Lord Lucas Portrait

Lord Lucas

Conservative - Excepted Hereditary

Regenerating Seaside Towns and Communities Committee
17th May 2018 - 19th Mar 2019
Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Bill [HL] Special Public Bill Committee
13th Sep 2016 - 9th Nov 2016
Digital Skills
12th Jun 2014 - 4th Feb 2015
Merits of Statutory Instruments Committee
14th Nov 2007 - 8th Dec 2011
Draft Civil Contingencies Bill (Joint Committee)
11th Jul 2003 - 28th Nov 2003
Information Committee (Lords)
25th Nov 2002 - 20th Nov 2003
Committee On Animals In Scientific Procedures
28th Jun 2001 - 16th Jul 2002
Works of Art Committee (Lords)
22nd Nov 1994 - 8th Nov 1995


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 14th September 2021
09:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 19th October 2021
10:00
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 189 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 104 Noes - 241
Speeches
Monday 19th July 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]

My Lords, the question I ask with Amendment 76A is: who is making sure, in this new world that we …

Written Answers
Tuesday 20th July 2021
National Insurance
To ask Her Majesty's Government why their systems use National Insurance numbers as personal identifiers if, at any given instant, …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Wednesday 29th January 2020
Hereditary Peerages and Baronetcies (Equality of Inheritance) Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to amend the law regarding succession to peerages and baronetcies and eligibility to stand for election as a …
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Lucas has voted in 144 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

13 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Lucas voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 208 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 339 Noes - 235
View All Lord Lucas Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(37 debate interactions)
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(15 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(31 debate contributions)
Home Office
(27 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(13 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Lucas's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Lucas, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Lucas has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Lucas has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Lord Lucas


A Bill to make provision for the succession of female heirs to hereditary titles; for husbands and civil partners of those receiving honours to be allowed to use equivalent honorary titles to those available to wives; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - Committee: 1st Sitting: House Of Lords
Friday 6th December 2013

A bill to amend the law regarding succession to peerages and baronetcies and eligibility to stand for election as a hereditary member of the House of Lords; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Wednesday 29th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to enable the succession of female heirs to hereditary peerages, and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Monday 11th June 2012

Lord Lucas has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


92 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the Feminist Declaration on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women, published in March 2020, and (2) the decision by the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA) to adopt that Declaration on 9 March 2020; what assessment they have made of the membership of (a) Government agencies, and (b) Government departments, with the ILGA; and what plans they have to review the inclusion of work undertaken by other UK members of the ILGA in education and school settings.

The Feminist Declaration was produced by the Women’s Rights Caucus, a global coalition of feminist organisations, on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. It is not an official declaration. The Government produced a report of progress on implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action which was published at the time of the anniversary.

ILGA World is an independent worldwide federation of more than 1,600 organisations. Therefore, its views do not represent this Government. Department for Education guidance clearly states that schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and sensitive to their needs.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the judicial review proceedings brought by Fair Play for Women against the UK Statistics Authority, whether they will standardise the use of the words ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ by public authorities.

Both ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ are terms used in legislation. It is up to individual organisations to decide which terms to use within their documents. In doing so, they will consider the language used, and how to ensure clarity and comprehension.

The Government has committed to review its approach to drafting legislation on subjects which prompt questions around language. As in the case of the Ministerial and other Maternity Allowances Act 2021, the most obvious area is legislation relating to pregnancy or childbirth, but there will, no doubt, be other related subjects where similar issues arise for the drafting and the review will consider those as appropriate. The review will consider the recent debates in both Houses arising from the passage of this particular Act, as well as practices adopted in other English language legislatures.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Ministerial Statement by Baroness Berridge on 22 September (HLWS457), what steps they are taking to ensure that the policies of all (1) departments, (2) police forces, (3) schools, (4) NHS trusts, and (5) other public bodies, align with the outcome of the review of the Gender Recognition Act 2004; what plans they have to ensure that (a) such policies define sex and gender reassignment as protected characteristics, and (b) the exemptions under the Equality Act 2010 are used in the interests of those having such protected characteristics.

The Government announced its response to the consultation on the Gender Recognition Act via Written Ministerial Statement, and published the analysis report on 22 September. The announcement was that there will be no changes to the GRA legislation, but that we will be making the process less bureaucratic by digitising the application process and reducing the fee. There is therefore no need to review policies of all departments, police forces, schools, NHS trusts or other public bodies as the law will not change.

The Government believes that the protection of single-sex spaces, as provided for in the Equality Act, is important. The Government reiterated in their recent response to the Gender Recognition Act consultation that the Equality Act provides crucial protections for sex and gender reassignment as protected characteristics.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Ministerial Statement by Baroness Berridge on 22 September (HLWS457), what plans they have to commission research on how to support children with gender identity issues.

The NHS has already started a series of long-term studies to better understand the outcomes of children and young people who are referred to gender identity services. NHS England are also currently reviewing the evidence base related to young people on the gender dysphoria pathway, including the evidence base that underpins the use and administration of puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones.

Dr Hilary Cass, OBE, is leading an independent review into gender identity services for children and young people. This will examine the recent rise in the number of children seeking treatment and how care can be improved for children and young people. The review will report back with recommendations next year.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have compare the census data with the Department for Work and Pensions' database of National Insurance numbers to identify (1) NI numbers which should be terminated, and (2) individuals who should be fined for non-completion of the 2021 census.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Lucas

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

13 July 2021

Dear Lord Lucas,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions relating to Census 2021 in England and Wales asking firstly how many 2021 census forms were (1) requested, and (2) have been completed and returned (HL1710); secondly, how many fines have been issued for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1711); and what plans there are to compare the census data with the Department for Work and Pensions' database of National Insurance numbers to identify (1) NI numbers which should be terminated, and (2) individuals who should be fined for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1713).

Census 2021 was designed to be a digital-first census and we encouraged people to complete online where possible, but we made sure that those who preferred to use a paper questionnaire were able to do so. Most households were sent a letter with an access code to complete the census online. Ten percent of households, where the take-up of the online option was likely to be relatively low, were sent a paper questionnaire in place of the Census 2021 letter. Each paper questionnaire also included an access code so that the household could complete online. Similarly, while most reminder letters sent to households that had not yet completed the census included the online access code, some households were sent paper questionnaires as part of the reminder and follow-up process. Paper questionnaires and online access codes were also available on request via our freephone contact centre or the Census 2021 website.

The response to Census 2021 has exceeded all expectations, with a return rate of 97 percent of households across England and Wales and an online-completion rate above our target of 75 percent. The return rate is based on the number of households where we have a valid return, as a percentage of all addresses that are not considered to be vacant. Final response rates will be calculated after following the processing of data from the census and the Census Coverage Survey, and may therefore differ from the return rate. While this processing is continuing, we are not able to provide the detailed information requested. We are planning to publish an article in the autumn with information on how people completed the census, including whether they did so online or on paper.

As regards the number of fines for non-completion and for providing false information in Census 2021, I would like to clarify that the Office for National Statistics (ONS) does not have the power to impose fines under the Census Act 1920. Fines can be imposed by the courts as a result of a successful prosecution, and the ONS works closely with the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) on bringing cases to court where necessary. The ONS is currently undertaking the non-compliance process, including gathering evidence to be passed to the CPS where appropriate. The main objective of this work is to persuade the few people who refuse to complete a questionnaire to do so; as such, people can avoid the risk of a fine for non-completion at any stage by completing the census.

We have no plans to use census data for the purposes described in your question. In accordance with all relevant legislation, UK Statistics Authority policy, and the promises made to census respondents, personal information collected during the census can and will be used for statistical purposes only, and not used in any way that could have a direct impact on individuals.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many fines have been issued for non-completion of the 2021 census.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Lucas

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

13 July 2021

Dear Lord Lucas,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions relating to Census 2021 in England and Wales asking firstly how many 2021 census forms were (1) requested, and (2) have been completed and returned (HL1710); secondly, how many fines have been issued for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1711); and what plans there are to compare the census data with the Department for Work and Pensions' database of National Insurance numbers to identify (1) NI numbers which should be terminated, and (2) individuals who should be fined for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1713).

Census 2021 was designed to be a digital-first census and we encouraged people to complete online where possible, but we made sure that those who preferred to use a paper questionnaire were able to do so. Most households were sent a letter with an access code to complete the census online. Ten percent of households, where the take-up of the online option was likely to be relatively low, were sent a paper questionnaire in place of the Census 2021 letter. Each paper questionnaire also included an access code so that the household could complete online. Similarly, while most reminder letters sent to households that had not yet completed the census included the online access code, some households were sent paper questionnaires as part of the reminder and follow-up process. Paper questionnaires and online access codes were also available on request via our freephone contact centre or the Census 2021 website.

The response to Census 2021 has exceeded all expectations, with a return rate of 97 percent of households across England and Wales and an online-completion rate above our target of 75 percent. The return rate is based on the number of households where we have a valid return, as a percentage of all addresses that are not considered to be vacant. Final response rates will be calculated after following the processing of data from the census and the Census Coverage Survey, and may therefore differ from the return rate. While this processing is continuing, we are not able to provide the detailed information requested. We are planning to publish an article in the autumn with information on how people completed the census, including whether they did so online or on paper.

As regards the number of fines for non-completion and for providing false information in Census 2021, I would like to clarify that the Office for National Statistics (ONS) does not have the power to impose fines under the Census Act 1920. Fines can be imposed by the courts as a result of a successful prosecution, and the ONS works closely with the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) on bringing cases to court where necessary. The ONS is currently undertaking the non-compliance process, including gathering evidence to be passed to the CPS where appropriate. The main objective of this work is to persuade the few people who refuse to complete a questionnaire to do so; as such, people can avoid the risk of a fine for non-completion at any stage by completing the census.

We have no plans to use census data for the purposes described in your question. In accordance with all relevant legislation, UK Statistics Authority policy, and the promises made to census respondents, personal information collected during the census can and will be used for statistical purposes only, and not used in any way that could have a direct impact on individuals.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 2021 census forms were (1) requested, and (2) have been completed and returned.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Lucas

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

13 July 2021

Dear Lord Lucas,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions relating to Census 2021 in England and Wales asking firstly how many 2021 census forms were (1) requested, and (2) have been completed and returned (HL1710); secondly, how many fines have been issued for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1711); and what plans there are to compare the census data with the Department for Work and Pensions' database of National Insurance numbers to identify (1) NI numbers which should be terminated, and (2) individuals who should be fined for non-completion of the 2021 census (HL1713).

Census 2021 was designed to be a digital-first census and we encouraged people to complete online where possible, but we made sure that those who preferred to use a paper questionnaire were able to do so. Most households were sent a letter with an access code to complete the census online. Ten percent of households, where the take-up of the online option was likely to be relatively low, were sent a paper questionnaire in place of the Census 2021 letter. Each paper questionnaire also included an access code so that the household could complete online. Similarly, while most reminder letters sent to households that had not yet completed the census included the online access code, some households were sent paper questionnaires as part of the reminder and follow-up process. Paper questionnaires and online access codes were also available on request via our freephone contact centre or the Census 2021 website.

The response to Census 2021 has exceeded all expectations, with a return rate of 97 percent of households across England and Wales and an online-completion rate above our target of 75 percent. The return rate is based on the number of households where we have a valid return, as a percentage of all addresses that are not considered to be vacant. Final response rates will be calculated after following the processing of data from the census and the Census Coverage Survey, and may therefore differ from the return rate. While this processing is continuing, we are not able to provide the detailed information requested. We are planning to publish an article in the autumn with information on how people completed the census, including whether they did so online or on paper.

As regards the number of fines for non-completion and for providing false information in Census 2021, I would like to clarify that the Office for National Statistics (ONS) does not have the power to impose fines under the Census Act 1920. Fines can be imposed by the courts as a result of a successful prosecution, and the ONS works closely with the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) on bringing cases to court where necessary. The ONS is currently undertaking the non-compliance process, including gathering evidence to be passed to the CPS where appropriate. The main objective of this work is to persuade the few people who refuse to complete a questionnaire to do so; as such, people can avoid the risk of a fine for non-completion at any stage by completing the census.

We have no plans to use census data for the purposes described in your question. In accordance with all relevant legislation, UK Statistics Authority policy, and the promises made to census respondents, personal information collected during the census can and will be used for statistical purposes only, and not used in any way that could have a direct impact on individuals.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what minimum standards they require from providers in the procurement of call centre operations regarding (1) the surveillance, and (2) other working conditions, for remote-working staff.

The Contact Centre Services framework agreement (RM3815) has minimum security standards for technology and people vetting, as well as standards in place for data protection (GDPR) within the framework agreement terms and conditions that all suppliers must adhere to.

Customer authorities may put in place call-off contracts with Service Level Agreements where suppliers will need to report on staff's availability to answer/handle calls.

However, specific call off clauses agreed between suppliers and customers concerning surveillance and working conditions of remote workers are not reported back centrally to the Crown Commercial Service.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by the Paymaster General on 1 March that "trans men are men and trans women are women", how they intend this phrase be understood.

The Ministerial and Other Maternity Allowances Act provides for maternity leave for mothers, irrespective of gender reassignment. We believe that all people should be treated with respect and their rights protected. We also believe in the compatibility of protecting women’s rights and the rights of transgender people.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what Cabinet-level discussions involving the Prime Minister have taken place in the last year about (1) establishing, and (2) monitoring, cross-Government objectives for supporting young people not on Universal Credit through the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed.

The Government recognises the significant impact of Covid-19 on young people, particularly the most vulnerable.

Young people benefit from many of the interventions introduced by the Government to support the economy during the Covid-19 pandemic. In addition, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport announced on 25 November that a specific £16.5m Youth Covid-19 Support Fund will protect the immediate future of grassroots and national youth organisations across the country. The Government has also released £90m from dormant accounts to support charities tackling youth unemployment.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to facilitate the appointment of the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament; and what estimate they have made, if any, of when that Committee will be appointed.

The Intelligence and Security Committee was reconstituted on 14 July 2020.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
4th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to update guidance on their websites to refer individuals who have received suspicious emails to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service, which currently refer only to Action Fraud.

The public have been able to report suspicious emails to the NCSC (National Cyber Security Centre) through the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) since April 21st, 2020 by emailing report@phishing.gov.uk, when it was launched alongside the Cyber Aware campaign.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what were the average salaries of central Government civil servants, broken down by grade, who retired in the last full year for which figures are available; and what were those peoples average salaries two years before retirement, broken down by grade.

The average salaries of civil servants at delegated grades who retired between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019 are below. We do not track individual salaries back to previous years at delegated grades.

Delegated grade retirees in 2018-19

AA

AO

EO

HEO

SEO

G7

G6

Average salary on retirement

£18500

£21800

£27200

£33900

£42100

£56500

£68300

These figures are sourced from the Annual Civil Service Employment Survey, rounded to the nearest £100, and only include those with a known salary: 22% of retirees did not have a reported salary.

Average salaries of civil servants at a Senior Civil Service (SCS) level who retired between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, for the most recent available year and two years prior are below.

SCS retirees in 2018-19

SCS PB1

SCS PB2

SCS PB3

Average salary on 31 March 2016

£84,100

£100,000

-

Average salary on 31 March 2018

£85,700

£103,700

-

These figures are sourced from the Cabinet Office SCS database. Grade is as at the time of retirement. Figures are not released where less than 5 staff are counted (indicated by “-”), rounded to the nearest £100, and only include those with a known salary in both years. Salary data is not available for all prior years, and 19% of retirees did not have a recorded salary over this period.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on the recording of biological sex, legal sex and gender (1) in the 2021 census, (2) when a person’s identity is recorded in connection with a crime, and (3) in a person’s medical records.

The draft Census (England and Wales) Order 2020 was laid in Parliament on 2 March 2020. It makes provision for the 2021 Census to ask a male/female sex question as in previous censuses. In addition, it is proposed the 2021 Census asks a voluntary question on gender identity for those 16 and over. This follows the Census (Return Particulars and Removal of Penalties) Act 2019 which enables census questions on sexual orientation and gender identity to be asked on a voluntary basis.

There is no central guidance for police forces on the recording of sex or gender of persons in connection with a crime.

The Personal Demographic Service (responsible for the NHS Number) record contains no clinical information. It holds administrative gender, which is not necessarily the same as clinical gender in some cases.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to give workers in the gig economy employment benefits and protection.

As announced in the Queens’ Speech, we will be bringing forward an Employment Bill to implement a range of Manifesto commitments.

This legislation will make workplaces fairer, by encouraging flexible working and introducing new protections for those in low-paid work and the gig economy.

It will balance the needs of both employers and workers and will ensure we have an employment framework that is fit for purpose in the 21st century.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the consequences, including safety, of proposals for UK domestic gas supplies to comprise up to 20 per cent hydrogen.

The Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996 (GSMR) were introduced as a statutory instrument to ensure the safety, quality, and management of the flow of gas through the gas network in Great Britain. The regulations are the responsibility of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). It is the responsibility of the Gas Network Operators (GNOs) to make the case to the HSE that any changes they propose to the GSMR are safe.

The HyDeploy project has been commissioned by GNOs to investigate the option of blending up to 20% hydrogen with natural gas in the gas grid. The HSE have granted an exemption to the current GSMR hydrogen content limit of 0.1% for the duration of the HyDeploy project, subject to strict safety arrangements being in place.

The evidence produced by HyDeploy will be used to assess whether legislative changes allowing hydrogen blending should be made. It will also be used to assess whether any consequential changes would be required to charging arrangements.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to (1) allow UK domestic gas supplies to comprise up to 20 per cent hydrogen, and (2) ensure that customers are fairly charged for gas supplies with a variable percentage of hydrogen.

The Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996 (GSMR) were introduced as a statutory instrument to ensure the safety, quality, and management of the flow of gas through the gas network in Great Britain. The regulations are the responsibility of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). It is the responsibility of the Gas Network Operators (GNOs) to make the case to the HSE that any changes they propose to the GSMR are safe.

The HyDeploy project has been commissioned by GNOs to investigate the option of blending up to 20% hydrogen with natural gas in the gas grid. The HSE have granted an exemption to the current GSMR hydrogen content limit of 0.1% for the duration of the HyDeploy project, subject to strict safety arrangements being in place.

The evidence produced by HyDeploy will be used to assess whether legislative changes allowing hydrogen blending should be made. It will also be used to assess whether any consequential changes would be required to charging arrangements.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to develop the UK gas network and appliances connected to it so that they are able to receive a supply of 100 per cent hydrogen.

Replacing natural gas in the gas grid with hydrogen may be an option which could contribute to decarbonising heat, along with other options including heat networks, electric heat pumps and biogas. The Government’s December 2018 report on Clean Growth: Transforming Heating concluded that there is currently no clear consensus on the best approach to decarbonising heat at scale and that further work is required on the 100 per cent hydrogen option to prove the safety and feasibility case and to better understand the costs and benefits.

BEIS is currently working with industry organisations and other stakeholders to ensure that all the R&D, testing and trialling work required to achieve this has been identified.

The Government is also currently investing in a range of innovation programmes to explore and develop the potential of low carbon hydrogen for end use sectors. This includes:

o Up to £20m to test the potential for switching to hydrogen (and other low carbon fuels) across a range of industrial sectors,

o Hy4Heat – a £25m hydrogen for heat innovation programme with the aim of establishing if it is technically possible and safe to replace methane with hydrogen in residential and commercial buildings and gas appliances,

o £23m to support deployment of hydrogen vehicles and growth of refuelling infrastructure.

13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of people in the UK who were (1) successfully, and (2) unsuccessfully, phished in the last period for which records are available.

39% of all UK businesses identified at least one cyber security breach or attack in the last 12 months. Among these firms, the most common type of breach is related to phishing attacks (reported by around four-fifths of businesses (83%) which were attacked (CSBS 2021). This figure has risen from 72% in 2017 to 83% now. The Home Office is responsible for policy on cyber crime and fraud/scams.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, for the last period for which records are available, what proportion of phishing incidents reported to report@phishing.gov.uk resulted in (1) an email address being successfully blocked, (2) links to malicious websites being removed, or (3) both.

Since launch in April 2020 the number of reports received by the NCSC’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERs) stands at more than 6,500,000 with the removal of more than 50,500 scams and 97,500 web addresses (URLs). In June there were up to 7000 individual URLs first identified by SERs submissions which were taken down.

Reporting figures are updated monthly on the NCSC website alongside information on SERS and protection against phishing can be found at Phishing: how to report to the NCSC

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, for the last period for which records are available, how many separate incidents the reports made to report@phishing.gov.uk referred to.

Since launch in April 2020 the number of reports received by the NCSC’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERs) stands at more than 6,500,000 with the removal of more than 50,500 scams and 97,500 web addresses (URLs). In June there were up to 7000 individual URLs first identified by SERs submissions which were taken down.

Reporting figures are updated monthly on the NCSC website alongside information on SERS and protection against phishing can be found at Phishing: how to report to the NCSC

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many reports were made to report@phishing.gov.uk for the last period for which records are available.

Since launch in April 2020 the number of reports received by the NCSC’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERs) stands at more than 6,500,000 with the removal of more than 50,500 scams and 97,500 web addresses (URLs). In June there were up to 7000 individual URLs first identified by SERs submissions which were taken down.

Reporting figures are updated monthly on the NCSC website alongside information on SERS and protection against phishing can be found at Phishing: how to report to the NCSC

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role Gendered Intelligence plays in filtering communications sent via (1) social media, or (2) web forms, in response to their campaigns.

No specific assessment has been made. Gendered Intelligence are an independent charity and the government has no part to play in reviewing whether or not they filter the responses to their campaigns.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 11 March (HL2275), what is their policy on the inclusion of biologically male athletes in women's sports.

Decisions regarding the involvement of trans people in competitive sport is a matter for individual governing bodies and international federations. UK Sport and Sport England encourage National Governing Bodies (NGBs) to carefully consider all sides of the debate, and access the best and most up to date research before making decisions.

UK Sport’s funding agreements require NGBs to ensure all World Class Programme athletes comply with the eligibility criteria of the relevant International Federation and competition governing body.

In addition, both UK Sport and Sport England require all NGBs receiving public money to be compliant with UK equality legislation.

To support NGBs, the Sports Council Equality Group (SCEG) which includes Sport England, Sport Wales, Sport Scotland, Sport Northern Ireland and UK Sport is currently working to provide an up to date picture of the current landscape in both domestic and elite sport, to ultimately enable the best and fairest decisions to be made by our NGBs around transgender athletes in sport. This should be available before the end of the year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with Sport England about the practical application of the Equality Act 2010 in sport; and what were the results of any such discussions.

Government’s sport strategy Sporting Future and Sport England’s strategy Towards an Active Nation set out both organisations’ commitment to creating a diverse sport sector.

DCMS have regular meetings with Sport England to discuss diversity in sport. These meetings cover a wide range of issues including increasing participation amongst under-represented groups, such as those from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, and ensuring a more diverse workforce. Outputs from Sport England’s work in this area includes:

  • The ‘This Girl Can’ campaign, which encourages women to get active regardless of shape, size and ability and seeks to break down the barriers that prevent them from doing so. The campaign has inspired 3.9 million women to take part since its launch in 2015

  • Work with a range of partners to increase BAME participation in sport and activity. Sport England published their ‘Sport for All’ report in January 2020, showing how people from BAME communities are taking part in sport and physical activity. Launched in response to low rates of participation in many BAME communities, this invited and challenged partners to address the ethnicity gap in sport participation, with Sport England committing to leading a joined-up approach to tackle this across the sport sector.

  • Work with leading board recruitment agency Perrett Laver to increase diversity at board level within national governing bodies of sport, with 65% and 75% of appointments to date being BAME and female candidates.

  • Investment in programmes that help disabled people get active and make sport more inclusive of their needs. Sport England also ensures that programmes for disabled people are included across each of their investment programmes, and are investing £1.6m from 2017 - 2020 into seven National Disability Sports Organisations who represent specific impairment groups. Sport England has also worked alongside leading charities including Age UK to develop the ‘We Are Undefeatable’ campaign, aimed at supporting people with long-term health conditions to be active.

  • Sporting Future asked Sport England to treat LGBT+ people in the same way as it does other groups protected by the Equality Act 2010. This enables sports to get the same expert help from Sport England and its partners with tackling increasing LGBT+ participation as they do with the other protected characteristics groups and they are making investments into key delivery partners to support their work in this space. For example, Sport England has invested £80,000 into Pride Sports to support Sport England with mapping all LGBT+ specific sport activity across the country and to deliver a LGBT+ summit event to offer insight, strategies and good practice solutions for engaging LGBT+ people in sport.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their estimate of the number of 17 year-olds in each local authority in England; and what proportion of them are studying for (1) academic, and (2) vocational qualifications, at state schools (a) within, and (b) outside, the local authority.

Information is not available for the specific breakdowns requested.

There are 2 table attachments for this response. The first table attachment (titled ‘Annex A’), has local authority level data showing the proportion of the population aged 17 in education and training as at March 2020. The proportion of 17 year olds participating will include those studying academic and vocational qualifications, participating on an apprenticeship or in wider training or re-engagement activity that complies with raising the participation age requirements. Activity can take place in schools, general further education colleges, sixth form colleges or private training providers.

The second table attachment for this response (titled ‘Annex B’), has local authority level data giving the proportion of children aged 17 in each local authority who attend state schools within and outside the local authority they reside, as at January 2020.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the new national Behaviour Survey, outlined by the Education Secretary in his speech to the Confederation of School Trusts on 28 April, will set out the connection between the details of pupil behaviour and any sanctions applied; if not, whether the survey will record the details of behaviour that results in exclusions; and whether such information will be linked to the unique pupil number so that related pupil characteristics can be explored.

This government is committed to improving behaviour and discipline in schools because we know the impact poor pupil behaviour can have on education as well as teacher wellbeing and retention.

On 28 April, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced that a new termly national Behaviour Survey will be running during the next academic year to give a regular snapshot of the state of behaviour in our schools. Further details on its scope will be made clear in due course.

Statistics on suspensions and permanent exclusions can be found from the National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2018 to 2019’ across state-funded schools. This includes the reasons schools report for excluding and exclusion by different pupil characteristics. The release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2018-to-2019.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for requiring schools that are responsible for their own admissions policies to provide their local education authority with (1) data on the most recent admissions round, and (2) their current admissions policies.

Local authorities will hold data on the most recent admission round because they receive all applications in the normal admissions round and send out offers of places on the national offer days, which are 1 March for secondary schools and 16 April for primary schools.

All admission arrangements for state-funded schools are also published in the local authority composite admissions prospectus which can be found on each local authority’s website.

Admission authorities are required, by the School Admissions Code and the School Information (England) Regulations 2008, to send their admission arrangements to their local authorities for inclusion in the composite prospectus by 8 August each year.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what basis the Office of the Children's Commissioner for England categorises 'children withdrawn from school to be home educated' as 'vulnerable children'.

The Office of the Children’s Commissioner is independent of the government and Parliament.

Children can be vulnerable for many different reasons. For the majority, being home educated will not affect the risk they are at. The government supports the right of parents to educate children at home when they wish to do so. Educating children at home works well when it is a positive choice and carried out with a proper regard for the needs of the child. However, we are looking carefully at the rise in Elective Home Education (EHE), particularly in respect to those children who have a social worker, education health and care plan or are known to children’s social care.

Following the announcement made by my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, on 22 February 2021, children are expected to attend provision from 8 March 2021. We are working closely with local authorities to encourage a return to full attendance in school and will be monitoring the situation, particularly to ensure that vulnerable children make a good transition back to school where they have not attended during the period of national restrictions. Where parents are anxious about the safety of their children returning to school, local authorities and school leaders will be reinforcing that it is in the best interests of pupils to return to school, particularly those who are vulnerable and might miss out most from time away from the classroom.

It is the responsibility of local authorities to take action when it appears that the EHE provision made by parents is unsuitable or a request for a child to be electively home educated would place the child at risk. If parents are unable to satisfy the local authority that the provision is suitable then the local authority can serve a school attendance order on the parents. In April 2019 we issued new and strengthened guidance to local authorities on how they can exercise these powers.

On 20 October 2020 we published advice for parents considering EHE, see link https://dfemedia.blog.gov.uk/2020/10/20/all-you-need-to-know-about-home-schooling-and-elective-home-education-ehe. This is designed to be shared with parents, schools, social workers and local authorities, where the option of EHE is raised. The document is intended to make clear implications of withdrawing their child from school and the challenge involved in providing EHE. At the same time we also produced information for local authorities and those who work with children, to set out how we expect those with duties to ensure children receive a suitable education to use their powers to engage with parents considering EHE where appropriate. This is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/elective-home-education.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what Cabinet-level interdepartmental discussions have taken place in the last year about the ‘not in education, employment or training’ (NEET) rate for 18 to 24-year olds; what objectives have been set for this NEET rate; and what steps they will take to achieve those objectives.

My hon. Friend, the Minister for Apprenticeships and Skills recently met with my hon. Friend, the Minister for Employment to discuss how our respective departments can work even more closely on the skills and employment agenda to ensure people are equipped with the skills they need for their futures and are informed about their options.

We know that 13.1% of 18-24 year olds in the UK were not in education, employment or training (NEET) in July – September 2020, according to the Office for National Statistics, which represents a fall on the same quarter from last year (13.3% July – September 2019). We will continue to monitor the NEET rate and review the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on young people NEET.

As part of my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Plan for Jobs, we made a number of skills commitments such as a significant expansion of the traineeships programme, the introduction of high value courses for year 13 leavers to continue in learning and payments for employers to hire new apprentices. We are tripling the scale of the traineeship programme to help even more young people who are NEET or at risk of being NEET, prepare for apprenticeships and work through a combination of sector-focused skills development and work experience. Alongside the expansion, we have reformed the traineeship programme to enable providers to deliver a more flexible and tailored programme during the COVID-19 outbreak. We are working with employers to develop sector-focused models of traineeships that prepare young people for specific roles, such as construction.

The National Careers Service in the community prioritises those aged 18-24 NEET and supports those most in need of intensive careers advice and guidance.

Kickstart and the introduction of Youth Hubs by the Department for Work and Pensions will also create many high quality work placements for young people claiming Universal Credit deemed at risk of long-term unemployment. More sector-based work academy programmes will provide vocational training and guaranteed interviews for more people, helping them gain the skills needed for jobs in their local area. We will be monitoring progress and take up of these offers alongside NEET numbers.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that schools and local education authorities have available to them best-practice guides on (1) race issues, and (2) the Black Lives Matter campaign, so that they do not have to rely on advice from third parties; and what assessment they have made of reports of pressure groups with divisive philosophies seeking to provide schools with educational materials on these subjects.

The Department for Education is committed to an inclusive education system which recognises and embraces diversity, and supports all pupils and students to tackle racism and have the knowledge and tools to do so.

We want to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe. We also want to equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society. That is why we are making Relationships Education compulsory for primary school-age pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for secondary school-age pupils and Health Education compulsory for pupils in all state-funded schools, from September 2020.

The statutory guidance sets out that as part of Relationships Educations, all primary-aged pupils will be taught the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them, or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs. Pupils will also be taught what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive. As with other aspects of the curriculum, schools will have flexibility over how they deliver these subjects, so they can develop an integrated approach that is sensitive to the needs and background of their pupils. The statutory guidance can be accessed via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

The statutory guidance sets out clear advice on choosing resources. Schools should assess each resource they intend to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and sensitive to their needs. These resources must be factually accurate. We also expect schools to consult with parents on these matters and to make reasonable decisions about the content of their curriculum. Schools should also ensure that, when they engage parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use, for example the books or materials they will use in lessons.

In Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) Education and Citizenship Education, pupils can develop their understanding of the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding.

Schools are required to actively promote fundamental British values, including democracy as well as the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of those of different faith and beliefs. The Department for Education has published advice for schools on promoting these values, and has made resources available through the ‘Educate Against Hate’ website. This website provides teachers, school leaders and parents with the information, guidance and support they need to challenge radical and discriminatory beliefs. Schools should also be aware of duties regarding impartiality and balanced treatment of political issues in the classroom to ensure content is handled in an appropriate way.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to endorse the advice relating to children with special educational needs and disabilities outlined in the report by Stonewall An Introduction to Supporting LGBT Children and Young People: A guide for schools, colleges and settings, published in March; and what plans they have to issue their own guidance.

Our ambition is for every child, no matter what challenges they face, to have access to a world-class education that sets them up for life. Schools and teachers are free to use their professional experience in how best to meet the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities.

The department does not endorse guidance produced by external organisations. The department’s statutory relationships, sex and health education guidance states that all pupils should receive teaching on LGBT relationships during their school years. Secondary schools should include LGBT content in their teaching and primary schools are strongly encouraged to include families with same-sex parents when teaching about different types of family. Through these subjects, children will be taught about the importance of respectful relationships and the different types of loving and healthy relationships that exist.

The department does not currently have plans to produce more guidance. However, we will ensure that the new programme of support for the new subjects, including training materials, an implementation guide and case studies, are inclusive to all pupils.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their definition of (1) man, (2) woman, (3) male, (4) female, (5) boy, (6) girl, (7) transgender, (8) sex, (9) gender, and (10) gender identity.

In the Equality Act 2010, "man" is defined as "a male of any age"; and "woman" as "a female of any age". The other terms listed in the question are not defined, except that "the protected characteristic of sex" is defined in Section 11 of the Equality Act as a reference to a man or a woman, or to persons of the same sex, as appropriate.

The Government Equalities Office provided a list of terms to help set the context and support respondents in completing the 2018 Gender Recognition Act Consultation. This included short descriptions of the terms ‘sex’, ‘gender’, ‘transgender’ and ‘gender identity’: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/721725/GRA-Consultation-document.pdf

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on the involvement of parents in discussions between a school and a pupil concerning the pupil’s wish to identify as a gender other than the one they were assigned at birth; and which agencies a school should consult, or ask permission from, before deciding to exclude parents from any such discussions.

The department strongly believes that that all children should be supported whilst growing up, so they can thrive and reach their potential in a safe and respectful environment. We recognise these issues are complex and sensitive matters to navigate. Schools and school leaders are well placed to work with parents, pupils and the appropriate range of public services available to support individual children.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to address sex stereotyping in schools.

From September 2020, it will be compulsory for all primary schools to teach relationships education and for all secondary schools to teach relationships and sex education. Health education will be compulsory in all state-funded schools. These subjects directly support the government’s ambitions to end discrimination against women and girls.

Pupils will be taught about stereotypes, consent, mutual respect, management of conflict, sexual violence and laws relating to sex, relationships and young people in an age-appropriate way.

The department’s careers strategy is clear that positive steps are being taken to tackle gender stereotypes in schools. For example, we are exploring how to close the gender divide in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) across educational and professional routes, such as through STEM apprenticeships and the new T levels.

We are funding gender balance programmes in physics and computing which aim to identify practical interventions that schools can implement to improve girls’ participation in these subjects. We are also funding research that will help us to better understand what works to improve girls’ mathematics and physics A-level participation.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy for schools to provide separate (1) changing rooms, and (2) toilets, for boys and girls; whether all or any of such facilities can be gender neutral under their policy; and what action a parent can take if a school is in breach of any such policy.

The department publishes advice to support schools in England to meet the standards set out in school premises regulations. For both maintained schools and academies (including free schools), the regulations state that suitable toilet and washing facilities are provided for the sole use of pupils. It also requires separate toilets for boys and girls aged 8 years or over to be provided except where the toilet facility is provided in a room that can be secured from the inside and that is intended for use by one pupil at a time. Suitable changing accommodation and showers should be provided for pupils aged 11 years and over at the start of the school year who receive physical education.

The department’s advice indicates that schools should take into account the age, number and sex of pupils, and any special requirements they have, when determining whether provision is suitable. It also advises that where there is unisex provision of toilet facilities the privacy of the occupant needs to be ensured, for example, by having adequate enclosure and a full height door.

We trust schools to work with parents to determine what is in the best interests of pupils, where there may be concerns. In the rare cases where this is not the case, parents should register their complaint by following the school’s complaint policy.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the reasons for the changes made in the prospective regulations for the use of asulam in 2020; and what alternative means of controlling bracken will be available in species-rich environments in lowland England.

Asulam is an herbicide active substance that has been used for a number of years to control bracken in the form of the formulated product “Asulox”.

All uses of herbicides are subject to strict regulation to protect people and the environment on the basis of a scientific risk assessment. The usual regulatory process involves approval of the active substance followed by authorisation of the product. However, asulam is not currently approved and so the use of Asulox to control bracken requires an application each year for so-called emergency authorisation. Emergency authorisation requires: a strong case for the importance of bracken control; a strong case that there are no alternatives to asulam use; ensuring that the use of asulam will be limited and controlled; and providing appropriate levels of protection for people and for the environment.

The application for use of Asulox this year has been assessed by the Health and Safety Executive, which concluded that restrictions were necessary. These include a buffer zone to protect aquatic organisms and a restriction to allow aerial application only. Ground-based application has not been allowed as alternative products containing amidosulfuron are available for this purpose. Amidosulfuron products are authorised for use where bracken is present on grassland (which includes moorland and rough grazing). Bracken can also be controlled by mechanical methods such as cutting, crushing and rolling.

6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake an independent assessment of the safety of asulam before the 2021 spraying season.

Applications to use asulam to control bracken are considered afresh each year. The assessment involves consideration of the need for use of asulam, ensuring that the use will be limited and controlled, and ensuring the protection of people and the environment. The assessment is carried out by the Health and Safety Executive with advice from the independent UK Expert Committee on Pesticides. This process will apply to any application received for the use of asulam in 2021.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government under which circumstances a service provider may require a person to provide a gender recognition certificate as a condition of providing services.

A Gender Recognition Certificate is a private, legal document which a person would not usually be required to produce as a condition of accessing services, in the same way that a person would not usually be asked to produce their birth certificate. If evidence of gender is required to access a service, it will normally be possible to provide it in the form of other documents, for example a driving licence or a passport.

The Equality Act allows service providers to offer services to one sex only, for example men’s or women’s toilets or changing rooms. Transgender people can be excluded from single-sex facilities if service providers have a legitimate reason for doing so and if exclusion is the least discriminatory way to proceed.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to require Network Rail to ensure the provision of toilet facilities for the exclusive use of biologically female staff members as well as toilet facilities which can be used by all women.

Network Rail provide separate facilities for women, for men and gender-neutral facilities in accordance with the Public Sector Equality Duty. Network Rail will continue to provide these facilities for their colleagues, which fully meet Government requirements.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what characteristics of the National Insurance number system prevent them being aware how many National Insurance numbers are valid.

The National Insurance Number application process is robust, however there are instances where errors do occur. If it is identified that a National Insurance Number has been allocated and a record created in error, there are processes in place between the Department of Work and Pensions and HMRC to take action to prevent the National Insurance Number being used, for example in cases where a fraudulent application has been identified or a duplicate record has been created in error.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why their systems use National Insurance numbers as personal identifiers if, at any given instant, they do not know whether such numbers are valid.

National Insurance Number are used as Identifiers for National Insurance Number Records; held for each individual who has been allocated a National Insurance Number.

Robust identity checks are undertaken when an application for a National Insurance Number is received. At the point of creation of a National Insurance Record the validity of the record has been confirmed.

Whilst a National Insurance Number is the identifier for a National Insurance account within the Department of Work and Pensions and HMRC, to enable Tax and Contributions to be posted to the citizen’s record and/or the administration of Department Benefits and Pensions, there are robust processes in place to validate a citizen’s/customer’s identity before a benefit/pension will be paid.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many National Insurance numbers were valid on the latest date for which this figure is available.

As of 11:50am on 16th July 2021, the Department Customer Information System (CIS) holds National Insurance Number records for 72, 096, 863 Adults; where a Date of Death is not held on their record. As processes are in place to remediate invalid National Insurance Number records, the volume of Live Adult records are deemed to be valid.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many National Insurance numbers were valid on 21 March.

The Information for 21 March is not available.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend the Unified Information Standard for Protected Characteristics to apply across government; and if so, how they intend to record a rape committed by a male who identifies as a woman with respect to (1) sex, and (2) gender identity.

We are discussing the options for implementing the recommendations with delivery partners and through appropriate stakeholder engagement.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what options they are considering for recording gender reassignment as part of the Unified Information Standard for Protected Characteristics; whether they are considering recording gender identity as part of that consideration; and if so, in what form.

We are discussing the options for implementing the recommendations with delivery partners and through appropriate stakeholder engagement.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what options they are considering for recording sex as part of the Unified Information Standard for Protected Characteristics; and in particular, what consideration they are giving to those instances where sex may be hard to determine or non-standard in its expression.

We are discussing the options for implementing the recommendations with delivery partners and through appropriate stakeholder engagement.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to require NHS doctors, when prescribing a treatment off-label, to encourage patients to allow their data to be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment; what plans they have to provide mechanisms whereby (1) consent and refusal may be easily recorded, and (2) relevant data may be made available for academic evaluation; and what plans they have to review such evaluations in order to reduce the percentage of off-label prescribing.

The Government has no plans to do so. However, the Department with NHS England and NHS Improvement, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence, the National Institute of Health Research recently launched a repurposing medicines programme which aims to strengthen the evidence base, licensing, supply and cost effectiveness of medicines being used outside their original medical indication. The aim is to improve clinical outcomes and patient experience by taking action to enable more equitable access to those medicines prioritised for adoption into the programme.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discourage the sale of (1) puberty blockers, and (2) cross-sex hormones, over the internet to children who do not have (a) a prescription, or (b) parental permission.

We would expect all registered pharmacies and pharmacists to meet the regulatory standards set by the General Pharmaceutical Council or the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland when considering dispensing any lawfully valid prescription. This includes puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones.

The Department has agreed with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to investigate changes to regulations that would allow the CQC to take enforcement action against online healthcare providers.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Care Quality Commission’s justification for the use of the word gender in the equality and human rights statement on its website reflects Government policy.


The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has used the word ‘gender’ instead of ‘sex’ in their Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Policy and Principles of Workforce Equality Monitoring since these documents were introduced in 2011.

These documents were reviewed by the CQC’s Staff Equality Networks and approved by the CQC’s Joint Negotiating and Consultation Committee, which includes trade union representatives and senior managers, alongside external, national union officers and were signed-off by the CQC’s board at that time.

The use of the word ‘gender’ did not arise as an issue of concern whilst completing Equality Impact Assessments for new human resources policies. It was neither subject to a specific assessment nor to legal advice at the time, but Government Legal Services have now reviewed the CQC’s use of the word gender in these documents and confirmed that this meets the requirements of the Equality Act 2010.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their current estimate for (1) the proportion of polymerase chain reaction tests for COVID-19 that are false positives, and (2) the number of cycles that such tests now go through; and whether they will place details of the research that supports the estimate of false positives and the decision on the number of cycles to be used in the Library of the House.

The current sensitivity of our polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for COVID-19 at our lighthouse laboratories is over 99%. It is not possible to provide a precise figure for the number of cycles PCR tests for COVID-19 go through as this will vary from test to test based on a variety of different factors. All manufacturers of PCR tests for COVID-19 must meet the requirements of our validation process to ensure the accuracy of their tests. These requirements, National technical validation process for manufacturers of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tests, are published online at GOV.UK.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Blackwood of North Oxford on 31 July 2019 (HL15681), when they estimate that the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust will publish the data collated as part of its study into early pubertal suppression in a group of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of gender dysphoria.

The paper produced from this study was submitted for publication earlier this year and has now been subject to peer review. It is expected to be published shortly.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they are providing to the public, and via which channels, to help them reduce the risk of being defrauded by those impersonating the staff of the NHS test and trace service through texts, emails and phone calls; and who is responsible for taking steps to reduce the risk of such attempted frauds.

The NHS Test and Trace service was launched on 28 May 2020 and information on how the service will contact people by text, email and phone was published on 27 May in an online only format on GOV.UK.

Guidance on advice on how to protect yourself and business from fraud and cyber crime was released by the Home Office. This is available in an online only format on GOV.UK. It was last updated on 27 April 2020.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who is responsible for reducing the risk of the public receiving fraudulent calls or emails purporting to come from the local authority and other teams involved in the NHS test and trace service.

The Government launched its new NHS Test and Trace service on 28 May 2020. This includes enhanced contact tracing.

NHS Test and Trace has been developed to government security standards and we have been working with the National Cyber Security Centre, on measures to keep the public safe. The NHS Test and Trace service uses text messages, email or phone. All text or emails will ask people to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing website with a set of unique characters provided alongside a secure link to the site. For those people that are unable to respond via email or text, perhaps because they do not have those options available to them, a phone-based service will contact them and support them through the process.

If the public are concerned about whether a call or email they receive comes from NHS Test and Trace service they can visit GOV.UK and view a page which lists the official phone numbers used by this service and can also check what is and is not going to be asked.

If anyone thinks they have been sent a scam message, they can report it to Action Fraud. If people receive an email which they are not quite sure about, they can forward it to the National Cyber Security Centre’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service and to report a spam text, they can forward the message to Ofcom’s spam texting service on 7726.

Any action to investigate reports of potential fraud will fall to the police / National Crime Agency and if prosecuted it will be for the courts to decide sentencing.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the penalties under civil or criminal law for (1) those organising frauds relating to the NHS test and trace service, () those aiding and abetting them, and (3) those who fail to take reasonable steps to protect their customers against such fraud; and what are the penalties for those employed in the NHS test and trace service, whether as individuals or as organisations, for misusing the information to which they have access.

The Government launched its new NHS Test and Trace service on 28 May 2020. This includes enhanced contact tracing.

NHS Test and Trace has been developed to government security standards and we have been working with the National Cyber Security Centre, on measures to keep the public safe. The NHS Test and Trace service uses text messages, email or phone. All text or emails will ask people to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing website with a set of unique characters provided alongside a secure link to the site. For those people that are unable to respond via email or text, perhaps because they do not have those options available to them, a phone-based service will contact them and support them through the process.

If the public are concerned about whether a call or email they receive comes from NHS Test and Trace service they can visit GOV.UK and view a page which lists the official phone numbers used by this service and can also check what is and is not going to be asked.

If anyone thinks they have been sent a scam message, they can report it to Action Fraud. If people receive an email which they are not quite sure about, they can forward it to the National Cyber Security Centre’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service and to report a spam text, they can forward the message to Ofcom’s spam texting service on 7726.

Any action to investigate reports of potential fraud will fall to the police / National Crime Agency and if prosecuted it will be for the courts to decide sentencing.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the process for reporting suspicious texts, emails and phone calls purporting to relate to the NHS test and trace service; to whom should such reports be made; whether Action Fraud and the Suspicious Email Reporting Service are involved; and, if so, whether there any plans for a separate, simpler process accessed from the main page of Action Fraud.

The Government launched its new NHS Test and Trace service on 28 May 2020. This includes enhanced contact tracing.

NHS Test and Trace has been developed to government security standards and we have been working with the National Cyber Security Centre, on measures to keep the public safe. The NHS Test and Trace service uses text messages, email or phone. All text or emails will ask people to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing website with a set of unique characters provided alongside a secure link to the site. For those people that are unable to respond via email or text, perhaps because they do not have those options available to them, a phone-based service will contact them and support them through the process.

If the public are concerned about whether a call or email they receive comes from NHS Test and Trace service they can visit GOV.UK and view a page which lists the official phone numbers used by this service and can also check what is and is not going to be asked.

If anyone thinks they have been sent a scam message, they can report it to Action Fraud. If people receive an email which they are not quite sure about, they can forward it to the National Cyber Security Centre’s Suspicious Email Reporting Service and to report a spam text, they can forward the message to Ofcom’s spam texting service on 7726.

Any action to investigate reports of potential fraud will fall to the police / National Crime Agency and if prosecuted it will be for the courts to decide sentencing.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
The Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the Written Answer by Lord McFall of Alcluith on 27 May (HL4295), whether he will supply full details of the regular surveys and other measures proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives to tackle bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct.

The Independent Complaints and Grievance Scheme, which constitutes a Parliament-wide regime for tackling bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct, was subject to a review after six months of operation, which has been published on the UK Parliament website, and a further review (the ’18-month review’) is planned for later this year, which is also expected to be published. This will be led by an independent reviewer, supported by an advisory panel, and will be an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of the Scheme, as well as to consider specific policy changes as directed by the 6-month review. The Codes of Conduct for Lords Members and Lords Members’ Staff now include the ICGS provisions on bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct, and these are kept under active review by the Conduct Committee.

In addition to the work to review the effectiveness of the ICGS, additional formal mechanisms are in place or planned which will help to assess progress on improving the broader workplace culture in the House of Lords and specific progress on addressing the recommendations made by Naomi Ellenbogen QC in 2019 in her review of bullying and harassment in the House of Lords. These include the Steering Group for Change, composed of staff and peer representatives, tasked with monitoring progress of implementation of Naomi Ellenbogen QC ’s report on bullying and harassment in the House of Lords, and providing advice and support to the Management Board and House of Lords Commission on their response to the report. There will also be a 12-month review of progress in implementing the recommendations of that report.

6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the tweet by the Department of Health and Social Care on 4 May that “There is emerging evidence to suggest that coronavirus may be having a disproportionate impact on some ethnic groups, as well as certain genders”, on what evidence they base their statement that gender affects the impact of COVID-19; what is their definition of gender when making that statement; how many affected genders they believe there to be; which are those affected genders; what consideration they gave to using the phrase “male” in place of “certain genders”; and what plans they have to use such a formulation in future.

The Government is concerned by the apparent disparities in how COVID-19 is affecting people. We have asked Public Health England to complete a rapid review to understand how COVID-19 may be having an impact on different groups of concern.

Short descriptions of the terms ‘sex’, ‘gender’, ‘transgender’ and ‘gender identity’ have been published by the Government Equalities Office.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 17 March (HL2178), whether NHS patients in England can request to have intimate examinations carried out by a doctor of a specified biological sex; and whether such requests are always adhered to.

National Health Service organisations set their own policies on patients’ ability to specify the gender of the staff treating them.

One of the NHS Constitution’s founding values is that of respect and dignity for patients, carers and staff in accordance with their needs and priorities and ensuring these are considered when designing and delivering services.

The General Medical Council guidance to doctors states that, when proposing to carry out an intimate examination, doctors should offer the patient the option of having an impartial observer (a chaperone) present wherever possible. This applies whether or not the doctor is the same gender as the patient, and they must treat patients as individuals and respect their dignity and privacy.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 17 March (HL2718), whether the NHS issues any guidance to NHS organisations related to policies on patients' ability to specify the sex or gender of the staff treating them; and whether such policies are (1) co-ordinated, or (2) compared in any way.

National Health Service organisations set their own policies on patients’ ability to specify the gender of the staff treating them.

One of the NHS Constitution’s founding values is that of respect and dignity for patients, carers and staff in accordance with their needs and priorities and ensuring these are considered when designing and delivering services.

The General Medical Council guidance to doctors states that, when proposing to carry out an intimate examination, doctors should offer the patient the option of having an impartial observer (a chaperone) present wherever possible. This applies whether or not the doctor is the same gender as the patient, and they must treat patients as individuals and respect their dignity and privacy.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the competence of people under the age of 16 to give informed consent to medical procedures which may affect their fecundity; how they decide who is competent to record and assess such consent; whether that person performing those functions is independent of the person proposing the medical procedure; and if not, why not.

The issue of informed consent by people under the age of 16 is currently the subject of legal proceedings and therefore the Department is unable to comment pending judicial ruling.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what research they are conducting to improve the medical (1) assessment, and (2) treatment of, children presenting with gender dysphoria.

Last year the National Institute for Health Research funded a £1.3 million longitudinal research study, titled Outcomes and Predictors of Outcome for Children and Young People Referred to UK Gender Identity Development Services. The results of the study will be made available via articles and publications.

In parallel to this work NHS England has also asked the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to deliver guidelines that will define referral criteria into the Gender Identity Development Service. NICE will also undertake a thorough review of the latest clinical evidence to help inform NHS England and Improvement’s review of the service specification for gender identity development services for children and young people.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on recording biological sex, legal sex and gender identity when a person donates blood; and how any such policy recognises biological sex-related risks such as transfusion-related acute lung injury.

NHS Blood and Transplant, which is accountable to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, is responsible for the provision of a reliable, safe and efficient supply of blood to hospitals in England.

All donors complete an extensive donor health check questionnaire before each donation. The donations are then screened for infections before the blood is sent to hospitals.

NHS Blood and Transplant respects and accepts the self-identified gender of the person presenting to give blood. Both the potential donor’s assigned sex at birth and their self-identifying gender are recorded. This information is then used to dictate how NHS Blood and Transplant uses any donated product in respect of biological sex-related risks – including transfusion-related acute lung injury.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what policies the NHS has in place for patients who require to be treated and cared for by staff of a particular sex.

As stated in the NHS Constitution, patients have the right to express a preference for using a particular doctor within their general practitioner practice, and the practice must try to meet this request. In other instances, National Health Service organisations set their own policies on patients’ ability to specify the gender of the staff treating them.

In addition, the General Medical Council guidance to doctors states that, when proposing to carry out an intimate examination, doctors should offer the patient the option of having an impartial observer (a chaperone) present wherever possible. This applies whether or not the doctor is the same gender as the patient.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the official Twitter account for the House of Lords celebrating Pride month, what plans there are to celebrate other protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010 on the same account.

The Administration wants to reach a broad and diverse audience via its social media channels and different content is devised for LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For this reason, the House of Lords Official Twitter account has run campaigns previously relating to the following characteristics: Race, Religion, Gender and LGBT+; as well as national campaigns such as Mental Health Awareness Week and National Inclusion Week.

The purpose of this is to create communications and engagement initiatives which seek to enhance the reputation and demonstrate the impact of the House of Lords, building a compelling case for its continued place at the heart of the UK’s parliamentary democracy. The Administration will continue to look for opportunities to deliver a diverse range of campaigns which reflect the diversity of our audiences.

19th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have for the police in England and Wales to follow the reported approach of Police Scotland of recording male perpetrators of rape or attempted rape who self-identify as female, as female on relevant police systems.

The Government takes all forms of sexual violence extremely seriously, regardless of between who it takes place or the profile of the perpetrator. Whether it is committed by a woman or a man, sexual violence in any situation, is completely unacceptable.

A total of 162,936 sexual offences were recorded by the police in England and Wales in the year ending March 2020.

More details on the prevalence of sexual offences can be found at https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/articles/sexualoffencesprevalenceandtrendsenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2020

It is an operational matter for the police to determine what relevant information should be recorded to assist in their investigation of individual crimes.

Home Office statisticians work with the Office for Statistics Regulation (OSR) on the quality of data from the police. The OSR have issued guidance on the collection and reporting of data about sex in official statistics which informs on-going conversations the Department has with policing partners on the issue of data:

https://osr.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/publication/draft-guidance-collecting-and-reporting-data-about-sex-in-official-statistics/

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to enable operators of the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) to respond to individuals forwarding suspicious phishing emails to the service to confirm (1) the outcome of their investigations, (2) the actions taken, and which (a) phone numbers, (b) email addresses, and (c) web pages have been blocked as a result.

The Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) was launched by the NCSC in April 2020 and allows anyone who suspects an email, text or other form of communication to report it to report@phishing.gov.uk or forward a text to 7726, free of charge. As of 31st March 2021, over 5,500,000 reports have been received from the public, leading to the removal of over 41,000 scams and 81,000 URLs.

The NCSC analyses the suspect email and any websites it links to and also use any additional information provided to look for and monitor suspicious activity. If any activity is discovered that they believe is malicious, they may:

  • seek to block the address the email came from, so it can no longer send emails;
  • work with hosting companies to remove links to malicious websites;
  • raise awareness of commonly reported suspicious emails and methods used (via partners).

Every report receives an automated email response. While the NCSC is unable to inform the reporter of the outcome of its review, they do act upon every message received.

The automated response also states that SERS is not to be used to report a crime. If a person thinks they have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, it is important that they should report this to Action Fraud (in England, Wales and Northern Ireland) and Police Scotland (in Scotland). Reports received are analysed by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and, where there is sufficient evidence, disseminated to an appropriate force for investigation. Action Fraud, as part of this process, also has the means to direct victims to specialist support organisations.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 17 March (HL Deb, col 371), that “on an experimental basis” they “will ask police forces to identify and record any crimes of violence against the person, including stalking and harassment, as well as sexual offences where the victim perceives it to have been motivated by a hostility based on their sex”, whether the police will record the sex of the victim on the basis of the victim’s legal sex or of their self-identified sex.

The Home Office is discussing this request with the police in the near future, following which further details about the data collection will be made available.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will change the focus of the current round of the Safer Streets Fund so that all applications aimed at protecting women from attack are eligible.

Recent tragic events have highlighted the importance of ensuring people are safe whilst walking our streets.

We have announced we are investing a further £25m into the Safer Streets Fund this year, focused on ensuring people feel safe in public spaces and building on the £45m we have already committed. This investment will be launched in May once the Purdah period attached to local council and Police and Crime Commissioner elections has ended.

The Fund will deliver physical crime prevention measures, such as improved street lighting or increased CCTV coverage. There is strong evidence to show that simple solutions like these help prevent crimes before they happen, empowering communities and individuals, including women and girls, to feel truly safe.

The ongoing application process for the second, £20m round of Safer Streets Funding will remain unchanged.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 3 February (HL12365), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what assessment they have made of the change in rates of sexual abuse by women reported to police; and what assessment they have made of the impact of police recording suspects' self-identified gender on the number of cases of sexual abuse being recorded as committed by women.

As set out in my response, information on sexual abuse committed by transgender women is not held centrally. Information on trends in sexual offences recorded by the police is routinely published by the Office for National Statistics. The most recent publication, is available here; https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingseptember2020.

The Office for National Statistics had made it clear that sexual offences recorded by the police do not provide a reliable measure of trends in these types of crime. Sexual offences, including examples of sexual abuse, are underreported and therefore cannot be used to accurately assess changes in perpetrator demographics.

The Government takes all forms of sexual abuse extremely seriously, regardless of between who it takes place or the profile of the perpetrator. Whether it is committed by a woman or a man, sexual abuse in any situation, is unacceptable.

We are taking action to improve outcomes for rape cases through our end-to-end review of the criminal justice response to rape, which commenced in Spring 2019. The review covers from the point of police report through to final outcome in court.

We are committed to ensuring victims receive the support they deserve - the Ministry of Justice has awarded £12 million to 91 rape support centres across England and Wales in 2020/21 to provide independent, specialist support to female and male victims of sexual violence. This represents a total investment of £32m over the last three years.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the change in rates of sexual abuse by women reported to police, and (2) the impact of reports of sexual abuse committed by transgender women in contributing to any such change; and what plans they have, if any, to undertake further research into these issues.

Information on trends in sexual offences recorded by the police is routinely published by the Office for National Statistics. The most recent publication, Crime in England and Wales: Year ending June 2020, is available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingjune2020

Figures for the year ending December 2020 are due to be published on the 3 February. Information on sexual abuse committed by transgender women is not held centrally.

We know that sexual abuse disproportionately affects women and girls. We are currently running a Call for Evidence which is available on GOV.uk (https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/violence-against-women-and-girls-vawg-call-for-evidence ) and will help inform our forthcoming Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy, due for publication this Spring.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment was made of compliance with (1) the Equality Act 2010, and (2) the exemptions under that Act, of the Security Industry Authority’s publication Trans customers: a guide for door supervisors, published in October 2018; and whether under this guidance a door supervisor presented with documentation as evidence of age by a trans customer where the image on such documentation does not match the appearance of that customer must admit such a customer.

The Security Industry Authority (SIA) publication ‘Trans Customers: A Guide for Door Supervisors’ reflects the Government Equalities Office’ guidance ‘Providing Services for Trans Customers’. The SIA’s guide was reviewed by the Government Equalities Office prior to its publication in 2018.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what supplementary budgets and resources are being provided to Action Fraud and the Suspicious Email Reporting Service to handle incidents of impersonation and fraud relating to the NHS test and trace service, and to support effective action against the perpetrators.

Reporting fraud and suspicious emails forms part of the core business of Action Fraud (AF) and the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) respectively.

Whilst there is a risk that the number of fraud reports increases, we believe that AF’s services are sufficiently equipped to respond to these effectively from within their existing resources. We will work closely with City of London Police (owners of the Action Fraud service) to ensure that this still remains the case as the service is expanded.

With regard to any increase in reports to SERS, it is an automated system designed to triage and – if found to be malicious - act upon reports of suspicious emails. As an automated service it can scale accordingly, without the requirement for supplementary budget or resource. In the six weeks since its launch, it has received and automatically acted upon over 670,000 reports.

The Home Office, NCSC, City of London Police and other stakeholders are already working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care to ensure that the service is delivered in a way which minimises the risk of fraud.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 May (HL3707), what is the current status of their Suspicious Emails Reporting Service.

In April 2020, the NCSC launched the Suspicious Email Reporting Service. This initiative by the NCSC makes a significant contribution to the Government’s aim to make the UK the safest place to live and work online.

As of 14 May, the Suspicious Email Reporting Service has had more than 300,000 emails submitted, leading to over 2,500 unique URLs, which resulted in 600 bogus sites being taken down. Examples of threats the NCSC has removed with the help of the reporting service include:

- Scam web pages that have been flagged include mock-ups of official GOV.uk and TV licencing websites (visitors are lured into giving their billing information to scammers posing as these legitimate organisations).

- Scam web pages purporting to sell coronavirus linked bogus products such as testing kits, face makes and even vaccines. (The NCSC noted a rise in cyber crime exploiting the coronavirus pandemic last month.)

This automated email reporting service makes it easier than ever for people to help protect others from falling victim to scams. To use the reporting service, people are asked to simply forward suspect emails to report@phishing.gov.uk. If they are found to link to malicious content, it will be taken down or blocked, helping prevent future victims of crime.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th May 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans there are for the (1) long-term evaluation, and (2) follow-up, of the Valuing Everyone training sessions.

Valuing Everyone is a training module designed specifically for Parliament that aims to raise awareness of, and confidence to tackle, bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct, as well as to highlight the sources of support available to those who have experienced this behaviour. Variations of this training are offered to staff of both Houses, members of both Houses and members’ staff.

The training is part of a suite of initiatives that together ensure that Parliament is a safe and respectful workplace, with zero tolerance of bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct. The two Houses will continue to conduct regular surveys, among other measures, to evaluate the effectiveness of these initiatives.

Participants are routinely asked to complete feedback forms, and the results of these (including those from MPs and Peers) demonstrate that participants have an overwhelmingly positive experience of the training, and in particular report that they are better able to recognise and call out unacceptable behaviour. These, together with ad hoc feedback from participants, allow an ongoing dialogue enabling the course to remain relevant and suitable for all parts of the parliamentary community. In addition, the training provider submits regular anonymised reports to the two Houses on themes that have emerged during the training, so that appropriate steps can be taken to address risks or to communicate more effectively about Parliament’s response to bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct.

30th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to add a link to the SAFERjobs scheme to webpages where they advise the public on how to report suspicious emails and phishing attempts.

It is up to SAFERJobs to include any guidance that the government provides. The Government is, however, continuing to put out general advice to the public on staying safe online.

On 21 April the Government launched a revised Cyber Aware campaign, to coincide with the launch of the NCSC’s new Suspicious Email Reporting Service. The new campaign will:

  • Provide the public and key stakeholders (industry, academia, tech community etc) with the assurance that HMG and the Intelligence and law enforcement community are working on their behalf to minimise the cyber threat;
  • Empower the public and micro-businesses to understand the best ways to stay safe online and feel empowered to take necessary protective actions; and
  • Support NCSC and wider efforts to combat the threat ‘at source’, taking down or blocking malicious URLs and SMS messages, and working behind the scenes to stop the threat reaching the public. We will prioritise areas where there is the most need for user behaviour to change, or there is active public concern.

We also recently launched a gov.uk page on coronavirus-related fraud and cybercrime. The page includes easy-to-follow steps for people to better protect themselves and signposts other relevant advice and tips. It can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-fraud-and-cyber-crime

The public should make all reports of fraudulent phishing emails and telephone calls to Action Fraud which is the national reporting facility for fraud and cyber crime https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what their policy is on the reporting by the public of fraudulent and phishing emails and telephone calls; to what email addresses or on what web pages such reports should be made; and what action the public may expect to be taken when such reports are made.

The public should make all reports of fraudulent phishing emails and telephone calls to Action Fraud which is the national reporting facility for fraud and cyber crime.

Action Fraud takes reports via its call centre and website. The contact centre’s operating hours are from 08:00 to 20:00 (Monday to Friday) but reports can be made at any time using their online reporting tool. There is also a dedicated 24/7 call service for live cyber incidents. The web pages can be found at: https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

Crime reports received by Action Fraud are considered by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB), both of which are operated by the City of London Police, the UK's national lead force for Fraud. Where enough evidence is available and viable leads are identified, actionable intelligence packages are created and sent to the appropriate local police force for them to consider whether they will adopt the report and commence enforcement activity. It remains the responsibility of local police to consider whether to progress any enforcement activity even where viable lines of enquiry have been identified by NFIB. Individuals can check the status of their reports through the website to see whether it’s been disseminated to a local force for investigation, and if an outcome has been recorded.

NFIB can also take down fraudulent websites, telephone numbers and close bank accounts linked to fraud.

Reports not deemed viable for investigation remain under constant consideration for links to newly reported crimes. The intelligence is also used to identify opportunities to disrupt offenders and to protect victims and prevent further frauds through warnings given out by Action Fraud through various channels and in collaboration with other counter fraud bodies and organisations.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy regarding the use of the phrase 'gender identity’, as opposed to the protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010 of ‘gender reassignment’ in such official documents as the Hate Crime Operational Guidance and the Crown Prosecutions Service’s LGBT Hate Crimes Schools Pack.

In the context of Government publications related to hate crime, the terms race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or transgender identity are used to refer to the characteristics which offences can be aggravated by.

This terminology is consistent with the national definition of hate crime agreed between the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Crown Prosecution Service, and relevant legislation, including sections 145 and 146 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy concerning the recording of incidents involving the protected characteristic of sex under the Equality Act 2010 as hate crimes.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics annually on the number of hate crime offences recorded by the police in England and Wales, broken down by five centrally monitored strands: race, religion, sexual orientation, disability and transgender identity.

Operational guidance for recording of hate crimes is set out by the College of Policing and the latest published guidance is available here:

https://www.report-it.org.uk/files/hate_crime_operational_guidance.pdf

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Equality and Human Rights Commission about amendments to its guidance on the Equality Act 2010 to help providers of services understand how to handle requests for access to services and facilities from transgender people.

Those seeking to rely on the protections and exemptions contained in the Equality Act 2020 must be able to do so with confidence and clarity. The Equality and Human Rights Commission's statutory codes of practice on the Equality Act 2010 explain the provisions of the Act and the EHRC is responsible for updating these codes as necessary.

This Government has been clear that we must take the right steps to protect safe single-sex spaces for women and girls; their access should not be jeopardised. Some women's organisations have expressed concern that predatory men may abuse the gender recognition system, intended to support transgender adults. We have heard these concerns and are considering carefully our next steps.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect the pilot projects funded through the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will begin; what criteria will be used to select these pilots; and which (1) priority groups, and (2) geographic areas, the Fund will target.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK?for people and?places


Funding for the UKSPF will ramp up so that total domestic UK-wide funding will?at least match receipts from EU structural funds, on average reaching around £1.5 billion per?year.?Its funding profile will be set out at the next Spending Review


To help local areas prepare over 2021-22 for the introduction of the UKSPF, the Government will provide?£220 million?additional funding to support our communities to pilot programmes and new approaches. This funding will be delivered UK-wide. Further details will be published in the New Year.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether an individual who is convicted of (1) rape, or (2) sexual assault, is recorded in crime statistics under their (a) gender identity, or (b) biological sex.

In the courts proceedings database we use binary sex rather than gender, because the binary classification better reflects how individuals are generally reported or managed through the CJS. Sex refers to whether someone is male or female based on their physiology, with ‘gender’ representing a social construct or sense of self that takes a wider range of forms. For example, prisons are either male or female institutions, with prisoners normally placed based on their legally recognised gender. However, given the range of recording practices throughout the CJS, it is likely that most recording includes a mixture of physiological and personal identity.

The recorded sex of defendants dealt with for rape and sexual assault offences can be found in our outcomes by offence tool here (search the drop down list in ‘offence’ and ‘sex’):[DXW1]

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987715/outcomes-by-offence-2020.xlsx

Offences of aiding, abetting, or conspiracy to, rape are recorded as rape offences in our outcomes by offence tool, but are not separately identifiable.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 13 March (HL2225), what is their policy on limiting the discretion of courts to refuse to make a compensation order on the basis of the behaviour of the victim; and what information they hold on the percentage of cases in which compensation was refused for such reasons in the last year for which figures are available.

Under the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000, courts are required to consider making a compensation order in cases involving personal injury, loss or damage, and to give reasons where no such order is made. There are no current plans to amend the court’s powers in respect of compensation orders.

Sentencing in individual cases is entirely a matter for the independent courts taking into account the circumstances of the case.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on convictions and sentencing up to December 2018, which is available in the ‘Outcomes by Offence data tool’, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

Information on the sentencing considerations for individual cases is not held centrally and would require a manual search of court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 13 March (HL2223), what guidance is given to prison governors on how to assess the balance between the rights of transgender individuals in custody and those of others in custody around them, as referred to in the Ministry of Justice Policy Framework on The care and management of individuals who are transgender; what examples are provided to illustrate this guidance; and how this guidance enables prison governors to assess the appropriate balance between the risk to inmates of a women's prison from being housed with a biologically male transgender prisoner who has a history of sexual offending and the risk of serious harm to the transgender prisoner if they were housed in a men's prison.

Governors do not have jurisdiction over the estate that a transgender individual is housed within. Rather, Complex Case Boards (CCBs) assess cases of transfers of transgender individuals between the male and female estates. These are chaired by Prison Group Directors (PGDs), who hold the ultimate responsibility for decisions. They are aided by experts and staff who have expertise on transgender identity and/or on the individual in question.

All PGDs who chair such boards are specially trained—in part using case studies, and many also have direct experience of cases. Additionally, there are core members of the CCB process who are invited to all CCBs and have experience of previous cases they have been involved with.

If a transgender female must legally be housed in the female estate, but a CCB deems their risk too high to be managed safely within the general population, HMPPS have alternative provision to enable this – namely through location on HMP Downview E Wing.

The ‘Care and management of individuals who are transgender’ Policy Framework was published on gov.uk within the Prison & Probation Policy Frameworks collection. Operational guidance was also published to accompany the Policy Framework which is available to all Governors and staff, to help them care for and manage transgender individuals. Additionally, E Learning on how best to care for and manage transgender individuals is also available to all Governors and staff.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) biologically female suspects or prisoners can insist on being strip-searched by, and in the presence of, biological females only, and (2) biologically female police or prison officers can refuse to strip-search prisoners or suspects who are biologically male.

There are lawful and effective procedures in place for the searching of prisoners, visitors and staff to ensure the detection of contraband. HMPPS conduct all searches in accordance with PSI 2016-07 Searching of the Person. All full searches must take place out of sight of the opposite sex, as such, staff must not conduct full searches on persons of the opposite sex.

Transgender prisoners who hold a GRC and who are fully post-operative, should be searched by a member of staff of the same gender of the prisoner’s acquired gender; that is, male to female transgender prisoners should be searched by female officers. The prison can insist that there is no discretion in these circumstances, as the prisoner will be both physically and legally of the acquired gender. Male to female transgender prisoners who hold a GRC will be searched according to the women’s full search procedures unless otherwise agreed as part of a voluntary written agreement

Transgender prisoners who do not hold a Gender Recognition Certificate and have not received any treatment (surgical or non surgical) for gender dysphoria, would normally be expected to be full searched by staff of the same legal gender. However, all transgender prisoners must be encouraged to enter into a voluntary written agreement in respect of their searching arrangements on arrival to an establishment. The voluntary agreement should be drawn up by local management and must clearly set out the arrangements for searching the prisoner. The establishment must decide if the agreement is suitable, taking into account such factors as legal considerations, possession of a GRC, sex characteristics of the prisoner, views of the prisoner and staff and the likelihood of the prisoner cooperating with a voluntary compact. It should be recognised that as a voluntary agreement the prisoner may withdraw from it any point in time. The details of the compact may need to change as circumstances change.

Staff may only be exempt from searching transgender prisoners in exceptional circumstances, for example, where there are genuine religious or cultural reasons for an objection.

We are investing £100m in prison security to stop contraband such as drugs, weapons and mobile phones from entering prisons. This includes X-ray baggage scanners and metal detection equipment to enhance searching of visitors and staff and the recently announced X-ray body scanners to detect prisoners concealing contraband inside their body. Searching remains a key element of the range of measures we are deploying to prevent this activity.

PSI 2016-07 Searching of the Person is currently under review and searching arrangements for Transgender prisoners may be revised as part of that review.

I am unable to comment on your question in relation to Police procedures.

4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on housing people with (1) functioning male sexual organs in the female prison estate, and (2) functioning female sexual organs in the male prison estate.

In 2019 the Ministry of Justice conducted a review into the care and management of individuals who are transgender, and this led to the publication of a revised Policy Framework which strengthens the risk and safeguarding process. This was fully implemented on 31st October 2019 across all men’s and women’s prisons.

The Policy Framework provides staff with clear direction in the care and management of transgender individuals, including managing potential risks both to and presented by transgender individuals. Part of this process ensures that a complex case board must be held for an individual to transfer between the male and female estates. This decision is made by taking into account a wide range of individual factors such as risk, offending history and an individual’s personal circumstances, medical history and what stage they are at in their transgender status. The Policy Framework also enables risk to be managed when an individual is placed into a prison which is different to that of their legal gender. The policy can be found on the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-care-and-management-of-individuals-who-are-transgender.

The safety of all prisoners is of paramount concern and it is our priority and commitment to ensuring that those under our care and management are treated fairly, lawfully and decently, with their rights properly respected.