Lord Carrington Portrait

Lord Carrington

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

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Division Votes
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Speeches
Wednesday 29th June 2022
Agricultural Fertiliser and Feed: Rising Costs
My Lords, I declare my interest as a farmer, as set out in the register. I too welcome this timely …
Written Answers
Tuesday 3rd August 2021
Agriculture: Environment Protection
To ask Her Majesty's Government why it is necessary to terminate the whole of an existing agri-environment scheme if a …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
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MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Carrington has voted in 156 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(14 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(8 debate interactions)
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Legislation Debates
Agriculture Act 2020
(3,356 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(1,933 words contributed)
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View all Lord Carrington's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Carrington, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Carrington has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Carrington has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Carrington has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Carrington has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


19 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow dairy farmers affected by the collapse of the service trade during the COVID-19 pandemic to access the Retail Grant Hospitality Scheme or apply for bounce back loans in response to such farmers reported difficulty in accessing the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

The Government has announced a package of measures designed to support businesses facing difficulties in this period of uncertainty, including the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF), and the Bounce Back Loans Scheme.

Businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March with a rateable value of less than £51,000 will be eligible for the following cash grants per property via the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund:

  • Eligible businesses in these sectors with a property that has a rateable value of up to and including £15,000 will receive a grant of £10,000.
  • Eligible businesses in these sectors with a property that has a rateable value of over £15,000 and less than £51,000 will receive a grant of £25,000.

Guidance on the types of businesses covered by the Expanded Retail Discount can be found on the GOV.UK website.

Any enquiries on eligibility for, or provision of the RHLGF should be directed to the relevant local authority.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why it is necessary to terminate the whole of an existing agri-environment scheme if a part of that scheme is included in an application for the new English Woodland Creation Grant Offer.

We recognise that the absence of a widely available legal route to take land out of an existing Environmental Stewardship (ES) or Countryside Stewardship (CS) into a new England Woodland Creation Offer (EWCO) agreement without significant/full reclaim of payments is a blocker for some woodland creation applicants. We are looking at how we may be able to transfer land in CS or ES agreement to EWCO, where this results in an environmental gain.

We are actively exploring options to find a way forward for existing agreement holders. In the meantime, the guidance in the EWCO manual remains valid. We will provide an update to potential applicants as soon as we have made tangible progress via our gov.uk pages and the Forestry Commission's e-alert. We remain committed to trebling our tree planting rates in England as part of our commitment to plant 30,000 hectares per year across the UK by the end of this Parliament.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will update the Impact Assessment conducted by DEFRA in 2018 now that more is known about the Agriculture Transition Plan and Environmental Land Management Schemes.

The Government published two evidence and analysis papers to support the introduction of the Agriculture Bill in the last Parliament. These outlined, in detail, the case for creating a new Environmental Land Management scheme, the rationale for moving away from Direct Payments and provided evidence on the high-level costs and benefits of Government intervention in agriculture. They remain comprehensive sources of public information.

Defra has undertaken further work since then to assess the impacts of both regulatory and spending proposals.

Prior to the Agriculture Act becoming law in November 2020, a supporting Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) was published. This sets out, at a descriptive level, the anticipated impacts of the regulatory provisions within the Act.

Defra will produce more detailed full RIAs and submit to the Regulatory Policy Committee for independent scrutiny in advance of introducing any secondary legislation for all measures within the Act that are above the threshold specified in Better Regulation Framework guidance.

Defra is currently using the most recent data and evidence available to analyse and assess the impacts of its policy proposals as part of the process of it developing a Programme Business Case for its spending proposals. A summary business case will be published within four months of it receiving final approval, in line with the commitments set out in the recent HMT Green Book review.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the replacement of field drains will qualify for support under the new Environmental Land Management schemes.

We are working with stakeholders and end users to determine the specific land management actions that will be paid for under the Environmental Land Management scheme. We will set out more details on this later this year. ‘The Path to Sustainable Farming: An Agricultural Transition Plan 2021 to 2024’ set out examples of the types of actions that we envisage paying for under the scheme.

29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what comparative analysis they have undertaken of the number of dairy farmers affected by COVID-19 provided (1) in the letter sent to Peers by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 22 April, and (2) in the briefing by the National Farmers Union provided to MPs on 15 April; whether they found any significant variation between those figures; and if so, what steps they intend to take in response.

Dairy farmers are crucial in ensuring that food supplies remain resilient in this difficult period. While the vast majority of the UK's dairy farmers are largely unaffected some have been directly impacted by the closure of the food service sector as a result of the lockdown measures taken in response to COVID-19. Between 5 and 10 per cent of total milk production goes to the food service trade. We continue to work closely with the National Farmers Union, the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) and Dairy UK to ensure that those most affected are supported.

In recognition of the unprecedented challenges facing this sector on 7 May we announced a new fund to support those dairy farmers who have seen decreased demand due to the loss of the food service sector. Eligible dairy farmers in England who have lost more than 25% of their income over April and May due to coronavirus disruptions will be eligible for funding of up to £10,000 each, to cover 70% of their lost income during this qualifying period. This will enable these producers to continue to operate and sustain production capacity without impacts on animal welfare.

The AHDB, together with Dairy UK, have launched a new £1 million campaign to drive an increase in the consumption of milk. Running over 12 weeks, the campaign will highlight the role that milk plays in supporting moments of personal connection during times of crisis. Defra and the devolved administrations are jointly contributing towards the financing of this campaign.

The dairy industry can also access various Government backed loan schemes. The COVID-19 Business Interruption Loan Scheme is available to dairy farmers, milk buyers and milk processors. In addition, the new Bounce Back Loan scheme applies to businesses operating in agriculture and will ensure that the smallest businesses can access up to £50,000 loans.

We also took a number of early emergency steps to support dairy farmers and those in other sectors. These included designating employees in the food sector as key workers and temporarily relaxing the normal rules on drivers' hours, enabling the sector to keep supply chains running, including deliveries from farm gate to processors.

Public intervention for skimmed milk powder and butter also continues to be available. Industry can sell skimmed milk powder and butter into public intervention when the price they would receive on the open market falls below the intervention price. This provides a floor price for dairy products. UK processors are also eligible for the recently opened private storage aid scheme for dairy.

Furthermore, the statutory instrument (SI) temporarily relaxing some elements of competition law for the dairy industry was laid before Parliament on 1 May 2020 and applies retrospectively from 1 April 2020. This makes it easier for the dairy industry to collaborate to maximise production, processing and storage efficiency in order to avoid wastage and to ensure that as much product as possible can be processed into high quality dairy products. The AHDB and Dairy UK have offered to work with the dairy industry to support the enactment of the powers under the SI. We and the Devolved Administrations are working closely with them on this.

We will continue to engage closely with representatives from all parts of the dairy supply chain to support the sector throughout this challenging period.

29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter sent to Peers by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 22 April, when they expect to receive the proposals by the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board and Dairy UK about the alleviation of overproduction in the dairy farming sector during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dairy farmers are crucial in ensuring that food supplies remain resilient in this difficult period. While the vast majority of the UK's dairy farmers are largely unaffected some have been directly impacted by the closure of the food service sector as a result of the lockdown measures taken in response to COVID-19. Between 5 and 10 per cent of total milk production goes to the food service trade. We continue to work closely with the National Farmers Union, the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) and Dairy UK to ensure that those most affected are supported.

In recognition of the unprecedented challenges facing this sector on 7 May we announced a new fund to support those dairy farmers who have seen decreased demand due to the loss of the food service sector. Eligible dairy farmers in England who have lost more than 25% of their income over April and May due to coronavirus disruptions will be eligible for funding of up to £10,000 each, to cover 70% of their lost income during this qualifying period. This will enable these producers to continue to operate and sustain production capacity without impacts on animal welfare.

The AHDB, together with Dairy UK, have launched a new £1 million campaign to drive an increase in the consumption of milk. Running over 12 weeks, the campaign will highlight the role that milk plays in supporting moments of personal connection during times of crisis. Defra and the devolved administrations are jointly contributing towards the financing of this campaign.

The dairy industry can also access various Government backed loan schemes. The COVID-19 Business Interruption Loan Scheme is available to dairy farmers, milk buyers and milk processors. In addition, the new Bounce Back Loan scheme applies to businesses operating in agriculture and will ensure that the smallest businesses can access up to £50,000 loans.

We also took a number of early emergency steps to support dairy farmers and those in other sectors. These included designating employees in the food sector as key workers and temporarily relaxing the normal rules on drivers' hours, enabling the sector to keep supply chains running, including deliveries from farm gate to processors.

Public intervention for skimmed milk powder and butter also continues to be available. Industry can sell skimmed milk powder and butter into public intervention when the price they would receive on the open market falls below the intervention price. This provides a floor price for dairy products. UK processors are also eligible for the recently opened private storage aid scheme for dairy.

Furthermore, the statutory instrument (SI) temporarily relaxing some elements of competition law for the dairy industry was laid before Parliament on 1 May 2020 and applies retrospectively from 1 April 2020. This makes it easier for the dairy industry to collaborate to maximise production, processing and storage efficiency in order to avoid wastage and to ensure that as much product as possible can be processed into high quality dairy products. The AHDB and Dairy UK have offered to work with the dairy industry to support the enactment of the powers under the SI. We and the Devolved Administrations are working closely with them on this.

We will continue to engage closely with representatives from all parts of the dairy supply chain to support the sector throughout this challenging period.

29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to encourage those dairy processors and farmers who have not participated in the scheme to reduce milk supply by around five per cent to join that initiative to address over-supply.

Dairy farmers are crucial in ensuring that food supplies remain resilient in this difficult period. While the vast majority of Britain’s dairy farmers are largely unaffected, some have been impacted by the closure of the food service sector as a result of the lockdown measures taken in response to Covid-19. Between 5 and 10 per cent of total milk production goes to the food service trade. While there is no Government-backed scheme to reduce milk supply, we fully support industry efforts to voluntarily reduce milk production where necessary.

In addition to the wider steps the Government has taken to support businesses impacted by COVID-19, a statutory instrument laid before Parliament on 1 May temporarily relaxed some further elements of competition law making it easier for the dairy industry to collaborate to maximise production, processing and storage efficiency in order to avoid wastage and to ensure that as much product as possible can be processed into high quality dairy products. The SI is available at the following link.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2020/481/contents/made

We will continue to engage closely with representatives from all parts of the dairy supply chain to support the sector throughout this challenging period.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential damage to the environment as a result of the three crop rule leading farmers to cultivate drenched farmland and thereby damage soil structures.

Farmers have been experiencing difficulties with the recent prolonged wet weather and are concerned about their ability to meet Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) rules.

Whilst we have not carried out specific assessments of the environmental impact of cultivating waterlogged farmland following the wet weather experienced so far this winter, we encourage farmers to take all the necessary and reasonable steps to protect their soils. In some cases, we understand that this may result in difficulty meeting CAP rules, including the ‘three crop rule’. The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) has recently updated its GOV.UK online guidance on flooding and wet weather so that farmers are clear on the rules and possible alternative options that will allow them to remain compliant – including alternatives to the three crop rule. This was put together in direct response to customers’ and stakeholders’ questions and concerns.

If they are in doubt, farmers should contact the RPA to discuss possible mitigation measures where farmers are unsure of the impact that flooding will have on their ability to comply with greening, or other CAP rules, including whether they should apply for force majeure.

We will continue to monitor the situation and work closely with stakeholders, including farmers, where cases of force majeure are put forward. We are also exploring how best to provide flexibility and support farmers affected by the recent wet weather.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the weather conditions experienced by farmers this planting season, what plans they have to suspend the three crop rule.

Farmers have been experiencing difficulties with the recent prolonged wet weather and are concerned about their ability to meet Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) rules.

Whilst we have not carried out specific assessments of the environmental impact of cultivating waterlogged farmland following the wet weather experienced so far this winter, we encourage farmers to take all the necessary and reasonable steps to protect their soils. In some cases, we understand that this may result in difficulty meeting CAP rules, including the ‘three crop rule’. The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) has recently updated its GOV.UK online guidance on flooding and wet weather so that farmers are clear on the rules and possible alternative options that will allow them to remain compliant – including alternatives to the three crop rule. This was put together in direct response to customers’ and stakeholders’ questions and concerns.

If they are in doubt, farmers should contact the RPA to discuss possible mitigation measures where farmers are unsure of the impact that flooding will have on their ability to comply with greening, or other CAP rules, including whether they should apply for force majeure.

We will continue to monitor the situation and work closely with stakeholders, including farmers, where cases of force majeure are put forward. We are also exploring how best to provide flexibility and support farmers affected by the recent wet weather.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to accept early Force Majeure claims as a prevention mechanism to ensure that soil structure is not damaged as a result of farmers trying to adhere to the three crop rule.

Farmers have been experiencing difficulties with the recent prolonged wet weather and are concerned about their ability to meet Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) rules.

Whilst we have not carried out specific assessments of the environmental impact of cultivating waterlogged farmland following the wet weather experienced so far this winter, we encourage farmers to take all the necessary and reasonable steps to protect their soils. In some cases, we understand that this may result in difficulty meeting CAP rules, including the ‘three crop rule’. The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) has recently updated its GOV.UK online guidance on flooding and wet weather so that farmers are clear on the rules and possible alternative options that will allow them to remain compliant – including alternatives to the three crop rule. This was put together in direct response to customers’ and stakeholders’ questions and concerns.

If they are in doubt, farmers should contact the RPA to discuss possible mitigation measures where farmers are unsure of the impact that flooding will have on their ability to comply with greening, or other CAP rules, including whether they should apply for force majeure.

We will continue to monitor the situation and work closely with stakeholders, including farmers, where cases of force majeure are put forward. We are also exploring how best to provide flexibility and support farmers affected by the recent wet weather.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to prevent any negative effect on the income of cereal and livestock farmers as a result of the wet weather.

Defra has been working closely with all farming sectors on the impacts of the wet weather experienced over the autumn and winter.

In recognition of the difficulties caused to farmers by flooding, Defra has made a total of £4 million available to eligible farmers through the Farming Recovery Fund. In August Defra announced up to £2 million available for farming businesses in Wainfleet and North Yorkshire that were particularly hard-hit by flooding, and in November 2019, Defra announced that it would extend the scheme to cover those impacted by the November flooding with a further £2 million. Assistance is provided to cover non-insurable items and activities such as re-cultivation, reseeding, reinstating field boundaries and removing debris from agricultural land.

During the current six year capital investment programme (from April 2015 to March 2021) the Government is investing a record £2.6 billion in over 1,000 flood defences schemes which will better protect 300,000 homes and an additional 700,000 acres (285,000 hectares) of agricultural land, helping to avoid more than £1.5 billion worth of direct economic damages to agricultural land.

In terms of the wider impact of the wet weather on farmers, Defra is continuing to observe price movements and other market information. For example, we will give close attention to the results of the Early Bird Survey, which the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board is rerunning to take account of the impact of the wet weather on winter cereal plantings.

We appreciate that the effects of the wet weather upon cash flow, yields, and other outcomes may only become apparent in the longer term, and will continue to engage closely with sectors in the coming months as to the negative impact from wet weather and to determine whether any action is needed.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people declaring an income from letting property pay the (1) additional, (2) higher, and (3) standard, rates of income tax for the most recent period for which the data is available.

In 2019/20, the numbers of individuals declaring income via Self-Assessment from letting property and falling into each of the (1) additional, (2) higher, and (3) standard income tax bands that the question refers to, rounded to the nearest thousand, are:

Marginal tax rate

Number of individuals

Additional higher rate (45%)

106,000

Higher rate (40%)

560,000

Basic rate (20%)

1,519,000

It should also be noted that:

- Taxpayers in Scotland will not pay the tax rates referred to in the question as they are subject to a separate income tax regime, and are therefore excluded from the figures above.

- Not all individuals with property income are required to declare it. For example, those with income below the £1,000 property allowance are not required to tell HMRC.

- Some individuals with property income between £1,000 to £2,500 will declare this via PAYE rather than Self-Assessment. These individuals are not included here.

- Some individuals will not fall into any of the tax bands referred to in the question as their income will be within their personal allowance.

During the pandemic, the Government has put in place a substantial financial package, backed up by billions of pounds, which is supporting renters to sustain tenancies and to afford their housing costs. The Government is supporting landlords by providing tenants with extensive financial assistance to continue paying rent.  The Government will also be bringing in a Better Deal for Renters designed to help the rental market work better for both tenants and landlords; a White Paper detailing this reform package will be brought forward in due course.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether buy-to-let mortgage holidays constitute a deferred payment which has to be repaid to lenders.

Mortgage holidays have provided support for borrowers to manage their finances during a period of uncertainty. Borrowers accessing payment holidays, including buy-to-let mortgage consumers, will still need to repay the full balance of their loan, and will continue to accrue interest during the payment holiday, unless the lender has indicated otherwise. There are various options for managing this, for example, by increasing their remaining monthly payments, or by adding an extension to the term. Borrowers should talk to their lender to understand the options they offer.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the benefits to the economy of the private rental sector.

We have not made an assessment to quantify the contribution of the private rented sector (PRS) to the economy. We recognise that the PRS plays an important role on providing homes to over 4 million households in England. The Government is committed to delivering a package of reforms to ensure the PRS can operate effectively and meet the needs of both tenants and landlords.


The PRS supports labour market mobility, allowing households to move easily both within and between regions, leading to a more efficient allocation of labour and skills. This is due to the relative ease with which renters can give notice and sign new tenancies, and the relative lower costs of moving, when compared to owner-occupier house sales. A key part of our future PRS reforms is to ensure the flexibility of private rental tenancies is retained, whilst balancing increased security for those tenants who need and want it, alongside driving an improvement in the quality and standards of PRS accommodation.


In addition, the Build to Rent sector continues to attract investment with analysis by Savills estimating that approximately £1.2 billion was invested into the UK’s Build to Rent sector during the first quarter of 2021.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their press release Support for renters continues with longer notice periods, published on 12 May, on what grounds they have concluded that many landlords are “highly vulnerable to rent arrears”.

The UK Government has put in place an unprecedented package of support for renters during the pandemic, including financial measures to enable them to continue paying rent to landlords.

However, we know that 45% of landlords have just one rental property and 38% have between two to four properties. For most landlords, income from rent makes up 42% of their total gross income making them highly vulnerable when their tenants build up rent arrears.

The Government has to balance supporting tenants with landlords' ability to exercise their right to justice where needed. As national restrictions continue to ease, it is appropriate that the emergency measures start to lift but we are doing so gradually.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individual tenants, rather than households, are represented by the finding in the Household Resilience Study: Wave 2, published on 21 April, that 22 per cent of private renters reported finding it more difficult to keep up with rent payments since June–July 2020.

The Household Resilience Study collects data by household, rather than by individual. In November-December 2020, 610,000 households reported that they were finding it more difficult to keep up with their rent payments since June-July 2020. 353,000 households reported that they were in rent arrears and 278,000 households reported that they were not currently in arrears but were very or fairly likely to fall behind with rent payments over the next three months.

Further information about the Household Resilience Study is available (attached) at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-resilience-study-wave-2.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individual tenants, rather than households, are represented by the finding in the Household Resilience Study: Wave 2, published on 21 April, that eight per cent of private renters said they were very or fairly likely to fall behind with rent payments over the next three months.

The Household Resilience Study collects data by household, rather than by individual. In November-December 2020, 610,000 households reported that they were finding it more difficult to keep up with their rent payments since June-July 2020. 353,000 households reported that they were in rent arrears and 278,000 households reported that they were not currently in arrears but were very or fairly likely to fall behind with rent payments over the next three months.

Further information about the Household Resilience Study is available (attached) at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-resilience-study-wave-2.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individual tenants, rather than households, are represented by the finding in the Household Resilience Study: Wave 2, published on 21 April, that nine per cent of private renters were in arrears in November–December 2020.

The Household Resilience Study collects data by household, rather than by individual. In November-December 2020, 610,000 households reported that they were finding it more difficult to keep up with their rent payments since June-July 2020. 353,000 households reported that they were in rent arrears and 278,000 households reported that they were not currently in arrears but were very or fairly likely to fall behind with rent payments over the next three months.

Further information about the Household Resilience Study is available (attached) at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-resilience-study-wave-2.