Baroness Finlay of Llandaff Portrait

Baroness Finlay of Llandaff

Crossbench - None

National Policy for the Built Environment Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 11th Feb 2016
Public Service and Demographic Change Committee
29th May 2012 - 5th Mar 2013
Science and Technology Committee (Lords)
19th Nov 2002 - 30th Oct 2007
Science and Technology: Sub-Committee I
13th Nov 2002 - 30th Oct 2007
Draft Mental Health Bill (Joint Committee)
22nd Jul 2004 - 11th Jul 2005
Committee on the Assisted Dying for the terminally ill Bill
30th Nov 2004 - 7th Apr 2005


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
National Security and Investment Bill
voted Aye
One of 64 Crossbench Aye votes vs 11 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 241
Speeches
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Integrated Review: Development Aid

My Lords, we will resume. Would the noble Baroness, Lady D’Souza, continue her speech from where she was interrupted?

Written Answers
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Research: Career Development
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic on the ability of …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 9th January 2020
Access to Palliative Care and Treatment of Children Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to make provision for NHS service commissioners to ensure that persons for whom they have responsibility for commissioning …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Finlay of Llandaff has voted in 142 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(79 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(78 debate contributions)
Home Office
(41 debate contributions)
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View all Baroness Finlay of Llandaff's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Finlay of Llandaff, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Finlay of Llandaff has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Finlay of Llandaff has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Baroness Finlay of Llandaff


A Bill to make provision for equitable access to palliative care services; for advancing education, training and research in palliative care; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 3rd Reading : House Of Lords
Tuesday 23rd February 2016

A bill to make provision for NHS service commissioners to ensure that persons for whom they have responsibility for commissioning physical and mental health services have access to specialist and generalist palliative care and support services; to enable hospices to access pharmaceutical services on the same basis as other services commissioned by a clinical commissioning group; and to make provision for treatment of children with a life-limiting illness


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Lords)
Friday 7th February 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for equitable access to palliative care services; for advancing education, training and research in palliative care; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Thursday 9th June 2016

Baroness Finlay of Llandaff has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


46 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
20th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic on the ability of early career researchers to continue in their research career.

We are aware of the enormous pressures that the pandemic has had on researchers and doctoral student’s ability to conduct their research. The Government has made available £280 million of funding to sustain UKRI and National Academy grant-funded research and fellowships affected by COVID-19 through costed grant extensions and other measures.

UKRI has made over £62 million of financial support available to students most impacted by the pandemic. It is estimated that this funding is available for up to 12,000 students. This will go some way in ensuring students at the beginning of their academic career will obtain their doctorates in good time and stead.

Most research environments have now adapted to the pandemic, adjusting data-collection plans for their projects, and also operating in a covid-safe way for staff on site. We understand some researchers have been disrupted more than others, and we expect institutions and funders to work with them on a case-by-case basis.

We will continue to monitor the impacts of COVID-19 and UKRI continues to listen and respond carefully as the situation evolves.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the long-term effects of (1) gambling advertising in sport, and (2) loot boxes, on young people.

Gambling advertising and sponsorship, including around sport, must be socially responsible and must not be targeted at children. The government assessed the evidence on advertising in its Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility Measures, the full response to which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consultation-on-proposals-for-changes-to-gaming-machines-and-social-responsibility-measures.

Since then, in March this year, the charity GambleAware has published the final report of a major piece of research into the effect of gambling marketing and advertising on children, young people and vulnerable people. That study found that exposure to advertising was associated with an openness to gamble in the future amongst children and young people aged 11-24 who did not currently gamble. It also found that there were other factors that correlated more closely with current gambling behaviour amongst those groups, including peer and parental gambling. It did not suggest a causal link between any of these and problem gambling in later life.

The government takes concerns raised about loot boxes in video games very seriously. On 23 September 2020 we launched an 8 week call for evidence which includes a focus on whether loot boxes cause harm and, if so, the nature of the harm. This will put us on the best footing to take any action that is necessary. We expect to publish a Government response to the call for evidence early next year.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with stakeholders on a wide range of issues. Ministers have not recently received representations from either the gambling or the sports sectors about gambling advertising or sponsorship of professional sports teams. The House of Lords Select Committee on the Economic and Social Impact of the Gambling Industry and Gambling Related Harm All Party Parliamentary Group have made recommendations to Ministers in both these areas.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have received about gambling company adverts and sponsorships displayed on the kit of professional sports teams.

Gambling advertising and sponsorship, including around sport, must be socially responsible and must not be targeted at children. The government assessed the evidence on advertising in its Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility Measures, the full response to which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consultation-on-proposals-for-changes-to-gaming-machines-and-social-responsibility-measures.

Since then, in March this year, the charity GambleAware has published the final report of a major piece of research into the effect of gambling marketing and advertising on children, young people and vulnerable people. That study found that exposure to advertising was associated with an openness to gamble in the future amongst children and young people aged 11-24 who did not currently gamble. It also found that there were other factors that correlated more closely with current gambling behaviour amongst those groups, including peer and parental gambling. It did not suggest a causal link between any of these and problem gambling in later life.

The government takes concerns raised about loot boxes in video games very seriously. On 23 September 2020 we launched an 8 week call for evidence which includes a focus on whether loot boxes cause harm and, if so, the nature of the harm. This will put us on the best footing to take any action that is necessary. We expect to publish a Government response to the call for evidence early next year.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with stakeholders on a wide range of issues. Ministers have not recently received representations from either the gambling or the sports sectors about gambling advertising or sponsorship of professional sports teams. The House of Lords Select Committee on the Economic and Social Impact of the Gambling Industry and Gambling Related Harm All Party Parliamentary Group have made recommendations to Ministers in both these areas.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their modelling relating to controls on numbers of students domiciled in England attending Welsh universities; and whether such modelling recognised the risk of a disproportionate financial impact on Welsh universities as a result of such controls.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and my hon. Friend, the Minister of State for Universities have regular meetings with Welsh ministers, and ministers from all the devolved administrations, about higher education issues. These discussions have included the development of student number controls policy. The department’s officials also have regular meetings and discussions with their counterparts.

Student number controls are a direct response to the COVID-19 outbreak. They are designed to minimise the impact to the financial threat posed by COVID-19 and they form a key part of the package of measures to stabilise the university admissions system.

These controls are a temporary measure and will be in place for one academic year only. Student number controls for institutions in the devolved administrations only apply to the number of English-domiciled entrants who will be supported with their tuition fees through the Student Loans Company. They are set at a level which will allow every institution to take more first year English students than they took last year. The funding of English-domiciled students is not a devolved matter and it is right and fair that this policy should apply as consistently as possible wherever they are studying in the UK.

Ministers will continue to work closely with the devolved administrations on strengthening and stabilising the higher education system following the COVID-19 outbreak.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have received in relation to the proposal by the Office for Students to cut funding to universities providing pre-registration clinical training for physiotherapists and other student clinicians by 3 per cent.

No representations have been made to Her Majesty’s Government in relation to the proposal by the Office for Students (OfS) to make savings to teaching grant funding, including for some pre-registration clinical courses.

The OfS consulted on their proposals, which include a proposal to make additional budget provision for providers in a small number of high-cost and high-priority areas, to reflect additional students on pre-registration courses in medicine, nursing, midwifery and allied health professions. Providers and other interested parties have therefore had an opportunity to make representations. The OfS will conclude the consultation in due course.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of a reduction in university funding on the expansion of physiotherapy training.

No representations have been made to Her Majesty’s Government in relation to the proposal by the Office for Students (OfS) to make savings to teaching grant funding, including for some pre-registration clinical courses.

The OfS consulted on their proposals, which include a proposal to make additional budget provision for providers in a small number of high-cost and high-priority areas, to reflect additional students on pre-registration courses in medicine, nursing, midwifery and allied health professions. Providers and other interested parties have therefore had an opportunity to make representations. The OfS will conclude the consultation in due course.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential benefits of the (1) procurement, and (2) deployment, of professional high-efficiency particulate air purifiers in enclosed workspaces.

Workplace health and safety law requires employers to ensure an adequate supply of fresh air in the workplace and this has not changed during the pandemic. It is not the health and safety regulator’s role to identify the benefits of the procurement and deployment of any specific equipment. This should be considered as part of the risk assessment carried out for the workplace. To assist with these assessments, the Health and Safety Executive have issued guidance on ventilation during the pandemic at:

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation.htm

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to expand same-day emergency care to all emergency departments in England; and what the timescales are for any such plans.

NHS England and NHS Improvement’s planning guidance 2021/22 priorities and operational planning guidance published on 25 March 2021 includes guidance to progress the work already underway through the same day emergency care (SDEC) programmes. This guidance includes that systems should:

- maximise the utilisation of direct referral from NHS 111 to other hospital services including SDEC and specialty hot clinics and implement referral pathways from NHS 111 to urgent community and mental health services; and

- adopt a consistent, expanded, model of SDEC provision, including associated acute frailty services, within all providers with a type 1 emergency department to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions.

A copy of the planning guidance is attached.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Royal College of Emergency’s Medicine’s call to (1) restore bed capacity to pre-COVID levels, and (2) provide an additional 9,429 hospital beds, as set out in their letter to the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 1 March.

We will continue to support the National Health Service in taking action to help reduce pressures on hospital bed capacity and increase patient flow through the emergency care pathway. This includes action within community services to help avoid unnecessary emergency admissions and the enhanced patient discharge arrangements which the NHS estimates has reduced long lengths of stay, increasing capacity to the equivalent of over 6,000 beds.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the next iteration of the NHS People Plan will be published; and what assessment they have made of the recommendations by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine RCEM Cares Retention of A&E staff: policy brief, published in February, (1) to recruit an additional 2500 Emergency Medicine Consultants, and (2) to increase the numbers entering Emergency Medicine training by 120 per year, to ensure services are sustainable long term; and what steps they intend to take in response.

The NHS People Plan is a shared programme of work to increase the workforce, support new ways of working and develop a compassionate and inclusive workplace culture in order to deliver the NHS Long Term Plan. We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Health Education England (HEE) and with systems and employers to determine our workforce and people priorities beyond April 2021 to support the recovery of National Health Service staff and services.

HEE has also worked proactively with system partners to address service pressures in emergency department teams. We have almost doubled the number of core trainees and consultants in emergency medicine since 2010. HEE will continue to work with service providers, the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and NHS England to understand and discuss the recommendations in this latest Royal College of Emergency Medicine briefing.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many international medical graduates are working for the NHS in the UK on a temporary visa; how many (1) such graduates, and (2) families of those graduates, have not yet been granted indefinite leave to remain; and how many of those graduates have been told that they may be deported.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that NHS estates can reduce the viral load of COVID-19 in the ambient air; and what plans they have to undertake wide-scale deployment of professional high-efficiency particulate air purifiers to reduce the risk of nosocomial infection.

The current National Health Service infection prevention control principles are applicable to all healthcare staff in all healthcare settings.

These set out safe systems of working including administrative, environmental and engineering controls and interventions to reduce the risk of transmission of infection. This includes cleaning and decontamination of the environment and shared equipment, social/physical distancing, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment and ventilation.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) crowding, and (2) corridor care, in accident and emergency departments, on patient safety during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Throughout the pandemic, the safety of all staff, patients and visitors has been a priority for the National Health Service.

It is for individual hospital trusts to carry out continual risk assessments of their premises and to put appropriate measures in place such as distancing, sanitising stations and the use of face coverings and other protective equipment to help minimise the spread of the COVID-19 virus, in line with nationally published guidance. This includes busy areas like accident and emergency departments, corridors and patient areas such wards and clinics.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) crowding, and (2) corridor care, on nosocomial outbreaks of COVID-19 in hospitals.

Throughout the pandemic, the safety of all staff, patients and visitors has been a priority for the National Health Service.

It is for individual hospital trusts to carry out continual risk assessments of their premises and to put appropriate measures in place such as distancing, sanitising stations and the use of face coverings and other protective equipment to help minimise the spread of the COVID-19 virus, in line with nationally published guidance. This includes busy areas like accident and emergency departments, corridors and patient areas such wards and clinics.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide funeral workers with access to Test and Trace risk assessments by Tier One contract tracers.

Public Health England’s Health Protection Teams (HPTs) undertake tier 1 contact tracing and have a key role in investigating workplace outbreaks; this includes in the funeral services industry.

In line with other essential services, COVID-19 cases working in the funeral sector are not automatically escalated to HPTs. If contact tracing results in staffing levels, due to high numbers of staff being asked to self-isolate, that jeopardise the continued functioning of their essential service then the employers are advised to discuss with the local HPT who can review the risk assessment in this light

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether frontline staff working in the funeral industry will be considered as a priority group to receive vaccination against COVID-19.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who provide advice to Government on which vaccine(s) the United Kingdom should use, and which groups to prioritise. Whilst there is a desire for the whole UK population to be vaccinated, there may need to be an element of prioritisation - based on availability, evidence on safety and efficacy in different population groups and constraints in supply.

The committee – in their interim advice - have advised that for Phase 1, the vaccine first be given to care home residents and staff, followed by people over 80 and health and social workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and clinical risk factors in the initial phase. We will consider the Committee’s advice carefully as further data emerges in preparation for Phase 2 including for critical workers in other essential sectors. Our vaccination programmes are led by the latest scientific evidence and we expect the Committee’s advice to develop as more evidence is gathered.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allocate frontline funeral workers key worker or equivalent status to enable them access to regular COVID-19 testing.

It is for local authorities to decide where to introduce testing in their areas and which cohorts testing will cover, including funeral workers. In addition to local authorities, NHS Test and Trace will also work closely with other Government departments to increase workplace testing for medium and large organisations within their sectors.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure the supply of radioactive isotopes and radioactive sources for cancer services after 31 December.

Our priority is to ensure that patients continue to have access to the medical products they need, including medical radioisotopes. We continue to work closely with industry, the National Health Service and others in the supply chain to deliver the shared goal of continuity of safe patient care by mitigating any potential disruption to supply into the United Kingdom of medical products at the end of the transition period

As set out in a letter from the Department to industry of 3 August, we are implementing a multi-layered approach, that involves asking suppliers of medicines and medical products, including medical radioisotopes to the UK from or via the European Union to get trader ready, reroute their supply chains away from any potential disruption and stockpiling to a target level of six weeks on UK soil where this is possible.

We understand that a flexible approach to preparedness may be required for medicines that cannot be stockpiled, such as some medical radioisotopes. We have asked suppliers of those products to use airfreight, which some suppliers are already doing now.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure the timely (1) supply, and (2) transit, of replacement radiotherapy machine parts into the UK following 31 December.

The Department, in consultation with the devolved administrations and Crown Dependencies, is working with trade bodies, product suppliers, and the health and care system to make detailed plans to help ensure continued supply of medicines, medical products and equipment to the whole of the United Kingdom at the end of the transition period.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of complications that occur as a result of non-surgical cosmetic treatments in the UK; and what are the annual costs to the NHS in England of correcting such complications.

The Government is committed to improving the safety of cosmetic procedures through better training for practitioners and clear information so that people can make informed decisions about their care.

Neither the Department nor its arm’s length bodies hold or collect data on non-surgical aesthetic treatments. Officials continue to work with stakeholders to explore the options for enhanced data collection and reporting mechanisms in this area. This could include the prevalence of cosmetic procedures, adverse reactions to procedures, and the incidence of consumers seeking treatment through NHS services for health complications following private cosmetic procedures.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to verify that all practitioners providing (1) special treatments, and (2) other non-surgical cosmetic treatments, are taking suitable control measures to prevent and control the transmission of (a) COVID-19, and (b) other infections.

The Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982 gives local authorities powers to regulate the hygiene and cleanliness of the practice of businesses providing special treatments. Local authorities also have general enforcement powers under health and safety at work legislation if they judge that there is a risk to customers’ health and safety.

Providers of aesthetic services should ensure they have taken the necessary steps to become COVID-19 secure in line with health and safety legislation and Government guidance on close contact services and working in other people’s homes. Where applicable, practitioners should also take into account any guidance issued by the healthcare regulators or a relevant professional body.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further (1) to reports of overcrowding in accident and emergency departments, and (2) to the COVID-19 pandemic, what action they are taking with NHS England (a) to increase the availability of acute hospital beds for those patients needing admission, and (b) to decrease overcrowding in such departments.

£150 million capital funding has just been awarded to expand and upgrade 25 more accident and emergency departments (A&Es), to reduce overcrowding and improve infection control ahead of winter. This is on top of the £300 million we announced recently, to upgrade A&Es across 117 trusts, bringing total funding to £450 million. This funding will expand waiting areas and increase the number of treatment cubicles, helping boost A&E capacity by providing additional space and reducing overcrowding.

In addition to this, the Prime Minister has announced £3 billion of extra National Health Service funding, which includes plans to maintain the use of the Nightingale hospitals, continue access to independent hospitals capacity and improve hospital discharge arrangements.

Plans are also in place for a significantly expanded influenza vaccination programme and the introduction of the NHS 111 First model which both should help prevent visits to A&E. Overall, these measures will help increase capacity in the NHS and prevent overcrowding.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of smartphones currently in circulation in the UK which are fully functional with (1) the NHSX COVID-19 contact tracing application, and (2) the new contact tracing application currently under development that uses the Google and Apple exposure notification application programming interface.

The NHS Test and Trace app which is currently being trialled will require smartphones to be running Apple iOS 13.5 and above or Android Marshmallow 6.0 and above. Estimates show that 82% of Apple smartphones and 91% of Android smartphones in the United Kingdom run or are capable of running these versions.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for (1) the NHSX COVID-19 contact tracing application, and (2) the new contact tracing application currently under development that uses the Google and Apple exposure notification application programming interface.

The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) is a value between 0 and 1 which allows for a comparative analysis of different classification systems. In the context of a contact tracing app, it is the probability that the app is able to correctly discriminate between risky and non-risky encounters where an encounter is classed as being with a user that has tested positive for COVID-19.

AUC values are based on modelling assumptions and, due to practical experimental limitations, are subject to uncertainty. A value of greater than 0.8 is generally considered by the scientific community to be ‘good or excellent’.

The new NHS Test and Trace app is estimated to have an AUC which improves on that achieved for the original NHSX COVID-19 contact tracing app and, with the implementation of further enhancements to the risk calculation and the underlying technology provided by Google and Apple, will have an AUC that would be considered good or excellent.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the studies, published by Trinity College Dublin on 15 and 26 June, which found that the COVID-19 contract tracing application’s performance was “similar to that of triggering notifications by randomly selecting from the participants, regardless of proximity" and that “there is only a weak dependence of detection rate on distance”; and what steps they intend to take in response.

Rigorous testing has been undertaken through the development of the app, including the Isle of Wight pilot and multiple field tests.

We continue to work with and learn from international partners across the world, especially countries which have launched apps using the Apple and Google Exposure Notification framework that Trinity College Dublin tested. We continue to collaborate closely with Apple and Google on refining their application programming interface.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Bethell on 22 June (HL Deb, cols 17–18), (1) when, and (2) where, the record of the governance processes used to inform the decisions to discontinue work on the NHSX COVID-19 application will be published.

The Government does not routinely publish details on the formulation and development of policy, which includes dates and minutes of meetings held.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that any application designed to track people who have been in contact with COVID-19 (1) works on a broad range of mobile phones and operating systems; (2) can send notifications to contacts within minutes of symptoms having been reported; (3) can detect hacking attempts and prevent notifications being sent maliciously; and (4) can apply corrective algorithms to ensure that distance is measured accurately.

We have prioritised security and privacy in all stages of the app’s development starting with the initial design and continuing throughout its implementation and testing. We have been working with experts from the National Cyber Security Centre, our independent Ethics Advisory Board, and security researchers and ethicists from industry.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on NHS services which must be available on a 24 hour basis and which are dependent on a small number of specialist staff, including those working in transfusion services, of the requirement to quarantine for a 14 day period under the COVID-19 track and trace policy; and what steps they are taking to introduce a COVID-19 testing process for any such staff to reduce the time they spend quarantined. [T]

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Testing – note for House of Lords which is attached, due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the survey by the Royal College of Anaesthetists survey which shows low confidence by medical staff in their ability to access necessary testing, personal protective equipment, and anaesthetic drugs; and what steps they are taking to restore the confidence of such staff to resume elective surgery.

Medical staff continue to put themselves at risk every day to care for those affected by the virus. The Government has been clear that those on the frontline will get all the support they need. We will continue to give the National Health Service everything it needs to tackle this outbreak and have central stockpiles of a range of medical products to help ensure the supply to the NHS and care sector.

We continue to work closely with our industry partners, the health and care system and others in the supply chain to ensure these medical products are delivered to the frontline, maintaining confidence and helping minimise any risks to patients and staff.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to announce the timetable for introducing the Liberty Protection Safeguards, which were established in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019.

The Government is acutely aware of the pressures that COVID-19 is exerting on the health and social care sector and will provide an update on the Liberty Protection Safeguards implementation timetable shortly. In the meantime, we are not asking the health and care sector to prioritise implementation work in light of the pandemic.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in view of carbon monoxide poisoning risks in the home, what steps they have taken to (1) raise awareness of the availability of free call-out gas services, (2) ensure that every pregnant woman has a carbon monoxide alarm following the suspension of antenatal screening for carbon monoxide, (3) amend the symptoms algorithm on the NHS 111 line to take account of the fact that symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning can masquerade as those of COVID-19.

The Department does not have a remit for the oversight of gas services or domestic carbon monoxide alarms.

NHS England and NHS Improvement issued guidance to maternity services to pause carbon monoxide testing of pregnant women during COVID-19 pandemic.

NHS 111, through the NHS Pathways system, uses information and symptoms given by the patient to assess what care they need. NHS Pathways does not diagnose but will recommend further action, including referrals, based upon their assessment. If anyone (including pregnant women) presents with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, they would be assessed using the appropriate algorithm based on their symptoms.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to (1) change services to patient care and experience; and (2) invest in the field of multidisciplinary and integrated perioperative care, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 has affected every part of local health and care systems. To respond to the challenge, National Health Service organisations, local councils and others are working across traditional organisational and team boundaries.

The NHS is investigating ways to ‘lock in’ beneficial changes to patient care and experience which have been introduced during the COVID-19 outbreak. These include backing local initiative and flexibility; enhanced local system working; strong clinical leadership; flexible and remote working where appropriate; and rapid scaling of new technology-enabled service delivery options such as a digital-consultations.

Similarly, a full programme of NHS-led work, through Integrated Care Systems and sustainability and transformation partnerships, will aim to join up services and foster multidisciplinary team working, to make perioperative care more responsive and convenient for patients across the full pathway; before, during and after surgery.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many NHS staff had received a negative COVID-19 test result and returned to work by 27 April; and what impact this has had on planned delays to cancer surgeries.

We do not hold information on the number of National Health Service staff who have tested negative for COVID-19 and returned to work as a result of a negative test. If a member of staff tests negative, then they can return to work if they are well enough to do so and should discuss this with their employing organisation.

Essential and urgent cancer treatments are continuing. The NHS is adapting how it runs its cancer services to ensure the safety of both patients and staff – this includes establishing dedicated cancer hubs for urgent treatment and diagnosis.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure there is an adequate supply of medicine, including anaesthetic drugs, to enable urgent cancer surgery to continue during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As part of our concerted national efforts to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak, we are doing everything we can to ensure patients continue to access safe and effective medicines. We are aware there is an increase in demand for a number of intensive care drugs including anaesthetic drugs and we are working with the pharmaceutical industry to make additional supplies available. We are also being ably supported by NHS England and NHS Improvement to ensure all supplies available are managed equitably across the United Kingdom.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has to provide a ‘letter of comfort’ to allow care homes and hospices to reuse medication in an emergency, when prescribed for another resident, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In hospitals, schemes already exist to re-use medicines supplied and maintained under the control of the hospital. Those medicines are under the supervision of health care professionals, such that they can safely be re-supplied against the prescription or direction of an authorised prescriber for another patient where they are no longer needed for the original patient.

Guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for managing medicines in care homes recommends that care home providers must ensure that medicines prescribed for a resident are not used by another resident.

The quality, integrity and safety of medicines are paramount and the best way to assure this is for pharmacies to supply medicines obtained through the regulated supply chain, appropriately labelled for individual patients to be used only by those patients.

However, in the unprecedented COVID-19 situation, consideration is being given by the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement for the use of unwanted medicines in certain specified circumstances, for example, end of life care. It is currently not envisaged that legislative changes will be required to support such a change in practice.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which regulations they intend to waive to allow GPs to re-purpose anticipatory medicines that are unused by patients at home.

In hospitals, schemes already exist to re-use medicines supplied and maintained under the control of the hospital. Those medicines are under the supervision of health care professionals, such that they can safely be re-supplied against the prescription or direction of an authorised prescriber for another patient where they are no longer needed for the original patient.

Guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for managing medicines in care homes recommends that care home providers must ensure that medicines prescribed for a resident are not used by another resident.

The quality, integrity and safety of medicines are paramount and the best way to assure this is for pharmacies to supply medicines obtained through the regulated supply chain, appropriately labelled for individual patients to be used only by those patients.

However, in the unprecedented COVID-19 situation, consideration is being given by the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement for the use of unwanted medicines in certain specified circumstances, for example, end of life care. It is currently not envisaged that legislative changes will be required to support such a change in practice.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow hospices and hospitals to put unused anticipatory medicines into stock if no longer needed for the named patient for whom they were dispensed.

In hospitals, schemes already exist to re-use medicines supplied and maintained under the control of the hospital. Those medicines are under the supervision of health care professionals, such that they can safely be re-supplied against the prescription or direction of an authorised prescriber for another patient where they are no longer needed for the original patient.

Guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for managing medicines in care homes recommends that care home providers must ensure that medicines prescribed for a resident are not used by another resident.

The quality, integrity and safety of medicines are paramount and the best way to assure this is for pharmacies to supply medicines obtained through the regulated supply chain, appropriately labelled for individual patients to be used only by those patients.

However, in the unprecedented COVID-19 situation, consideration is being given by the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement for the use of unwanted medicines in certain specified circumstances, for example, end of life care. It is currently not envisaged that legislative changes will be required to support such a change in practice.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether refugee doctors who are not yet fully registered with the General Medical Council are able to work in the NHS as medical assistants; and if so, (1) what pay grade they are placed on, and (2) whether they are afforded full indemnity, including full vicarious liability indemnity and death in service compensation.

The local employing organisation will decide if refugee doctors who are not registered with the General Medical Council are able to work in the National Health Service. All providers of Care Quality Commission-regulated activity have a duty to ensure that their staff have the skills, knowledge and experience for the work undertaken.

A temporary Medical Support Worker job description has been developed in collaboration with the Chief Medical Officer’s office, designed for doctors who are not registered with the General Medical Council. The NHS Job Evaluation Scheme, which helps to ensure staff receive equal pay for work of equal value, has evaluated this job as band 6, meaning a basic salary of £31,365 to £37,890. Enhancements may also be paid for working unsocial hours.

Indemnity for individuals employed or engaged to work for an NHS trust will be covered by the Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts and if they are engaged by a general practitioner (GP) practice providing NHS GP services, they will be covered by the Clinical Negligence Scheme for General Practice. To ensure there are no gaps in indemnity coverage for NHS staff, the Coronavirus Act 2020 provides additional powers to provide clinical negligence indemnity for NHS activities related to the COVID-19 outbreak, where there is no other indemnity arrangement in place. Information about death in service compensation is yet to be confirmed.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many doctors who were refugees have been registered with the General Medical Council in each of the last three years.

The General Medical Council (GMC) does not hold information on the total number of refugees or former refugees that are on the medical register.

The following figures are based on doctors who declared their refugee status to the GMC.

2017

23

2018

30

2019

48

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many non-smoking pregnant women, who have their carbon monoxide levels routinely monitored, have been found to have raised levels of carbon monoxide.

This information is not held centrally.

4th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the extension of the paid benefits of the Job Retention Scheme following the announcement of the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (No.4) Regulations 2020, will be fully backdated to 23 October for Wales.

The CJRS has been available in Wales throughout the pandemic. Eligible employers in Wales would have been able to furlough their employees in October and furloughed employees will have received at least 80% of their wages. The CJRS, which was recently extended to the end of March 2021, has always been available UK-wide and all changes to the scheme apply UK-wide, as they have done throughout the pandemic.

To further support the whole UK, the Chancellor recently announced an increase of £2 billion to the upfront guaranteed funding for the devolved administrations. For Wales, this means an increase to £5 billion of support on top of their Spring Budget funding.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications were received from NHS doctors to bring their dependents to the UK; and how many of those were (1) granted, and (2) declined, in each year since 2012.

The Home Office does not collate this data in an accessible way or publish the information requested.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people qualified for asylum in the UK in each of the last three years; and how many of those people were known to be qualified doctors.

The Home Office does not record the number of those that have been granted asylum in the UK over the past three years that are known to be qualified

Doctors.

The Home Office publishes a range of data on asylum seekers and refugees in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. The number of asylum grants for the last three years is within the table below and can be found in table ASY_02a of the published Immigration statistics

www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2019/list-of-tables#asylum-and-resettlement

2017

2018

2019

Total grants

6,779

6,931

10,804

Asylum

5,957

5,557

9,404

Humanitarian Protection

146

582

642

Discretionary Leave

84

104

71

UASC Leave

417

344

181

Other Grants

175

344

506

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all mortgage repayments and interest payments for leasehold flats with unsafe cladding purchased under the Help to Buy Scheme have been reset to zero for those properties now valued at zero; and whether all such repayments since the Grenfell Tower fire have been reimbursed.

As at June 2020 NAO reported that Homes England estimates that 274 homes bought under the Help to Buy: Equity Loan scheme were affected by ACM cladding, based on a comparison of Departmental building safety data and the Homes England Help to Buy loan accounts. Of these, 170 homes across 28 buildings have live loan accounts, with the remaining 104 homes having redeemed their loan.

The redemption value of all Help to Buy: Equity Loans is based on the current market value of the property. A RICS surveyor will assess the market value in accordance with terms set out in the loan agreement.

Homes England report that most of the buildings with live Help to Buy loans are well on the way to being fully remediated and therefore the progress made in building remediation means the consistent enforcement of the mortgage continues to be reasonable.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the maximum level of fine they can impose on freeholders of flat blocks where dangerous cladding has not been removed; and how many such fines have been imposed since the Grenfell Tower Inquiry started.

Government itself cannot impose fines but where building owners are failing to make acceptable progress in removing unsafe cladding then they should expect enforcement action by local authorities or Fire and Rescue Authorities. We have established a Joint Inspection Team to support local authorities in taking enforcement action where building owners are refusing to remediate high-rise buildings with unsafe cladding or are not making acceptable progress. Local authorities have a duty to take enforcement action under the Housing Act 2004 if they find the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards on residential premises and failure to comply with this can result in a financial penalty of up to £30,000 or prosecution in the Magistrates’ Court, which may result in a unlimited fine on conviction.

The Fire Safety Bill will also clarify that the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (the ‘Fire Safety Order’) applies to external wall systems and will put beyond doubt that Fire and Rescue Authorities can enforce against and where necessary, pursue prosecution if Responsible Persons or those otherwise responsible under the Fire Safety Order fail to take appropriate fire safety measures with regards to unsafe cladding in multi-occupied residential buildings. The highest financial penalty that can be imposed for non-compliance with the Fire Safety Order is an unlimited fine. It is for the Court to decide on a case-by-case basis what financial penalty should be allocated. Details of enforcement action taken or being taken by local authorities and Fire and Rescue Authorities in regard to the buildings with unsafe Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) cladding can be found on the Building Safety Programme Monthly Data Release which is available (attached) at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/aluminium-composite-material-cladding#acm-remediation-data .

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)