Department of Health and Social Care

All 10 Written Questions max 10 shown

Date Title Questioner
8 Oct 2019, 3:54 p.m. Hospitals: Construction Mohammad Yasin

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's News story, New hospital building programme, published on 29 September 2019, what criteria his Department used to determine which NHS trusts were eligible for funding under that programme to develop new hospitals.

Answer (Edward Argar)

On 29 September, the Government announced the largest hospital building programme in a generation as part of a new Health Infrastructure Plan (HIP) that is backed by a long-term programme of investment. The plan’s new, strategic approach will ensure the health service will have world-class facilities for patients and staff for the long term.

The HIP1 and HIP2 schemes were selected through the following process:

NHS England and NHS Improvement conducted a strategic assessment of hospital estates and came up with a list of priority schemes. These were selected on the basis of age and/or where a combination of other metrics that indicated a high need for investment in the estate. This included the consideration of the high value scheme bids submitted by providers as part of previous sustainability and transformation partnership (STP) capital rounds, and other relevant previous representations by trusts and STPs. The other metrics being - Estates and facilities running costs; backlog costs; Critical Infrastructure Risk (a subset of the highest risk elements of backlog with a potential for significant impact e.g. fire safety); unused and functionally unsuitable space; and incidents having an impact on clinical services.

Based on that, a small number of schemes were identified as being suitable to fully fund now, given their advanced level of readiness to deliver in near future. These are the 6 projects for HIP1.

The remaining list of priority schemes was then further filtered based on a combination of criteria, including the level of Critical Infrastructure Risk in the estate and an overall check of the regional breakdown (to make sure no regions were over or under-represented), and engagements through NHS regional teams. This gave us the 21 projects identified to receive seed funding to kick start their schemes, ready for building in HIP2.

HIP scheme selection was not specifically discussed at the NHS Property Board, which did not meet during the period when final decisions were made. However, the underlying principles and issues have been discussed previously by the NHS Property Board and members were involved in discussions that led to the final selection of schemes.

Schemes will be required to submit business cases to provide the required standard assurance on the key features including patient benefits, value for money and commercial terms etc. A number of the six HIP1 schemes have submitted business cases to NHS Improvement previously but these will need to be developed further or revised to align with the current scope of their scheme. The Department is looking to speed up and streamline the business case process and approvals.

8 Oct 2019, 3:25 p.m. Cervical Cancer: Screening Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for cervical screening test results.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8 Oct 2019, 3:22 p.m. Hepatitis: Screening Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve the detection of hepatitis B and C.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8 Oct 2019, 3:20 p.m. General Practitioners: Rural Areas Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on recruiting additional GPs in rural locations.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8 Oct 2019, 3:17 p.m. General Practitioners: Surrey Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to maintain the level of out-of-hours GP cover in Surrey.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

8 Oct 2019, 3:03 p.m. Vasa Praevia Laura Smith

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of cases of Vasa Praevia in expectant mothers in the last year for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

A count of finished consultant episodes (FCEs) with a primary diagnosis or all diagnoses of labour and delivery complicated by vasa praevia, for 2018/19 - activity in English National Health Service hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector can be found in the following table.

.

FCEs

Primary diagnosis

109

All Diagnoses

194

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), NHS Digital

8 Oct 2019, 2:54 p.m. Hospital Wards: Children and Young People Jonathan Ashworth

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of NHS trusts' compliance with NHS Improvement guidance on safe staffing levels for children and young people’s wards.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

We are committed to ensuring that every trust has the support it requires, including the guidance and tools, to determine the right level and skill mix of staff at the right time.

There has been no specific assessment of National Health Service trusts' compliance with NHS Improvement guidance on safe staffing levels for children and young people’s wards.

However, systematic reviews of all relevant children’s services consider a broad range of aspects of care and include National Quality Board guidance on safe staffing. Any matters pertaining to workforce as a result of these reviews would be referred to the NHS England and NHS Improvement nursing clinical workforce team, who would then provide targeted support.

In addition, NHS trusts are required to specify the degree of their compliance with Developing Workforce Safeguards, which explains the principles behind safe staffing.

Developing Workforce Safeguards can be accessed via the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/developing-workforce-safeguards/

In addition, appropriate staffing levels are a core element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime, which is underpinned by legislation. CQC inspectors assess against the key lines of enquiry on safe staffing in their framework.

8 Oct 2019, 2:51 p.m. Cancer: Screening Jonathan Ashworth

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on testing timeframes of changes being made to the provision of molecular pathology testing in cancer care and treatment.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

NHS England is mobilising the Genomic Medicine Service which brings together existing clinical genetics services and the new genomic laboratory infrastructure. By consolidating genomic testing services into seven Genomic Laboratory Hubs (GLHs), the National Health Service is able to operate more efficiently using cutting-edge high throughput technology and supporting make equitable access. The new service will enable additional genomic information to inform treatment and enable turnaround times to be kept to a minimum.

The turnaround times which are set out in the GLH service specification fall within the existing 62 day standard for receiving first treatment for cancer.

8 Oct 2019, 2:50 p.m. Breast Cancer: Screening Emma Reynolds

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending provision of genetic testing to all people diagnosed with breast cancer.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out the ambition to extend the use of molecular diagnostics and, over the next 10 years, to routinely offer genomic testing to all people with cancer for whom it would be of clinical benefit.

8 Oct 2019, 2:47 p.m. Cancer: Mortality Rates Mr Jonathan Lord

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the mortality rate was for people under 75 years of age with cancer in each of the last three years.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

The directly age-standardised cancer mortality rates per 100,000 population in England under 75 years of age for each of the three most recently published years are shown in the following table:

Year

Mortality rate

2015

136.4

2016

135.6

2017

131.8