David Hanson Written Questions

Questions to All Government Departments tabled by David Hanson


Date Title Questioner
9 Jul 2019, 1:48 p.m. Mersey Gateway Bridge: Fixed Penalties David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many fixed penalty notices have been issued to people crossing the Mersey Gateway bridge in each of the last five years.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The Mersey Gateway Bridge and its tolling operation are the responsibility of Halton Borough Council and its operational company the Mersey Gateway Crossings Board. It is contracted to Merseyflow.

The Department of Transport does not hold the information requested.

9 Jul 2019, 1:48 p.m. Mersey Gateway Bridge: Fixed Penalties David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many unpaid fixed penalty notices for crossing the Mersey Gateway bridge resulted in action from a bailiff in each of the last five years.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The Mersey Gateway Bridge and its tolling operation are the responsibility of Halton Borough Council and its operational company the Mersey Gateway Crossings Board. It is contracted to Merseyflow.

The Department of Transport does not hold the information requested.

2 Jul 2019, 1:14 p.m. Airguns: Reviews David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Written Question 230648, Airguns: Reviews, when his Department plans to publish its response to the review on the regulation of air weapons which was launched on 10 October 2017.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

We intend to publish our conclusions to the review of air weapons regulation as soon as possible, alongside a consultation on firearms safety issues to which the Government committed during the passage of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019.

23 May 2019, 2:09 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) less than and (ii) more than six months for each offence classification in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of women given a custodial sentence of less than and more than six months, at Magistrates and Crown courts, by offence and police force area in 2018 is published in the Court Outcomes by Police Force Area data tool at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802045/court-outcomes-by-PFA-2018.xlsx

The requested data can be gathered by:

  • Select the relevant court in the ‘Court Type’ field (Magistrates/Crown)
  • Select ‘2018’ in the ‘Year of Appearance’ field
  • Select ’02: Female’ in the ‘Sex’ field
  • Drag the ‘Offence’ field into Rows
  • Select the relevant sentence lengths in the ‘Custodial Sentence Length’ field (six months or less/ greater than six months)
  • Select the relevant police force area in the ‘Police Force Area’ field

The number of women given a custodial sentence less than and more than six months from each magistrates and Crown court in North Wales in 2018, with corresponding offence, is available in the attached tables.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

23 May 2019, 2:09 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women sentenced to (a) less than and (b) more than six months were taken into immediate custody from each (i) magistrates and (ii) Crown court in North Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of women given a custodial sentence of less than and more than six months, at Magistrates and Crown courts, by offence and police force area in 2018 is published in the Court Outcomes by Police Force Area data tool at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802045/court-outcomes-by-PFA-2018.xlsx

The requested data can be gathered by:

  • Select the relevant court in the ‘Court Type’ field (Magistrates/Crown)
  • Select ‘2018’ in the ‘Year of Appearance’ field
  • Select ’02: Female’ in the ‘Sex’ field
  • Drag the ‘Offence’ field into Rows
  • Select the relevant sentence lengths in the ‘Custodial Sentence Length’ field (six months or less/ greater than six months)
  • Select the relevant police force area in the ‘Police Force Area’ field

The number of women given a custodial sentence less than and more than six months from each magistrates and Crown court in North Wales in 2018, with corresponding offence, is available in the attached tables.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

23 May 2019, 2:06 p.m. Prisoners: Males David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult men with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned.

Number of adult1 female offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

1

144

4

2

Sexual offences

0

25

0

0

Robbery

0

17

0

0

Theft Offences

3

67

67

5

Criminal damage and arson

0

20

0

0

Drug offences

7

80

0

2

Possession of weapons

3

18

7

1

Public order offences

0

8

3

0

Miscellaneous crimes against society

28

145

4

0

Fraud offences

3

91

2

1

Summary offences excluding motoring

2

1

14

1

Summary motoring offences

0

0

10

0

All offences

47

616

111

12

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Number of adult1 male offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

15

946

34

28

Sexual offences

16

1,420

24

20

Robbery

0

161

0

4

Theft Offences

16

321

141

23

Criminal damage and arson

1

52

6

0

Drug offences

35

1,304

14

40

Possession of weapons

28

152

107

16

Public order offences

10

117

10

3

Miscellaneous crimes against society

124

833

67

28

Fraud offences

13

252

11

2

Summary offences excluding motoring

27

2

262

12

Summary motoring offences

2

1

76

0

All offences

287

5,561

752

176

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

23 May 2019, 2:06 p.m. Prisoners: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult women with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned.

Number of adult1 female offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

1

144

4

2

Sexual offences

0

25

0

0

Robbery

0

17

0

0

Theft Offences

3

67

67

5

Criminal damage and arson

0

20

0

0

Drug offences

7

80

0

2

Possession of weapons

3

18

7

1

Public order offences

0

8

3

0

Miscellaneous crimes against society

28

145

4

0

Fraud offences

3

91

2

1

Summary offences excluding motoring

2

1

14

1

Summary motoring offences

0

0

10

0

All offences

47

616

111

12

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Number of adult1 male offenders with no previous convictions2 sentenced to immediate custody by court type3, sentence length4,5 and offence type; England and Wales6, 2018

Number of Offenders

Offence type7

Crown Court

Magistrates Court

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Less than 6 months

6 months or more

Violence against the person

15

946

34

28

Sexual offences

16

1,420

24

20

Robbery

0

161

0

4

Theft Offences

16

321

141

23

Criminal damage and arson

1

52

6

0

Drug offences

35

1,304

14

40

Possession of weapons

28

152

107

16

Public order offences

10

117

10

3

Miscellaneous crimes against society

124

833

67

28

Fraud offences

13

252

11

2

Summary offences excluding motoring

27

2

262

12

Summary motoring offences

2

1

76

0

All offences

287

5,561

752

176

Source: Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer

Notes:

1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.

2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.

3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.

4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.

5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known

6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police

7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were sent to immediate custody from the (a) Crown Court and (b) Magistrates' Courts for sentences of (i) less than and (ii) more than six months for each offence classification in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women with no previous convictions were sent to immediate custody from the (a) the Crown Court and (b) Magistrates' Courts for sentences of (i) below 6 months and (ii) 6 months and above in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

8 May 2019, 3:49 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women in the North Wales police force area received an immediate custodial sentence of (a) less than and (b) more than six months for each category of offence from the (i) Crown Courts and (ii) Magistrates Courts in 2018-19.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The number of female offenders sentenced to custody by court level and police force area, including North Wales, in 2017, can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool, which can be found at the below link:-

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

Select the drop down boxes referring to custodial sentence length in order to establish sentence lengths. Select female from the sex drop box and, once having done this, young adults and adults to establish women. Offence classification can be found in both the Offence Type and Offence group boxes, depending on which specific definition applies here.

The number of female offenders with no previous convictions sentenced to immediate custody by court type, sentence length, and offence type in England and Wales in 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Court proceedings data for 2018 are planned for publication on 16 May 2019, with data for 2019 planned for publication in May 2020.

Our vision, as set out in our Female Offender Strategy, is to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.

There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.

Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.

30 Apr 2019, 4:15 p.m. Convictions David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether time spent in court cells as a disposal to a conviction in lieu of a fine is categorised as a custodial sentence for the purposes of determining that the conviction cannot be filtered from a standard or enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service certificate.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Police Act 1997 sets out the circumstances for the disclosure of certain convictions and cautions on a standard or enhanced criminal record certificate issued by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). In particular, the Act provides for the disclosure of any conviction receiving a custodial sentence. The DBS relies on information recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC) that determines whether a conviction should be disclosed under the Act.

Time spent in court cells as a disposal to a conviction in lieu of a fine is not categorised as a custodial sentence. The sentence is treated as a fine and any time spent in custody is a committal in default of payment of the fine.

3 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Knives: Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department of 22 March 2019, Official Report, column 1404, how much of the £100 million in funding will be allocated to the police, by each police force.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

On 13 March the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an additional £100 million of funding for serious violence in 2019/20 to help the police’s immediate response to the rise in serious knife crime, and also to support investment in Violence Reduction Units. It is important that we recognise that greater law enforcement on its own will not reduce serious violence and that we must continue to focus on prevention.

The majority of the investment will go towards supporting police forces where violent crime is impacting the most, to take immediate action to suppress the violence we are seeing, to make our streets safer. We are engaging with partners including the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and we are developing the criteria by which forces will receive this funding.

29 Mar 2019, 5:10 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of Community Rehabilitation Companies in delivering resettlement plans.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The latest performance statistics can be found in the ‘Community Performance Quarterly Management Information Release: update to September 2018’ on Gov.uk at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-update-to-september-2018

These figures show that CRC performance against target for completion of resettlement plans was at 95.5% for this period.

The Government has acted decisively in response to issues with CRC performance by bringing forward the end of CRC contracts and consulting on a range of proposals to better integrate probation provision. The contract changes we agreed with CRCs last year include £22m per year in additional funding for Through The Gate services, which will mean approximately 500 more staff working with offenders in prison after April 2019.

We have launched a consultation on proposals to introduce more effective future delivery arrangements. We want to learn from what has worked well and what hasn’t and better integrate public, private and third sector providers in future arrangements. Our changes will put in place a more stable and resilient probation system, which works effectively to protect the public and tackle reoffending.

28 Mar 2019, 4:59 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been assessed by Community Rehabilitation Companies and National Probation Services for a resettlement plan in the 12 weeks prior to release from prison in each of the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Department regularly publishes data showing the percentage of offenders who have had a resettlement plan written by Community Rehabilitation Companies (SLM013). The latest release can be found via the following link;

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-update-to-september-2018

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe, stable and secure to live. Overcoming the many barriers offenders face to securing suitable accommodation is something that Ministry of Justice cannot do in isolation.

The Secretary of State for Justice and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government are both members of the cross-Government Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce and the Reducing Reoffending Board. Homelessness of ex-offenders is a key issue that is discussed at these meetings.

Through this work, we are investing up to £6.4m in a joint pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons, namely Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville. We have now launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

28 Mar 2019, 2:37 p.m. Offenders: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many former prisoners who have had support via the resettlement plan were (a) sleeping rough, (b) other homeless and (c) in unsettled accommodation after (i) four, (ii) 12 and (iii) 26 weeks in each year since introduction of Community Rehabilitation Companies.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe, stable and secure to live. Overcoming the many barriers offenders face to securing suitable accommodation is something that Ministry of Justice cannot do in isolation.

The Secretary of State for Justice and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government are both members of the cross-Government Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce and the Reducing Reoffending Board. Homelessness of ex-offenders is a key issue that is discussed at these meetings.

Through this work, we are investing up to £6.4m in a joint pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons, namely Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville. We have now launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

27 Mar 2019, 9:29 a.m. Prisoners' Release: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were (a) released from each prison and (b) recorded as homeless on release from each prison in each of the last five years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The exact information could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost, but we have closely related data, detailed below.

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe and secure to live. Having somewhere stable to live acts as a platform for ex-offenders to be able to access the services and support needed to turn their back on crime for good. Published statistics for 2017/18 showing the accommodation status for all offenders can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-march-2018
Published statistics on releases by prison can be found here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

As part of the Government initiative to reduce and ultimately eliminate rough sleeping across England, we are investing up to £6.4 million over two years in a pilot scheme to help ex-offenders into accommodation from three prisons, namely Bristol, Pentonville and Leeds. The pilots will focus on male prisoners who have served shorter sentences, who have been identified as having a risk of homelessness. We have launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

27 Mar 2019, 9:27 a.m. Offenders: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many meetings he has held with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government to discuss homelessness of ex-offenders.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe, stable and secure to live. Overcoming the many barriers offenders face to securing suitable accommodation is something that Ministry of Justice cannot do in isolation.

The Secretary of State for Justice and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government are both members of the cross-Government Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce and the Reducing Reoffending Board. Homelessness of ex-offenders is a key issue that is discussed at these meetings.

Through this work, we are investing up to £6.4m in a joint pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons, namely Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville. We have now launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

27 Mar 2019, 9:26 a.m. Offenders: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans are in place to support local authorities to work closely with Community Rehabilitation Companies and the National Probation Service in identifying homeless ex-offenders.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) and the National Probation Service (NPS) are required to facilitate access to housing for the offenders that they are managing. This includes working together with local partners to help offenders find and maintain accommodation as part of a package of support tailored to meet their individual needs.

We know that Through The Gate provision is not currently meeting the standard we require. That is why we are investing an additional £22m per annum over the remaining life of the CRC contracts to ensure that CRCs deliver an enhanced Through The Gate service to offenders leaving prison. This investment will support approximately 500 additional CRC staff to deliver Through The Gate in prisons. Alongside this investment there will be a new specification, to be introduced shortly, which will ensure that CRCs complete specific tasks, including to help every prisoner to secure and maintain settled accommodation.

We are also investing £6m as part of the Government’s Rough Sleeping Strategy in pilot schemes bringing together prisons, local authorities, probation providers and others to plan, secure and sustain accommodation for offenders on release.

We regularly publish the performance of CRCs, including measures showing the percentage of offenders who have settled accommodation on release from custody. The latest information can be found in the ‘Community Performance Quarterly Management Information Release: update to June 2018’ on Gov.uk at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-june-2018

27 Mar 2019, 9:26 a.m. Offenders: Homelessness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether any targets are in place for Community Rehabilitation Companies and the National Probation Service to reduce the number of ex-offenders that are homeless.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) and the National Probation Service (NPS) are required to facilitate access to housing for the offenders that they are managing. This includes working together with local partners to help offenders find and maintain accommodation as part of a package of support tailored to meet their individual needs.

We know that Through The Gate provision is not currently meeting the standard we require. That is why we are investing an additional £22m per annum over the remaining life of the CRC contracts to ensure that CRCs deliver an enhanced Through The Gate service to offenders leaving prison. This investment will support approximately 500 additional CRC staff to deliver Through The Gate in prisons. Alongside this investment there will be a new specification, to be introduced shortly, which will ensure that CRCs complete specific tasks, including to help every prisoner to secure and maintain settled accommodation.

We are also investing £6m as part of the Government’s Rough Sleeping Strategy in pilot schemes bringing together prisons, local authorities, probation providers and others to plan, secure and sustain accommodation for offenders on release.

We regularly publish the performance of CRCs, including measures showing the percentage of offenders who have settled accommodation on release from custody. The latest information can be found in the ‘Community Performance Quarterly Management Information Release: update to June 2018’ on Gov.uk at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-june-2018

26 Mar 2019, 5:53 p.m. Homelessness: Offenders David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when the pilot scheme to help homeless ex-offenders conducted by the Norfolk Community Foundation and Norfolk’s former High Sheriff in Norwich will be (a) launched and (b) concluded; and what criteria will be used to assess the scheme's effectiveness.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

This provision is expected to start in early June 2019, subject to standard DWP partnership checks and procedures being completed. It is planned to run for one year and will support approximately 24 ex-offenders recently released from prison. Evaluation will be conducted by the Norfolk Foundation in the form of an impact study.

DWP is committed to providing the best possible support for all our claimants, including the most vulnerable in society. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs.

We encourage all our Jobcentre teams to consider opportunities for partnership-working, where local circumstances allow. Local areas have the flexibility to work alongside local and national organisations to help meet the needs of their communities, assisting our most vulnerable claimants, including those effected by homelessness.

In addition, all Jobcentres in England refer claimants considered to be homeless or at risk of homelessness, to the local authority to receive further housing support.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what the planned timescale is for the (a) completion of draft questions, (b) evidence gathering exercise, (c) closing date and (d) Government's response to the call for evidence on attacks against retail employees.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what steps his Department is planning to take to deliver the targeted communications activity to raise awareness of the existing legislation that covers assaults against an individual when working in a retail environment; and what the budget is for that communications activity.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, when he plans to publish details on the outcomes of the retail group meeting held in February 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the Library, what the (a) outcomes were and (b) response was to the letter to the Commissioner of the City of London Police on retail crime and attacks on retail employees.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Members: Correspondence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to the letter from the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 22 January 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

1 Mar 2019, 3:34 p.m. Styal Prison David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women whose home address is in North Wales served sentences of (a) less than six months and (b) six months or more at HMP Styal in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The department is unable to identify the total number of women in each year as the information is not centrally held. Table 1 in the attached instead sets out the number of women with a home address in North Wales held at HMP Styal who were serving less than/more than 6 months at quarterly intervals over the last 5 years.

Table 2 attached, shows the number of women remanded to HMP Styal by a court in North Wales since 2014.

There is persuasive evidence that short custodial sentences do not work in terms of rehabilitation and that community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective in reducing reoffending, and therefore keeping the public safe. We will therefore be looking at what more we can do to emphasise that short custodial sentences should be viewed as a last resort.

In June we published our female offender strategy which makes clear that we want fewer women serving short sentences in custody and more remaining in the community, making use of women’s centres to address needs such as substance misuse and mental health problems.

1 Mar 2019, 3:34 p.m. Styal Prison David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were on remand at HMP Styal from courts in North Wales in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The department is unable to identify the total number of women in each year as the information is not centrally held. Table 1 in the attached instead sets out the number of women with a home address in North Wales held at HMP Styal who were serving less than/more than 6 months at quarterly intervals over the last 5 years.

Table 2 attached, shows the number of women remanded to HMP Styal by a court in North Wales since 2014.

There is persuasive evidence that short custodial sentences do not work in terms of rehabilitation and that community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective in reducing reoffending, and therefore keeping the public safe. We will therefore be looking at what more we can do to emphasise that short custodial sentences should be viewed as a last resort.

In June we published our female offender strategy which makes clear that we want fewer women serving short sentences in custody and more remaining in the community, making use of women’s centres to address needs such as substance misuse and mental health problems.

27 Feb 2019, 1:29 p.m. Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 27 December 2018 to Question 202714 on Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme, when he plans to write to the Right Hon. Member for Delyn on the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

I shall be writing to the rt. hon. Member on this matter within the next two weeks.

22 Feb 2019, 2:31 p.m. Commonwealth: Offences against Children David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement of 14 January 2019 on Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting: Update, HCWS1247, which member states will receive training on tackling online child exploitation; what funding he has allocated to that training; and when that training is planned to be completed.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

In support of commitments made at the 2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM), the UK has allocated £2 million to projects which tackle online child sexual exploitation. The Home Office is supporting work in Sri Lanka to build the evidence base, protect those at risk, and strengthen the co-ordination and implementation of efforts amongst multiple authorities and law enforcement agencies. The Home Office is also working with the African Union (AU) to strengthen regional and national capacity to address online child sexual exploitation, including in nine Commonwealth countries: Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, and Uganda. The project will also build capacity in several non-Commonwealth members of the AU.

22 Feb 2019, 2:23 p.m. Commonwealth: Cybercrime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the Written Statement of 14 January 2019 on Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting: Update on delivery, HCWS1247, which Commonwealth member states are supported by his Department and the World Bank to deliver national cyber security reviews; what funding he has allocated to that programme; and when those reviews will report.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

​Following the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in April 2018, the UK will fund at least ten national cyber security capacity reviews before the next Heads of Government meeting in 2020. The ten member states currently planned for a review are: Nigeria, the Gambia, Mauritius, Lesotho, Botswana, Cameroon, Namibia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Malaysia. £0.7 million has been currently set aside from the Commonwealth 18-20 Fund and the UK Prosperity Fund for these reviews.

22 Feb 2019, 12:17 p.m. Armed Forces: Commonwealth David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Commonwealth nationals joined the Armed Forces in each year since 2013.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Minister of State for the Armed Forces (Mark Lancaster) on 21 January 2019 to Question 208803 to the hon. Member for Romford (Andrew Rosindell).

21 Feb 2019, 4:39 p.m. Immigration: Commonwealth David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Commonwealth nationals who are members of the British Armed Forces have applied for their (a) partner and (b) children to settle in the UK; and how many of those applications were (i) accepted and (ii) rejected due to lack of income in each year since 2013.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We do not publish this specific data. This information could only be obtained by a manual case by case review to collate the data which would be disproportionately expensive.

19 Feb 2019, 5:37 p.m. Seaborne Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether any expenses were claimed by civil servants undertaking their duties to establish contractual arrangements with Seaborne Freight.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

Limited incidental travelling expenses were claimed by civil servants during the course of discussions. The precise total involved could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

19 Feb 2019, 5:32 p.m. Seaborne Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many meetings his officials had with executives of Seaborne Freight; and what the (a) length and (b) cost of those meetings was.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

Several meetings involving executives of Seaborne Freight were held during contract negotiations and subsequently to discuss implementation. The full information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

19 Feb 2019, 5:14 p.m. Seaborne Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost of legal advice was to his Department during the (a) due diligence, (b) contract management and (c) contract cancellation process for the Seaborne Freight contract.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

Combined costs of external legal, financial and project assurance advice on all three freight contracts including legal advice up to the end of December 2018 were approximately £800,000. Subsequent costs up to termination cannot yet be derived as contracts are still live and invoices pending.

19 Feb 2019, 4:41 p.m. Companies House: Forms David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) RP02a and (b) RP07 forms Companies House has received in each of the last five years.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The table below shows how many (a) RP02A and (b) how many RP07 forms were received in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Year

RP02 Received

RP07 Received

2014

3,499

N/A

2015

4,791

N/A

2016

5,189

2,969

2017

5,981

6,804

2018

5,591

8,070

Figures for RP02 include both RP02a and RP02b, as historical statistics are not broken down. However, RP02b forms are estimated to be less than 10% of total number of RP02 forms received.

Figures for RP07 began in April 2016, which is when the relevant legislation was implemented.

19 Feb 2019, 4:38 p.m. Companies House: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many prosecutions have been made in each of the last five years for fraudulent use of an address through Companies House.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

There have been no prosecutions for fraudulent use of an address through Companies House. The Department is currently considering a broad package of reforms to Companies House and plan to consult on these reforms in due course.

19 Feb 2019, 12:54 p.m. Seaborne Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) FTE civil servants and (b) lawyers worked on the Seaborne Freight contract during the (i) due diligence, (ii) contract management and (iii) contract cancellation processes.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

The contract awarded to Seaborne was part of a broader procurement exercise to secure additional freight capacity after Brexit, wherein nine companies were approached and contracts were awarded to three. The precise staff time involved could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

8 Feb 2019, 2:55 p.m. Prisoners: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the recommendations in the report, Management and supervision of men convicted of sexual offences, published by HM Inspectorate of Probation in January 2019, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the Excellence and Quality in Process is improved.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We are grateful to H M inspectorates for their helpful report. We will publish an action plan shortly, setting out our comprehensive response to the report’s recommendations and conclusions. The Inspectorates recognised that the EQuiP (Excellence and Quality in Process) system is a work in progress. We will consider the report’s observations in relation to EQuiP as we continue to develop the system.

6 Feb 2019, 5:25 p.m. Prisons: Contracts David Hanson

Question

What recent assessment he has made of the performance of prison contractors.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Several privately managed prisons are among some of the highest performing prisons across the estate; these include HMP Oakwood, HMP Bronzefield, HMP Dovegate and HMP Ashfield.

As well as contractual performance indicators, privately managed prisons are subject to the Prison Performance Tool. These annual ratings are published on gov.uk.

Privately managed prison providers achieve the majority of their contractual targets, and their performance is closely monitored by the robust contract management processes in place.

Each privately managed prison has an on-site Controller, employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against performance indicators.

6 Feb 2019, 5:23 p.m. Prisoners: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many sexual offenders were not moved to a local resettlement prison in their area of release due to a lack of spaces available for vulnerable prisoners at those sites in each of the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Data on the reasons for movement of prisoners is not centrally held. To answer would involve the examination of thousands of individual records at local level.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) endeavours to hold prisoners in establishments which keep them as close to home as possible so they can (re)build family ties, secure housing, access health services and look for work. Consideration is also given to other factors such as time to serve, offending behaviour and the access to relevant training programmes as per the requirements set out in their sentence plan.

Closeness to home is particularly important for those nearing release so they can access resettlement services. To support this, HMPPS will ensure that most prisoners are returned to their home community rehabilitation company or probation area for release where they are managed by either a contracted-out or state provider or the National Probation Service (depending on level of risk). This will provide continuity of service for offenders in custody and the community.

5 Feb 2019, 6:46 p.m. Prisons: Mobile Phones David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mobile phones have been seized in prison establishments in (a) 2015-6, (b) 2016-7 and (c) 2017-18.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of mobiles phones found in prison is published here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/annual-hm-prison-and-probation-service-digest-2017-to-2018

Please refer to table 9.6, this covers data from 2016/2017. The number of mobile phones found in an incident was not specifically recorded prior to October 2015 when a new incident type was introduced.

We are investing £70 million determined to tackle head-on the issues that undermine the safety and security of our prisons. We are taking decisive measures to find and block mobiles, including investing into detection equipment, including hand-held detectors and portable detection devices. These figures highlight the success of these measures, and the determination of prison staff to disrupt this behaviour. Any offender found using a mobile phone could face an extra two years behind bars.

4 Feb 2019, 3:57 p.m. Sentencing David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to take to ensure that Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service implement a national needs analysis for people serving both custodial and community sentences; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

National needs information about prisoners and those under probation supervision is available to those making decisions about HMPPS service planning and provision. Immediate needs of prisoners are recorded on the Basic Custody Screening Tool (BCST). The needs of those under supervision by probation are recorded on case management systems. Assessments of both those in prison and on probation are completed using the Offender Assessment System (OASys) and other specialist tools. This information is used to plan delivery of interventions that help reduce the likelihood of reoffending and/or manage the risk of serious harm. Additionally, national data tools, including segmentation of the prison and probation population, are made available to HMPPS periodically to support business planning decisions at a local and national level.

4 Feb 2019, 3:56 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners released from training prisons whose sentences were for sexual offences did not receive (a) Community Rehabilitation Company resettlement and (b) Through the Gate services on release in each of the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) do not hold the specific information requested centrally and it could only be obtained at disproportionate cost by manually searching offender records to ascertain whether those released from training prisons were offered resettlement activities or Through the Gate services following their release from prison.

We are taking decisive action to improve the delivery of probation services in England and Wales, including investing £22million in extra support for offenders leaving prison. When sex offenders are released, they are closely monitored by police and probation and subject to strict licence conditions – and liable to be returned to custody for breaching them. We have introduced a new Director General role for Probation to develop a dedicated approach to managing sex offenders, and we are expanding supervised accommodation, investing in training and deploying specially trained probation officers to focus on sex offenders in prison.

4 Feb 2019, 3:55 p.m. Prisoners: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all prisons that house sexual offenders have a strategy developed for managing those offenders.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I note that the question is related to one of the findings in the recently published thematic inspection by HM Inspectorate of Probation and HM Inspectorate of Prisons on the management and supervision of men convicted of sexual offences. We take this report, and our responsibilities to protect the public, incredibly seriously. With this in mind we will publish a full action plan setting out a comprehensive response to the Inspectorates’ recommendations and conclusions, including how we will respond to this and the other recommendations made in the report, shortly.

4 Feb 2019, 3:55 p.m. Prisoners: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans for strategies for sexual offenders to be implemented in all prisons that house them.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I note that the question is related to one of the findings in the recently published thematic inspection by HM Inspectorate of Probation and HM Inspectorate of Prisons on the management and supervision of men convicted of sexual offences. We take this report, and our responsibilities to protect the public, incredibly seriously. With this in mind we will publish a full action plan setting out a comprehensive response to the Inspectorates’ recommendations and conclusions, including how we will respond to this and the other recommendations made in the report, shortly.

4 Feb 2019, 3:54 p.m. Prisoners: Sexual Offences David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many trainee probation officers were trained to work with sexual offenders in each of the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

All trainees working towards attaining the Professional Qualification in Probation Practice receive training in working with sexual offenders.

We are taking decisive action to improve the delivery of probation services in England and Wales, including investing £22 million in extra support for offenders leaving prison. When sex offenders are released, they are closely monitored by police and probation and subject to strict licence conditions – and liable to be returned to custody for breaching them. We have introduced a new Director General role for Probation to develop a dedicated approach to managing sex offenders, and we are expanding supervised accommodation, investing in training and deploying specially trained probation officers to focus on sex offenders in prison.

24 Jan 2019, 4:29 p.m. Retail Sector Council David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how often the Retail Sector Council meets; and whether the dates of these meetings are in the public domain.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Retail Sector Council meets approximately three times a year. They first met in March, then June and November of 2018. Their next meeting is scheduled for February.

The UK retail sector is one of the largest employers in the country, with a workforce of over three million and accounting for around 5.1% of economic output with sales of nearly £360 billion in 2017.

The latest ONS retail briefing shows that for the whole of 2018, retail sales in terms of quantity bought increased by 2.7% and Total Retail sales in 2018 increased to £368bn in 2018, an increase of 3%, but we and the Council recognise that the sector faces some key challenges.

The Council is prioritising its work to address the key challenges facing the sector and will initially focus on; costs to business, skills and lifelong learning, employment protection, consumer protection, the circular economy and the Industrial Strategy. The priority areas were selected by the industry and each workstream will be led by a senior industry figure.

16 Jan 2019, 3:23 p.m. Seaborne Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department (a) agreed and (b) made any payments to Seaborne Freight between 30 December 2018 and 29 March 2019.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

I refer the hon Member to my Rt Hon Friend's Written Statement of 7 January. Payments for services will not be made until the services are provided.

15 Jan 2019, 5:10 p.m. Police: Training David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, How many police officers have completed the training contained within the National Disclosure Plan by police force area.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Statistics published by the College of Policing on 20 December 2018 show the number of officers and staff that had completed new 'disclosure and relevancy – conducting fair investigations' training as at 30 November 2018. This includes a breakdown by police force area. These are available at https://www.college.police.uk/News/College-news/Documents/Disclosure_programme_completion_figures191218v3.pdf

11 Jan 2019, 12:49 p.m. Members: Correspondence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Under-Secretary of State for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability plans to respond to the Right hon. Member for Delyn on the rountable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

I have considered the proposals raised at the roundtable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018 and am committed to providing the Rt. Hon Member for Delyn a response before the tabling deadline for Lords amendments to the Offensive Weapons Bill.

27 Dec 2018, 3:46 p.m. Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his letter of 25 September 2018 to the right hon. Member for Delyn on Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme, when he plans to provide an update.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

BEIS officials have continued to receive information on this matter from the rt. hon. Member’s constituent, and from RBS. I will write to the rt. hon. Member shortly with a further update.

10 Dec 2018, 3:55 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 14 February 2018 on Question 126904 on Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance, how many outstanding (a) preventative and (b) reactive maintenance actions on the prisons estates (i) at each location and (ii) under each facilities management contract there were on 1 December 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Data for 1 December 2018 is not yet available. I will write to the Rt Hon Member with the information requested once the figures can be provided and will place a copy of my letter in the Library.

3 Dec 2018, 4:26 p.m. Styal Prison: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were sent to prison at HMP Styal from courts in North Wales for (a) less than and (b) more than six months between (i) January and December 2017 and (ii) each of the previous four years.

Answer (Edward Argar)

There is persuasive evidence that short custodial sentences do not work in terms of rehabilitation and that community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective in reducing reoffending, and therefore keeping the public safe. We will therefore be looking at what more we can do to emphasise that short custodial sentences should be viewed as a last resort.

In June we published our female offender strategy which makes clear that we want fewer women serving short sentences in custody and more remaining in the community, making use of women’s centres to address needs such as substance misuse and mental health problems.

Table 1 shows the number of women admitted into HMP Styal following sentencing at a North Wales court, by sentence length; 2013 to 2017

29 Nov 2018, 3:23 p.m. Offenders: Housing Benefit David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on people on remand of the reduction under universal credit in the period for which they can claim housing benefit from 12 to six months; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

There are no current assessments either by the Ministry of Justice or the Department for Work and Pensions.

We recognise that having somewhere stable to live on release from prison can be a critical factor in supporting rehabilitation and reducing homelessness, and this is particularly acute for short-sentenced offenders. This is why Universal Credit continues to pay housing support for up to 6 months to support those benefit recipients who are imprisoned, whether on remand and/or sentenced.

31 Oct 2018, 2:35 p.m. Prison Officers: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the number of prison officers diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder in relation to their work in the prison service.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Information is not available on the number of prison officers diagnosed with PTSD in relation to their work in the prison service as there is no classification for PTSD available on the centralised recording of sick absence.

HMPPS is committed to ensuring the health, safety and wellbeing of its staff in England and Wales, with all staff having access to a comprehensive occupational health service and employee assistance programme.

27 Jul 2018, 1:49 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were employed at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release location specific statistics on the deployment of its resources as doing so could compromise border security.
For information on Border Force staffing from 2010 I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to the Hon. Member for Westmorland and Lonsdale on 7 February 2017, UIN 60627.

The latest published staffing figures for Border Force can be found in the Home Office Annual Report for 2016 – 17 on page 66 at:
/ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Data for staffing levels in 2017/18 will be available when the Annual Report for 2017 – 18 is published

27 Jul 2018, 1:46 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many days were lost to sick leave by UK Border Force officers at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

27 Jul 2018, 1:46 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were (a) recruited, (b) dismissed and (c) retired at (i) Heathrow, (ii) Gatwick, (iii) Stansted and (iv) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

25 Jul 2018, 3:04 p.m. Remand in Custody David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been held on remand in prison for more than six months in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information on the amount of time spent on remand, for individuals who were remanded in custody by the courts is not centrally held.

The most recent published figures on remand can be found in the Criminal Justice Statistics 2017 report (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017).

25 Jul 2018, 2:04 p.m. Prisoners' Release David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of prisoners were released from each prison on a Friday in each year since 2010.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested is detailed in the table attached.

Prisoners are released when they have a statutory entitlement to be released once they have reached their automatic release date, or are released on a discretionary basis by the Parole Board, the Secretary of State or through early release on Home Detention Curfew (HDC) by prison governors.

If the automatic release date – which for the majority of prisoners is the half-way point in their sentence – falls on a weekend or Bank holiday, the law (Section 23(3) Criminal Justice Act 1961) requires the release to be brought forward to the first preceding working day. To defer the release date would mean holding the person unlawfully.

The exception is where the sentence is 5 days or less. In such cases the law provides for release to be on the Saturday if the automatic release date falls on a weekend or Bank Holiday.

Where appropriate, offenders may be released on temporary licence (ROTL) in the run up to their release to facilitate appointments for resettlement purposes and the Probation Service and Community Rehabilitation Companies provide support for offenders who are released on licence.

25 Jul 2018, 2:03 p.m. Reoffenders David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people released from each prison in each year since 2010 were subsequently recalled back into custody (a) within 12 months and (b) within a week.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Information about the number of offenders recalled to custody is held centrally, but it is not possible to cross-reference the data with information held on national systems about offenders released, without incurring disproportionate costs.

Public protection is our priority and recall is used to ensure that offenders on licence who present a high risk of harm to the public or are at risk of re-offending are returned to custody as quickly as possible.

The HMI Probation Thematic Report on Enforcement and Recall, published in February 2018, concluded that: “In this inspection, we found almost all NPS and CRC recall decisions were good decisions, with the NPS particularly good at considering alternatives to recall beforehand.”

20 Jul 2018, 9:46 a.m. Prisons: Construction David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to his speech delivered on 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, what the timetable is for the additional 10,000 prison places to be completed; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect of those additional places on prison officer to offender ratios.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Ministry of Justice remains committed to previously announced plans, subject to planning approvals, value for money and affordability, to build six category C modern prisons. We intend to build the first prison at Wellingborough (Northamptonshire) through public capital, with construction work expected to begin late 2018 to early 2019 with completion projected for early 2021. We will continue work to demolish buildings at the former HMP/YOI Glen Parva and intend to deliver this second prison through private finance. We will also build a further four prisons on land adjacent to HMP Full Sutton (East Yorkshire), Port Talbot (Neath), HMP/YOI Hindley (Greater Manchester) and HMP/YOI Rochester (Kent) and we will provide more detail about the delivery of these once we have undertaken the relevant assessments in regard to population projections, planning approvals, value for money and affordability tests.

Alongside the new prisons, a new houseblock at HMP Stocken, (Rutland) which will create 206 modern prison places. Construction of the houseblock started in February 2017 and is expected to begin taking prisoners in December 2018.

The same considerations in assessing staffing levels will be applied to the new prisons as to those in the existing estate. HM Prison and Probation Service will not take part in the prison competition but will provide a ‘public sector benchmark’ against which potential operators’ bids can be assessed and will take on the provider role if bids do not meet quality or value for money thresholds.

20 Jul 2018, 9:43 a.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, which 10 prisons the Drug Taskforce is being deployed for; and what (a) law enforcement and (b) healthcare agencies are planned to be involved in that work.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

As the Secretary of State indicated in his speech, we have formed a Drugs Taskforce working with law enforcement and health partners across government to restrict supply, reduce demand and build recovery in prisons. The Taskforce is providing support across the estate but is focused on the prisons with the worst drug problems. Further details, including the 10 prisons with which the Taskforce is undertaking focussed work, will be announced in due course.

20 Jul 2018, 9:43 a.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, if his Department will publish its findings on the ten prisons in which the Drug Taskforce will be implemented.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

As the Secretary of State indicated in his speech, we have formed a Drugs Taskforce working with law enforcement and health partners across government to restrict supply, reduce demand and build recovery in prisons. The Taskforce is providing support across the estate but is focused on the prisons with the worst drug problems. Further details, including the 10 prisons with which the Taskforce is undertaking focussed work, will be announced in due course.

20 Jul 2018, 9:43 a.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, who the members of the Drugs Taskforce will be.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

As the Secretary of State indicated in his speech, we have formed a Drugs Taskforce working with law enforcement and health partners across government to restrict supply, reduce demand and build recovery in prisons. The Taskforce is providing support across the estate but is focused on the prisons with the worst drug problems. Further details, including the 10 prisons with which the Taskforce is undertaking focussed work, will be announced in due course.

20 Jul 2018, 9:37 a.m. Prison Officers: Training David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, how much his Department is investing into training for prison staff on preserving evidence.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We are developing a new training package for prison staff to improve the preservation of evidence following a crime in prison. This will help make sure the police and CPS have access to the best information, in good time, to support investigations; make charging decisions and prosecute cases successfully. The cost of developing and delivering this new training package is being met from within HMPPS’ existing budgets.

By giving prison staff the right tools to deal with crime effectively we can make staff and prisoners safer - as well as sending a message to offenders that rehabilitation is the only endeavour worth pursuing in prison.

20 Jul 2018, 9:35 a.m. Prisons: Digital Technology David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, in which parts of the prison estate the digital categorisation tool has been trialed; and what impact assessment findings have been made from that trial.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We have been conducting a trial of the prototype version of the digital categorisation tool at HMP Cardiff and HMP Swansea. Offenders have continued to be categorised under the existing process while the tool is run in parallel to test its impact. We will assess the differences in categorisation once the trials are complete, and continue to develop and test the digital tool in the coming months.

19 Jul 2018, 1:04 p.m. Prosecutions David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been issued a postal requisition in (a) total and (b) each Crown Prosecution Service region; and of those people how many (i) failed to (A) attend court and (B) report to a police station and (ii) attended a magistrates court in each year since 2011.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information sought could only be provided at disproportionate cost or is not held.

17 Jul 2018, 1:56 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, if he will break down the £6,000,000 investment into counter-narcotics by (a) training expenditure, (b) detection equipment and (c) security improvements.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The funding cannot easily be divided into these three categories. The £6m investment into enhancing prison security will predominantly be spent on developing and implementing new technologies to improve the detection of drugs and other contraband. This includes body scanners and mobile phone blocking equipment which significantly assist Prison Officers’ work to reduce drugs and other illicit items coming into prisons. The investment in detection equipment will support general security improvements across the prison estate, and it will be backed by the training that prison staff need to be able to use that technology.

17 Jul 2018, 1:56 p.m. Prisons: Capital Investment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, which prisons will receive the additional investment of £16,000,000; and how much of that money will be spent in each prison.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

While details are still being finalised, we are focusing on the prisons with the most pressing needs. The works under consideration include refurbishment of poor-quality cellular accommodation, life-expired shower facilities and life-expired food service areas to meet expected standards of decency and hygiene, as well as up-grades to fire safety systems. In procuring these works our aim will be to achieve a good standard of delivery at a fair price for the taxpayer. Contract details will be made publicly available via the Ministry’s transparency returns in the usual way.

17 Jul 2018, 1:56 p.m. Prisons: Capital Investment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, what steps his Department is taken to ascertain whether the £16,000,000 investment in 11 prisons represents value for money to the public purse; and what steps are being taken to make contracts transparent on the work undertaken.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

While details are still being finalised, we are focusing on the prisons with the most pressing needs. The works under consideration include refurbishment of poor-quality cellular accommodation, life-expired shower facilities and life-expired food service areas to meet expected standards of decency and hygiene, as well as up-grades to fire safety systems. In procuring these works our aim will be to achieve a good standard of delivery at a fair price for the taxpayer. Contract details will be made publicly available via the Ministry’s transparency returns in the usual way.

17 Jul 2018, 1:56 p.m. Prisons: Capital Investment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 10 July 2018 to the Centre for Social Justice, what standards his Department plans for the £16,000,000 investment in 11 prisons to improve by prison receiving investment.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

While details are still being finalised, we are focusing on the prisons with the most pressing needs. The works under consideration include refurbishment of poor-quality cellular accommodation, life-expired shower facilities and life-expired food service areas to meet expected standards of decency and hygiene, as well as up-grades to fire safety systems. In procuring these works our aim will be to achieve a good standard of delivery at a fair price for the taxpayer. Contract details will be made publicly available via the Ministry’s transparency returns in the usual way.

16 Jul 2018, 3:45 p.m. Shoplifting David Hanson

Question

What steps he is taking to reduce shop theft.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

I chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group with the British Retail Consortium. This brings retailers and the police together to ensure an effective response to crimes affecting retailers and includes work to reduce shop thefts.

13 Jul 2018, 1:21 p.m. Armed Conflict: Schools David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the letter from the Minister of State for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 24 April 2018 to schools that participated in the Safe Schools Declaration, what steps he is taking to encourage international partners to endorse that Declaration.

Answer (Mark Field)

The UK is actively encouraging international partners to endorse the Safe Schools Declaration at both official and ministerial level. I was pleased to see the recent endorsements of the Declaration by Germany and by Djibouti. At a UN Security Council Open Debate on Children and Armed Conflict on 9 July, the UK called upon all UN Security Council members and UN member states to endorse the Declaration. We will continue to make representations to countries who have yet to endorse the Declaration.

12 Jul 2018, 3:41 p.m. LGBT People: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how the Government is supporting young LGBT+ people in line with the Safe Schools Declaration.

Answer (Mark Field)

The UK is fully committed to the promotion and protection of LGBT rights. The Safe Schools Declaration is a humanitarian pledge to protect all children, students and education personnel in schools and educational facilities from attack during armed conflicts and protracted crises. The Government is in the process of implementing the Declaration and its supporting guidelines. The Declaration and its guidelines do not make specific reference to matters relating to LGBT persons.

10 Jul 2018, 2:11 p.m. UK Intellectual Property Office: Standards David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the average length of time was for an application for a patent submitted to the Intellectual Property Office to be (a) granted and (b) dismissed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

(a) For patents granted in the years 2010-2018, the average time from filing of the patent application to grant was:-

Grant Year

Days to Grant

Approx Months to Grant

2010

1071

35

2011

1077

35

2012

1015

33

2013

923

30

2014

954

31

2015

1038

34

2016

1120

37

2017

1186

39

2018

1241

41

(b) Few unsuccessful patent applications are formally dismissed, with most simply expiring through failure to comply with the Patents Act within a prescribed period. Measurement of this time period does not, therefore provide a meaningful metric.

10 Jul 2018, 2:11 p.m. UK Intellectual Property Office: Standards David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications for a patent lodged at the Intellectual Property Office have been pending a decision for over (a) two, (b) three and (c) 4 years.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The number of patent applications which have been pending a decision for over two, three and four years are:

(a) Over two years: 8233

(b) Over three years: 3863

(c) Over four years: 1241

The IPO has a Ministerial Target, offering faster handling of patent applications by providing an examination report with a search report when both are requested at the application date, and meeting at least 90% of requests for an accelerated two-month turnaround for search, publication and examination. All requests to receive the search and examination reports together are acceded to; and 97% of all accelerated examination requests have been completed within 2 months of request for the current financial year.

10 Jul 2018, 2:10 p.m. UK Intellectual Property Office: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff were employed at the Intellectual Property Office in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The headcount at the Intellectual Property Office from 01 April 2010 is as follows:

Date

Headcount

01/04/2010

907

01/04/2011

899

01/04/2012

920

01/04/2013

982

01/04/2014

1017

01/04/2015

1108

01/04/2016

1169

01/04/2017

1171

01/04/2018

1215

4 Jul 2018, 4:35 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 13 June 2018 to Question 149941 on Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance, by what date he plans to write to the hon. Member for Delyn with that information and place a copy of the letter in the Library.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I have written to the Rt Hon Member and placed a copy of the letter in the Library.

2 Jul 2018, 1:24 p.m. Right of Abode David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many right of abode certificates have been (a) applied for and (b) granted to (i) males and (ii) females by country of origin following a change of name in each year since 2010; and how much has accrued to the public purse from those applications in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office does not record the information requested as this is not part of the application process. To provide the requested information would require manual examination of all applications for right of abode and exceed the dispropotionate cost limit.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, how many young people have been refused British citizenship as a result of being found to not be of good character under each classification; and how many young people have faced restrictions in applying as a minor in each year since December 2012.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many young people, as defined by the British Nationality Act 1981, have been (a) refused and (b) granted citizenship in each year since December 2012.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, whether his Department has undertaken a review of the guidance it issues on good character for young persons; and what discussion his Department has had with stakeholders on the definitions used.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

22 Jun 2018, 9:23 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many community rehabilitation companies have submitted evidence to his Department citing financial difficulties in providing rehabilitation services.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We work closely with probation providers to make sure they meet their contractual obligations and understand any barriers to delivery.

Following discussions with Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) and their parent companies, in 2017 we made changes to contracts so that payments to them more accurately reflect the costs of delivering services. This was set out in a written statement to Parliament in July last year.

We have been clear that CRC performance needs to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to make sure we secure the quality of services we need.

22 Jun 2018, 9:22 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to terminate community rehabilitation company contracts in 2020.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts are currently due to end in 2022.

We have been clear that CRCs need to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to ensure that we secure the quality of probation services we need. Contracts allow for a range of action to be taken.

No decisions have yet been made about the future delivery of probation services once current CRC contracts end: we will update Parliament as necessary.

22 Jun 2018, 9:22 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions he has had with community rehabilitation companies on their future role in providing probation services.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts are currently due to end in 2022.

We have been clear that CRCs need to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to ensure that we secure the quality of probation services we need. Contracts allow for a range of action to be taken.

No decisions have yet been made about the future delivery of probation services once current CRC contracts end: we will update Parliament as necessary.

22 Jun 2018, 9:22 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of ending contracts with community rehabilitation companies early in 2020; and what estimate he has made of the cost of early termination of each such contract.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts are currently due to end in 2022.

We have been clear that CRCs need to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to ensure that we secure the quality of probation services we need. Contracts allow for a range of action to be taken.

No decisions have yet been made about the future delivery of probation services once current CRC contracts end: we will update Parliament as necessary.

22 Jun 2018, 9:22 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of (a) the potential merits and (b) cost of bringing back in-house the services provided by community rehabilitation companies when contracts with those companies end.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts are currently due to end in 2022.

We have been clear that CRCs need to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to ensure that we secure the quality of probation services we need. Contracts allow for a range of action to be taken.

No decisions have yet been made about the future delivery of probation services once current CRC contracts end: we will update Parliament as necessary.

22 Jun 2018, 9:22 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on rehabilitation services of reducing the number of community rehabilitation companies providing such services.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts are currently due to end in 2022.

We have been clear that CRCs need to improve, and are in commercial discussions with providers to ensure that we secure the quality of probation services we need. Contracts allow for a range of action to be taken.

No decisions have yet been made about the future delivery of probation services once current CRC contracts end: we will update Parliament as necessary.

22 Jun 2018, 9:21 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the value for money of community rehabilitation company contracts and the effect of those contracts on re-offending rates.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We closely monitor Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) performance and hold providers to account for meeting their contractual obligations.

Although adjustments made to contracts in 2017 to better reflect the cost of delivering services increased the potential value of CRC contracts by up to £277m, our total spend on CRCs is still expected to be substantially less than the c.£3.7bn originally forecast.

Since contracts began, CRCs have reduced the number of people reoffending by two percentage points. Nevertheless, we recognise that CRC performance needs to improve. We are currently in commercial discussions with providers to make sure we secure the quality of services we need, and have been clear that that all options to manage performance, including contract termination, remain under consideration.

22 Jun 2018, 9:21 a.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of the performance of community rehabilitation companies.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We closely monitor Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) performance and hold providers to account for meeting their contractual obligations.

Although adjustments made to contracts in 2017 to better reflect the cost of delivering services increased the potential value of CRC contracts by up to £277m, our total spend on CRCs is still expected to be substantially less than the c.£3.7bn originally forecast.

Since contracts began, CRCs have reduced the number of people reoffending by two percentage points. Nevertheless, we recognise that CRC performance needs to improve. We are currently in commercial discussions with providers to make sure we secure the quality of services we need, and have been clear that that all options to manage performance, including contract termination, remain under consideration.

18 Jun 2018, 3:03 p.m. Sentencing: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of deferred sentences for women broken down by police force areas in each year since 2010.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of female offenders who received a deferred sentence broken down by police force area, from 2010 to 2017, can be viewed in the table attached.

We remain committed to addressing the issues around female offending so we can better protect the public and deliver more effective rehabilitation. That is why we plan to set out a strategy to improve outcomes for women in both the community and custody as soon as we are able.

14 Jun 2018, 4:59 p.m. Prison Officers David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the staffing ratio of prison officers to prisoners has been in (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since 2010.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Prison population statistics and workforce statistics are regularly published. These can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-population-figures-2018.

HM Prison and Probation workforce statistics (which contains staffing figures in public sector prisons but not in privately managed prisons) are published quarterly. The latest publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/her-majestys-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-march-2018. Latest staffing figures for privately managed prisons since 2010 were provided in the reply to the Honourable member for Leeds East for PQ 114727.

Prison officer numbers are at their highest in five years, which is vital to ensuring prisons are safe, secure and decent. We have recruited over 3,000 new prison officers across the country in the last 18 months to improve safety and help turn offenders’ lives around. The recruitment drive will continue until we reach required levels across the prison estate, ensuring prisons can fulfil their purpose - protecting the public, reducing reoffending and crucially, rehabilitating offenders.

14 Jun 2018, 4:59 p.m. Prison Officers David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to improve the staffing ratio between prison officers and prisoners; and what the timescale is for increasing the number of prison officers.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Prison population statistics and workforce statistics are regularly published. These can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-population-figures-2018.

HM Prison and Probation workforce statistics (which contains staffing figures in public sector prisons but not in privately managed prisons) are published quarterly. The latest publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/her-majestys-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-march-2018. Latest staffing figures for privately managed prisons since 2010 were provided in the reply to the Honourable member for Leeds East for PQ 114727.

Prison officer numbers are at their highest in five years, which is vital to ensuring prisons are safe, secure and decent. We have recruited over 3,000 new prison officers across the country in the last 18 months to improve safety and help turn offenders’ lives around. The recruitment drive will continue until we reach required levels across the prison estate, ensuring prisons can fulfil their purpose - protecting the public, reducing reoffending and crucially, rehabilitating offenders.

13 Jun 2018, 3:02 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many outstanding (a) preventative and (b) reactive maintenance actions on the prisons estates (i) at each location and (ii) under each facilities management contract there were on 1 June 2018.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We are in the process of reviewing the data we hold in relation to maintenance action (both reactive and preventive). In particular, we are seeking to get a clearer understanding of how many of the tasks Carillion were undertaking had been completed before responsibility for facilities management transferred to Gov Facility Services Ltd in February. I will write to the Hon Member with further information once this work has been completed and will place a copy of my letter in the Library.

7 Jun 2018, 1:24 p.m. Prison Officers: Protective Clothing David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his policy is on prison officers wearing (a) smoke hoods and (b) other respiratory protective equipment when attending an incident in a cell involving the use of a psychoactive substance.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Smoke Hoods are designed explicitly for the purpose of protecting prison officers from the harmful effects of fire and smoke gasses when tackling cell fire incidents. The set is limited to short-duration cell fire response operations and is not designed and should not therefore be used for any other purpose, such as to protect from psychoactive substances. All prison officers are trained in its use including annual refresher training.

Prison officers are trained to visually inspect cells via the cell door’s observation window to assess the condition of the cell and the behaviour and position of its occupant(s) prior to entry. Procedures are in place to defer entry and to take other measures if there is evidence of the potential for noxious fumes or smoke to be present other than where there is an apparent immediate risk to life. Respiratory protective equipmentis not mandated for all entry into cells as the vast majority of entries into cells present no significant respiratory risk.

29 May 2018, 1:47 p.m. Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisons have held events to observe (a) Holocaust Memorial Day, (b) National Black History Month and (c) Interfaith Awareness Week in each of the last five years; and what his policy is on prisons observing those events.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Prisons are free to decide locally how they participate in Holocaust Memorial Day and Black History Month. Although chaplaincy teams locally may have marked the event in some way, there has been no national engagement regarding Interfaith Awareness Week. National Prison Radio promotes national support for local initiatives, and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service also provides information to prisons via its staff networks to support prison staff in their participation in local events. We do not collect information centrally on the number of prisons which have held such events.

We have not evaluated the Empty Spaces project which, as it is being conducted in a prison in Northern Ireland, does not fall under our jurisdiction as we are responsible for Prisons in England and Wales.

29 May 2018, 1:47 p.m. Prisons: Holocaust Memorial Day David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) effectiveness and (b) potential merits of expansion to other prisons under his jurisdiction of the Empty Spaces project developed by prisoners at Magilligan Prison in Northern Ireland.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Prisons are free to decide locally how they participate in Holocaust Memorial Day and Black History Month. Although chaplaincy teams locally may have marked the event in some way, there has been no national engagement regarding Interfaith Awareness Week. National Prison Radio promotes national support for local initiatives, and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service also provides information to prisons via its staff networks to support prison staff in their participation in local events. We do not collect information centrally on the number of prisons which have held such events.

We have not evaluated the Empty Spaces project which, as it is being conducted in a prison in Northern Ireland, does not fall under our jurisdiction as we are responsible for Prisons in England and Wales.

22 May 2018, 3:23 p.m. Young Offenders: North Wales David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of young people sentenced in each sentencing court of (a) the Crown Court and (b) magistrates' courts for (i) less than 6 months and (ii) more than 6 months of custody in the North Wales Police Force Area in each of the last 5 years.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The number of young people aged 10 to 17 sentenced, by court and by length of sentence within the North Wales Police Force Area from 2012 to 2016, can be viewed in the attached table.

Figures are broken down by less than 6 months, 6 months and more than 6-month sentences.

17 May 2018, 4:23 p.m. Prison Sentences: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women were sent to immediate custody from the (a) the Crown Court and (b) magistrates' courts for sentences (i) below 6 months and (ii) above 6 months in each police force area in England and Wales in each of the last five years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of custodial sentences issued to female offenders in England and Wales, by court type and police force area from 2012 to 2016, can be viewed in the attached Tables 1 to 5. The data for 2017 will be published on 17 May 2018.

We are committed to doing all we can to address the issues around female offending so we can better protect the public and deliver more effective rehabilitation. That is why we will set out a strategy for female offenders, to improve outcomes and services for women in both the community and custody.

9 May 2018, 5:06 p.m. Airguns David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to publish the outcome of the Government's review of air weapon regulation, announced on 12 December 2017.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Government’s review of the regulation of air weapons received a large number of representations from interested parties and members of the public. We are considering these carefully and will publish our findings in due course.

18 Apr 2018, 3:45 p.m. Prisons: Mobile Phones David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mobile phones confiscated in each prison have been analysed for information contained in them for each year since 2010.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of mobile phones (including SIM cards) seized in prisons that are analysed for information each year is as follows

2010 – No data available

2011 – 10643

2012 – 9541

2013 – 6505

2014 – 12612

2015 – 9877

2016 – 10269

2017 – 4484*

*Fewer examinations took place in 2017 due to the creation of a new examination facility in HMPPS. During this time particularly high-interest phones were prioritised for examination. Therefore, we can expect the number to rise again in 2018.

5 Apr 2018, 12:26 p.m. Vetting David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people waited longer than (a) 14 days, (b) 18 days, (c) 25 days and (d) 60 days to receive their Disclosure and Barring Service reports; and what the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring Service reports was by police force in each year since 2010.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The tables below set out the number of people who have waited longer than 14, 18, 25 and 60 days to receive their disclosure certificates*:

2010/11:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,880,214

1,578,142

1,243,836

453,391

Standard

9,222

4,926

2,784

674

Total

1,889,436

1,583,068

1,246,620

454,065

2011/12:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

688,549

519,641

368,941

104,773

Standard

4,456

2,960

1,794

487

Total

693,005

522,601

370,735

105,260

2012/13:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

790,299

613,596

380,402

42,520

Standard

3,917

2,935

1,961

319

Total

794,216

616,531

382,363

42,839

2013/14:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

834,288

751,147

593,457

405,014

Standard

3,221

3,063

2,151

946

Total

837,509

754,210

595,608

405,960

2014/15:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,038,411

736,329

490,198

181,338

Standard

15,125

4,420

1,473

216

Total

1,053,536

740,749

491,671

181,554

2015/16:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,972

675,921

446,212

209,613

Standard

3,688

1,646

897

217

Total

921,660

677,567

447,109

209,830

2016/17:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

948,522

725,014

516,048

204,482

Standard

2,579

998

617

124

Total

951,101

726,012

516,665

204,606

2017-Feb 2018:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,339

675,261

404,637

39,940

Standard

11,021

3,157

698

137

Total

928,360

678,418

405,335

40,077

*To include Standard and Enhanced checks.

Data relating to the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring checks carried out by each police force in each year since 2010 is available, but due to the volume of data, it is not in a reportable format. Officials will ensure a hard copy of this data is placed in the House library.

5 Apr 2018, 9:21 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of deaths associated with solvent abuse.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

5 Apr 2018, 9:21 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the implications for its policies of the Office for National Statistics report into solvent abuse, published on 26 March 2018.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

4 Apr 2018, 12:24 p.m. Nitrous Oxide: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the misuse of nitrous oxide.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Psychoactive substances, such as nitrous oxide, have already cost far too many lives. That is why we changed the law in 2016 to make it illegal to supply substances that are capable of having a psychoactive effect.

The introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act sent out a clear message – we will take whatever action is necessary to keep our families and communities safe.

Since the Act came into force, over 300 retailers across the United Kingdom have either closed down or are no longer selling psychoactive substances, police have arrested suppliers and action by the National Crime Agency has resulted in the removal of these drugs for sale on UK based websites.

4 Apr 2018, 10:11 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what funding the Government has committed to reduce deaths associated with solvent abuse via each (a) Department, (b) Agency, (c) Local authorities, and (d) voluntary organisation?

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Funding decisions in relation to substance misuse services have been devolved to local authorities through the public health grant. It is for local authorities to commission the appropriate health services to address the use of volatile substances based on an assessment of local need.

Local areas need to consider how best to prevent and treat volatile substance use through age appropriate services. Local specialist services can support young people to address their substance misuse, and should operate as part of a wider network of services which aim to support young people with a range of issues and help them to build their resilience.

Adults who have problems with volatile substances can also access support from community drug and alcohol services, which should be able to provide appropriate psychosocial interventions to help them stop using these substances and medicines for symptomatic relief if needed.

3 Apr 2018, 4:08 p.m. Jamaica: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding the Government has allocated to the costs of a new prison in Jamaica since September 2015; and what the status is of the construction of that prison.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

In January 2017 the Government of Jamaica formally declined the UK Government’s offer to support the costs of building a new prison in Jamaica. No cost allocation has therefore been made.

3 Apr 2018, 3:02 p.m. Prisoners: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) Albanian, (b) Nigerian, (c) Somalian, (d) Rwandan, (e) Chinese, (f) Vietnamese and (g) South African nationals were held in UK prisons as of (i) 30 June 2010 and (ii) 31 January 2018; and how many of those prisoners were transferred to serve their sentences in their home nation.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Any foreign national who comes to our country and abuses our hospitality by breaking the law should be in no doubt of our determination to deport them. More than 40,000 foreign national offenders have been removed from the UK since 2010, with a record number of over 6,300 removed in 2016/17.

The UK has Prisoner Transfer Agreements in place with over 100 countries and territories around the world, which includes Albania, Nigeria and Rwanda; however, transfer agreements are not in place with China or the Republic of South Africa. Furthermore, while a Prisoner Transfer Agreement is not in place with Somalia, there is a transfer agreement with Somaliland. Between the 30 June 2010 and 31 December 2017, a total of 442 prisoners were transferred from the UK to prisons around the world to serve sentences of imprisonment.

The specific information requested is set out in the table below. Please note that the prison population data quoted for 30 June 2010 and 31 December 2017 includes offenders on remand, those serving sentences for civil or financial offences, and those detained under immigration powers in prisons or in HMPPS run Immigration Removal Centres, all of whom are not eligible for prisoner transfer. As such, only a proportion of the offenders in the data quoted will be eligible for transfer, and only to countries where a Prisoner Transfer Agreement is in place.

Country

Nationals held by HMPPS on 30 June 2010

Nationals held by HMPPS on 31 December 2017 (the latest published data)

Number of prisoners removed under Prisoner Transfer Agreements, since those arrangements entered into force

Albania

154

716

23

Nigeria

727

270

2

Somalia

433

320

0

Rwanda

20

10

0

China

364

75

0

Vietnam

596

135

4

South Africa

137

75

0

3 Apr 2018, 2:58 p.m. Prisoners: Jamaica David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Jamaican nationals were in UK prisons as of (a) 30 June 2015 and (b) 31 January 2018.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

On 30 June 2015 there were 619 Jamaican nationals held in prisons in England and Wales, and HMPPS run Immigration Removal Centres, with this figure declining to 448 on 31 December 2017, our most recent published figures. In regard to Jamaican nationals held in Scotland and Northern Ireland, as prisons are a devolved matter, figures would need to be provided by the Devolved Administrations.

Any foreign national who comes to our country and abuses our hospitality by breaking the law should be in no doubt of our determination to deport them. More than 40,000 foreign national offenders have been removed from the UK since 2010, with a record number of over 6,300 removed in 2016/17.

3 Apr 2018, 12:40 p.m. Shops: Crimes of Violence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that violence against shopworkers is recorded by police forces.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Violence is unacceptable wherever it takes place, and violence or abuse against retail staff should not be tolerated. We encourage all victims, including shopworkers, to report these crimes to the police whenever they occur so that they can be recorded and investigated and the perpetrators brought to justice.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, we are working with our partners across government, the police and in the retail sector to explore what more can be done to prevent and tackle violence and abuse against retail staff.

3 Apr 2018, 12:37 p.m. Shops: Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Local Shop Report 2017, published by the Association of Convenience Stores, what steps she is taking the reduce the level of convenience store crime.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government takes retail crime very seriously. We recognise the damage and disruption that different crimes can have on businesses including smaller businesses and convenience stores.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, which I co-chair with the British Retail Consortium, we bring together representatives from government departments, the police and the retail sector, including the Association of Convenience Stores, to focus on the crime issues that affect businesses of all sizes. This includes addressing the crimes that affect retail establishments and improving the safety of the staff who work in them.

29 Mar 2018, 3:50 p.m. Developing Countries: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much overseas development aid funding has been allocated to the construction of prisons in each country in receipt of such funding since 2010.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

DFID does not collate figures on how much ODA funding has been specifically allocated to prison construction. However, we have supported the reform and rehabilitation of prisons in developing countries, such as £2.3 million in Somalia.

19 Mar 2018, 3:52 p.m. Employment Agencies: Termination of Employment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of notice periods for people on agency contracts with regard to dismissal procedures.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The termination arrangements for agency workers are determined by the contract of engagement.

In recognition of a need for greater transparency to better support agency workers, the Government set out in its response to the Taylor review of modern employment practice the intention to introduce a “key facts” page for agency workers, which will set out clearly all the information needed by an agency worker to make an informed decision prior to entering into a contract.

19 Mar 2018, 3:22 p.m. Temporary Employment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people who have been employed as agency workers for (a) less than one year, (b) between one and two years and (c) more than two years.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Department holds no information on how long agency workers have been employed on contracts for specific periods of time.

19 Mar 2018, 3:21 p.m. Temporary Employment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with employers who use agency contracts on access to bereavement or compassionate leave.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Department’s discussions with employers about bereavement or compassionate leave have not referred to agency contracts.

Our manifesto made a commitment that bereaved parents should be able to take some time away from work to grieve for a lost child. To achieve that, the Government is supporting the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Bill. Consultations with business representatives took place last summer and further consultation will take place this year on the details.

Acas has developed guidance for employers on managing bereavement in the workplace, in conjunction with Cruse Bereavement Care. It recognises the effect that bereavement might have on employees in undertaking their duties, sets out the law in this area and provides guidance on good practice, including having a bereavement policy in place.

19 Mar 2018, 3:20 p.m. Temporary Employment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect on the level of workers' rights of people being employed on agency contracts.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Taylor review into modern employment practices highlighted several areas where the protections of agency workers’ rights could be strengthened.

In response, the Government is currently consulting on the regulation of umbrella companies, and intermediaries; state enforcement of the Agency Worker Regulations; whether “pay between assignments” contracts for agency workers (known as the Swedish derogations) should be repealed; and on the essential information that should be included in a ‘key facts’ summary of an agency worker’s contract.

19 Mar 2018, 2:48 p.m. Poverty: Wales David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been deemed to be living in in-work poverty in each (a) constituency in Wales and (b) ward in Delyn in each year since 2010.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

National statistics on the number of people living in in-work relative low income are set out in the annual "Households Below Average Income" publication. The numbers of people living in in-work relative low income is not available at constituency or ward level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography.

The percentage of working age adults living in relative low income by economic status at a UK level can be found in file “5_workingage_timeseries_risk.ods”, table 5_11ts and the number of working age adults living in relative low income for Wales can be found in file “5_workingage_timeseries_region.ods”, table 5.18ts.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/599136/hbai-2015-2016-supporting-ods-files.zip

19 Mar 2018, 9:47 a.m. Glenys Stacey David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial remuneration Dame Glenys Stacey will receive from his Department for undertaking the review of the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system; and how many staff will be assisting her in that review.

Answer (George Eustice)

Dame Glenys’s salary will not change as a result of her appointment to this review. The review will be supported by a small secretariat function based in Defra, the details of which are currently being finalised.

16 Mar 2018, 2:48 p.m. Glenys Stacey David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what arrangements his Department has made with the Ministry of Justice to ensure that Dame Glenys Stacey will be able to continue her work as HM Chief Inspector of Probation whilst undertaking the review into the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system.

Answer (George Eustice)

HMI Probation has recently recruited two new director and head of function posts, as part of a new organisational design. This increases HMI Probation senior staff capacity substantially, and enables some delegation. It is anticipated that the organisation will continue to inspect and report exactly as planned.

16 Mar 2018, 2:46 p.m. Glenys Stacey David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many hours Dame Glenys Stacey will be working on the review of the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system.

Answer (George Eustice)

Dame Glenys Stacey has been appointed to work for two days per week, between 1 March and 31 December 2018, on the Farm Inspection Review.

16 Mar 2018, 2:38 p.m. Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what is the expected (a) completion and (b) publication date of her Department’s review of the operation of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office is committed to publishing the review 30 months after the introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

16 Mar 2018, 2:38 p.m. Prison Officers: Termination of Employment David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who had a prison officer grade were (a) dismissed and (b) resigned in each year since 2010.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The number of band 3-5 prison officers who have resigned or have been dismissed in each year since 2010 can be found in table 11b in the latest HMPPS workforce statistics publication at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/her-majestys-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-december-2017

14 Mar 2018, 5:32 p.m. Local Growth Deals: North Wales David Hanson

Question

What recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the timetable for the delivery of the North Wales growth deal.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

I have had regular discussions with my ministerial colleagues regarding the North Wales Growth Deal, especially in light of its significant cross-border aspects.

The benefit of a growth deal is that they are driven by local communities, and as such the timetable is in their hands.

14 Mar 2018, 5:15 p.m. Prisons: Mobile Phones David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time taken is between confiscated mobile phones being sent by prisons and the information being shared with police forces.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information requested is not available. The decision to refer a confiscated mobile phone to the police is taken on a case by case basis and therefore no data exists as to the average time taken for this to happen.

14 Mar 2018, 5:13 p.m. Prisons: Technology David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech of 6 March 2018 to the Royal Society of Arts on prison reform, if he will list the 30 prisons which will receive the new technology; how many prison officers in each prison will be nominated to use that technology; what additional training will be provided to those prison officers; and what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of implementing that new technology.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The technology being introduced into prisons will allow for a much faster identification of threats to prison security, particularly the trafficking of drugs and other illicit items. It will allow the police to identify the criminal networks outside prisons involved in this activity.

We are unable to list the exact locations of the technology and the number of officers in each prison who will be nominated to use it as this is operationally sensitive. However the locations are being chosen based on the threat they face from serious organised crime.

I can confirm that all officers using the technology will attend a dedicated formal training course. The estimated full development and implementation costs of installing this technology is £250,000.

14 Mar 2018, 5:13 p.m. Prisons: Organised Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech to the Royal Society of Arts on 6 March 2018, what estimate he has made of the number of prisoners identified as ring leaders.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We are committed to making sure that prisons are safe, decent and support rehabilitation. That is why we have invested £14m to tackle serious and organised crime, which impacts on the community and is one of the major root causes of instability in prisons.

The impact of harms like violence and drug use are clear, but these are often the result of prisoners who ostensibly behave, but have others do their bidding. We need to cut these prisoners off from their network and prevent them from operating, to create environments in which prisoners can be rehabilitated.

Through our own data, and closer work with law enforcement, we are looking at how we can better use intelligence and information to identify these ringleaders among the 6,500 prisoners who have links to organised crime and target them for disruption. Due to the sensitive nature of this data, I am unable to disclose more precise figures.

14 Mar 2018, 5:11 p.m. Prisons: Organised Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech to the Royal Society of Arts on 6 March 2018, how much of the £14m investment to tackle serious and organised crime in prisons, will be spent on (a) establishing teams within prisons and (b) the National Crime Agency.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We are committed to making sure that prisons are safe, decent and support rehabilitation. That is why we have invested £14m to tackle serious and organised crime, which impacts on the community and is one of the major root causes of instability in prisons.

£3m will fund the Serious Organised Crime Unit, made up of a national unit and regional teams that will relentlessly undermine and disrupt serious and organised crime by providing support to local prisons and probation teams, and working closely with law enforcement.

£3m will fund the National Intelligence Unit, which is already in place, working through regional teams and with law enforcement. Through better use of intelligence about the risks presented to prison security and public protection by Serious and Organised Crime Groups, HMPPS will deliver proactive, targeted and robust operational responses.

Over £8m will be invested locally to allow more analysis of local intelligence, which can support intelligence led tactical searching to address identified risks and threats.

We are also working closely with law enforcement partners, including the National Crime Agency, whose funding is not the responsibility of the Ministry of Justice. Through this work we can deliver a robust joint response to those serious and organised criminals operating in prisons.

14 Mar 2018, 5:10 p.m. Reoffenders David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his speech to the Royal Society of Arts on 6 March 2018, which senior Ministers will be part of the cross-government group to reduce re-offending; and how often will that group meet.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Reoffending by prisoners released from custody is estimated to cost society approximately £15 billion per year. On the 6th of March 2018 the Secretary of State for Justice announced his intention to convene a cross-government group of senior Ministers to work across all relevant departments to reduce re-offending and the cost of reoffending to society.

It is only by working cross-government that we will be able to help ex-offenders secure employment, find a home, get treatment for a drug addiction and support for mental health issues.

Further details will be announced in due course.

13 Mar 2018, 5:42 p.m. Approved Premises David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many recorded crimes were committed by people residing in bail and probation hostels by site in England and Wales in each of the last 12 months.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

At the time of conviction, offenders who commit a further offence while resident at Approved Premises (AP) may have left the AP, which will therefore have no record of the conviction. To obtain the requested information, it would therefore be necessary to cross-check thousands of AP and court records, which could not be done without incurring disproportionate cost.

12 Mar 2018, 3:39 p.m. Approved Premises David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff there were without security clearance in bail and probation hostels by site in England and Wales in each of the last 12 months.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

This data is not held centrally and can only be collated at disproportionate cost. Where staff are working in approved premises if they hold no vetting they will be supervised at all times by permanent, vetted NPS staff. A new way of working in approved premises is being implemented, which will lead to there always being two personnel on duty during the night rather than one. During the transition to a new way of working, NPS have agreed an additional precautionary measure which will, in some instances, provide triple cover during the two month transition period.

12 Mar 2018, 3:33 p.m. Reoffenders: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of women subject to post-release supervision by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRC) were recalled to prison for non-compliance by CRC area in England and Wales in (a) 2015, (b) 2016 and (c) 2017.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The number of females recalled per year by each Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) is set out in the table below.

CRC Area

2015

2016

2017*

Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire & Hertfordshire

26

43

33

Bristol, Gloucestershire, Somerset & Wiltshire

20

42

21

Cheshire & Greater Manchester

40

42

41

Cumbria & Lancashire

27

29

27

Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire & Rutland

49

53

58

Dorset, Devon & Cornwall

12

20

16

Durham Tees Valley

15

11

16

Essex

13

25

13

Hampshire & Isle of Wight

18

29

19

Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire

23

30

19

Kent, Surrey & Sussex

42

46

43

London

79

131

144

Merseyside

21

35

39

Norfolk & Suffolk

13

13

21

Northumbria

11

11

12

South Yorkshire

27

17

12

Staffordshire & West Midlands

45

63

53

Thames Valley

20

22

19

Wales

42

60

49

Warwickshire & West Mercia

17

18

17

West Yorkshire

19

39

42

Total (ALL)

579

779

714

* Recalls in 2017 up to 30 September 2017.

The figures in this table have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

The numbers of women subject to post-release supervision are not recorded so it is not possible to show the proportion of women subject to post-release supervision who have been recalled.

Our probation reforms mean we are now monitoring 40,000 offenders who would previously have been released with no supervision at all. HMPPS, the NPS and CRCs are working to ensure that recalls are used appropriately and effectively.

5 Mar 2018, 5:27 p.m. Government Departments: Procurement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 21 February 2018 to Question 127748, on Amey and Carillion, how many times repayments were made by a contractor to the Department when a defect of contract was identified in the financial year 2016-17.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Department doesn’t record how many times repayments were made by a contractor to the Department when a defect of contract was identified. Following a defect additional costs are incurred by the contractor to remedy the defect without any additional charge to the Department.

In the majority of cases Amey and Carillion correct the defect in accordance with the contract and therefore no repayment amount is due.

For the duration of their contracts, Carillion have incurred £4,057,543 in Financial Remedies and Amey have incurred £2,176,592 in financial remedies. Financial remedies are imposed under the agreed Payment Mechanism System when the Key Performance Scores are below the required level.

27 Feb 2018, 5:31 p.m. Prisons: Seized Articles David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2018 to Question 64325 and the Answer of 2 March 2018 to Question 64326, how many incidents of (a) drugs by weight, (b) SIM cards and (c) mobile phones were found in prisons in 2017.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Ministry of Justice intends to routinely publish information on finds of mobile phones, SIM cards and drugs in the future. Data for 2017 will be provided in due course as part of the normal publication schedule at

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/annual-national-offender-management-service-digest-2016-to-2017

26 Feb 2018, 5:26 p.m. Police: Finance David Hanson

Question

What discussions she has had with Police and Crime Commissioners on the level of the police precept for 2018-19.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Before the police funding settlement, I spoke and received written submissions from leaders in police forces in England and Wales. Police leaders - especially in England where referendum limits apply - were clear that they wanted additional flexibility to increase funding through precept. I heard their messages and responded by allowing increases of an average £1 per month in England, enabling each PCC to maintain their funding in real terms next year.

21 Feb 2018, 6:14 p.m. Amey and Carillion David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which prisons contracted out facilities management to (a) Carillion (b) Amey.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Facilities management services were contracted at the following prisons:

a) Carillion Establishments

b) Amey Establishments

Blantyre House

Deerbolt

Cookham Wood

Durham

Dover (Now closed)

Frankland

East Sutton Park

Holme House

Ford

Kirklivington Grange

Lewes

Low Newton

Maidstone

Buckley Hall

Rochester

Garth

Elmely

Haverigg

Stanford Hill

Hindley

Swaleside

Kennet

Aylesbury

Kirkham

Bullingdon

Lancaster Farms

Grendon

Liverpool

Haslar (Now closed)

Manchester

Huntercombe

Preston

Albany

Risely

Parkhurst

Styal

Springhill

Thorn Cross

Winchester

Wymott

Woodhill

Askham Grange

Bristol

Everthorpe

Channings Wood

Full Sutton

Dartmoor

Hatfield

Eastwood Park

Hull

Erlestoke

Leeds

Exeter

Lindholme

Guys Marsh

Moorland

Leyhill

New Hall

Portland

Wakefield

The Verne

Wealstun

Bedford

Wetherby

Bure

Wolds

Chelmsford

Foston Hall

Highpoint

Gartee

Hollesley Bay

Glen Parva (Now closed)

Littlehey

Leicester

The Mount

Lincoln

Norwich

Long Lartin

Warren Hill

Morton Hall

Wayland

North Sea Camp

Whitemoor

Nottingham

Belmarsh

Onley

Coldingley

Ranby

Downview

Stocken

Feltham

Sudbury

Highdown

Whatton

Holloway (Now closed)

Brinsford

Pentonville

Drake Hall

Send

Featherstone

Wandsworth

Hewell

Wormwood Scrubs

Stafford

Stoke Heath

Swinfen Hall

Werrington

Cardiff

Swansea

Usk

Prescoed

Berwyn

21 Feb 2018, 6:11 p.m. Amey and Carillion David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many recorded breaches of contracts by (a) Carillion and (b) Amey there were in financial year 2016-17.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Ministry of Justice records defects of the contract where there have been deficiencies in the service delivered by contractors. These are flagged to the contractor so that they can correct them in a timely manner. We keep all our contracts under a robust monitoring system. Defects have been reported to Carillion 578 and Amey 299 times since the start of the contract in June 2015.

20 Feb 2018, 5:15 p.m. Prisoners: Universal Credit David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the merits of awarding universal credit to prisoners who are nearing completion of their sentence before they leave prison.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

Prisoners are able to speak to a Department of Work and Pensions Work Coach shortly before release who is able to make an appointment at the relevant Job Centre as early as the day of release. Once the former prisoner attends the Job Centre to complete his claim, eligible prisoners can receive funds within hours.

Ministry of Justice officials are working with the Department of Work and Pensions to improve the process with the aim of enabling a claim in advance of release and will release more details in due course.

20 Feb 2018, 5:01 p.m. Forensic Science David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department took to minimise risk in response to the National Audit Office report on The Home Office's oversight of forensic services, published in January 2015.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

This was a briefing paper for the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. The Home Office published its Forensic Science Strategy in March 2016 setting out how policing would deliver a national approach to forensic science delivery, supported by the Home Office.

20 Feb 2018, 1:10 p.m. Universal Credit: Prisoners David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions her Department has had with the Ministry of Justice on the merits of awarding universal credit to prisoners who are nearing completion of their sentence before they leave prison.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

We are currently working with the Ministry of Justice to look at ways of developing the service for prison leavers claiming Universal Credit on release.

In the month leading up to their release, Prisoner Work Coaches can support prisoners in preparation to make a claim to Universal Credit. Following recent improvements to Universal Credit advances, claimants, including prison leavers, can now apply to receive up to 100% of their expected monthly entitlement from day one of their claim. Ministry of Justice and DWP are working collaboratively to ensure that prison leavers receive financial support and gain stability to find work on their day of release.

14 Feb 2018, 5:10 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many outstanding (a) preventative and (b) reactive maintenance actions on the prisons estates (i) at each location and (ii) under each facilities management contract there were on 1 January 2018.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The table attached provides the number of outstanding reactive and planned maintenance tasks, as logged in our management system on 1 January 2018, at each Prison in England and Wales for Mitie, Carillion and Amey. Typically, some 95,000 maintenance tasks are completed each month; around 90 to 95% of all tasks raised. Some of these tasks cannot be completed in the month for a variety of reasons which can lead to duplication of a task. The figures provided include these duplicate tasks, which account for part of the apparent 'backlog'.

Our current priority is to stabilise and improve service delivery, with an improved focus on cleanliness and decency. We have created of a new government-owned facilities management company that has taken over the delivery of the prison Facilities Management services previously provided by Carillion.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who will be responsible for the provision of forensic science services following the collapse of Key Forensic Services; and how much financial support will be given to establish that provider.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on police forces of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many pending cases Key Forensic Services was handling in each police force area prior to its collapse.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have ongoing case work with Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the cost to the public purse of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

7 Feb 2018, 3:57 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Contracts David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many recorded breaches of contracts between private contractors and his Department there were by (a) site and (b) company in each year since 2010.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Feb 2018, 3:57 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Contracts David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many penalties his Department imposed on private sector companies for breaches of contract with his Department by company in each year since 2010.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Feb 2018, 3:57 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Contracts David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many contract breach penalties his Department is awaiting payment for; and what the value of those penalties is.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

6 Feb 2018, 10:56 a.m. Universal Credit: Appeals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to Answer of 29 January 2018 to Question 124093, on Social Security Benefits: Appeals, how many people waited (a) less than one month, (b) less than two months, (c) less than three months, (d) less than four months, (e) less than five months, (f) less than six months and (g) six months or more for mandatory reconsideration for universal credit in each year since its introduction.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The information requested is shown in the table below:

Universal Credit (UC)

Mandatory Reconsiderations (MR) cleared within each time period

-

1 month

2 months

3 months

4 months

5 months

6 months

6 months +

Total

Apr 2014 – Mar 2015

1,890

30

#

#

#

#

#

1,920

Apr 2015 – Mar 2016

16,370

150

10

10

#

#

#

16,550

Apr 2016 – Mar 2017

18,000

3,910

3,890

1,320

60

30

30

27,260

Apr 2017 – Dec 2017

24,480

7,190

870

240

130

40

40

32,990

Notes:

Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.

‘#’ means fewer than 5 in this category.

5 Feb 2018, 5:27 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to collect information on outcomes for victims once they leave support for people rescued from modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office does not routinely collect data on victims after they have left the National Referral Mechanism. In October 2017, the Government announced a package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism including the development of a digitised casework system. It is anticipated that the digital system will improve our ability to collate and report on the progress of victims through the National Referral Mechanism.

The reform package additionally includes an extended period of move on support for confirmed victims. This will enable a more robust transition for victims leaving government funded support. In addition, the provision of a 6 month drop-in service will present the opportunity for continued engagement between support providers and confirmed adult victims.

5 Feb 2018, 5:25 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department will introduce an all-encompassing cross-Government governance structure for tackling modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Government has a co-ordinated policy and operational response, with a Modern Slavery Taskforce chaired by the Prime Minister.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

5 Feb 2018, 5:24 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will undertake a review of the funding allocated across Government to tackle modern slavery and how effective that expenditure is.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Home Office works collaboratively with other government departments and agencies to tackle modern slavery and we monitor the Department’s direct spend on tackling modern slavery. This includes measures such as £8.5 million grant funding from the Police Transformation Fund to transform the police response to modern slavery, and the Modern Slavery Fund of £33.5 million official development assistance managed by the Home Office, to tackle modern slavery across the globe.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

5 Feb 2018, 5:21 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to implement framework options for monitoring performance and progress in reducing modern slavery, as recommended by the National Audit Office.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The UK Government has had an ambitious Modern Slavery Strategy in place since 2014 and the world-leading Modern Slavery Act was introduced in 2015. Significant progress has been made in implementing the Strategy which have been monitored through performance indicators relating to individual parts of the Strategy. The Home Office will continue to develop its performance framework as necessary, in cooperation with other government departments and agencies.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

5 Feb 2018, 1:52 p.m. Universal Credit David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit payments have been made to credit unions in each month since its introduction.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The information requested is not available.

31 Jan 2018, 5:39 p.m. Police: Wales David Hanson

Question

What recent representations he has received from Police and Crime Commissioners in Wales on police funding for Wales in 2018-19.

Answer (Stuart Andrew)

Wales Office ministers meet regularly with representatives of the police in Wales to discuss a range of issues.

The Government recently announced the proposed police funding settlement for 2018/19 which would see an additional £450m invested across England and Wales, including around £16m direct to Welsh PCCs.

31 Jan 2018, 12:42 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many National Referral Mechanism forms were (a) not completed properly by first responders and (b) missing information in each year since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The recently announced reform of the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), includes measures aimed at improving the identification of potential victims and, decision-making timescales. The digitisation of the NRM and a review of the role of First Responders will address the quality of the initial referrals received by the Competent Authority and better support their decision-making.

30 Jan 2018, 4:20 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have a dedicated modern slavery taskforce.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. Decisions about the size and composition of the police workforce are an operational matter for chief officers, in line with the local priorities set by their Police and Crime Commissioner.

30 Jan 2018, 4:19 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of subcontractors of the modern slavery victim care contract use the Human Trafficking Foundation Care Standards.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

As part of the recently announced package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), Government committed to adopting the Trafficking Survivor Care Standards, drafted by the Human Trafficking Foundation with contributions from a range of non-governmental organisations, including a number of subcontractors of the Victims Care Contact.

We are currently working with a group of key stakeholders, including subcontractors of the Victim Care Contract, to update the standards and design a compliance regime. The standards will then be incorporated into future care contracts for adult victims of modern slavery. In the meantime, we will work with all subcontractors to ensure they are meeting the minimum standards.

30 Jan 2018, 4:17 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the average waiting time for victims of modern slavery and human trafficking to access English courses provided by the Salvation Army as part of the victim care contract.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Victim Care Contract for adult victims of modern slavery, delivered for the Government by The Salvation Army does not include the provision of English courses and therefore the Home Office does not have data on average waiting times for victims to access classes. Through the Victim Care Contract, victims of modern slavery receive accommodation, subsistence, access to mental, physical and dental health services, and signposting to legal support.

Recently announced reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) will mean that confirmed victims have access to this support for a minimum of 90 days, and when victims leave central-government funded support they will have access to drop-in services for a further 6 months

30 Jan 2018, 4:11 p.m. Business: Procurement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that businesses who are required to provide statements on their supply chains (a) provide such a statement and (b) complete their statements to a sufficient standard; and what steps her Department is taking to monitor the performance of businesses in providing those statements.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

As a result of the world-leading provisions in the Modern Slavery Act 2015, we have seen thousands of transparency statements published and businesses are now more focused on this issue than ever before. The legislation was designed to harness pressure from civil society, consumers and investors rather than set up a burdensome system of Government monitoring. We are pleased that civil society organisations are using company statements to hold businesses to account, including contacting businesses that have not yet published statements.

The Government has strengthened guidance for businesses and recently wrote to over 10,000 businesses that may be required to publish statements reminding them of their obligations and providing useful resources. We expect this activity will further increase the number and quality of statements published.

In October the Government also launched a new ‘Business Against Slavery Forum’ which will establish a new partnership between Government and business to accelerate progress in tackling modern slavery. It will focus on sharing best practice and building new initiatives to tackle modern slavery, including improving business engagement with the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

30 Jan 2018, 4:08 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for her Department to implement improvements to the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Improvements to the National Referral Mechanism were announced in October 2017. The reforms cover 16 work streams some of which will be implemented more quickly than others. A number of reform measures are subject to commercial tender for provision of services. The detailed implementation plans for each work stream are being developed, which will identify the likely timescales.

30 Jan 2018, 4:06 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals have been made under the National Referral Mechanism by police forces in England and Wales by police force in each month since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. However, the October 2017 report from the police inspectorate (HMICRFS) on the police response to modern slavery includes data on NRM referrals made by police forces by year.

This report can be accessed at the following link:

www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/wp-content/uploads/stolen-freedom-the-policing-response-to-modern-slavery-and-human-trafficking.pdf

The National Crime Agency also regularly publishes statistics relating to the number of potential victims of modern slavery referred to the National Referral Mechanism, broken down by police force area. These can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics

30 Jan 2018, 4:03 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to put in place data sharing arrangements between all parties involved in tackling modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office has a number of agreements with partner agencies to enable data to be shared for the purposes of tackling modern slavery. We are considering the impact of the proposed Data Protection Bill in relation to these agreements. We are exploring options to put in place improved data sharing arrangements with international partners to tackle modern slavery up stream.

30 Jan 2018, 4:01 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department will set a target for the time taken for cases of modern slavery to be processed under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The time taken to process National Referral Mechanism (NRM) cases varies by complexity. As part of the ongoing reform of the NRM, changes will be made to ensure a quicker, more certain decision making process, that victims have confidence in.

29 Jan 2018, 3:59 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many outstanding decisions UK Visas and Immigration has on victims of modern slavery who have been referred under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

29 Jan 2018, 3:34 p.m. Asylum David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people seeking asylum are being considered under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

13 Dec 2017, 6:02 p.m. HM Passport Office: Compensation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much compensation Her Majesty's Passport Office has paid out in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Since 2014/15 compensation payments for HM Passport Office are included within overall HM Passport Office costs disclosed in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts.

Prior to 2014/15 HM Passport Office produced its own Annual Reports and Accounts which disclosed all HM Passport Office income and expenditure, including compensation payments to customers.

6 Dec 2017, 5:30 p.m. HM Passport Office: Overtime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much HM Passport Office spent on overtime in each month of 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Overtime costs for Her Majesty’s Passport Office are included within overall staffing costs published in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts. Staffing costs for January to March 2017 are included in the published 2016/17 financial year report. Staffing costs for April to June 2017 will be included in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts for financial year 2017/18.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

4 Dec 2017, 1:38 p.m. Violent and Sex Offender Register David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he expects the owners of the multi-agency public protection guidance to remove references to the UK Border Agency.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The MAPPA Guidance is currently under review. References to the UKBA are primarily contained within the Duty to Co-operate Agencies and Foreign National Offenders chapters. My officials have redrafted both of these chapters and references to UKBA have been removed. As with other chapters, officials are consulting interested parties on proposed revisions to these two chapters and are currently awaiting comments from the Home Office Immigration Enforcement. Once the consultation has been completed, officials will seek approval from and on behalf of the Secretary of State for the amended chapters to be published.

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders, who had been issued with removal directions, have (a) made asylum claims (b) lodged judicial review applications and (c) made further representations in each year since 2010?

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-detained foreign national offenders who have completed their custodial sentences have been removed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of foreign national offenders that have missed a reporting event, and how many have subsequently (i) had contact re-established and (ii) not had contact re-established in each year since 2010?

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate he has made of the number of foreign national offenders broken down by offence and region.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

28 Nov 2017, 5:29 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the implementation of a smoking ban on narcotics use in prisons.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Guidance has been developed, in conjunction with Public Health England to provide information and practical advice to staff to assist with managing the potential risks associated with narcotics. There are strategies in place to reduce the supply of narcotics and detection of all psychotic substances (PS). This include the empowerment and training of staff to tackle PS use.

We have also taken swift action to stop the supply of drugs into all our prisons, equipping all prisons with portable and fixed detectors to tackle illicit use of phones in prisons. We are working with the police to catch and convict criminal using drones to smuggle contraband into prisons, and are testing physical and technological countermeasures to stop incursions.

28 Nov 2017, 4:21 p.m. Oakhill Secure Training Centre David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to further review the performance and management of Oakhill training centre following the recent Ofsted inspection report.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The Ofsted inspection report on Oakhill Secure Training Centre is unacceptable and we have taken urgent action to address the concerns raised by Ofsted. A new interim Director, with extensive experience, has been appointed at Oakhill and an experienced HMPPS Governor has been brought in to provide extra scrutiny.

We are robustly monitoring performance against the contract and are clear that we will take further steps, if needed, to improve delivery.

More widely across the estate, we are investing £64 million to reform youth custody and increase staffing, to improve safety and reduce violence.

28 Nov 2017, 1:57 p.m. Drugs: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prisoners have been identified as suffering a drug-induced psychosis in prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is not collected centrally.

28 Nov 2017, 1:55 p.m. Drugs: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of Project NEPTUNE in prisons.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

No such assessment has been made.

NHS England is currently revising the National Substance Misuse Specification which will be published in December 2017. The Project NEPTUNE clinical guidance will be referenced within the specification.

28 Nov 2017, 1:34 p.m. Prisons: Liverpool David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

Information is not collected centrally on how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

The Government has not made an assessment of the effectiveness of the use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

28 Nov 2017, 1:34 p.m. Drugs: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

Information is not collected centrally on how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

The Government has not made an assessment of the effectiveness of the use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

28 Nov 2017, 1:30 p.m. Drugs: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many emergency callouts for prisoners suffering the effects of drug usage there have been (a) in each prison and (b) broken down by primary healthcare provider in each year since 2010.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is not collected centrally.

In February 2013, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) (now HM Prison and Probation Service) issued guidance to prisons and immigration removal centres operated by NOMS concerning emergency ambulance call-outs. This guidance, Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 03/2013 Medical Emergency Response Codes outlines the medical symptoms in a prisoner, but not behaviours such as drug misuse, for which a prison must always call out an emergency ambulance. This PSI is mandatory in all prisons in England.

28 Nov 2017, 1:30 p.m. Drugs: Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions emergency services have attended prisoners affected by illegal drug use by (a) prison and (b) primary healthcare provider in each year since 2010.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested is not collected centrally.

In February 2013, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) (now HM Prison and Probation Service) issued guidance to prisons and immigration removal centres operated by NOMS concerning emergency ambulance call-outs. This guidance, Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 03/2013 Medical Emergency Response Codes outlines the medical symptoms in a prisoner, but not behaviours such as drug misuse, for which a prison must always call out an emergency ambulance. This PSI is mandatory in all prisons in England.

28 Nov 2017, 1:22 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with prison governors about the use of talking therapies to help prisoners with drug dependency.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

NHS England commission all healthcare services in prisons, including the use of talking therapies. Since April 2017, we have empowered Governors to have greater input into decision making with NHS England commissioners to ensure their prison have effective healthcare services.

Health service providers and Governors recognise that talking therapies are an integral part of all substance misuse psychosocial interventions.

24 Nov 2017, 2:50 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscated drugs found in prisons have been tested in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

We take a zero-tolerance approach to drugs in our prisons. Anyone found with contraband will be subject to disciplinary action and police investigation. We are taking unprecedented action to stop the supply and use of drugs, including an innovative new drug testing programme and have over 300 dogs to detect psychoactive substances.

We have also invested £3 million in enhanced intelligence, to improve our targeted intelligence and search capabilities. We are working closely with government partners to address issues with drugs at every stage of the supply chain, including those attempting to smuggle drugs into prisons.

In this case the information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. This is because Prison-NOMIS does not, normally, contain this data in a consistent format, and much of the data is held at a local level.

24 Nov 2017, 2:46 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to test waste water from prisons for illegal substances.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

In the Prison Safety and Reform White paper published in November 2016, the Ministry of Justice committed to strengthen measures to enhance our drug testing regime in prisons, this included increasing the frequency and range of drugs tested for. Waste water testing is one of the options under consideration alongside other innovative technologies.

24 Nov 2017, 2:45 p.m. Prison Officers: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers inadvertently consumed narcotics in prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HM Prison & Probation Service does not have a staff drug testing policy and therefore does not have the information requested. We are committed to ensuring the health, safety and wellbeing of our staff and have a zero tolerance, supported by tough new laws to deal with people smuggling banned substances into jails, and we are clear that those caught with banned items will be dealt with appropriately.

23 Nov 2017, 1:24 p.m. Proscribed Organisations: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action have been removed since those organisations were proscribed.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

23 Nov 2017, 1:24 p.m. Proscribed Organisations: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for how long websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action remained live after those organisations were proscribed.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

10 Nov 2017, 2:22 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Written Statement of 19 July 2017, HCWS81, on Justice Update, which community rehabilitation companies have had their contracts amended.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

All 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies have had their contracts amended so they can focus on activities that best rehabilitate offenders and keep society safe. This additional investment will see projected payments to providers being no higher than originally budgeted for at the time of the reforms.

2 Nov 2017, 9:33 p.m. Prisons: North Wales David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in which prisons women who (a) gave a North Wales address and (b) were sentenced by a North Wales Court were held in each year since 2010.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The following table shows the number and location of female prisoners who have a reported home address in North Wales1, in each September since 2010.

Prison

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Askham Grange

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Bronzefield

under 5

under 5

Downview

under 5

Drake Hall

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

East Sutton Park

under 5

Eastwood Park

under 5

Foston Hall

under 5

under 5

under 5

Low Newton

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Morton Hall

under 5

New Hall

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Peterborough (Female)

under 5

under 5

Styal

5

under 5

13

12

9

13

27

22

Total

11

8

20

14

21

22

36

28

The following table shows the number and location of female prisoners sentenced at a court in North Wales2, in each September since 2010.

Prison

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Askham Grange

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Bronzefield

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Downview

under 5

under 5

Drake Hall

6

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

East Sutton Park

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Eastwood Park

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Foston Hall

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Low Newton

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Morton Hall

under 5

New Hall

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Peterborough (Female)

under 5

under 5

under 5

under 5

Styal

24

18

27

30

20

31

42

37

Total

37

26

36

40

39

43

54

42

1 North Wales has been defined as having a reported address within the local authorities of: Anglesey; Conwy; Denbighshire; Flintshire; Gwynedd; and Wrexham.

2 North Wales has been defined as any court within the North Wales Police authority area.

If a request is made for information and the total figure amounts to five people or fewer, the MoJ must consider whether this could lead to the identification of individuals and whether disclosure of this information would be in breach of our statutory obligations under the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). We believe that the release of some of this information would risk identification of the individuals concerned. For this reason, MoJ has chosen not to provide an exact figure where the true number falls between one and five. However, it should not be assumed that the actual figure represented falls at any particular point within this scale; '≤5' is used as a replacement value from which it would be difficult to isolate or extract any individual data.

It is important to stress that it is not possible to infer from an address in Wales that an individual considers themselves Welsh. HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) cannot identify English and Welsh prisoners. Someone with an address, for example in London, may well consider themselves to be Welsh, while someone with an address in Wales may not. UK nationals have a nationality of British. Therefore the data shown are not necessarily representative of those who identify as English or Welsh. The results are sorted by origin address (home address on reception into custody) and not nationality. English, Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish are not captured on our database as separate nationalities.

Around 97% of prisoners have an origin location - i.e. addresses that are recorded in our central IT system. If no address is given, an offender’s committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. This information is included in the data provided in the tables above. Those with no recorded origin are typically foreign nationals or those recently received into custody. No address has been recorded and no court information is available for around 3% of all offenders; these figures are excluded from the tables attached.

The numerical information provided has been drawn from administrative IT systems, which as with any large scale recording system are subject to possible error with data entry and processing. Further guidance on the considerations for processing a request under FOIA, can be found by following the links: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/36/contents and http://www.justice.gov.uk/guidance/foi-step-by-step.htm

2 Nov 2017, 5:18 p.m. Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 2 December 2016 to Question 54519, what the timetable is for the publication of the Government's review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

The Government has conducted a review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 to assess whether it has met its intended objectives and whether it should be retained or repealed. A report of the findings of this review will be published later this year.

30 Oct 2017, 5:31 p.m. Apprentices: Females David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2017 to Question 107455, how many women born between (a) 6 April 1950 and 5 April 1953, (b) 6 April 1953 and 5 December 1953 and (c) 6 December 1953 and 5 April 1960 have (i) started and (ii) completed an apprenticeship in each of the last seven years.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The tables attached show the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements by women in each of the last six academic years.

It should be noted that older people are less inclined to undertake an apprenticeship compared to those of a younger age, as shown in the table below comparing the 45-59 age group to the 60+ age group. Since 2013/14 the number of apprenticeship starts has been increasing year on year for both of these age groups.

Age group

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

(provisional) 2016/17

45-59

62,200

61,060

41,850

55,730

57,780

58,110

60+

3,680

3,260

2,480

3,410

3,560

3,680

In addition, overall female apprenticeship starts are greater than those for males as shown in the table below.

Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

(provisional) 2016/17

Female

276,220

279,000

232,940

264,750

268,730

262,820

Male

244,360

231,210

207,480

235,140

240,630

228,520

Note: The Starts and Achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take two years to complete.

Data on apprenticeship starts and achievements by age band, and by gender are available in the apprenticeship demographic tools:

Starts: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624584/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-starts-v1.xlsx

Achievements:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624824/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-achievements-v1.xlsx

19 Oct 2017, 4:07 p.m. Apprentices: Older People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) men and (b) women over 60-years of age have (i) started and (ii) completed an apprenticeship in each of the last seven years.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The tables below show the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements of those aged over 60-years of age in the last six academic years:

i) Apprenticeship Starts for those aged over 60 years by Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Provisional 2016/17

Female over 60

1,130

980

740

1,090

1,160

1,320

Male over 60

1,510

1,280

960

1,330

1,330

1,330

ii) Apprenticeship Achievements for those aged over 60 years by Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Provisional 2016/17

Female over 60

520

460

360

330

420

460

Male over 60

590

720

460

510

590

560

Note: The Starts and Achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take two years to complete.

Data on apprenticeship starts and achievements by age band, and by gender are available in the apprenticeship demographic tools:

Starts: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624584/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-starts-v1.xlsx.

Achievements: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624824/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-achievements-v1.xlsx.


16 Oct 2017, 4:30 p.m. Bookmakers: Competition David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on competition of the decision by Betfred to close on-site bookmakers at UK racecourses.

Answer (Tracey Crouch)

The provision of on-site bookmakers at racecourses is a commercial matter for the racing and betting industries. Racegoers have access to a variety of betting options at the racecourse including fixed odds betting provided by on-course bookmakers at the side of the track, pool betting provided at the racecourse and online betting via smartphones.

16 Oct 2017, 4:30 p.m. Bookmakers: Competition David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assurances her Department secured in 2011 on the longevity of on-site bookmakers after the sale of the Tote to Betfred.

Answer (Tracey Crouch)

The provision of on-site bookmakers at racecourses is a commercial matter for the racing and betting industries. Racegoers have access to a variety of betting options at the racecourse including fixed odds betting provided by on-course bookmakers at the side of the track, pool betting provided at the racecourse and online betting via smartphones.

12 Sep 2017, 2:46 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what programmes his Department has operated in prisons for drug rehabilitation in each year since 2010 broken down by (a) budget, (b) number of male and female prisoners who used the programme and (c) location of prison.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested on what drug rehabilitation programmes are operated, the budget, number of prisoners using them and the location of the prison is either not collected centrally or not available in the format requested.

NHS England estimates that it spends approximately 20% of all prison healthcare spending on substance misuse services. In the financial year 2016/17, NHS England allocated approximately £405 million for all health expenditure in the adult prison estate. Comparable data is not available prior to 2013/14 when NHS England became operational.

12 Sep 2017, 2:46 p.m. Prisons: Drugs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much has been spent by his Department on drug rehabilitation for (a) men and (b) women in prisons in (i) England and (ii) Wales in each year since 2010.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information requested on what drug rehabilitation programmes are operated, the budget, number of prisoners using them and the location of the prison is either not collected centrally or not available in the format requested.

NHS England estimates that it spends approximately 20% of all prison healthcare spending on substance misuse services. In the financial year 2016/17, NHS England allocated approximately £405 million for all health expenditure in the adult prison estate. Comparable data is not available prior to 2013/14 when NHS England became operational.

12 Sep 2017, 11:03 a.m. Prisoners: Mental Illness David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) male and (b) female prisoners who have been identified with mental health issues (i) have been subsequently moved to a secure mental health hospital, (ii) are still in the prison where those issues were identified, (iii) have moved prison and (iv) have been moved to a bail hostel in each of the last seven years.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The total number of prisoners who have been transferred to a secure hospital under sections 47 or 48 of the Mental Health Act 1983 in each of the last seven years, and the numbers of those prisoners recorded as male or female areis set out below:

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Male

1011

881

884

994

1084

1067

1071

Female

85

123

112

107

104

106

104

Total

1096

1004

996

1101

1188

1173

1175

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

945

953

979

990

1,061

1,010

980

It is not possible to provide a breakdown of these figures by gender; this information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Data on how many (a) male and (b) female prisoners who have been identified with mental health issues (ii) are still in the prison where those issues were identified, (iii) have moved prison and (iv) have been moved to a bail hostel in each of the last seven years is not collected centrally. We take the mental health of prisoners extremely seriously, which is why we have increased the support available to vulnerable offenders - especially during the first 24 hours in custody - and invested more in mental health awareness training for prison officers. We are putting more funding into prison safety and have embarked on major Prison Safety Programme, in order to reduce the number of self-inflicted deaths and incidents of self-harm in our prisons. But we recognise that more can be done and continue to work in partnership with HMPPS, NHS England and Public Health England to improve mental health services for offenders at all points of the criminal justice system.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that all prisoners are able to open a bank account.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners (a) had and (b) have not had a bank account in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have left prison without a bank account in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on the rehabilitation of prisoners of not having a bank account.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what training his Department provides to prison officers to assist prisoners in the opening of bank accounts.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Offenders: Bank Services David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with banks, building societies and savings co-operatives on the introduction of a scheme to help offenders open bank accounts.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HMPPS coordinates the Offender Banking Programme in England and Wales which runs in partnership with 6 major UK commercial banks and a leading Building Society in order to give offenders who are soon to be released from custody the opportunity to apply for a basic bank account. Having access to a bank account is vital for access to benefits and to receive pay from employment on release, a key element in helping with the rehabilitation of offenders.

There are currently 101 prison-bank partnerships, the most recent partnership being made with HMP Berwyn, a large new public sector prison which opened earlier this year. Every resettlement prison has a relationship with a specific bank who offer direct support and guidance on their specific processes to prison staff to enable the opening of accounts.

On arrival in to custody, staff complete a Basic Custody Screening Tool and information from this indicates that 71% of prisoners have bank accounts. HMPPS does not keep a record of those who have left prison without a bank account. However, around 5,000 accounts per year are opened under the programme. The banks report a high percentage of those accounts subsequently being activated and used on release.

6 Sep 2017, 4:03 p.m. Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the review into the Sex Offender Treatment Programme was commissioned; and which Minister commissioned that review.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The recently published study in to Core Sex Offender Treatment Programmes was commissioned in December 2014 by the then MOJ Director of Analysis as part of ongoing evaluative work undertaken by the Department.

5 Sep 2017, 8:05 a.m. Psychoactive Substances Act 2016: Reviews David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish its framework for the review of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 as set out in section 58 of that Act.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

On 14 July the Home Office published The Psychoactive Substances Act Review Framework which set out the Government’s plans to measure as far as possible any change in activity before and after the implementation of the Psychoactive Substances Act.

8 Aug 2017, 1:53 p.m. UK Border Force: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff were operational at the Border Force (a) Intelligence South East and Europe (Folkestone), (b) Intelligence Hub (Dover), (c) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Sheffield), (d) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Croydon), (e) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Solihull) and (f) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Glasgow) in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

8 Aug 2017, 1:53 p.m. UK Border Force: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many intelligence personnel were employed by Border Force in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

4 Aug 2017, 12:49 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many files the UK has sent to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution in each of the last three years.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

4 Aug 2017, 12:49 p.m. European Cybercrime Centre David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

3 Aug 2017, 2:32 p.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) passport renewal and (b) a first passport were classified as in progress in each month since January 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The table below contains information on applications that are classed as work in progress. These are applications where Her Majesty’s Passport office is not waiting for a response from the customer.

Applications in Progress

Renewals

First Times

Jan-17

29,695

26,884

Feb-17

41,920

31,695

Mar-17

49,873

38,773

Apr-17

53,389

37,051

May-17

36,495

36,609

Jun-17

65,399

44,561

3 Aug 2017, 2:18 p.m. Drugs: Counterfeit Manufacturing David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) websites have been shut down, (b) goods have been seized, (c) arrests have been made and (d) medicine units have been seized in the UK under Operational Pangea in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office does not hold this information. INTERPOL releases information annually detailing the total results of Operational Pangea from all participating countries.

1 Aug 2017, 9:40 a.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport applications processed by the Passport Office missed the three week target for processing in each month between 1 January and 30 June 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Between 1 January 2017 and 30 June 2017, 1,352 UK passport applications not requiring further information took longer than three weeks to process.

This represents 0.06% of the 2.4 million UK applications issued in this period.

31 Jul 2017, 12:25 p.m. UK Border Force: Dogs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many detector dogs Border Force had in each (a) airport, (b) port and (c) train terminal in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force works at the Border with a range of law enforcement partners including the police and the Ministry of Defence, including the use of detector dogs.

Border Force detector dogs are a national resource and the current number available for deployment nationally to detect illegal goods and clandestines is 108.

65 of these dogs are wholly owned by Border Force and 43 are provided by a UK based contractor.

Since 2010, the numbers have been (Border Force owned dogs only):

2010: 75

2011: 73

2012: 70

2013: 69

2014: 70

2015: 64

2016: 67

25 Jul 2017, 3:18 p.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the number of overseas applications for passports has been in each month since March 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Her Majesty’s Passport Office received a total of 1,258,726 overseas passport applications from March 2014 to December 2016. A monthly breakdown of the total is provided in the table below.

Table

Overseas passport applications received March 2014 to December 2016.

Mar-14

40,874

Apr-14

37,836

May-14

43,092

Jun-14

34,926

Jul-14

32,064

Aug-14

29,327

Sep-14

33,670

Oct-14

32,998

Nov-14

28,110

Dec-14

25,919

Jan-15

39,276

Feb-15

41,273

Mar-15

47,400

Apr-15

42,913

May-15

40,364

Jun-15

40,769

Jul-15

36,041

Aug-15

31,636

Sep-15

38,995

Oct-15

37,174

Nov-15

32,893

Dec-15

25,929

Jan-16

43,902

Feb-16

47,771

Mar-16

49,548

Apr-16

45,894

May-16

42,248

Jun-16

40,485

Jul-16

36,333

Aug-16

33,651

Sep-16

34,559

Oct-16

32,620

Nov-16

34,034

Dec-16

24,202

25 Jul 2017, 2:57 p.m. HM Passport Office: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport examining officers HM Passport Office employed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The table below shows the number of Her Majesty's Passport Office full-time equivalents working within operational directorates for passport production, which includes passport examining officers and other front line roles, on the 31 March of each year.

Number (FTE)

2011

2,586

2012

2,216

2013

2,389

2014

2,593

2015

3,594

2016

3,412

2017

3,219

25 Jul 2017, 2:55 p.m. HM Passport Office: Standards David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Passport Agency's average process time was for (a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The tables below show the average processing time in days for a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014 for UK and International applications. From April 2017 the median average times were used instead of the mean average previously reported, due to enhanced reporting available through a new system.

Table 1

UK average processing times for straightforward (SFPC) & non-straightforward passport applications (NSFPC)

Date

UK SFPC

UK NSFPC

Jan-14

4.2

8.1

Feb-14

6.8

10.3

Mar-14

7.7

11.9

Apr-14

9.3

13.9

May-14

10.9

15.6

Jun-14

14.0

18.5

Jul-14

16.2

21.3

Aug-14

12.0

19.3

Sep-14

3.8

12.5

Oct-14

2.4

9.7

Nov-14

2.1

9.1

Dec-14

2.0

9.4

Jan-15

2.4

7.2

Feb-15

3.1

7.6

Mar-15

3.4

8.3

Apr-15

2.7

8.0

May-15

2.5

7.7

Jun-15

2.5

8.0

Jul-15

2.0

8.2

Aug-15

1.8

8.0

Sep-15

2.2

8.1

Oct-15

2.8

8.7

Nov-15

2.6

8.4

Dec-15

1.7

8.4

Jan-16

2.0

6.2

Feb-16

2.4

6.6

Mar-16

2.3

7.0

Apr-16

3.0

7.5

May-16

3.3

7.8

Jun-16

4.4

8.7

Jul-16

5.4

9.4

Aug-16

5.6

9.5

Sep-16

3.6

8.3

Oct-16

1.8

6.9

Nov-16

1.8

6.2

Dec-16

1.8

6.5

Jan-17

1.8

6.2

Feb-17

2.1

6.4

Mar-17

2.6

7.2

Apr-17

3.1

7.9

May-17

3.7

8.1

Jun-17

3.8

8.3

Table 2

International average processing times for straightforward & non-straightforward passport applications

Date

Int SFPC

Int NSFPC

Jan-14

9.0

16.4

Feb-14

11.4

16.3

Mar-14

15.5

20.9

Apr-14

26.0

29.8

May-14

24.8

34.3

Jun-14

27.3

34.4

Jul-14

30.2

36.2

Aug-14

27.5

34.6

Sep-14

16.0

29.5

Oct-14

10.4

25.5

Nov-14

5.4

21.6

Dec-14

3.9

21.8

Jan-15

4.7

19.7

Feb-15

5.2

16.4

Mar-15

4.4

15.1

Apr-15

3.4

12.1

May-15

4.0

12.9

Jun-15

4.2

12.9

Jul-15

3.7

13.2

Aug-15

2.6

12.3

Sep-15

3.7

12.0

Oct-15

2.6

11.2

Nov-15

2.5

11.3

Dec-15

2.1

12.0

Jan-16

2.7

9.5

Feb-16

3.7

9.8

Mar-16

2.9

10.0

Apr-16

3.2

10.2

May-16

3.0

10.5

Jun-16

3.1

11.3

Jul-16

4.1

12.7

Aug-16

5.8

13.9

Sep-16

3.9

10.3

Oct-16

2.1

11.8

Nov-16

2.0

11.2

Dec-16

1.9

12.2

Jan-17

1.9

11.8

Feb-17

3.1

11.2

Mar-17

2.9

11.3

Apr-17

2.8

9.7

May-17

3.0

11.2

Jun-17

2.6

11.7

25 Jul 2017, 2:40 p.m. Immigration Controls: Enforcement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost was of the Deloitte review of intelligence for the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement, commissioned in 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The cost of the Deloitte Review of intelligence for Immigration Enforcement and Border Force was £340,704.

25 Jul 2017, 1:34 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Delyn David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency have had their personal independence payments overturned as a result of (a) mandatory reconsideration and (b) an appeal hearing in each year for which data is available.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The latest available data on personal independence payment (PIP) clearances split by type of clearance (i.e. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/.

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Table 1 below shows the number of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Mandatory Reconsideration decisions where the award was changed by year since the introduction of PIP in the Parliamentary Constituencies of Torfaen, Delyn and Jarrow.

Table 1 - Number of Mandatory Reconsiderations decisions where the award changed by financial year of decision.

Year of Mandatory Reconsideration

2013/14

2014/ 15

2015/ 16

2016/ 17

2017/18 (April 17 only)

Total

Torfaen

Less than 5

80

70

110

20

280

Delyn

Less than 5

30

30

60

10

130

Jarrow

Less than 5

20

40

80

10

150

Tables 2-4 below show the Number of appeals found in favour of appellant by financial year, data from Ministry of Justice.

Table 2

Jarrow1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

0

0%

2014-153

PIP4

15

58%5

2015-163

PIP4

76

49%

2016-173

PIP4

123

51%

Table 3

Torfaen constituency1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

Less than 5

Less than 5

2014-153

PIP4

80

69%

2015-163

PIP4

488

74%

2016-173

PIP4

516

70%

Table 4

Delyn constituency1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

0

0%

2014-153

PIP4

22

42%

2015-163

PIP4

194

52%

2016-173

PIP4

479

67%

1 Social Security and Child Support data are attributed to the hearing venue nearest to the appellants’ home address. For appellants living in Jarrow appeals are attributed to the South Shields venue. For appellants identified as living in Torfaen Constituency this would be Langstone Tribunal venue. For appellants identified as living in Delyn Constituency this would be this would be either Prestatyn or Wrexham Tribunal Venues.

2. Percentage Found in favour of Appellant this is based on the number found in favour as a percentage of the appeals cleared at hearing. In line with the published stats, data are not available at a level more-detailed than hearing venue.

3 By financial year - from April to March.

4 PIP replaced Disability Living Allowance for people aged 16 to 64 and rolled out from 8 April 2013. As such, appeal volumes in HM Courts & Tribunals Service in the Year 2013-2014 are low.

5 Indicates the population where the decision was in favour with 30 appeals or less

25 Jul 2017, 9:45 a.m. Public Sector: Delyn David Hanson

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency worked in the public sector in each year for which data is available.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

25 Jul 2017, 9:41 a.m. Young People: Delyn David Hanson

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many 18 to 25-year olds in Delyn constituency are recorded (a) in the latest census estimate and (b) on the electoral register; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

24 Jul 2017, 1:25 p.m. Immigration Controls: Undocumented Migrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

24 Jul 2017, 1:23 p.m. Immigration Controls David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers were subsequently recovered in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

21 Jul 2017, 12:56 p.m. Energy: Delyn David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number and proportion of people in Delyn constituency covered by the Government's proposals to safeguard customers on the poorest value energy tariff.

Answer (Margot James)

Ofgem is considering options to protect vulnerable consumers and has yet to announce a formal proposal. Alongside this Ofgem has announced a package of measures to help consumers move away from poor value tariffs.

20 Jul 2017, 4:57 p.m. Sex Offender Treatment Programme David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the reasons are for the time taken to publish the report, entitled Impact evaluation of the prison-based Core Sex Offender Treatment Programme, published on 30 June 2017.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Ministers were informed of the outcomes of the evaluation and the planned operational response in February 2017. The report was published on 30 June, shortly after the pre-election period.

20 Jul 2017, 4:57 p.m. Sex Offender Treatment Programme David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's report, Impact evaluation of the prison-based Core Sex Offender Treatment Programme, published on 30 June 2017, when the decision was made to halt that programme.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The HM Prison and Probation Service Executive Committee took the operational decision to cease delivery of the Core and Extended Sex Offender Treatment Programmes and accelerate transition to the Horizon and Kaizen programmes in February 2017 following receipt of the peer reviewed evaluation report and advice from the independent Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel.

20 Jul 2017, 12:49 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Delyn David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency who had been categorised as lifelong recipients of disability living allowance have subsequently been judged as ineligible for personal independence payments in each year for which data is available.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

20 Jul 2017, 11:45 a.m. UK Border Force: Computer Software David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has undertaken an assessment of the effect of switching off the ATHENA border force software at the end of May 2016 on the Border Force.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Athena was replaced by the Single Intelligence Platform (SIP) at the beginning of May 2016. The single intelligence platform was designed specifically for intelligence across the Border Force, Immigration Enforcement and HM Passport Office. It is better suited to the operational needs of Home Office intelligence, is simpler to use, has greater functionality than Athena and has delivered significant efficiencies. SIP has enabled wider access including HM Passport Office.

It has been built and developed by Home Office Digital Data and Technology. Improvements and new functionality are added on a weekly basis. The user research conducted every week provides a wealth of empirical evidence confirming the positive effect on the user experience.

Information from the decommissioned Athena database remains available and accessible to intelligence staff in Immigration Enforcement and Border Force.

20 Jul 2017, 11:43 a.m. Immigration Controls: Enforcement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement have made on the implementation of the Deloitte review of intelligence commissioned in 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Since publication of the Deloitte Review, Immigration Enforcement (IE) and Border Force (BF) have made a number of changes in direct response to its recommendations. This includes strengthening tasking and prioritisation processes, organisational restructures and developing a culture where the value of intelligence is understood across the organisation.

We consider that all of the Deloitte recommendations have now been addressed or are incorporated as part of our Transformation programme, and therefore the review is now closed.

20 Jul 2017, 11:42 a.m. Immigration Controls David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force category (a) A, (b) B and (c) C alerts were (i) issued and (ii) produced a successful outcome for maritime and air freight for each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

This information is exempt from disclosure under sections 31(1) (a) & (e) of the Freedom of Information Act due to the potential to compromise National border security.

20 Jul 2017, 11:39 a.m. UK Border Force: Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) airports, (b) ports and (c) train terminals had a dedicated Border Force customs team to deal with freight in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

This Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. All airports, ports and train terminals have Border Force Customs to deal with freight.

20 Jul 2017, 11:38 a.m. UK Border Force: Handbooks David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force staff have accessed the Professional Practice Manual on her Department's intranet since it was introduced.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force does not have access to the level of information that is required in response to the PQ.

20 Jul 2017, 11:30 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken in response to the findings in the report from the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration of 21 July 2016 on intelligence functions of Border Force and Immigration Enforcement regarding making best use of the Intelligence Management System.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force and Immigration Enforcement are continually making improvements to the Intelligence Management System as part of the system’s development to meet business needs specific to each organisation.

For example, the link between the Intelligence Management System and the Single Intelligence Platform enables Intelligence Management System records and information to be automatically uploaded into Single Intelligence Platform. This has been completed and went live in autumn 2016. This was a significant improvement ensuring the system is used to its full potential.

Border Force is working on delivering a border specific user interface in IMS. This will enable Border Force to improve and increase the recording of information received within IMS.

20 Jul 2017, 11:12 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the most recent (a) guidance and (b) training was issued for UK Visas and Immigration caseworkers on using the Intelligence Management System.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

UKVI issued detailed training guidance to temporary migration caseworkers in June 2016. This included detailed instruction on how to complete the online referral form.

Immigration Enforcement deliver training on request to UKVI caseworkers as part of their intelligence cycle transformation work.

Intelligence requirements are regularly circulated to all staff as set out in the quarterly threat assessment. These provide clear indications of what information is needed to fulfil those intelligence gaps and complete the intelligence picture.

20 Jul 2017, 10:55 a.m. Children: Poverty David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what percentage of children were living in poverty in Delyn constituency in each year for which data is available.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

National statistics on the number of children in relative low income are set out in the annual "Households Below Average Income" publication. The number and proportion of children in relative low income is not available at local authority or constituency level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography.

Latest 3-year estimates for Wales of the proportion and number of children in low income are available in Table 4.16ts and Table 4.17ts in the file “4_children_timeseries_risk” from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/599136/hbai-2015-2016-supporting-ods-files.zip

20 Jul 2017, 10:53 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure Border Force regions use the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

20 Jul 2017, 10:53 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department has issued to Border Force teams on the use of the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets to log intelligence data.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

20 Jul 2017, 10:48 a.m. UK Border Force: Handbooks David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has a hard copy of the Professional Practice Manual to each Border Force operation site since it was introduced.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Professional Practice Manual (PPM) is an Immigration Enforcement product. Border Force staff refer to their own guidance and, in addition, have access to PPM via the Home Office Intranet.

19 Jul 2017, 3:25 p.m. Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to create a new scheme to rehabilitate offenders since the halt of the Sex Offender Treatment Programme.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

HM Prison and Probation Service provides eight accredited programmes for men with sexual convictions. These vary in length and complexity, depending on the risks posed by individuals and the settings in which the programmes are delivered. All programmes are reviewed regularly and overseen by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advice Panel, a panel of International experts to ensure that they are in line with the latest evidence.

Significant changes have been made to the programmes provided for this group of offenders in line with the emerging evidence. HMPPS began delivery of two new programmes, Horizon for medium risk men in April 2016, and Kaizen for higher risk men in June 2017, following their accreditation by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advice Panel.

19 Jul 2017, 3:25 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if his Department will launch a review into the contractual agreements of private sector service providers for maintenance work in prisons.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

It is right that prison repair work is carried out in a timely and effective manner to ensure public protection. We always work to ensure we achieve value for money for the taxpayer and keep our costs under review.

We are currently engaging with key stakeholders, including our suppliers, to consider how we can improve the existing contracts for Facilities Management to achieve the best outcome for HMPPS. This work is anticipated to continue over summer 2017 and be completed in the autumn.

19 Jul 2017, 3:23 p.m. Prisons David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which prisons operate a personal officer programme.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Prison service orders do not require Governors to operate a personal officer programme and there is no central register of which establishments do operate one.

The review of Offender Management in Custody (OMiC) introduces a new role of key worker who will have a case load of approximately six prisoners, whom they will guide support and coach to help reduce the negative impact of imprisonment. Key work is similar but not the same as a personal officer scheme. Where personal officer schemes do currently exist they will be replaced by key workers.

The OMiC model is currently being rolled out in 10 pathfinder prisons and will be rolled out across the remaining closed prison estate by the end of March 2019.

19 Jul 2017, 3:23 p.m. Prisons: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff have been employed in Offender Management Units in each prison in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The recording of information on the number of staff employed specifically in Offender Management Units is not held on the corporate HR system. This means that although relevant data exists at prison level, this could not be collated to provide a comprehensive picture.

18 Jul 2017, 3:50 p.m. Sexual Offences: Reoffenders David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been convicted of sex offences in category (a) adult: violent/serious rape, sexual assault, (b) adult other: possession and distribution of banned material, (c) child contact: any sexual offence involving direct sexual contact with a victim who is under 16 years old (or under 18 years old in cases of incest, prostitution and abuse of a position of trust), (d) child other: abuse of a position of trust (not involving direct sexual contact) with a victim who is under 16 years old following grooming and other child non-contact offences, (e) child image: creation, possession and distribution of indecent images of a victim under 18 years old, (f) breach of conviction/release conditions related to a sexual offence, (g) prostitution/soliciting involving a victim who is over 18 years old and related offences such as running or promoting a brother, (h) non-sexual violent: violent non-sexual offences, (i) non-sexual non-violent have (i) undertaken the Sex Offender Treatment Programme and (ii) gone on to re-offend in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The information requested can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2017, 3:49 p.m. Segregation of Prisoners David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisons undertook at least one segregation monitoring and review meeting in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Segregation Monitoring and Review Group (SMARG) meetings and reports are not held centrally and to obtain the information requested from each prison would incur disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2017, 3:47 p.m. Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many convicted sex offenders have (a) started and (b) completed the Sex Offender Treatment Programme; and of those offenders how many are (i) in prison, (ii) released and (iii) in a bail hostel.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Information on the numbers of convicted sex offenders who have (a) started and (b) completed the Sex Offender Treatment Programmes is published annually. The data until 2015/16 is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/547224/supplementary-tables.zip. Data for the period 2016 / 17 due to be published on 27July 2017.

Information on the current locations of former participants in the Core Sex Offender Treatment Programme is held on individual offender files. The information requested could therefore be provided only at disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2017, 3:46 p.m. Prisoners' Transfers: Offender Assessment System David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if his Department will launch a review into the process of, and arrangement for, sentence planning to ensure that prisoners transferring from other prisons arrive with a complete and up to date OASys.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The review of Offender Management in Custody (OMiC) has included a review of OASys and sentence planning arrangements.

The new Offender Management in Custody model considers and addresses the issues which prisons currently face around completing OASys reports. The new model will move the resource for OASys report completion into the training / resettlement estate and away from local / reception prisons.

The model also introduces a new role of Prison Offender Managers, who will be based in the prison. These Prison Offender Manager posts will be held by a combination of band 4 prison staff and NPS Probation Officers.

Roll out of the new OM model has commenced within the 10 pathfinder sites and HMP Berwyn. We are currently working through the roll out schedule into the wider estate, but the new OM model will be in place in all Closed prisons by March 2019.

18 Jul 2017, 3:45 p.m. Prisons: Computers David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners (a) requested and (b) were granted access to laptop computer facilities in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

All prisoners are able to request access to IT for legal purposes. However, there is a clear need to balance the need to access electronic legal information with the risk that some prisoners may seek to use IT for illicit or criminal purposes. Therefore, prisoners are only provided with IT equipment where there is a clear and genuine need, and where not to do so would raise a real risk of prejudicing the legal proceedings.

Where such a requirement is clear, a prisoner can be provided with IT for the sole specified purpose of considering digital evidence. The IT can be made available for as long as the requirement to use it remains, up to the conclusion of the relevant legal proceedings.

There is currently no national guidance on the process for access to digital evidence (formerly access to justice). Local procedures for assessing access to digital evidence have been developed in collaboration with the High Security and Long Term Estate and the Directorate of Security, Order and Counter Terrorism Guidance on the procedures for applying for, and receiving, access to digital evidence will be published for prison staff and prisoners this year.

Information on the number of applications made and approved for access to digital evidence is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2017, 3:45 p.m. Prisons: Computers David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what guidelines his Department has produced for prisons on Access to Justice on (a) how and when computers can be accessed by prisoners and (b) for how long and what actions and tasks can be undertaken.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

All prisoners are able to request access to IT for legal purposes. However, there is a clear need to balance the need to access electronic legal information with the risk that some prisoners may seek to use IT for illicit or criminal purposes. Therefore, prisoners are only provided with IT equipment where there is a clear and genuine need, and where not to do so would raise a real risk of prejudicing the legal proceedings.

Where such a requirement is clear, a prisoner can be provided with IT for the sole specified purpose of considering digital evidence. The IT can be made available for as long as the requirement to use it remains, up to the conclusion of the relevant legal proceedings.

There is currently no national guidance on the process for access to digital evidence (formerly access to justice). Local procedures for assessing access to digital evidence have been developed in collaboration with the High Security and Long Term Estate and the Directorate of Security, Order and Counter Terrorism Guidance on the procedures for applying for, and receiving, access to digital evidence will be published for prison staff and prisoners this year.

Information on the number of applications made and approved for access to digital evidence is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

18 Jul 2017, 3:44 p.m. Prisons: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been spent on Offender Management Unit staff in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) does not record expenditure in its central accounting system in a format that allows for the identification of spend on Offender Management Unit staff and therefore, cannot provide data for the period requested.

18 Jul 2017, 3:43 p.m. Prisoners' Transfers: Offender Assessment System David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been transferred between prisons who have (a) completed and (b) incomplete OASys in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The Information requested is not held centrally.

18 Jul 2017, 3:41 p.m. Prisons: Education David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) capacity and (b) attendance was of the prisons education, learning and skills departments in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The education curriculum for each prison in England is agreed locally by the prison governor with their Offender Learning and Skills Service provider and decisions over the available capacity are made locally. Information on the capacity of learning and skills departments in individual prisons is not collected nationally.

National data on the total number of offenders aged 18 and over in the prison system participating in learning in England from academic year 2010/11 is published and can be found here (table 10):

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624613/Further-education-and-skills-July-2017-SFR-27-2017-main-tables_ODS.ods.

18 Jul 2017, 3:40 p.m. Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost was of contracts tendered out for prison maintenance by (a) prison and (b) private sector service provider in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

It is right that prison repair work is carried out in a timely and effective manner to ensure public protection. We always work to ensure we achieve value for money for the taxpayer and keep our costs under review.

The most recent applicable data available for the period requested is from 2012, when Mitie Care and Custody Ltd took over the provision of facilities management (FM) at HMP Brixton, later expanding to cover three sites. Until June 2015, FM services at the rest of the public-sector prison estate was delivered in-house by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). Since then, it has been delivered by Amey Community Ltd and Carillion Plc.

Below is a breakdown of the applicable tendered fixed costs for each of the three private sector service providers broken down by year as requested. These contracts were tendered on a ‘lot’ basis and as such costs are not broken down by establishment. The number of establishments/sites within each package has been included below for completeness:

Custodial Facilities Management: Tendered Fixed Costs (Excludes Indexation and variable works)

Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Total

Mitie Care and Custody

Lot C: Various: 3 Sites

£2,189,000

£2,810,000

£2,843,000

£3,055,000

£3,500,000

£3,529,000

£10,084,000

Amey Community Limited

From June 2015

Lot E: North East, North West, Yorkshire Humberside: 34 Sites

N/A

N/A

N/A

£11,780,000

£23,560,000

£23,560,000

£58,900,000

Lot F: East Midlands, West Midlands and Wales: 27 Sites

N/A

N/A

N/A

£9,340,000

£18,680,000

£18,680,000

£46,700,000

Carillion PLC

From June 2015

Lot G: South West, South Central, Kent & Sussex: 32 Sites

N/A

N/A

N/A

£9,880,000

£19,760,000

£19,760,000

£49,400,000

Lot H: Greater London and East of England: 22 Sites

N/A

N/A

N/A

£10,020,000

£20,040,000

£20,040,000

£50,100,000

Totals:

£2,189,000

£2,810,000

£2,843,000

£44,075,000

£85,540,000

£85,569,000

£215,184,000

18 Jul 2017, 3:40 p.m. Prisons: Equality David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisons have dedicated equalities departments.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Prison Governors are responsible for identifying a functional head with lead responsibility for coordinating equalities work within the prison, ensuring that there is a coherent approach to equalities obligations. Every prison has been allocated resources for an equality officer and Governors are free to deploy this resource in a way that best meets the needs of their population.

11 Jul 2017, 1:45 p.m. Cyprus: Politics and Government David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help facilitate a negotiated solution to the dispute over the status of Cyprus.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

The UK continues to be a strong supporter of a settlement to reunite Cyprus. I am disappointed that the Conference on Cyprus in Switzerland ended without agreement. We are encouraging all the parties to reflect on the outcome and consider next steps.

10 Jul 2017, 4:52 p.m. Counter-terrorism David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions her Department has used the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme since its creation.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme (TFTP) allows UK law enforcement access, in specific circumstances, to information on international financial transactions on the SWIFT messaging network. The Joint Report from the EU Commission and US Treasury Department highlighted the valuable role data from TFTP had played in supporting counter-terrorism investigations. Due to reasons of national security it is not in the public interest to disclose the specific details of the UK’s use of the TFTP.

Joint Report from the European Union Commission and the U.S. Treasury Department regarding the value of TFTP Provided Data – 27 November 2013

10 Jul 2017, 3:20 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the UK has accessed Europol's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams in each year since their creation.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has never accessed EUROPOL's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams since their creation.

10 Jul 2017, 3:19 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information the UK has shared with Europol's information system on foreign terrorist fighters in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

10 Jul 2017, 3:19 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information has been exchanged by the UK to other EU member states via Europol's Secure Information Exchange Network Application service in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of Europol assistance in tackling missing trader intra-community fraud on the UK's ability to tackle value added tax fraud.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Early Warning System on the UK's ability to tackle new psychoactive substances.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Europol's information system on the UK's ability to tackle crime.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Terrorism Situation and Trend Report system on the UK's ability to tackle terrorism.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol on the UK's ability to work across borders with the US.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 10:49 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) financial, (b) intelligence, (c) personnel and (d) other assistance Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre has given to the UK in each year since February 2016.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Cooperation between UK law enforcement and Europol’s European Migrant Smuggling Centre on organised immigration crime is well-established and routine. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK through enhanced intelligence exchange.

However, the specific data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

10 Jul 2017, 10:39 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant on the UK's ability to easily extradite those who have committed crimes.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

10 Jul 2017, 10:39 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has on replacement for the SIRENE Bureaux if the UK leaves the European Arrest Warrant agreement.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

10 Jul 2017, 10:35 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant requests made by (a) the UK to each other EU state and (b) each other EU member state to the UK have been rejected as not valid in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Between 21 July 2014 and 31 March 2017 the National Crime Agency refused to certify 508 European Arrest Warrants on the grounds of disproportionality or dual criminality.

The NCA does not hold figures prior to the 2014 reforms made to the European Arrest Warrant, which came into effect on 21 July 2014.

The NCA does not hold equivalent figures for EU member states.

7 Jul 2017, 1:42 p.m. Industrial Disputes: Shrewsbury David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress the Criminal Cases Review Commission has made on its review into the Shrewsbury 24 case.

Answer (Dominic Raab)

The Criminal Cases Review Commission’s review of the applications from the ‘Shrewsbury 24’ is progressing. The Commission are currently considering additional documentation relating to this case. I know that the CCRC will consider this - and the views of the applicants about this material - with care. I understand that the Commission hope to complete their review of this case before the end of the year.

7 Jul 2017, 9:09 a.m. Radicalism: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed Europol's EU internet referral unit in each year since 1 July 2015.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

7 Jul 2017, 9:09 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the total number of referrals to the EU Internet Referral Unit was; and how many of those referrals led to the deletion of internet content in each year since 2015.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

7 Jul 2017, 9:03 a.m. European Cybercrime Centre David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of losing access to the (a) European Cybercrime Centre and (b) Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment on tackling cybercrime after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) arrests and (b) prosecutions have taken place in the UK after Europol investigations into missing trader intra-community fraud in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many kilograms of (a) drugs, (b) new psychoactive substances and (c) endangered species goods have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many weapons have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to fight cybercrime of the UK's potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Cybercrime action taskforce after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to protect citizens, businesses and the state from malware attacks of the potential loss of access to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare on tackling illegal migration to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre on tackling human trafficking to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:49 a.m. Crime: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to the Schengen Information System on tackling crime after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation on measures such as SIS II once the UK has left the EU but it is too early to speculate at this stage what future arrangements may look like.

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant (a) arrests, (b) requests and (c) surrenders have been made in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have been requested by each police force since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have (a) been issued by the UK, (b) resulted in an extradition back to the UK and (c) resulted in an extradition back to the country requesting the warrant in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:38 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the Crown Prosecution Service of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with the Crown Prosecution Service on the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

6 Jul 2017, 3:21 p.m. Counter-terrorism David Hanson

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of losing access to the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme on tackling terrorism in the UK.

Answer (Mel Stride)

No decisions have been taken regarding how the UK will continue to cooperate with the EU on tackling cross-border crime and security threats as this will be a matter for negotiations. The Government has been clear that one of the 12 negotiating objectives is continuing to work with the EU to preserve European security, to fight terrorism, and to uphold justice across Europe. We are examining a number of options and as part of the negotiations, we will discuss with the EU and its Member States how best to continue cooperation on security, law enforcement and criminal justice, including access to the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking terrorism.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed information from Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases have been shared through Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare programme by (a) the UK, (b) other EU member states, (c) states with operational agreements with Europol and (d) states with strategic agreements with Europol in each year since that programme's creation in March 2015.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what contributions Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare has made to UK border control operations at (a) Calais and (b) other locations in each year since March 2015.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspects have been arrested in the UK after the use of Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre since February 2016.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on tackling human trafficking.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug VAT fraud cases that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases that Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the Government has placed an urgent request for judicial cooperation with Eurojust on terrorism-related cases in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. European Judicial Cybercrime Network David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment has she made of the potential effect of loss of access to the European Judicial Cybercrime Network after the UK has left the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle VAT fraud.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle drug trafficking.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on private and non-profit sectors who use that organisation's services.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many human trafficking cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in and (b) outside the UK in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many VAT fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases of human trafficking Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

30 Jun 2017, 1:46 p.m. Ministry of Justice: ICT David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, by what date his Department plans to deliver the strategic (IT) gateway; and what the reasons are for delay.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The Strategic Partner Gateway (SPG) has been available since September 2016, providing secure data exchange capability between nDelius and CRCs own offender case management systems once they are ready.

There was a delay in implementing the SPG which was originally expected to be in place in the second quarter of 2015. This was due to extra work required on technical data exchange requirements, and design changes as a result of additional business processes that had been identified.

The CRCs do not yet have their own case management systems in service. Following extensive testing and accreditation, the first anticipated cutover to a CRC’s own system and the SPG is currently planned to take place by early autumn 2017.

30 Jun 2017, 1:43 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many end-state performance targets have been met by each community rehabilitation company providers in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) came into existence on 1 June 2014 and ownership was transferred to new rehabilitation providers on 1 February 2015.

The performance of CRCs, including compliance with Licence and Post-Sentence Supervision (PSS), is assessed through a range of service levels and through a robust contract management and assurance process. Performance information against these service levels is published quarterly, and the latest data can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-december-2016. End state targets for some service levels were only expected to be met by February 2017, and this period is due for publication on 27 July 2017.

Public protection is our top priority and we will take all necessary action to make sure the probation system is reducing reoffending and preventing future victims. We have undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account and will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:43 p.m. Probation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the proportion of offenders is who were recorded as having successfully completed their period of licence or post-sentence supervision in (a) England, (b) Wales and (c) each community rehabilitation company following a release from custody in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) came into existence on 1 June 2014 and ownership was transferred to new rehabilitation providers on 1 February 2015.

The performance of CRCs, including compliance with Licence and Post-Sentence Supervision (PSS), is assessed through a range of service levels and through a robust contract management and assurance process. Performance information against these service levels is published quarterly, and the latest data can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-mi-update-to-december-2016. End state targets for some service levels were only expected to be met by February 2017, and this period is due for publication on 27 July 2017.

Public protection is our top priority and we will take all necessary action to make sure the probation system is reducing reoffending and preventing future victims. We have undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account and will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:41 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department expects the review of community rehabilitation company performance measures to be completed.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

We have been carrying out a comprehensive review of the probation system to improve outcomes for offenders and communities while making sure public protection remains our top priority. It considered all aspects of the probation system, including CRC performance and contractual arrangements. The review has now concluded and we will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:41 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment the Government has made of staff moral in community rehabilitation companies in England and Wales.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

We recognise that the reforms to probation services led to a period of great change for staff. Staff in the National Probation Service (NPS) and Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) were provided with support both during and after the transition to the new probation structures.

CRCs are responsible for the welfare of the staff they employ. All suppliers were required to outline their employee incentive offer at the bidding stage, and these have been contractualised. We monitor CRCs closely through a robust contract management process.

We have undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account, and will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:39 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many financial penalties have been incurred by (a) number and (b) financial value by community rehabilitation companies in (i) England, (ii) Wales and (iii) each county in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

This information is commercially sensitive.

We hold providers rigorously to account for their performance and take action wherever they are falling short. Our contract management teams closely monitor and robustly manage providers to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce reoffending, protect the public and provide value for money to the taxpayer. If standards are not met, financial penalties can be applied through Service Credits. Service Credits are a payment made by the Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) back to the Government, as a means of compensating for services under the contract where the CRC fails to meet the contractual service levels expected.

30 Jun 2017, 1:38 p.m. Probation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to improve National Probation Service effectiveness for cases (a) of domestic abuse and (b) involving the safeguarding of children.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The National Probation Service (NPS) is responsible for assessing the level of risk posed by each offender under its supervision and ensuring that a robust plan is in place to manage any risk which the offender presents with respect to domestic abuse or to harming children. Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service (HMPPS) has recently created a Directorate to lead a major programme to ensure that the NPS’s operational practice is of the highest standard. All NPS staff are required to complete a training package on child safeguarding and domestic abuse and repeat the training, every three years to ensure that their knowledge and skills are kept up to date.

To support its contribution to local multi-agency arrangements, the NPS has developed a series of National Partnership Strategy Frameworks. They cover the NPS’s involvement in multi-agency risk assessment conferences (MARACs) for high risk domestic abuse victims and Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs).

(a) For domestic abuse, NPS staff are required to be alert to the possibility that there might be issues relating to domestic abuse in every case they manage and not just in those cases where the offender is already convicted of an offence in which domestic abuse is involved. The NPS is able to purchase specialist interventions from the Community Rehabilitation Companies to address the risk of domestic abuse. The then National Offender Management Service (NOMS), now Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service, produced and promulgated updated Domestic Abuse Guidance in August 2016.

(b) The NPS issued a Child Safeguarding Policy Statement in January this year, to replace interim guidance. NPS staff now have access to a range of safeguarding toolkits, information, quality assurance tools and practice guidance. In addition, the NPS has produced and promulgated a guide to staff supervising perpetrators of child sexual exploitation.

30 Jun 2017, 1:37 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many community rehabilitation companies are in dispute with his Department on the payment mechanism.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

No Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) is in formal dispute with the department. We have undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account. We have already made some changes to how CRCs are paid so they can focus on activities that best rehabilitate offenders and keep society safe. The details of these negotiations are commercially sensitive.

30 Jun 2017, 1:35 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many appointments have been (a) offered and (b) undertaken by service users of community rehabilitation companies in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The information requested is not collated centrally.

Community Rehabilitation Companies came into existence on 1 June 2014 and ownership was transferred to new rehabilitation providers on 1 February 2015. We have since undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account and will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:35 p.m. Community Rehabilitation Companies David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many service users main contact with the community rehabilitation company is by telephone, in each community rehabilitation company in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The information requested is not collated centrally.

Community Rehabilitation Companies came into existence on 1 June 2014 and ownership was transferred to new rehabilitation providers on 1 February 2015. We have since undertaken an overarching review of probation, looking at the standards we set for providers and how we hold them to account and will be publishing our findings in due course.

30 Jun 2017, 1:32 p.m. Offenders: Rehabilitation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Government has produced or is planning to produce a report on the effectiveness of the new Integrated Offender Management arrangements.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Integrated Offender Management is a local partnership arrangement that sees criminal justice agencies working together with other partners to tackle the offenders who cause most harm to their local communities.

Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary have included a report on the police contribution to local IOM arrangements in their PEEL inspections of police forces’ effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy. For Community Rehabilitation Companies and the National Probation Service, Her Majesty’s Inspection of Probation report on IOM in Quality and Impact Inspections.

The Government currently has no plans to produce a report specifically on the effectiveness of Integrated Offender Management.

30 Jun 2017, 1:22 p.m. Probation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many multi-agency public protection arrangements eligible offenders are managed by the National Probation Service in (a) England, (b) Wales and (c) each county in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The available information can be found in the table below. The National Probation Service (NPS) was created in June 2014. Data on MAPPA offenders for the year 2016-17 will not be released until the MAPPA annual report is published as National Statistics. The data cannot be broken down by county as the NPS is not organised along county lines. Instead the data is presented for England, Wales and by NPS Division.

Quarterly snapshots of the number of MAPPA offenders managed by the NPS in the community by England, Wales and NPS Division from 30/06/14-31/03/16.

30/06/14

30/09/14

31/12/14

31/03/15

England

23,258

25,365

27,849

28,042

Wales

1,355

1,420

1,516

1,725

NPS London

3,847

4,005

4,377

4,329

NPS Midlands

4,357

4,747

5,251

5,275

NPS North East

4,484

4,956

5,234

5,313

NPS North West

4,145

4,790

5,067

5,261

NPS South East and Eastern

3,041

3,237

3,951

3,927

NPS South west and South Central

3,384

3,630

3,969

3,937

England and Wales

24,613

26,785

29,365

29,767

30/06/15

30/09/15

31/12/15

31/03/16

England

28,695

29,646

30560

31,732

Wales

1,748

1,796

1,887

1,951

NPS London

4,415

4,493

4,579

4,724

NPS Midlands

5,326

5,510

5,618

5,815

NPS North East

5,392

5,539

5,695

5,904

NPS North West

5,397

5,572

5,906

5,944

NPS South East and Eastern

4,094

4,356

4,469

4,904

NPS South west and South Central

4,071

4,176

4,293

4,441

England and Wales

30,443

31,442

32,447

33,683

29 Jun 2017, 2:36 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the cost to the public purse has been of installing charging points for electric vehicles in each year since 2010.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Please find below a breakdown of funding provided by the Government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) to support the installation of electric vehicle chargepoints in each financial year since 2010/11:

Financial Year

Total OLEV Spend

2010/11

£2.23m

2011/12

£2.58m

2012/13

£9.71m

2013/14

£14.86m

2014/15

£41.65m

2015/16

£16.88m

2016/17

£7.06m

In addition, £22.9m of funding under the Government’s £40m Go Ultra Low City Scheme is for charging infrastructure, and is being awarded across four years from 2016.

29 Jun 2017, 2:33 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to ensure that the roll-out of charging stations for electric vehicles is spread evenly across all regions and parts of the UK.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Government is supporting an increase in provision of electric vehicle chargepoints as part of its programme for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). At Autumn Statement 2016, the Chancellor announced additional funding of £80m for charging infrastructure for the period to 2020 and Government is considering how best to allocate this funding to meet the needs of drivers across the UK and deliver value for money.

Alongside this, Highways England has £15m to expand the existing rapid chargepoint network to ensure that across 95 per cent of the strategic road network there will be a chargepoint at least every 20 miles.

In addition, the Government is proposing to take forward powers under the forthcoming Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill that will enable the Government to require Motorway Service Areas, and large fuel retailers to install sufficient provision of electric vehicle chargepoints.

Additional grant funding is also available UK-wide to support the installation of chargepoints at workplaces, at homes, and on residential streets. Further detail of how to apply is available online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-grants-for-low-emission-vehicles

29 Jun 2017, 2:30 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many charging points for electric vehicles there are in (a) Wales, (b) England, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland at the latest date for which information is available.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Public chargepoints funded by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles must be registered on the Government’s National Chargepoint Registry, an open source data set containing information on the type and geographical location of chargepoints. The registry is available online at: www.national-charge-point-registry.uk

Operators of public chargepoints can also choose to add other chargepoints to this dataset. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill is due to include new powers that could require operators of public chargepoints to make openly available key information about all chargepoints that they operate, including geographic location.

The current dataset from the National Chargepoint Registry shows the following statistics for chargepoints in the UK:

  1. Wales - 37

  2. England - 4909

  3. Scotland - 997

  4. Northern Ireland - 346

Additional chargepoints will also have been installed with support from the private sector that are not listed on this data set but can be found on websites such as Zapmap (www.zap-map.com)

29 Jun 2017, 2:22 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department provides to local authorities to increase the roll-out of charging points for electric vehicles.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) ‘On-street Residential Scheme’ is providing up to £2.5m for Local Authorities to fund the installation of chargepoints in residential streets where homeowners have no access to off-street parking. £22.9m is being provided to Local Authorities for electric vehicle infrastructure through OLEV’s ‘Go Ultra Low Cities’ scheme and a further £14m through their ultra low emission taxis scheme.

Between 2010 and 2014 more than 6400 chargepoints were installed in 8 local authority regions though the Plugged in Places support scheme. Between 2013 and 2015, following a competitive bidding process open to all UK Local Authorities, more than 580 fast chargepoints and 250 rapid chargepoints were installed under the National Infrastructure Grant Schemes.