Lord Moylan Portrait

Lord Moylan

Conservative - Life peer

1 APPG membership (as of 15 Jun 2022)
SME (Small and Medium-sized Enterprises) House Builders
Lord Moylan has no previous appointments


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 5th July 2022
09:45
Built Environment Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Public transport in towns and cities
5 Jul 2022, 9:45 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
The Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport at Department for Transport
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Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 12th July 2022
09:45
Division Votes
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 109 Conservative No votes vs 1 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 119
Speeches
Thursday 30th June 2022
Crime, Reoffending and Rehabilitation
My Lords, I am grateful to my noble friend Lord Farmer for initiating this debate. If noble Lords will indulge …
Written Answers
Tuesday 24th May 2022
Prison Sentences
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 4 April (HL7159) which …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Moylan has voted in 294 divisions, and 4 times against the majority of their Party.

28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Moylan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Moylan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Moylan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
21 Jun 2022 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2022 - View Vote Context
Lord Moylan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 88 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 181
View All Lord Moylan Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(22 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(19 debate interactions)
Lord Frost (Conservative)
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(29 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(23 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Moylan's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Moylan, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Moylan has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Moylan has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Moylan has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Moylan has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


33 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effects of the EU’s proposed Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism on trade and commerce in Northern Ireland in the light of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and what consultations they have been offered by the EU on this matter.

The Government has noted the EU’s announcement on the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism. In line with the provisions in Article 13(4) of the Protocol, as an act that falls within the scope of the Protocol, but which neither amends nor replaces a Union act listed in the Annexes to this Protocol, it is a matter for the Joint Committee to determine whether it should apply in Northern Ireland. The EU has informed the UK of its proposal, as required by the Protocol, and we will carefully consider its impact on Northern Ireland and the UK’s internal market, ahead of future discussions in the Joint Committee.

24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what public expenditure has been incurred on the (1) Traders’ Support Scheme, (2) the Movement Assistance Scheme, and (3) other such programmes for the support of Northern Ireland businesses operating under the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and whether they have estimated the full expenditure for 2021.

The UK has taken forward extensive work on and invested substantial sums in the operation of the Protocol since the beginning of the year. The total spend on the Trader Support Service through to May 2021 is £125m. In procuring the contract, the UK Government committed over £200m in trader support through the service, and as it stands the forecast is for around £360m in support over the full two years to the end of 2022.

Since launching in December 2020, the MAS has supported over 140 businesses with the cost of more than 11,400 certificates; the scheme is now confirmed to run until at least December 2023. We have already spent £25 million on the Digital Assistance Scheme and the forecast is that total spend in this area could run to up to £150 million.

11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK construction sector's financial structure, including capital structure; and what assessment they have made of the impact of this on their infrastructure plans.

There are weaknesses in the current business model of the construction sector, with low margins and a high level of reliance on subcontracting, which have contributed to poor productivity compared to other sectors. The Government is working with the construction industry to address these issues, including by investing £420m through the Transforming Construction Challenge in the development and commercialisation of innovations that will improve the productivity, profitability, and sustainability of the industry. The Government has also published the Construction Playbook, which sets the objective of ensuring that the industry can make a fair profit on work undertaken, through a more strategic and collaborative approach to contracting and working with the industry. This will strengthen the financial position of firms in the industry, and incentivise investment by firms to improve their performance.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the removal of COVID-19 restrictions in England, what plans the Royal Parks have to reopen the South Carriage Drive in Hyde Park to vehicular traffic.

The Royal Parks charity manages Hyde Park on behalf of HM Government, and is responsible for decision-making about operational matters.

This is an operational matter for The Royal Parks. We understand, however, that South Carriage Drive has been closed since March 2020 as part of a trial to reduce through traffic in Hyde Park. Whilst the original trial was focused on weekend restrictions, the road has also been closed for safety reasons on weekdays during this period due to the introduction of a temporary cycle path, immediately outside the park, by Transport for London.

We understand that The Royal Parks is currently assessing evidence of the trial on the weekend restrictions, and plans to make an announcement about the closure later this year.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the Office for Students (OfS) has taken since the Secretary of State for Education wrote to it on 8 February stating that “the OfS should not hesitate to use the full range of its powers and sanctions where quality of provision is not high enough”.

We want all higher education students, regardless of their background, to benefit from high quality, world-leading higher education. The letter of 8 February from my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, sets out guidance to the Office for Students as the regulator for higher education, and strategic priorities for the next year and beyond. One of our highest priorities and an important manifesto commitment is to drive up quality and standards in higher education, which is a fundamental part of the levelling up agenda.

The letter of 8 February supports the Office for Students’s consultation on regulating quality and standards, which aims to introduce a more rigorous and effective quality regime and to raise the bar on quality and standards in higher education. The Office for Students has concluded the first stage of its consultation. The Office for Students will shortly consult on the detail of how the quality and standards framework will work, including on how it will identify and take action against poor quality provision.

The government has made it clear that we expect the Office for Students to make rapid progress to ensure that an enhanced regulatory regime is in place, supported by effective and meaningful enforcement action, as soon as possible.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to produce criteria for the evaluation of bicycle lanes created by local highways authorities in response to the statutory guidance Traffic Management Act 2004: network management in response to COVID-19 updated on 13 November; and whether such criteria will include the evaluation of the effects (1) on all modes of transport subject to that Act, and (2) on the emergency services.

The Department is currently developing a framework to help local authorities monitor and evaluate the schemes that they will be delivering through tranche two of the Active Travel Fund. They will be asked to consider, among other things, congestion impacts before and after scheme implementation. All local authorities are required to consult with emergency services on changes to road layouts that require Traffic Regulation Orders as set out in the statutory guidance, and as a condition of funding for schemes delivered through the Active Travel Fund.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which firms have been selected to run electric scooter trials in areas where trials are being undertaken.

11 different companies are operating across the live trial areas. These are: Ginger, Spin, Lime, Beryl, Tier, Zwings, Voi, Bird, Neuron, Zipp, and Wind.

Many of these companies have their own model of scooter which meets the minimum requirements set by the Department. Trials include both short- and long-term rental. The range of trial areas provide a diverse range of local environments in which to assess e-scooter use.

The key areas we are seeking evidence of are the safety of e-scooters, what mode shift they cause, and what impacts they have on other road users. There is no minimum number of operators who need to participate in trials to assess this, but we will additionally seek to learn and share lessons on how different e-scooter providers operate.

The local authorities hosting the trials have selected the operators they wish to work with. They have undertaken their own procurement processes, ensuring that the operators meet both the Department’s and their own requirements for the trial. We have set out these requirements in our guidance for local authorities and have only approved trials where these are met. The requirements include that the operator has geofencing and driving licence checks in place, that local areas have engaged with local police and disability groups, and that data generated will be shared with the Department.

Many of the operators are going beyond these minimum requirements, including providing free helmets to users and offering online or in-person training to use the scooters.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that electric scooter trials test a range of (1) models, (2) providers, and (3) local circumstances.

11 different companies are operating across the live trial areas. These are: Ginger, Spin, Lime, Beryl, Tier, Zwings, Voi, Bird, Neuron, Zipp, and Wind.

Many of these companies have their own model of scooter which meets the minimum requirements set by the Department. Trials include both short- and long-term rental. The range of trial areas provide a diverse range of local environments in which to assess e-scooter use.

The key areas we are seeking evidence of are the safety of e-scooters, what mode shift they cause, and what impacts they have on other road users. There is no minimum number of operators who need to participate in trials to assess this, but we will additionally seek to learn and share lessons on how different e-scooter providers operate.

The local authorities hosting the trials have selected the operators they wish to work with. They have undertaken their own procurement processes, ensuring that the operators meet both the Department’s and their own requirements for the trial. We have set out these requirements in our guidance for local authorities and have only approved trials where these are met. The requirements include that the operator has geofencing and driving licence checks in place, that local areas have engaged with local police and disability groups, and that data generated will be shared with the Department.

Many of the operators are going beyond these minimum requirements, including providing free helmets to users and offering online or in-person training to use the scooters.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of firms that would need to be involved in electric scooter trials for an evidence based policy decision to be made.

11 different companies are operating across the live trial areas. These are: Ginger, Spin, Lime, Beryl, Tier, Zwings, Voi, Bird, Neuron, Zipp, and Wind.

Many of these companies have their own model of scooter which meets the minimum requirements set by the Department. Trials include both short- and long-term rental. The range of trial areas provide a diverse range of local environments in which to assess e-scooter use.

The key areas we are seeking evidence of are the safety of e-scooters, what mode shift they cause, and what impacts they have on other road users. There is no minimum number of operators who need to participate in trials to assess this, but we will additionally seek to learn and share lessons on how different e-scooter providers operate.

The local authorities hosting the trials have selected the operators they wish to work with. They have undertaken their own procurement processes, ensuring that the operators meet both the Department’s and their own requirements for the trial. We have set out these requirements in our guidance for local authorities and have only approved trials where these are met. The requirements include that the operator has geofencing and driving licence checks in place, that local areas have engaged with local police and disability groups, and that data generated will be shared with the Department.

Many of the operators are going beyond these minimum requirements, including providing free helmets to users and offering online or in-person training to use the scooters.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that firms providing electric scooters under the current trials can meet their undertakings; and what requirements must local and combined authorities operating such trials meet.

11 different companies are operating across the live trial areas. These are: Ginger, Spin, Lime, Beryl, Tier, Zwings, Voi, Bird, Neuron, Zipp, and Wind.

Many of these companies have their own model of scooter which meets the minimum requirements set by the Department. Trials include both short- and long-term rental. The range of trial areas provide a diverse range of local environments in which to assess e-scooter use.

The key areas we are seeking evidence of are the safety of e-scooters, what mode shift they cause, and what impacts they have on other road users. There is no minimum number of operators who need to participate in trials to assess this, but we will additionally seek to learn and share lessons on how different e-scooter providers operate.

The local authorities hosting the trials have selected the operators they wish to work with. They have undertaken their own procurement processes, ensuring that the operators meet both the Department’s and their own requirements for the trial. We have set out these requirements in our guidance for local authorities and have only approved trials where these are met. The requirements include that the operator has geofencing and driving licence checks in place, that local areas have engaged with local police and disability groups, and that data generated will be shared with the Department.

Many of the operators are going beyond these minimum requirements, including providing free helmets to users and offering online or in-person training to use the scooters.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities' investigation into potential breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products, what specific issues have arisen in the export of cigarettes to Roswell Park; whether the correct exports process was followed; and when they expect the investigation to conclude.

Following an open tender process, King’s College London (KCL) was appointed to undertake testing of a range of products to support the investigation into potential breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products. KCL’s bid stated that they intended to subcontract the laboratory testing stage to Roswell Park, a world-leading tobacco research and testing institute.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities continues to work with KCL to ensure that all cigarette brands sent to Roswell Park for analytic destructive testing are exported in compliance with regulations. We expect outcomes from the testing to be available by the end of March 2022.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities' investigation into potential breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products, why an American organisation was appointed to undertake the testing rather than a UK one.

Following an open tender process, King’s College London (KCL) was appointed to undertake testing of a range of products to support the investigation into potential breaches of the prohibition of characterising flavours in tobacco products. KCL’s bid stated that they intended to subcontract the laboratory testing stage to Roswell Park, a world-leading tobacco research and testing institute.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities continues to work with KCL to ensure that all cigarette brands sent to Roswell Park for analytic destructive testing are exported in compliance with regulations. We expect outcomes from the testing to be available by the end of March 2022.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake an independent audit of the clinical outcomes of NHS England; and what discussions they have had with the devolved administrations about undertaking similar audits of the clinical outcomes of (1) NHS Scotland, (2) NHS Wales, and (3) Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland, in order to compare performance across the UK.

National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme audits on National Health Service healthcare services in England are commissioned and managed by the independent Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership on behalf of NHS England. It is a requirement of the NHS standard contract in England that all providers of NHS care in England participate in the programme which supports trusts in identifying necessary improvements for patients. Most of the audits involve services in England and Wales. Some also include services from Scotland and Northern Ireland.

4th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Lord Greenhalgh on 3 November (HL Deb, col 632), when they will publish the results of Public Health England's research into evidence around places of worship and the proliferation of the COVID-19 virus.

Public Health England had not been requested to research and publish detailed specific data on the numbers of COVID-19 cases related to place of worship and allied settings on outbreak investigation. This is now being performed.

8th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made, if any, to the government of Zimbabwe about the detention of Makomborero Haruzivishe

The UK remains concerned about the human rights situation in Zimbabwe, including arrests of, and violence towards, civil society and opposition activists. The British Embassy in Harare is in touch with Makomborero Haruzivishe's lawyers as we await the outcome of his appeal.

The UK regularly urges the Zimbabwean Government to meet its international and domestic obligations by respecting the rule of law and the freedoms and rights enshrined in the Zimbabwean Constitution, safeguarding human rights, and committing to genuine political and economic reform for the benefit of all Zimbabweans. The Minister for Africa most recently raised the human rights situation in Zimbabwe with Foreign Minister Shava on 9 June. We will continue to speak out, both privately and in public, where we have concerns, and work alongside the international community to support a better future for all Zimbabweans.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend an official invitation to visit the UK to Robert Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, an opposition candidate in the January presidential election in Uganda.

Our High Commissioner to Uganda has met Robert Kyagulanyi on a number of occasions and discussed our concern over human rights and democratic reform. We will continue to meet with Robert Kyagulanyi, but Kampala is a more likely location.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to rectify issues with British passport holders whose passports are faulty and cannot be read at e-gates upon arrival at UK airports.

The British passport’s electronic chip has been extensively tested to ensure its durability throughout the lifetime of the passport. Additionally, each passport’s electronic chip is assessed as part of the personalisation process.

A passport chip inspection may fail at the Border for several reasons. If a fault is identified with an electronic chip that was assessed to have been present when the passport was issued, then it will be replaced at no additional cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect the Undercover Policing Inquiry to make its final report; what has been the cost of that inquiry to date; and what the final cost of that inquiry is expected to be.

The Undercover Policing Inquiry was established in 2015, to investigate undercover deployments conducted by police forces in England and Wales since 1968 and was expected to report within three years.

In May 2018, the Undercover Policing Inquiry published a Strategic Review which anticipated that the Inquiry would begin evidence hearings in June 2019 and that it would report to the Home Secretary before the end of 2023. In January 2019 the Inquiry published an update which explained that several issues, such as the significant complexity of documents and the difficulties presented by issues such as privacy and data protection, had led to a fresh look at the timelines. Evidence hearings subsequently began in November 2020 and will continue in 2021.

The Terms of Reference state the Inquiry will report to the Home Secretary as soon as practicable. It is important that the Inquiry gets to the truth and makes meaningful recommendations for the future. The Inquiry remains independent of the Home Office, which is crucial to its effectiveness and so, decisions and conduct in relation to the investigations are for the Inquiry to make.

The Inquiry cost, to the end of September 2020, is £32,286,400; this information is published by the Inquiry every quarter on its website. The Government is committed to giving the Inquiry the resources it needs to fulfil its important function of getting to the truth, exposing what has gone wrong in the past, and learning lessons for the future.

It is difficult to provide an expected final cost of the Inquiry at this stage, but this will be published in full, at the close of the Inquiry.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 7 December 2020 (HL10627), when they expect to publish the three-month review of the spending of the £30 million allocated on 8 October 2020 to help local authorities in England fund their COVID-19 compliance and enforcement work.

In November 2020, a £30 million ringfenced Compliance and Enforcement Grant was allocated to all district and unitary authorities in England to spend on COVID-19 compliance and enforcement related activities. In January 2021 MHCLG issued an activity and spend survey to all councils in receipt of the grant. The responses from this informed a review of how the grant was being utilised.

The Department have no plans to release the findings of the three-month review. Information was provided in confidence by local authorities during the grant period to support the development of Government policy. The information gathered as part of the review was used to inform successive iterations of the Local authority COVID-19 compliance and enforcement good practice framework’, (attached) which was archived on 19 July 2021 but it still available for reference.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the exercise by local authorities of the compliance and enforcement activities related to COVID-19; and whether all such activities have been carried out in compliance with the Guidance to support local authority compliance and enforcement activity, including COVID-19 secure marshals or equivalents published on 8 October.

On 8 October, the Government allocated £30 million to local authorities in England to help them fund their Covid-19 compliance and enforcement work. There will be a three month review of the spending of that grant. Government's regular engagement with local authorities indicates they are working hard to help people comply with the rules, in partnership other local agencies such as the police.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps Homes England is taking (1) to encourage, and (2) to create, opportunities for small and new-entry builders in the housing construction sector; and what plans they have, if any, to reflect these steps in the specification for the forthcoming tender for Homes England's Delivery Partner Panel 4.

Homes England’s strategic objectives include helping small builders grow into medium builders and to encourage new entrants into the market. The Home Building Fund specifically focuses on supporting SME builders who are unable to access suitable finance in the marketplace. It does this by providing development finance direct, as well as through lender frameworks designed to encourage and enhance the supply of liquidity in the market to the SME builder.

In addition, Homes England looks to ensure SMEs can access land through its Land Hub, and the agency’s standard building lease sets out a legal obligation for a proportion of homes to be built out by SMEs or Registered Providers.

Work to replace the current Delivery Partner Panel (DPP3) is focused on diversifying the housing market and increasing SME access to public land opportunities, in line with the agency’s strategic objectives.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 4 April (HL7159) which said there would be greater ministerial scrutiny of the moves of indeterminate sentence prisoners to open conditions”, whether this policy has already been put into effect and, if so, from what date; if the policy has not been put into effect, on what date it will come into force; which minister will be charged with undertaking the scrutiny referred to; what criteria will determine which cases are considered; against what criteria they will assess the case for a move to open conditions, and if these will differ from the criteria currently applied by officials; and what documentation the minister will receive and consider in order to reach a decision in the cases they consider personally.

Following a decision by the Deputy Prime Minister last year, there will now be greater scrutiny of Parole Board recommendations on open prison moves. The test for considering a recommendation for open conditions for Indeterminate Sentence Prisoners (ISPs) will change, and I will write to the noble Lord in due course to provide an update.

Our primary responsibility is to protect the public and it remains the case that the independent Parole Board will grant those serving indeterminate sentences release only once they have demonstrated they will no longer pose a significant risk to the public.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences have been referred into the offender personality disorder pathway broken down by protected characteristics in each year since 2017.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

22nd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences have been referred into the offender personality disorder pathway in each year since 2017.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

22nd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences have had two or more post tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences in England and Wales were progressed to open conditions but subsequently returned to closed conditions in each year since 2017.

Year

Number of transfers of IPP prisoners from predominant function ‘Open’ to predominant function ‘Closed’ prisons

2017

235

2018

205

2019

159

2020

116

Note: These figures exclude those recalled from IPP sentences.

Data sources and quality

The figures in this table have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Almost invariably, an IPP prisoner will be approved for open conditions only in response to a positive recommendation from the Parole Board. Recently, the Deputy Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Justice announced that there would be greater ministerial scrutiny of the moves of indeterminate sentence prisoners to open conditions. A prisoner in open conditions will be returned to closed conditions in response to poor behaviour or evidence of increased risk.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences have been reviewed by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service psychology services in each year since 2017.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many places were available in progression regimes for prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences in England and Wales in each year since 2017, broken down by establishment.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, progression regimes in each year since 2017.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

HL7157 & HL7158:

HMPPS operate four Progression Regimes in closed, adult male category C prisons which provide opportunities for parole-eligible prisoners who are not making anticipated progress, and particularly prioritise places for those serving an IPP sentence. The first Progression Regime opened at HMP Warren Hill in December 2014. Following the success of the Regime at HMP Warren Hill, a further three Progression Regimes were opened in 2018 at HMP The Humber, Erlestoke and Buckley Hall.

The following table shows the number of prisoners in England and Wales subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that have been (1) received into, and (2) released from, Progression Regimes in each year since 2017.

Year

Received onto a Progression Regimes

Release from a Progression Regime

2017

80

47

2018*

124

30

2019

119

43

2020

92

43

2021

80

44

* Progression Regimes opened at HMPs Erlestoke, Humber and Buckley Hall.

These data have been drawn from local spreadsheets and databases held by the Progression Regimes, as national data systems can only capture movement for a whole prison, rather than individual units within a prison. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

The total capacity of the Progression Regimes was 202 in 2017, with only the Progression Regime at HMP Warren Hill operational at that time. This number rose to 350 spaces (202 in HMP Warren Hill, 40 in HMP Erlestoke, 48 in HMP Humber and 60 in HMP Buckley Hall) with the opening of the three additional Progression Regime sites by the end of 2018. In 2019 a further 40 places were opened in HMP Erlestoke, however last year one of their Progression Regime units closed, affecting their number of places. This unit is being replaced with a new one later this year.

HL7160:

Psychology reviews for IPP prisoners commenced in 2016 and targeted those serving IPP sentences where no progress had been made to either open conditions or release despite 2 or more post tariff parole reviews. In 2019, the cohort was widened to incorporate IPP prisoners with tariffs of fewerless than 2 years. In 2021, the cohort was again expanded to include all those 5 or more years post tariff irrespective of whether they had been to open prison previously, those serving IPP sentences for non-sexual and non-violent offences, and those serving IPP sentences for robbery.

The following table shows the number of IPP psychology reviews completed for eligible IPP prisoners, as described above, each year since 2016. The high figure in 2016 reflects the fact that a large proportion of those eligible had their reviews in the first year the central reviews were introduced:

Year

Reviews completed

2016

873

2017

209

2018

225

2019

159

2020

107

2021

212

HL7161:

HMPPS Women’s Estate Psychology Services have implemented an indeterminate sentence prisoners strategy which includes the IPP cohort. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that all are supported to progress through their prison sentences as quickly as possible. Psychologists regularly review cases and work with prison and probation colleagues to remove barriers to progression and expedite completion of interventions and services.

HL7216:

The following table shows the number of prisoners subject to IPP sentences that have had two or more post-tariff parole reviews with no progression to (1) open conditions, or (2) release, in each year since 2017:

Snapshot Date

Total number of IPP prisoners with two or more “no release” decisions in their latest two reviews (up to the snapshot date)*

31-Dec-17

1,173

31-Dec-18

1,028

31-Dec-19

943

31-Dec-20

887

31-Dec-21

874

*Caveats:

1. The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

2. These figures include both the recalled and unreleased IPP populations.

HL7217 & HL7218:

The following data are produced from service provider returns and, whilst quality assured, are subject to reporter error. As of 31 December 2021 there were 4,869 people with IPP sentences who had been identified as meeting the screening criteria for the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway. OPD pathway screening is an administrative activity which does not necessarily mean someone needs a specific intervention to address a personality disorder. Such a need would be identified when the prisoner’s probation officer reviews the prisoner’s sentence plan to take account of the OPD pathway screening.

Of those identified as meeting the screening criteria, 2,780 are currently in custody (with 1,200 of these in custody on recall).

From 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021, a total of 1,892 offenders serving IPP sentences have been referred to OPD Services as follows:

Year of referral

No of IPP Referrals

2017

177

2018

221

2019

358

2020

517

2021

619

Total (2017-2021)

1892

To note: in the breakdown of protected characteristics below, some categories have been merged where necessary to avoid the risk of identifying individual offenders.

By Age:

Year of referral

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Total

2017

11

72

53

33

8

177

2018

7

94

66

44

10

221

2019

17

159

99

61

22

358

2020

19

238

150

86

24

517

2021

22

276

184

101

36

619

Total

76

839

552

325

100

1892

By Ethnicity:

Year of referral

Asian: Asian British

Black: Black British

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Groups

Other / Not Stated

White

Total

2017

8

18

7

0

144

177

2018

4

18

17

0

182

221

2019

15

41

6

1

295

358

2020

14

57

24

0

422

517

2021

12

63

32

7

505

619

Total

53

197

86

8

1548

1892

By Sex:

Year of referral

Female

Male

Unspecified

Total

2017

3

174

0

177

2018

7

214

0

221

2019

11

347

0

358

2020

27

490

0

517

2021

39

577

3

619

Total

87

1802

3

1892

25th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many offenders subject to indeterminate sentences for public protection will be eligible for a licence review each year for the next five years.

We do not publish the data at the present time; however, we continue to review processes to allow the publication of more information in the future.

The accumulative number of IPP offenders, who will become eligible for a licence review each year for the next five years is set out below.

Table: IPP cases with at least one release by 30/09/2021 by eligibility to apply for licence termination:

Year

Number of cases eligible

End of 2021

403

End of 2022

850

End of 2023

1,353

End of 2024

1,771

End of 2025

2,272

End of 2026

2,829

Notes:

1. Number of Cases Eligible is Cumulative (i.e. cases eligible in 2021 will also be eligible in 2022 etc).

2. Data is taken from administrative sources (nDelius) and subject to the inherent inaccuracy in any such large-scale data source.

Statistics on the prison population are routinely published as part of the quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

25th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish data on (1) the number of offenders subject to indeterminate sentences for public protection who became eligible for licence review over the past year, and (2) the number of those who applied for a licence review over the same period.

We do not publish the data at the present time; however, we continue to review processes to allow the publication of more information in the future.

The accumulative number of IPP offenders, who will become eligible for a licence review each year for the next five years is set out below.

Table: IPP cases with at least one release by 30/09/2021 by eligibility to apply for licence termination:

Year

Number of cases eligible

End of 2021

403

End of 2022

850

End of 2023

1,353

End of 2024

1,771

End of 2025

2,272

End of 2026

2,829

Notes:

1. Number of Cases Eligible is Cumulative (i.e. cases eligible in 2021 will also be eligible in 2022 etc).

2. Data is taken from administrative sources (nDelius) and subject to the inherent inaccuracy in any such large-scale data source.

Statistics on the prison population are routinely published as part of the quarterly Offender Management Statistics on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly