Baroness Hoey Portrait

Baroness Hoey

Non-affiliated - Vauxhall

Became Member: 14th September 2020


Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
European Scrutiny Committee
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
European Scrutiny Committee
15th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
9th Nov 2007 - 30th Mar 2015
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
1st Mar 2004 - 17th Jul 2005
Science and Technology Committee
1st Mar 2004 - 17th Jul 2005
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
1st Mar 2004 - 17th Jul 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of National Heritage) (Sport)
29th Jul 1999 - 7th Jun 2001
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Jul 1998 - 29th Jul 1999
Social Security
27th Jun 1994 - 21st Mar 1997
Shadow Spokesperson (Women)
1st Jun 1992 - 1st Jun 1993


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Hoey has voted in 253 divisions, and 13 times against the majority of their Party.

18 Oct 2023 - Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 9 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 204
18 Oct 2023 - Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 10 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 209
23 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Non-affiliated No votes vs 7 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 218
23 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Non-affiliated No votes vs 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 199
16 Jan 2024 - Trade (Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership) Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Non-affiliated Aye votes vs 4 Non-affiliated No votes
Tally: Ayes - 102 Noes - 212
6 Feb 2024 - Electoral Commission Strategy and Policy Statement - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Non-affiliated No votes vs 5 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 175 Noes - 159
6 Feb 2024 - Automated Vehicles Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Non-affiliated No votes vs 4 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 204
4 Mar 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 171
4 Mar 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 180
4 Mar 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 167
4 Mar 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 6 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 169
11 Mar 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Non-affiliated No votes vs 5 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 192
14 May 2024 - Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Hoey voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Non-affiliated No votes vs 7 Non-affiliated Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 228 Noes - 213
View All Baroness Hoey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Frost (Conservative)
(19 debate interactions)
Lord Caine (Conservative)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Northern Ireland Office
(58 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(23 debate contributions)
Home Office
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Baroness Hoey's debates

Lords initiatives


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
19th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that (1) tennis clubs in Northern Ireland can participate in British tennis, and (2) tennis clubs can affiliate to both Tennis Ireland and the Lawn Tennis Association if they wish.

The Lawn Tennis Association is the internationally recognised governing body for tennis in Great Britain, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. Tennis Ireland is the internationally recognised governing body for tennis in the Republic of Ireland and also has the responsibility for promoting and supporting tennis in Northern Ireland.

It is not currently possible for a club to be affiliated to both Tennis Ireland and the Lawn Tennis Association. If a club in Northern Ireland wished to affiliate to the Lawn Tennis Association, that would be a matter for such a club to raise with the LTA directly. Dual affiliation would be a matter for each national governing body, and the International Tennis Federation, to agree.

10th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they had with the Crown Prosecution Service prior to the domestic abuse guidance, published on 5 December 2022, which states that a spouse who withholds money from their partner for gender transitioning may be committing domestic abuse.

As part of their independent functions the CPS periodically issue guidance to aid their prosecutors. The publication of the domestic abuse guidance came following a CPS run public consultation that was widely publicised through Government departments, Police and Crime Commissioners, Domestic Abuse and Victims’ Commissioners, and the public. A full consultation response can be found on the CPS website. As a courtesy, the CPS forwarded a copy of the guidance to the Attorney General’s Office at the time of publication in December 2022. No substantive discussions were held.

28th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of written statements made in a case by the Crown Prosecution Service that the Bible contains references "which are simply no longer appropriate in modern society and which would be deemed offensive if stated in public".

The Wessex Area of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has undertaken a post-case review and acknowledges that the statement was inappropriate. The statement was not intended to and does not represent a change to published CPS Policy. It is not indicative of a general approach by the CPS to cases involving the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and the right to freedom of expression. As a result of the post-case review, in future, where skeleton arguments are ordered, in cases where there is scope for argument to arise as to rights such as that of freedom of expression, such arguments will be submitted to the Senior District Crown Prosecutor for signing off, prior to service.

20th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether the new EU law on protection of geographical indications for craft and industrial products will be introduced in Northern Ireland under the Windsor Framework via Article 13(4)(a), following the applicability motion on 19 March which did not gain cross-community consent.

It is welcome that the restoration of the devolved institutions allows for the exercise of the democratic scrutiny mechanisms that have been put in place. Following the applicability motion on 19 March, the duties under Schedule 6B of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 apply. The Government will determine and set out its approach to Parliament in the usual way, respecting the statutory framework in full.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
1st Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether checks are still made on goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland via the UK Internal Market Scheme.

As set out in the Safeguarding the Union Command Paper, the internal market system will ensure the smooth flow of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for internal UK trade. In line with the Government’s commitments since 2021, these arrangements establish individual schemes that can be used only by UK internal market traders, to preserve those benefits for UK traders and to maintain the smooth flow of that trade. Checks on internal UK movements under the schemes will be removed except those conducted by UK authorities and required as part of a risk-based or intelligence-led approach to tackle criminality, abuse of the schemes, smuggling and disease risks. We will set out further information on the transition to these new arrangements shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
1st Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to introduce legislation to ensure “zero checks and zero customs paperwork” for goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland via the UK Internal Market Scheme; and if so, when.

As set out in the Safeguarding the Union Command Paper, the internal market system will ensure the smooth flow of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for internal UK trade. In line with the Government’s commitments since 2021, these arrangements establish individual schemes that can be used only by UK internal market traders, to preserve those benefits for UK traders and to maintain the smooth flow of that trade. Checks on internal UK movements under the schemes will be removed except those conducted by UK authorities and required as part of a risk-based or intelligence-led approach to tackle criminality, abuse of the schemes, smuggling and disease risks. We will set out further information on the transition to these new arrangements shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether a matter vetoed under the operation of the Stormont Brake and not subsequently agreed by the UK–EU Joint Committee may be brought to international arbitration; and whether the UK has committed to accepting such a decision as final.

It is correct to note that the Stormont Brake safeguard is not subject to any ECJ oversight, and any dispute on this issue would be resolved through subsequent independent arbitration according to international, not EU, law.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when all (1) checks, and (2) paperwork, will cease to be required for goods moving via the UK Internal Market Scheme.

As set out in the Safeguarding the Union Command Paper, the internal market system will ensure the smooth flow of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for internal UK trade. In line with the Government’s commitments since 2021, these arrangements establish individual schemes that can be used only by UK internal market traders, to preserve those benefits for UK traders and to maintain the smooth flow of that trade. Checks on Internal UK movements under the schemes will be removed except those conducted by UK authorities and required as part of a risk-based or intelligence-led approach to tackle criminality, abuse of the schemes, smuggling and disease risks. We will set out further information on the transition to these new arrangements shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the 2021 census, (1) how were the cisgender and transgender individuals who took part in ONS qualitative research on gender identity conducted in 2017 selected; (2) what percentage of transgender individuals participated in the (a) 2019 census rehearsal and (b) 2021 census; (3) which local authority areas were chosen for the rehearsal; and (4) what assessment they have made of census data relating to high levels of trans-identified individuals in areas of England and Wales with high minority ethnic populations.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Baroness Hoey

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

14 November 2023

Dear Baroness Hoey,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking (1) how the cisgender and transgender individuals who took part in Office for National Statistics (ONS) qualitative research on gender identity, conducted in 2017, were selected; (2) what percentage of transgender individuals participated in the (a) 2019 census rehearsal and (b) 2021 census; (3) which local authority areas were chosen for the rehearsal; and (4) what assessment has been made of census data relating to high levels of trans-identified individuals in areas of England and Wales with high minority ethnic populations (HL38).

Census 2021 was the first census in England and Wales to collect data on people's gender identity. The census asked a voluntary question on gender identity of people aged 16 and over and this data was first published in January 2023.

On 8 November 2023, the ONS published an article titled ‘Quality of Census 2021 gender identity data’ [1]. This is the result of its investigation into the quality of census gender identity data after some unexpected patterns were identified. It included looking at patterns of trans identification by ethnic group, country of birth and proficiency in English. These patterns can offer some insight into the last aspect of your question relating to the level of trans-identified individuals in England and Wales with high minority ethnic populations.

Gender identity question development

As with all census questions, the gender identity question went through a detailed process of development and testing. This evaluated three core designs as described in detail in our 2020 publication ‘Sex and gender identity question development for Census 2021’ [2]. As set out in Annex 2 of that report, the testing activities conducted for this topic included:

  • qualitative research involving both trans participants and those whose gender identity is the same as their sex registered at birth (cisgender)

  • quantitative research through five online and multi-modal surveys with a range of respondents

  • inclusion in the 2019 Census Rehearsal

Your questions relating to specific testing within that process are addressed below

Participants in qualitative testing in 2017

In 2017, we carried out two sets of qualitative testing as part of the development of the gender identity question. In March and April 2017, we carried out exploratory cognitive interviews and focus groups, this testing is referred to as 2017:6 in annex 2 [2] and in the summary of testing for Census 2021 which includes further information [3]. We included cisgender (female and male), transgender, and intersex participants, as well as people with a transgender person in their family. We also made sure we involved people of different ages, education levels, ethnicities, and household types. Transgender participants were recruited through the following sources:

  • Various trans organisations and contacts.

  • Respondents to the ONS’s Opinions and Lifestyle Survey who had given permission for ONS to contact them again for future research.

  • Follow-up contact with volunteers from previous research.

  • Through a request for volunteers with the required characteristics among family, friends, and other contacts of ONS staff (the participants did not include ONS staff themselves).

In August and September 2017, we carried out further cognitive interviews with cisgender and transgender participants (2017:15) [2] . Transgender participants were recruited through various trans organisations and follow-up contact with people who had responded to recruitment for the earlier research but weren’t interviewed at that time. Cisgender participants were recruited through the research team’s register of participants in previous research on other topics, who had given permission for ONS to contact them again for future research.

The 2019 Census Rehearsal

The 2019 Census Rehearsal took place in four local authority areas: Carlisle, Ceredigion, Hackney, and Tower Hamlets. These locations were selected so that we could rehearse in different types of areas. The Rehearsal tested our preparations, our operational processes and systems, our digital platform, our engagement and communications strategies and the Census Coverage Survey, as part of our preparations for Census 2021. It was not designed to collect representative data, but to test, evaluate and gather feedback on our preparations. The overall response rate for this voluntary survey was therefore lower than for Census 2021, particularly for communal establishments such as student halls of residence.

The gender identity question was voluntary in Census 2021 and was clearly marked as voluntary in the questionnaire for both the census and the 2019 Rehearsal. In the Rehearsal, 0.3% of respondents aged 16 and over answered ‘No’ to the gender identity question, reporting that their gender identity was different to their sex registered at birth. In Census 2021, 0.5% of respondents answered ‘No’ to the gender identity question; 6% of census respondents gave no answer to the question.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/qualityofcensus2021genderidentitydata

[2] https://www.ons.gov.uk/census/censustransformationprogramme/questiondevelopment/sexandgenderidentityquestiondevelopmentforcensus2021

[3] https://www.ons.gov.uk/census/censustransformationprogramme/questiondevelopment/summaryoftestingforcensus2021

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many excess deaths there have been in England and Wales in each quarter since 1 January 2020; what were the totals in the years (1) 2020, (2) 2021, (3) 2022, and (4) 2023 to date; and what proportion of deaths where COVID-19 is mentioned on the death certificate have been (a) male, and (b) female.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Baroness Hoey

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

14 November 2023

Dear Baroness Hoey,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many excess deaths there have been in England and Wales in each quarter since 1 January 2020; what were the totals in the years (1) 2020, (2) 2021, (3) 2022, and (4) 2023 to date; and what proportion of deaths where COVID-19 is mentioned on the death certificate have been (a) male, and (b) female (HL36).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Table 1 provides information on excess deaths by quarter in England and Wales. It also provides the age-standardised mortality rate (ASMR) by quarter which is a weighted average of the age-specific mortality rate per 100,000 people. This takes into account the population size and age structure which means comparisons between populations that may contain different proportions of people of different ages can be made.

Table 2 provides information on deaths involving COVID-19 by sex.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number and proportions of excess deaths by quarter, 2020 to 2023 [1] [2] [3]

Year

Quarter

Deaths

ASMR

Five-year average deaths

Five-year average ASMR

Excess deaths

Percentage excess deaths

Percentage excess ASMR

2020

1

150077

1045.2

151931

1120.6

-1854

-1.2

-6.7

2020

2

183118

1271.1

127709

928.9

55409

43.4

36.8

2020

3

120456

826.9

119446

855.6

1010

0.8

-3.3

2020

4

154271

1059.1

132992

948.8

21279

16.0

11.6

2021

1

180673

1266.2

151931

1120.6

28742

18.9

13

2021

2

120663

836.5

127709

928.9

-7046

-5.5

-10

2021

3

134035

914.6

119446

855.6

14589

12.2

6.9

2021

4

150963

1019.1

132992

948.8

17971

13.5

7.4

2022

1

148514

1013.3

156965

1137.7

-8451

-5.4

-10.9

2022

2

138818

926.3

126521

905.1

12297

9.7

2.3

2022

3

137700

902.5

122596

863.6

15104

12.3

4.5

2022

4

152136

991.8

137332

962.2

14804

10.8

3.1

2023

1

171371

1136

158239

1126.3

13132

8.3

0.9

2023

2

139277

909.2

128234

898

11043

8.6

1.2

2023

3

128711

827.9

126109

869

2602

2.1

-4.7

Source: Office for National Statistics

Table 2: Number and proportions of deaths involving COVID-19 by quarter, 2020 to 2023 [1] [2] [3] [4]

Year

Quarter

Deaths

Male (Deaths)

Female (Deaths)

Male (%)

Female (%)

2020

1

1734

1054

680

60.8

39.2

2020

2

48580

26638

21942

54.8

45.2

2020

3

2770

1552

1218

56

44

2020

4

28711

16003

12708

55.7

44.3

2021

1

56418

29836

26582

52.9

47.1

2021

2

2670

1567

1103

58.7

41.3

2021

3

7696

4504

3192

58.5

41.5

2021

4

10943

6392

4551

58.4

41.6

2022

1

12875

7186

5689

55.8

44.2

2022

2

8369

4472

3897

53.4

46.6

2022

3

6756

3648

3108

54

46

2022

4

6344

3394

2950

53.5

46.5

2023

1

7978

4118

3860

51.6

48.4

2023

2

4246

2355

1891

55.5

44.5

2023

3

2053

1241

812

60.4

39.6

Source: Office for National Statistics

[1] Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring, in each period.

[2] Figures include deaths of non-residents.

[3] Figures for 2023 are based on provisional data.

[4] The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10) codes for COVID-19 are U07.1, U07.2, U09.9, U10.9

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Caine on 7 November 2022 (HL Deb col 530), what assessment they have made of the compatibility of Article VI of the Union of Ireland Act 1800 with the green and red lane system in the Windsor Framework.

We published our legal position when the Windsor Framework was agreed. This provided the Government's assessment that the Framework respects the Acts of Union.

We understand that the Acts of Union are of fundamental importance, reflecting Northern Ireland’s constitutional position in the United Kingdom.

We remain fully committed to Northern Ireland’s place in the Union and believe that it is best safeguarded by a fully functioning devolved government.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government to which events to mark the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, and proclamation events to mark the accession of His Majesty King Charles III that they were responsible for organising, members of the Northern Ireland Judiciary were invited; and (1) which events they attended, and (2) who was in attendance from this group in each case.

The Lady Chief Justice of Northern Ireland, The Rt Hon. Dame Siobhan Keegan DBE KC was the member of the Northern Ireland Judiciary invited to events to mark the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and proclamation events to mark the accession of His Majesty King Charles III, for which the organisational responsibility was with HMG.

The Lady Chief Justice attended the Accession Council. The Lady Chief Justice was invited to the Proclamation at Hillsborough Castle and was invited to and attended the Service of Reflection at St Anne’s Cathedral, Belfast.

The Royal Household had responsibility for the guest list for the State Funeral of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. HMG provided support in coordinating certain elements of the guest list.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Supreme Court judgment on R v Adams 2020, whether they plan to legislate to restore the Carltona Principle which provides that acts of government officials are synonymous with acts of a Secretary of State; and if so, when.

The Government believes that lack of clarity on when the Carltona principle applies is unhelpful. We are not currently planning to legislate on this issue but we are continuing to keep the impact of the judgement in R v Adams, and options for responding, under careful review.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which outside contractors are used by departments to book international travel.

This information is not held centrally.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) which departments use Capita to book international travel, and (2) what has been the cost of using Capita to book international travel for (a) Ministers, and (b) civil servants.

This information is not held centrally.

Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are aware of any arrests in the Republic of Ireland for the sale of British sausages.

Northern Ireland is an integral part of the United Kingdom, and its consumers should be able to enjoy products they have bought from Great Britain. Our biosecurity standards remain as high as they always have done, and these goods remain entirely safe for NI consumers to enjoy. The Government has seen no evidence of chilled meats moved from Great Britain finding their way onto the EU market.

We welcome the fact that we have been able to agree an extension of the grace period on chilled meats moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This means that Northern Ireland consumers will be able to continue to buy chilled meat products from Great Britain, and allows for further discussions to continue on a permanent solution without requiring the UK to dynamically align with EU rules.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are aware of any criminal operations to disguise the origin of sausages intended for sale in Northern Ireland in order to sell them in the Republic of Ireland.

Northern Ireland is an integral part of the United Kingdom, and its consumers should be able to enjoy products they have bought from Great Britain. Our biosecurity standards remain as high as they always have done, and these goods remain entirely safe for NI consumers to enjoy. The Government has seen no evidence of chilled meats moved from Great Britain finding their way onto the EU market.

We welcome the fact that we have been able to agree an extension of the grace period on chilled meats moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This means that Northern Ireland consumers will be able to continue to buy chilled meat products from Great Britain, and allows for further discussions to continue on a permanent solution without requiring the UK to dynamically align with EU rules.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received notification from the government of Ireland that sausages intended for sale in Northern Ireland are being sold in the Republic of Ireland.

Northern Ireland is an integral part of the United Kingdom, and its consumers should be able to enjoy products they have bought from Great Britain. Our biosecurity standards remain as high as they always have done, and these goods remain entirely safe for NI consumers to enjoy. The Government has seen no evidence of chilled meats moved from Great Britain finding their way onto the EU market.

We welcome the fact that we have been able to agree an extension of the grace period on chilled meats moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This means that Northern Ireland consumers will be able to continue to buy chilled meat products from Great Britain, and allows for further discussions to continue on a permanent solution without requiring the UK to dynamically align with EU rules.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made an assessment of the number of British sausages which have been smuggled from Northern Ireland into the Republic of Ireland since 1 January.

Northern Ireland is an integral part of the United Kingdom, and its consumers should be able to enjoy products they have bought from Great Britain. Our biosecurity standards remain as high as they always have done, and these goods remain entirely safe for NI consumers to enjoy. The Government has seen no evidence of chilled meats moved from Great Britain finding their way onto the EU market.

We welcome the fact that we have been able to agree an extension of the grace period on chilled meats moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This means that Northern Ireland consumers will be able to continue to buy chilled meat products from Great Britain, and allows for further discussions to continue on a permanent solution without requiring the UK to dynamically align with EU rules.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what prevents the temporary provision allowing sausages to be moved from Great Britain to Northern Ireland under the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland from being made permanent.

Northern Ireland is an integral part of the United Kingdom, and its consumers should be able to enjoy products they have bought from Great Britain. Our biosecurity standards remain as high as they always have done, and these goods remain entirely safe for NI consumers to enjoy. The Government has seen no evidence of chilled meats moved from Great Britain finding their way onto the EU market.

We welcome the fact that we have been able to agree an extension of the grace period on chilled meats moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland. This means that Northern Ireland consumers will be able to continue to buy chilled meat products from Great Britain, and allows for further discussions to continue on a permanent solution without requiring the UK to dynamically align with EU rules.

14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland, how they define unfettered market access for goods moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

I refer the noble Lady to the answer given to PQHL11816.

As set out on gov.uk, and in the Government's December Command Paper, our unfettered access policy will mean that Northern Ireland businesses can continue to move their goods from Northern Ireland to Great Britain, and place them on the whole UK market, without new barriers being put in place. That is given full effect through our phased approach. In the first phase, which has been operating since 1 January, goods moving directly from Northern Ireland directly to Great Britain will benefit from unfettered access. There will be no new checks or controls on those movements. And even where goods move indirectly via Ireland, there will be no tariffs on those movements. This will be followed up with a second phase over the course of 2021 which will focus the benefits of unfettered access specifically on genuine Northern Ireland businesses. Alongside that, the UK Internal Market Act 2020 ensures that those businesses will continue to place those goods on the GB market.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they define (1) a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and (2) a hard border between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

As set out on gov.uk, and in the Government's December Command Paper, our unfettered access policy will mean that Northern Ireland businesses can continue to move their goods from Northern Ireland to Great Britain, and place them on the whole UK market, without new barriers being put in place. That is given full effect through our phased approach. In the first phase, which has been operating since 1 January, goods moving directly from Northern Ireland directly to Great Britain will benefit from unfettered access. There will be no new checks or controls on those movements. And even where goods move indirectly via Ireland, there will be no tariffs on those movements. This will be followed up with a second phase over the course of 2021 which will focus the benefits of unfettered access specifically on genuine Northern Ireland businesses. Alongside that, the UK Internal Market Act 2020 ensures that those businesses will continue to place those goods on the GB market.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland, how they define "unfettered market access for goods moving from Northern Ireland to other parts of the United Kingdom's internal market."

As set out on gov.uk, and in the Government's December Command Paper, our unfettered access policy will mean that Northern Ireland businesses can continue to move their goods from Northern Ireland to Great Britain, and place them on the whole UK market, without new barriers being put in place. That is given full effect through our phased approach. In the first phase, which has been operating since 1 January, goods moving directly from Northern Ireland directly to Great Britain will benefit from unfettered access. There will be no new checks or controls on those movements. And even where goods move indirectly via Ireland, there will be no tariffs on those movements. This will be followed up with a second phase over the course of 2021 which will focus the benefits of unfettered access specifically on genuine Northern Ireland businesses. Alongside that, the UK Internal Market Act 2020 ensures that those businesses will continue to place those goods on the GB market.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of civil servants are currently working from home.

The information on Civil Servants currently working from home is not held centrally.

Civil Servants are required to follow the local COVID measures wherever they are deployed throughout the UK. Where staff are able to work from home effectively they are doing so and Civil Servants working in essential services will continue to go into our COVID secure workplaces where necessary.

During September we collected data weekly; the number of employees working in the workplace in the London area for some or all of their working patterns were 27,724 individuals by the end of the month. Moving to a monthly collection period from October, workplace attendance increased to 33,151.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants worked from an office in London during September and October.

The information on Civil Servants currently working from home is not held centrally.

Civil Servants are required to follow the local COVID measures wherever they are deployed throughout the UK. Where staff are able to work from home effectively they are doing so and Civil Servants working in essential services will continue to go into our COVID secure workplaces where necessary.

During September we collected data weekly; the number of employees working in the workplace in the London area for some or all of their working patterns were 27,724 individuals by the end of the month. Moving to a monthly collection period from October, workplace attendance increased to 33,151.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
28th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the amount of drone equipment and heavy machinery going from the UK to Armenia, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan which is then sent on to Russia.

HMG has sanctioned every item that Ukraine has found Russia using on the battlefield to date. This includes goods that could be used for drones and heavy machinery.

We maintain a Common High Priority List (CHPL) of items critical to the Russian military, to thwart attempts to circumvent sanctions through third countries.

We continue to engage with relevant countries and monitor our exports for signs of circumvention, to do everything we can to ensure that sanctioned UK technologies do not make it to Russia.

13th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government who are the members of the statutory inquiry established to investigate the Post Office Horizon scandal; and who chairs that inquiry.

The Post Office Horizon IT Inquiry is chaired by Sir Wyn Williams FLSW, a former High Court judge, who is supported by an Inquiry team including counsel, solicitors, assessors, and the Secretariat.

The statutory roles to the Inquiry which support the Chair are Counsel to the Inquiry (Jason Beer, KC), Solicitor to the Inquiry (Segun Jide) and Secretary to the Inquiry (Leila Pilgrim). There are two assessors to the Inquiry (Erika Eliasson-Norris and David Page) who have been appointed to provide advice to the Chairman on their area of relevant expertise regarding the Inquiry.

18th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the National Federation of SubPostmasters concerning the removal of DVLA services from Post Offices.

The Department for Business and Trade (DBT) meets with the National Federation of SubPostmasters (NFSP) regularly, both at official and at ministerial level. The NFSP have raised their concerns at the potential future removal of DVLA services from Post Office branches at these meetings, and officials have ensured these concerns are highlighted at Ministerial level and with Post Office Limited. The contract negotiations themselves represent a commercial matter between DVLA and Post Office.

16th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to using the Export Control Act 2002 to filter unsuitable items crossing from Northern Ireland into the Republic of Ireland to prevent a border in the Irish Sea.

The Export Control Act 2002 provides the legal basis for our export control legislation on military and certain dual-use goods. Military list items and certain dual-use items specified within the European Union (EU) Dual-use Regulation (“the Dual-use Regulation”), require an export licence for export from Northern Ireland to Ireland. Export licence applications for these items would be assessed against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, which is statutory guidance issued by the Secretary of State and laid before Parliament under section 9 of the Export Control Act 2002. We would not issue an export licence in response to an application where to do so would be inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria. Unless specified within Annex IV of the Dual-use Regulation, dual-use items exported from Northern Ireland to Ireland would not require a licence.

The Windsor Framework ensures the free flow of trade from Great Britain to Northern Ireland through a new green lane, removing unacceptable customs processes. The only checks conducted will be risk-based to target smuggling or criminality in the green lane, highly-controlled goods, or any goods bound for the EU in the red lane.

16th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Royal Mail Stamp Swap Out scheme; and what assessment they have made of the cost of that scheme so far.

The development of stamp products is an operational matter for Royal Mail. The Government is not involved in the operational or commercial decisions of Royal Mail, a private business.

8th Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether the Future Fund refused an application from Fly Atlantic; and if so, what were the reasons for doing so.

The Future Fund launched on 20 May 2020 and closed to new applications on 31 January 2021. The total number of applications received was 1,851. The scheme was open to all companies that met the eligibility criteria published on the British Business Bank’s website and passed the necessary checks. As it was a rules-based scheme, there was no assessment by the Future Fund of individual investments. The British Business Bank publishes the names of all companies in which the Future Fund retains an equity interest. The identity of applicants who did not meet the eligibility criteria is not made public.

25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how much funding has been allocated by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) Councils in the last five years to (1) legacy, and (2) legal projects, in Northern Ireland which involve (a) transitional justice, (b) dealing with the past, (c) human rights, and (d) amnesties; which (i) university departments, and (ii) non-academic project partners, have benefited, and by how much; and how a variety of political views has been maintained in the funding allocation.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) funding is allocated according to research excellence as assessed by independent peer review. UKRI fund a number of projects in Northern Ireland but do not hold data in the requested format.

13th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether any retained EU law will still apply to Northern Ireland after the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill is enacted.

The Bill will continue to uphold the UK Government’s commitments to complying with its international obligations. Accordingly, it will ensure that any retained EU law required to maintain our international obligations will continue to be implemented, including the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The Bill is UK-wide in its territorial extent. Therefore, the key measures in the Bill will apply to the devolved governments, including the powers.

14th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which parts of the Subsidy Control Bill are not intended to apply to Northern Ireland because of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

Clause 48(2)(a) provides that the subsidy control requirements contained in the Bill do not apply to subsidies given, or schemes made, in accordance with Article 10 of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Article 10 of the Northern Ireland Protocol provides that EU State aid rules continue to apply to aid which affects trade in goods and electricity between NI and the EU.

All parts of the Subsidy Control Bill apply to subsidies for services in Northern Ireland.

The Government is currently in intensive discussions with the EU, with the aim of delivering significant changes to the Protocol. As outlined in the Command Paper of 21 July 2021, the UK’s proposal is that all types of subsidy would in the future be within scope of the domestic regime, with some enhanced arrangements for subsidies of significant scale in Northern Ireland.

27th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the value of the services provided by the Post Office; and what plans they have to support its work in the future.

Previous analysis, commissioned by BEIS and undertaken by London Economics and YouGov[1], found that users of the Post Office placed a value of between £4.3bn and £9.7bn per annum on the network. The research is attached, but is also available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/566224/beis-16-37-post-office-network-social-value.pdf.

More recently, new research by Public First has revealed how much of a vital role Post Offices play in high streets, providing a boost of more than £1 billion for surrounding retailers and businesses. The research is available here: https://postofficeimpact.co.uk/

The £227 million funding the Government has provided through the Spending Review extends the network subsidy at £50 million for a further year and provides Post Office with £177 million to invest in the future of the business.

[1] The Social Value of the Post Office Network, London Economics/YouGov, 2020

16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) Government departments and bodies, and (2) private institutions, have stopped using the Post Office for payments over the past two years.

While the Government sets the strategic direction for the Post Office, the company has the commercial freedom to deliver this strategy as an independent business. Post Office Limited is therefore responsible for decisions on its commercial partnerships with Government Departments and private companies alike.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what continuing role they have in assessing and funding the Casement Park project for Euro 28, and what funding they have already committed or anticipated to be committed.

The Department for Communities in Northern Ireland is responsible for the redevelopment of Casement Park. Funding decisions are therefore primarily a matter for the Northern Ireland Executive.

We continue to work closely with partners in Northern Ireland to make sure that EURO 2028 leaves a lasting legacy across the whole United Kingdom.

16th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 11 December 2023 (HL763), whether they will now answer the question put; namely, when they first discussed the inclusion of Casement Park in the UEFA Euro 2028 bid.

Work started on the UK and Ireland EURO 2028 bid in January 2022, building on a feasibility study into a bid for the FIFA World Cup. Discussions about potential venues – including in Northern Ireland – were part of this process from the outset.

Casement Park was confirmed as a proposed stadium in the final joint bid in April 2023, as it is the stadium site in Northern Ireland which could most closely meet UEFA’s technical requirements, including size, capacity, and facilities.

As with all stadia, those included are subject to UEFA’s final venue selection and match-scheduling process.

30th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how much they have spent on any aspect of the Casement Park redevelopment, including any estimate for time spent by civil servants.

Casement Park was confirmed as a proposed stadium for Euro 2028 in the final bid of April 2023. The Sub-Regional Stadia Programme, including the redevelopment of Casement Park, is the responsibility of the Department for Communities in Northern Ireland.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport engages with its partners in Northern Ireland, as do other Government Departments – including the Northern Ireland Office and HM Treasury – on plans to deliver Euro 2028 and to make sure the tournament leaves a lasting legacy of football for all.

We will continue to analyse relevant proposals and business cases for Casement Park, to ensure that we are making the best use of resources to support the success of the tournament.

30th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they first discussed the inclusion of Casement Park in the UEFA Euro 2028 bid.

Casement Park was confirmed as a proposed stadium for Euro 2028 in the final bid of April 2023. The Sub-Regional Stadia Programme, including the redevelopment of Casement Park, is the responsibility of the Department for Communities in Northern Ireland.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport engages with its partners in Northern Ireland, as do other Government Departments – including the Northern Ireland Office and HM Treasury – on plans to deliver Euro 2028 and to make sure the tournament leaves a lasting legacy of football for all.

We will continue to analyse relevant proposals and business cases for Casement Park, to ensure that we are making the best use of resources to support the success of the tournament.

30th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which departments are engaging with the Irish Football Association in relation to the UEFA Euro 2028 Casement Park project.

Casement Park was confirmed as a proposed stadium for Euro 2028 in the final bid of April 2023. The Sub-Regional Stadia Programme, including the redevelopment of Casement Park, is the responsibility of the Department for Communities in Northern Ireland.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport engages with its partners in Northern Ireland, as do other Government Departments – including the Northern Ireland Office and HM Treasury – on plans to deliver Euro 2028 and to make sure the tournament leaves a lasting legacy of football for all.

We will continue to analyse relevant proposals and business cases for Casement Park, to ensure that we are making the best use of resources to support the success of the tournament.

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Football Association about the implications for fairness and safety for women in football of their policy developments on the inclusion of transgender people.

The Football Association has previously attended a roundtable meeting about participation in sport by transgender people, hosted by His Majesty's Government, where we set out the position below.

When it comes to competitive sport, HM Government believes that fairness has to be the primary consideration. HM Government is clear that a way forward is needed which protects and shows compassion to all, whilst being clear that the integrity of competition must be maintained.

Where sex does have an impact on the fairness of competitive women’s sport, domestic governing bodies and international federations must provide clear direction to protect the integrity of women's sport.

It is ultimately for all individual sports’ National Governing Bodies, including the Football Association, to decide on the specific appropriate initiatives to make women’s sport fair and safe in their organisations whilst making football inclusive for all.

26th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will appoint a representative of Northern Ireland to the BBC board.

This campaign is in its final stages and an appointment will be made in due course, in line with the requirements of the Governance Code and the BBC’s Royal Charter.

18th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 16 May (HL7711), whether they intend to ensure that the redevelopment of the National Football Stadium at Windsor Park and of Casement Park in Belfast have equal funding.

There has been a long-standing commitment in Northern Ireland, as part of the regional stadium development programme, to redevelop Casement Park – alongside the National Football Stadium at Windsor Park and Kingspan Stadium, which have already undergone improvements. Given the inclusion of Casement Park in the UK and Ireland EURO 2028 bid, and the current lack of a Northern Ireland Executive, HM Government is working closely with partners in Northern Ireland to ensure that the redevelopment is adequately funded, is delivered in good time, and complies with UEFA’s technical requirements.

18th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government when they expect the BBC Member for Northern Ireland to be appointed to the BBC Board.

Interviews for this campaign were held on 31 October, and an appointment will be made in due course, in line with the Code of Governance for Public Appointments and the BBC Royal Charter.

9th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how long there has been a vacancy on the BBC Board for a member from Northern Ireland; and when they expect this vacancy to be filled.

This role has been vacant since the Board was formed in 2017. It was not possible to make an appointment to the board at that time due to the dissolution of the Northern Ireland Executive. A process to appoint a Northern Ireland Member was run in 2021, but Ministers decided to restart the process due to an insufficiently diverse and broad longlist.

The executive search company Odgers Berndtson was hired to support a new campaign, which is currently underway and closed to applications on 6 June 2022. An appointment will be made in due course, in line with the Code of Governance for Public Appointments and the BBC Royal Charter.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the British Olympic Association about renaming Team GB to Team UK.

The Government met the British Olympic Association as part of a wider National Governing Body meeting in February but did not discuss renaming the Olympic team from Team GB & NI to Team UK.

The British Olympic Association is the National Olympic Committee for Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands and the UK Overseas Territories and is wholly responsible for our national representation at the Games and for any branding of the Olympic team representing the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.