Lord Trees Portrait

Lord Trees

Crossbench - Life peer

Became Member: 3rd July 2012


Middle Level Bill Committee
4th Jun 2018 - 12th Jul 2018
European Union Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 27th Apr 2017
EU Energy and Environment Sub-Committee
12th Jun 2015 - 27th Apr 2017


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Trees has voted in 48 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Trees Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(35 debate interactions)
Lord Douglas-Miller (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Agriculture Act 2020
(5,334 words contributed)
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Act 2022
(4,615 words contributed)
Professional Qualifications Act 2022
(1,619 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Trees's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Trees, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Lord Trees


A Bill to amend the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 to prevent misuse of the title of veterinary nurse; and for connected purposes

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 10th June 2015

Lord Trees has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 7 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2nd May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will specify the relevant activities which will be proscribed under legislation to enable compliance with, and enforcement of, the Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023.

The Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023 provides a framework for the introduction of future bans on the advertising and offering for sale, in England and Northern Ireland, of low-welfare animal activities abroad.

Future decisions on which specific animal activities will fall in scope of the advertising ban will be evidence-based and subject to Parliamentary scrutiny. Sufficient, compelling evidence will be required to demonstrate why any specific advertising ban is needed.

This Government continues to make animal welfare a priority and we are currently exploring a number of options to ensure progress as soon as is practicable.

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their timetable for consulting on activity regulations under the Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023.

The Animals (Low-Welfare Activities Abroad) Act 2023 provides a framework for the introduction of future bans on the advertising and offering for sale, in England and Northern Ireland, of low-welfare animal activities abroad.

Future decisions on which specific animal activities will fall in scope of the advertising ban will be evidence-based and subject to Parliamentary scrutiny. Sufficient, compelling evidence will be required to demonstrate why any specific advertising ban is needed.

This Government continues to make animal welfare a priority and we are currently exploring a number of options to ensure progress as soon as is practicable.

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Animal Welfare Committee report Opinion on the welfare implications of different methods and systems for the catching, carrying, collecting and loading of poultry, published in March 2023, whether they have any plans to introduce the recommendation contained in that report to amend the law so that "it is legally permitted to lift chickens, and turkeys weighing less than 10-kg, by two legs".

The Animal Welfare Committee Opinion on the welfare implications of different methods and systems for the catching, carrying, collecting and loading of poultry was published in February 2024. We are carefully considering its findings before deciding on next steps and are working with the Welsh and Scottish Governments to ensure a consistent approach across Great Britain.

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of their progress in meeting the commitment in the UK–EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement to "ensure that … sanitary and phytosanitary measures do not create unnecessary barriers to trade".

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) includes a sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) chapter which allows the UK and the EU to take a risk-based approach to our respective SPS border controls and provides a basis for cooperation on avoiding unnecessary barriers to trade. Officials meet their counterparts on a regular basis to discuss the SPS provisions of the TCA.

Where issues are raised, we are happy to pursue appropriate resolution. For example, through the provisions of the SPS Chapter, the UK is working with the EU to take forward electronic certification, which will facilitate trade through reducing delays and reducing business administration.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the welfare implications of ther baiting of electrified fences used to keep animals in or out of defined areas.

In England, wildlife is protected by law through legislation such as the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017.

Section 11 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 prohibits certain methods of killing or taking wild animals. Under subsection 2(c), a person will be guilty of an offence if they set in position any electrical device for killing or stunning, calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal included in Schedule 6 of that Act, such as badgers and hedgehogs. It is also an offence under regulation 45 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 to use electrical and electronic devices capable of killing or stunning, for the purpose of capturing or killing a European protected species, or for any of the protected species listed on Schedule 4 of those Regulations.

The Government has not made a specific assessment of the welfare implications of the baiting of electrified fences.

6th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risk of Dengue Fever being transmitted in the UK, now and in the future.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection that is transmitted by the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito from the Stegomyia subgenus. The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) undertakes surveillance of dengue cases in the United Kingdom. All cases identified in the UK to date are imported cases where a human has been infected abroad then travelled to the UK. There is no current evidence of the presence of mosquito species that can transmit dengue in the UK and there is no risk of acquisition of infection within the UK.

Changing weather conditions favourable for the proliferation of mosquitoes and the expansion outside of historical areas of transmission secondary to climate change may lead to changes in dengue transmission beyond current endemic areas. UKHSA have published modelling on the future risk of establishment of mosquito species that can transmit dengue in the UK, and undertake daily international horizon scanning via epidemic intelligence to track changing dengue epidemiology globally. Detections of invasive mosquitoes are responded to in line with the national contingency plan to prevent the establishment of mosquitoes that can transmit dengue.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of those testing positive for COVID-19 as a result of a polymerase chain reaction test, and subsequently included in the national statistics, (1) display symptoms of the virus at the time of the test, and (2) subsequently develop such symptoms.

We do not publish data in the format requested.