietnam

Zimbabwe

Scott Mann
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an estimate of the number of dogs that were commercially imported into the UK from other countries in (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022.

The number of dogs imported commercially into the UK from the EU and the Rest o