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Written Question
Immigration Bail
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Brendan O'Hara (SNP - Argyll and Bute)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle the destitution of some highly skilled migrants without indefinite leave to remain who have not been issued with immigration bail letters granting them the right to work or benefit from Section 3C leave.

Answered by Chris Philp

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.


Written Question
Fraud: Criminal Investigation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Charlotte Nichols (LAB - Warrington North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of reports of fraud have been passed on to police forces from Action Fraud for further investigation in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

The Home Office publish the number of fraud offences recorded by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) following reports from Action Fraud, Cifas and UK Finance and the number referred to police forces for investigation each year. The latest published figures can be found in Table 4.1 in the link below.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/901030/crime-outcomes-1920-hosb1720-tables.ods


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stephen Farry (Alliance - North Down)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's guidance, EU Settlement Scheme: EU, other EEA and Swiss citizens and their family members, version 11.0, published for Home Office staff on 6 April 2021, what form of immigration status and rights EU citizens and non-EU family members who do not apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline for receipt of applications to that scheme of 30 June 2021 will have (a) during the 28 day notice period granted to make a late application to that scheme as set out in that guidance and (b) after the 28 day notice period for making a late application to that scheme in the event that those citizens or family members did (i) not make a late application to that scheme during that notice period and (ii) make a late application to that scheme during that notice period and are waiting for the outcome of that late application.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stephen Farry (Alliance - North Down)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's guidance, EU Settlement Scheme: EU, other EEA and Swiss citizens and their family members, version 11.0, published for Home Office staff on 6 April 2021, what immigration enforcement steps she plans to take in response EU citizens and non-EU family members who do not apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline for receipt of applications to that scheme of 30 June 2021 in cases where those citizens or family members (a) are deemed not to have reasonable grounds for a late application to that Scheme and (b) fail to make a late application to that Scheme within the 28 day notice period as set out in that guidance.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stephen Farry (Alliance - North Down)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has (a) recruited additional immigration enforcement officers and (b) allocated additional funding towards immigration enforcement to anticipate potential increases in the number of undocumented EU citizens being in the UK as a result those citizens failing to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline of 30 June 2021.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.


Written Question
Windrush Generation: Compensation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her Answer of 15 April 2021 to Question 179171, on Windrush Generation: Compensation, if she will estimate the number of applications to the Windrush Compensation Scheme that remain outstanding more than (a) two years, (b) 18 months and (c) 12 months after the applicants first submitted those applications.

Answered by Priti Patel

The number of cases being worked through the Windrush Compensation Scheme as of 21 April are 1417. Of these 1417 cases:

  • 281 have been in the process for 12-18 months;
  • 214 have been in the process for over 18 months;
  • 5 have been in the process for over 24 months.

Windrush Compensation Scheme staff continue to work hard to resolve these claims from the moment they are received and individuals are provided with an update on the progress of their claim on a monthly basis as a minimum, unless they have requested otherwise. A case is finally closed when an individual accepts a final offer or an application to the Scheme is unsuccessful as it does not meet the criteria. All claims will have been considered for a preliminary payment of £10,000 within 6 weeks of eligibility being confirmed under the terms of the Scheme, including these open applications. A preliminary payment is offered as soon as we receive the minimum level of information required to show that they will be entitled to compensation under the Scheme. Some of these people may also have received an urgent and exceptional payment. This policy remains available for those who have an urgent and exceptional need that cannot wait for a payment to be made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme. As of 25 March 2021, the Scheme had offered 362 preliminary awards (totalling £3,620,000); of which 255 (£2,550,000) had been accepted. 228 awards (£2,280,000) had been paid.

That said, each person’s claim is deeply personal and requires careful and detailed consideration to understand their individual circumstances and experiences. There are 13 different categories of claim and some individuals’ experiences are more complex than others and it is right we take the time to ensure these are considered carefully. We want people to receive the maximum compensation to which they are entitled and work closely with individuals, for example by contacting other government departments and third parties to help gather evidence to support their claim.

This holistic approach necessarily takes time but is ultimately beneficial to individuals.

Data on the number of claims received and the number of payments made is published as part of the regular transparency data release which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/windrush-compensation-scheme-data-march-2021.

Since April 2019 the Scheme has paid or offered £18 million. Of this, more than £6.1 million have been accepted and paid, an increase of £2 million in one month.

We have made fundamental improvements to the Scheme to ensure people receive significantly more money, more quickly. We increased the value of awards for impact on life at every level so everyone will be paid more in this category, with the maximum award increasing from £10,000 to £100,000 (with options for even higher awards in exceptional circumstances).

Within six weeks of these changes, we had offered more than we had in the first 19 months of the scheme (at the end of January we had offered £12m) and since the end of December we have more than doubled the amount of compensation paid to individuals (from £2.8m to £6.1m).

In December 2018, the Home Office established an Urgent and Exceptional Payments process for those members of the Windrush generation who had an urgent and exceptional need in advance of the Windrush Compensation Scheme. The process remains open for those who need it. The total value of the payments approved as of 29 March 2021 is £104,338.58.


Written Question
Windrush Generation: Compensation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 15 April 2021 to Question 179170 on Windrush Generation: Compensation, notwithstanding that her Department does not routinely publish the information requested, how many applicants to the Windrush Compensation Scheme her Department is aware of who have died in the period between applying for and receiving compensation under that scheme.

Answered by Priti Patel

It is very regrettable that a claimant passes away before a compensation award can be made or an apology sent to them.

The Windrush Compensation Scheme staff are working hard to ensure that where they are aware of claimants with critical or life shortening illnesses, that their cases are prioritised.

In the deeply unfortunate circumstances where a claimant has passed away after submitting a compensation claim, but before the claim is fully resolved, the team continues to work closely with the appointed representative, usually members of the family, to ensure the compensation payment is made as quickly as possible to that family member.

Out of the 1,996 applications made to the Windrush Compensation Scheme, we are aware of 21 cases to date where unfortunately the claimant has passed away after having submitted a claim but before receiving compensation. We are working closely with the families and legal representatives to determine the right person to whom the compensation can be paid as quickly as possible.

It must be noted that this data is manually recorded and is reliant on the person receiving the information on an applicant notifying the Windrush Compensation Scheme to record this information. The data isn’t recorded in a reportable field in the casework system.


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Peter Grant (SNP - Glenrothes)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 20 April 2021 to Question 181333 on Immigration: EU Nationals, what her Department's policy is in circumstances where an individual who is required to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme is unable to prove that they had reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline.

Answered by Kevin Foster

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution


Written Question
Modern Slavery Act 2015
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Anthony Mangnall (CON - Totnes)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 19 April 2021 to Question 176048 on Modern Slavery Act 2015, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to update the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.


Written Question
Refugees: Eritrea
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Tim Farron (LDEM - Westmorland and Lonsdale)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to support Eritrean refugees with acute mental distress.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Refugees can access the same NHS health services as UK citizens, including mental health services.


Written Question
Visas: Voluntary Work
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Sarah Olney (LDEM - Richmond Park)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason people who enter the UK on a visitor visa are unable to volunteer.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Visitors to the UK can undertake a wide range of activities, including volunteering. The volunteering should last no more than 30 days in total and be for a charity registered with either the Charity Commission for England and Wales; the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland; or the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator.

Undertaking voluntary work for longer periods of time is provided for in the Temporary Worker – Charity Worker route of the points-based system.


Written Question
Detention Centres: Hassockfield
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Mary Kelly Foy (LAB - City of Durham)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans the Government has to provide accommodation for women released from Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre to continue their asylum claims.

Answered by Chris Philp

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Green of Deddington (CB - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of the 2.2 million EU citizens now granted pre-settled status will be able to switch to settled status in (1) 2021, and (2) each of the next five calendar years.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

A person granted pre-settled status can apply for settled status as soon as they qualify for this. They will be eligible for settled status once they have completed five years’ continuous residence or where other criteria for eligibility for settled status without that length of continuous residence are met.

The Home Office cannot assess a person’s eligibility for settled status until they make an application to the scheme.


Written Question
Migrant Workers: Domestic Service
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Bishop of Bristol (Bishops - Bishops)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many bids were received from organisations to provide information sessions on employment rights for overseas domestic workers; whether any of the bids have been successful; and when they expect the sessions to begin.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Following extensive market engagement, a full commercial tender exercise was conducted, which attracted only two bids to provide the information and advice sessions for Overseas Domestic Workers. Neither bid was successful.

All domestic workers are though provided with an information leaflet explaining their rights and how to access help should they need it. Further help and information is also available online at:

http://www.gov.uk/domestic-workers-in-a-private-household-visa/your-employment-rights


Written Question
Windrush Lessons Learned Review
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Bishop of Durham (Bishops - Bishops)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) are the Terms of Reference, and (2) is the intended completion date, for Wendy Williams' review of progress on recommendations made in the report Windrush Lessons Learned Review: independent review by Wendy Williams, published on 31 March 2020.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.