Sir Alan Campbell Written Questions

48 Questions to Government Departments tabled by Sir Alan Campbell


Date Title Questioner
24 Sep 2020, 4:07 p.m. Special Educational Needs: Autism Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has provided to schools on supporting autistic children to return to school during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

The government recognises the significant challenges the COVID-19 outbreak has presented for autistic children, young people and their families. As I set out in my letter of 2 September to children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), their families and carers and those who work to support them, we know that it is critical that all pupils and students can once again benefit from a full-time on-site education 5 days a week. Schools and colleges should ensure that they receive the education, therapeutic or specialist support and reasonable adjustments required for a successful return to school or college. To support this, we have published guidance for the full opening of schools, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

We have also published guidance for the full opening of special schools and other specialist settings, which provides a framework, approved by Public Health England, that sets out the high-level actions that should be taken. and is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings.

The guidance makes it clear that coproduction and collaboration with families is crucial.

The department funds the Autism Education Trust (AET) to deliver training to education professionals and embed good autism practice in schools and colleges across England. AET has developed a hub of guidance and resources for families, teachers and other professionals aimed at supporting children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak and in this period of adjustment as they return to school. The guidance is available at: https://www.autismeducationtrust.org.uk/?s=covid.

This includes guidance for schools on making appropriate reasonable adjustments and practical strategies for managing increased anxiety, changes in routine and environment and transitions to new settings.

The department has also launched a new programme run by mental health experts, backed by £8 million, to provide schools and colleges across England with the knowledge and access to the resources they need to support children and young people, teachers and parents, if they have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes a focus on the specific mental health and wellbeing needs of children with autism and SEND.

10 Sep 2020, 12:16 p.m. Coronavirus: Disease Control Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to adopt the independent SAGE Group's proposed zero covid-UK strategy.

Answer (Helen Whately)

We are already undertaking a range of measures to tackle COVID-19, protect the National Health Service and help ensure that the country can return to normality as soon as possible.

To prepare the National Health Service for winter, the Government is providing an additional £3 billion of funding. This includes money to allow the NHS to maintain the Nightingale surge capacity and continue to use the extra hospital capacity available within the independent sector.

Effective local management of any outbreaks is the first line of protection against a second wave. To support local authorities, we have made £300 million available and they already have robust plans in place to respond to outbreaks.

NHS winter preparations include delivering a very significantly expanded seasonal flu vaccination programme for priority groups.

9 Sep 2020, 1:33 p.m. Remote Education: Pre-school Education Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's guidance for parents and carers of children attending out-of-school settings during the coronavirus (covid-19) outbreak, published on 10 July 2020, when similar guidance will be published for parents with children under five years old.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

The guidance for parents and carers with children under five is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/what-parents-and-carers-need-to-know-about-early-years-providers-schools-and-colleges-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

It was first published on 18 June 2020.

8 Sep 2020, 4:57 p.m. Origin Marking Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will make it its policy to ensure the country of origin is displayed on consumer products bought (a) online and (b) offline.

Answer (Paul Scully)

Under the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013, retailers are required to provide the geographical address at which they are established. This will not necessarily indicate the place of manufacture of the goods but the consumer can request this information from the retailer when making the purchase and the retailer would be obliged under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 to respond accurately. The Government does not have plans to introduce further requirements.

8 Sep 2020, 4:25 p.m. Stamp Duties: Coronavirus Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of backdating the reduction in stamp duty to the start of the covid-19 lockdown.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The SDLT relief is intended to encourage confidence in the property market and support the wider economy. Backdating the SDLT relief retrospectively would not support this aim, and would inevitably lead to borderline cases for purchases completed at an earlier point.

8 Sep 2020, 3:14 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish (a) the eligibility criteria for and (b) further details on the New Green Homes Grant.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

Guidance and further details about the Green Homes Grant voucher scheme were published on 28 August. This included information on eligibility, items where support can be claimed as part of energy efficiency measure installations, as well as items that will not be paid for under the voucher scheme. More details will be published in due course.

7 Sep 2020, 4:24 p.m. Leisure: Coronavirus Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when indoor play centres will be allowed to open as lockdown restrictions are eased due to the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Nigel Huddleston)

On 13 August, the Government announced that indoor play and indoor soft play venues could open from 15 August. We worked with BALPPA, the trade body that represents the industry to develop guidance that lays out detailed measures for indoor play and indoor soft play operators to make venues COVID-secure. These include closing ball pits and sensory areas, reducing capacity of venues and soft play frames, regular deep cleaning, pre-bookable timed sessions, increased sanitation, and a rigorous process to support track and trace. We will continue to engage with the sector and will keep the guidance under regular review.

6 Sep 2020, 5:36 p.m. Care Homes: Coronavirus Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what is his policy on those in (a) care homes or (b) residential care units to require a (i) quarantine period or (ii) covid-19 test to be undertaken if they do return home for (A) a short period or (B) overnight.

Answer (Helen Whately)

We are aware that limiting visits has been difficult for many families and care home residents who want to see their loved ones. Guidance for visits out of a care homes is under development and will be published shortly.

3 Sep 2020, 3:58 p.m. Care Homes: Visits Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will clarify guidance on the permitted social interactions for those in care home settings with their immediate family members.

Answer (Helen Whately)

On 22 July 2020 the Government published updated guidance on visiting arrangements for care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This guidance is applicable to all nursing and care homes and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/visiting-care-homes-during-coronavirus

We appreciate the challenges which care homes face in safeguarding their residents, and we are aware that limiting visits in care homes has been difficult for many families and residents. Care homes can now develop their visiting policies based on a local dynamic risk assessment. This approach is based on the circumstances and needs of the individual care setting, including both residents and staff and the external COVID-19 environment.

3 Sep 2020, 3:19 p.m. Business: Coronavirus Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government is planning to make further funding available to sectors that have remained closed due to the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Kemi Badenoch)

The Government has delivered one of the most generous and comprehensive packages of support globally, with a total fiscal response of close to £200bn. Many of the measures introduced including loan schemes, tax deferrals and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, remain open and have been designed to be accessible to businesses in most sectors and across the UK.

The Government recognises however that some sectors have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. After careful review of the evidence, the Government has acted to deliver targeted support to a number of sectors, such as arts, culture and heritage through a bespoke £1.57 billion package, and hospitality, leisure and retail through the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund, the Eat Out to Help Out scheme and a reduction in VAT for hospitality, holiday accommodation and attractions.

We continue to collect evidence on the impact of the pandemic, including on specific sectors, which will of course inform our efforts to support the recovery and back UK business going forward.

1 Sep 2020, 11:06 a.m. Care Homes: Visits Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will clarify guidance on permitted social interactions for those currently in residential care units with their immediate family members.

Answer (Helen Whately)

On 22 July 2020 the Government published updated guidance on visiting arrangements for care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/visiting-care-homes-during-coronavirus

Our priority has been to enable residents to be reunited safely with their loved ones. This guidance will be updated as the risk posed by COVID-19 continues to change.

30 Jul 2020, 11:28 a.m. Ice Skating: Coronavirus Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will provide compensation for the additional costs incurred by ice rinks following the revision of Government guidance on 17 July 2020, altering the date when those rinks could open as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Answer (Nigel Huddleston)

Sports and physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. From 1 August ice-skating rinks should be able to reopen.These facilities will be able to offer on-site services to customers, provided they are COVID-secure and follow Government guidance.

Sport England have announced a £195 million package of support to help community clubs through this crisis. It recently boosted its Community Emergency Fund by a further £15 million to meet the demand, taking the total up to £210 million.

27 Mar 2020, 1:49 p.m. Coronavirus: Health Services Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether routine treatment will be stopped during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Edward Argar)

National Health Service organisations were advised, in a letter to them from NHS England and NHS Improvement dated 17 March, that they should assume to need to postpone all non-urgent elective operations from 15 April at the latest, for a period of at least three months. NHS trusts also have full local discretion to wind down elective activity over the next 30 days as they see best, to free up staff for refresher training, beds for COVID-19 patients, and theatres/recovery facilities for adaptation work. Emergency admissions, cancer treatment and other clinically urgent care should continue unaffected.

27 Mar 2020, 9:33 a.m. Beer: Industry Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to guarantee wages of employees who work in the brewing industry and supply chain during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government has announced a significant package of financial support for businesses and employees. Further details of this package are available at: http://www.businesssupport.gov.uk.

26 Mar 2020, 9:24 a.m. Beer: Non-domestic Rates Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the business rate relief scheme extends to breweries.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

MHCLG has published guidance for local authorities on eligibility for the business rates Expanded Retail Discount, which can be found online here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/business-rates-retail-discount-guidance

It is for the relevant local authority to make decisions on eligibility based on the guidance and their knowledge of the local area.

17 May 2019, 10:58 a.m. Social Security Benefits: Appeals Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the waiting time for benefits appeals from the 40 week average cited by HM Courts and Tribunal Service.

Answer (Paul Maynard)

It is important that appeals are heard as quickly as possible. The Ministry of Justice recognises that there are delays in the system and is in the process of recruiting more judicial office holders in order to increase capacity and help to reduce waiting times for appellants. In the Social Security and Child Support (SSCS) jurisdiction, 225 new medical members and 119 disability-qualified members have recently been appointed and are now hearing cases.

The SSCS jurisdiction will also benefit from the fact that 250 fee-paid judges and 100 salaried judges are being recruited across tribunals more widely. In addition, we have recently launched a new digital service with a view to enabling speedier processing of appeals and providing a better service for all parties to the proceedings. Information on the new digital service can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/appeal-benefit-decision/submit-appeal

13 May 2019, 4:06 p.m. Public Health: Finance Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Spending Review will include targeted investment in public health to improve regional health outcomes.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Local authorities will receive over £3.1 billion in 2019/20 for use on public health. Future funding priorities will be determined through the Spending Review process. In its Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has already committed to strengthen action on prevention and health inequalities. All local health systems will be expected to set out in 2019 how they will reduce health inequalities by 2023/24 and 2028/29.

7 May 2019, 3:05 p.m. Public Health: Finance Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how he plans to use the Spending Review to invest in public health.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

The forthcoming Spending Review is an opportunity for the Government to make decisions on public spending in the round. As part of that, the Treasury will work closely with other departments to assess public health priorities.

26 Feb 2018, 3:34 p.m. Domestic Appliances: Safety Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the General Data Protection Regulation, what steps he is taking to support manufacturers to track appliances sold to customers to enable effective product corrective action.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

Manufacturers and distributors are responsible for ensuring they have effective systems in place to prevent risks to consumers if a product that they have placed on the market is found to be unsafe.

On 21st January I announced the creation of a new Office for Product Safety and Standards to co-ordinate rapid and effective action on national product safety issues. The new Office is supporting the British Standards Institution (BSI) to develop a code of practice on corrective action and recalls which aims to help business to prepare and deal with any product safety issue which may arise.

The code will provide guidance on the use of data, including that it should be handled in accordance with data protection legislation, which would include the General Data Protection Regulation when it comes into force in May 2018. The code will be published shortly.

21 Feb 2018, 2:54 p.m. Universal Credit: Employment Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether universal credit recipients who have received a provisional offer of employment but are undergoing security checks prior to being approved for the role must continue applying for other employment opportunities.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

Claimants in receipt of Universal Credit are expected to fulfil the work related requirements appropriate to their current circumstances. For a claimant with a potential job start that is not immediate, this could include continuing to look for alternative or temporary work that fits with their expected start date, where the Work Coach and claimant agree this is reasonable.

5 Dec 2017, 2:21 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on legal advice by North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group in each of the last three years.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England advises that NHS North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCGs) spending on legal advice since 2014/15 is as follows:

2014/15 £9,826

2015/16 £49,064

2016/17 £40,837

2017/18 £40,692 (year-to-date, up to end of October 2017, month seven)

Please note that legal costs listed include all costs incurred as a result of direct patient care, and do not just relate to advice in respect of organisations or contracts.

The year-to-date figure for 2017/18 includes £17,281 in respect of the CCG’s response to the legal challenge to the urgent care procurement process earlier this year, and £1,281 in relation to the new urgent care work which is currently underway. There are no further costs associated with the urgent care procurement process, as this work is carried out by officers of the CCG and North of England Commissioning Support as part of their normal work.

5 Dec 2017, 2:21 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent by North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group on the formal process entered into in January 2017 to secure a new provider for urgent care services in North Tyneside.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England advises that NHS North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCGs) spending on legal advice since 2014/15 is as follows:

2014/15 £9,826

2015/16 £49,064

2016/17 £40,837

2017/18 £40,692 (year-to-date, up to end of October 2017, month seven)

Please note that legal costs listed include all costs incurred as a result of direct patient care, and do not just relate to advice in respect of organisations or contracts.

The year-to-date figure for 2017/18 includes £17,281 in respect of the CCG’s response to the legal challenge to the urgent care procurement process earlier this year, and £1,281 in relation to the new urgent care work which is currently underway. There are no further costs associated with the urgent care procurement process, as this work is carried out by officers of the CCG and North of England Commissioning Support as part of their normal work.

5 Dec 2017, 2:17 p.m. North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the level of funding was, per patient, for North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group in the last financial year for which figures are available.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England’s published clinical commissioning group (CCG) allocation figures are published, and accessible via the link below. Per capita allocations are found in column nine, and figures from the last financial year – 2016-17 – begin on page one. Data for North Tyneside CCG can also be found on this page.

These figures are as published when allocations were updated in January 2016, and thus do not include any adjustments that may subsequently have been made locally. It should be noted that these figures relate to funding for core CCG services only; they do not, for example, include primary medical care.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ccg-allocations.pdf

5 Dec 2017, 2:17 p.m. Clinical Commissioning Groups Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the mean level of funding was, per patient, for each English Clinical Commissioning Group in the last financial year for which figures are available.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

NHS England’s published clinical commissioning group (CCG) allocation figures are published, and accessible via the link below. Per capita allocations are found in column nine, and figures from the last financial year – 2016-17 – begin on page one. Data for North Tyneside CCG can also be found on this page.

These figures are as published when allocations were updated in January 2016, and thus do not include any adjustments that may subsequently have been made locally. It should be noted that these figures relate to funding for core CCG services only; they do not, for example, include primary medical care.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ccg-allocations.pdf

4 Dec 2017, 5:52 p.m. Crime Prevention: Cash Dispensing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions her Department has had with representatives of the banking and security industries on the development of new technology to prevent criminal attacks on ATM cash machines.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

We keep all crime threats under review, and work with the police and other partners to determine whether there is more to be done to address specific threats.

We have not had any recent discussions specifically about criminal attacks on ATM cash machines, but we will look carefully at recent trends as part of our ongoing work with the police and relevant industry leads to tackle new and emerging crime threats.

4 Dec 2017, 5:52 p.m. Crime Prevention: Cash Dispensing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with representatives of the banking and security industries on steps to tackle the recent increase in criminal attacks on ATM cash machines.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

We keep all crime threats under review, and work with the police and other partners to determine whether there is more to be done to address specific threats.

We have not had any recent discussions specifically about criminal attacks on ATM cash machines, but we will look carefully at recent trends as part of our ongoing work with the police and relevant industry leads to tackle new and emerging crime threats.

4 Dec 2017, 5:52 p.m. Crime: Cash Dispensing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with police forces in the (a) East Midlands, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) Bristol areas on the recent increase in criminal attacks on ATM cash machines.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

We keep all crime threats under review, and work with the police and other partners to determine whether there is more to be done to address specific threats.

We have not had any recent discussions specifically about criminal attacks on ATM cash machines, but we will look carefully at recent trends as part of our ongoing work with the police and relevant industry leads to tackle new and emerging crime threats.

4 Dec 2017, 5:52 p.m. Crime Prevention: Cash Dispensing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will make an assessment on the effectiveness of Gryphon as a means of protection against criminal attacks on ATM cash machines.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

We keep all crime threats under review, and work with the police and other partners to determine whether there is more to be done to address specific threats.

We have not had any recent discussions specifically about criminal attacks on ATM cash machines, but we will look carefully at recent trends as part of our ongoing work with the police and relevant industry leads to tackle new and emerging crime threats.

20 Nov 2017, 2:50 p.m. Microgeneration: Finance Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of the financial reserves held under the Microgeneration Certification Scheme; and what plans he has for the use of those reserves.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The latest verified accounts for the MCS Service Company are published on the Companies House website. This states that as of 29 February 2016 there was £6,794,171 held in the account on behalf of the Secretary of State (of the Department for Energy and Climate Change; now the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy). At that time there was also £1,895,623 held in Escrow.

The MCS Service Company has the right to use funds drawn from the account in relation to the day to day activities of the Company. Negotiations are currently taking place for the Scheme to be transferred to the MCS Charitable Foundation, at which point the reserves will be the responsibility of the MCS Charitable Foundation.

3 Nov 2017, 11:47 a.m. Diabetes: Medical Equipment Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of flash glucose monitoring on the management of diabetes.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Freestyle Libre, a flash glucose monitoring system has been approved for reimbursement on National Health Service prescription from 1 November 2017 through listing in Part IX of the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff.

The NHS Business Services Authority carries out the assessment of Part IX applications made by manufacturers on behalf, of the Secretary of State for Health, for prescribing at NHS expense by an appropriate practitioner.

The listing of a medical device in the Drug Tariff should not be interpreted as a recommendation to prescribe a particular product. Patients will need to discuss the ongoing management of their condition with their healthcare professional and consider whether flash glucose monitoring is suitable for them.

Any device made available for prescribing to patients through listing in Part IX is required to meet set criteria, namely that the product is safe and of good quality, it is appropriate for general practice and, if relevant, non-medical prescribing, and it is cost effective.

Within its financial constraints, the NHS is committed to providing access to new drugs and medical technologies. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

3 Nov 2017, 11:47 a.m. Diabetes: Medical Equipment Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department takes to ensure that people with diabetes have access to new and emerging technologies as they come to market.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Freestyle Libre, a flash glucose monitoring system has been approved for reimbursement on National Health Service prescription from 1 November 2017 through listing in Part IX of the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff.

The NHS Business Services Authority carries out the assessment of Part IX applications made by manufacturers on behalf, of the Secretary of State for Health, for prescribing at NHS expense by an appropriate practitioner.

The listing of a medical device in the Drug Tariff should not be interpreted as a recommendation to prescribe a particular product. Patients will need to discuss the ongoing management of their condition with their healthcare professional and consider whether flash glucose monitoring is suitable for them.

Any device made available for prescribing to patients through listing in Part IX is required to meet set criteria, namely that the product is safe and of good quality, it is appropriate for general practice and, if relevant, non-medical prescribing, and it is cost effective.

Within its financial constraints, the NHS is committed to providing access to new drugs and medical technologies. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

26 Oct 2017, 4 p.m. Energy: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2017 to Question 106663, on energy: housing, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the Each Home Counts quality mark; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, which reported in December 2016. The majority of the recommendations, including creation of a quality mark, were directed at industry rather than Government, and it is for industry to propose how it will be implemented.

As stated in the review’s report, the intention of the quality mark is to bring better clarity and protection to all those operating in the sector, and to those benefiting from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, as well as to simplify the landscape and seek to remove complexity and bureaucracy for businesses wherever possible. It is also intended to provide consumers with confidence in the benefits they will receive from having measures installed in their homes and in the quality of the advice they receive on energy saving measures and their installation.

As there is no regulatory requirement Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

Ministers have not had discussions with existing providers of quality marks or other schemes on the introduction of the Each Home Counts quality mark, but officials have participated in discussions with the Implementation Board, which operates on a voluntary basis, and a number of stakeholders including businesses and trade bodies.

26 Oct 2017, 4 p.m. Energy: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2017 to Question 106663, on energy: housing, what discussions he has had with operators of existing trader quality mark schemes on the introduction of the Each Home Counts quality mark.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, which reported in December 2016. The majority of the recommendations, including creation of a quality mark, were directed at industry rather than Government, and it is for industry to propose how it will be implemented.

As stated in the review’s report, the intention of the quality mark is to bring better clarity and protection to all those operating in the sector, and to those benefiting from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, as well as to simplify the landscape and seek to remove complexity and bureaucracy for businesses wherever possible. It is also intended to provide consumers with confidence in the benefits they will receive from having measures installed in their homes and in the quality of the advice they receive on energy saving measures and their installation.

As there is no regulatory requirement Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

Ministers have not had discussions with existing providers of quality marks or other schemes on the introduction of the Each Home Counts quality mark, but officials have participated in discussions with the Implementation Board, which operates on a voluntary basis, and a number of stakeholders including businesses and trade bodies.

20 Oct 2017, 11:21 a.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to make available the minutes of the Each Home Counts implementation board.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry with the support of Government, in line with the recommendations of the review. Appointments to the Implementation Board and steering groups are made by industry where members provide expertise from across the sector, reflecting the scope of recommendations identified by the review. Board members participate on a voluntary basis, and receive no remuneration for doing so.

The Board has encouraged constructive stakeholder participation and a broad range of industry stakeholders have been involved in Each Home Counts, including representatives from the heating sector. The Chair of the Board last met representatives of the heating industry on 6 July and is due to meet them again on 24 October.

All members of the Implementation Board and workstream leads are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified individuals are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Due to the independent nature of the Implementation Board, it would be for the Chair and members to consider sharing minutes of their meetings. Information about Board meetings is shared with stakeholders in the fortnightly Each Home Counts newsletter.

20 Oct 2017, 11:21 a.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Chair of the Each Home Counts implementation board last met representatives of the heating industry.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry with the support of Government, in line with the recommendations of the review. Appointments to the Implementation Board and steering groups are made by industry where members provide expertise from across the sector, reflecting the scope of recommendations identified by the review. Board members participate on a voluntary basis, and receive no remuneration for doing so.

The Board has encouraged constructive stakeholder participation and a broad range of industry stakeholders have been involved in Each Home Counts, including representatives from the heating sector. The Chair of the Board last met representatives of the heating industry on 6 July and is due to meet them again on 24 October.

All members of the Implementation Board and workstream leads are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified individuals are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Due to the independent nature of the Implementation Board, it would be for the Chair and members to consider sharing minutes of their meetings. Information about Board meetings is shared with stakeholders in the fortnightly Each Home Counts newsletter.

20 Oct 2017, 11:21 a.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that there is no conflict of interest for individuals leading work streams under Each Home Counts.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry with the support of Government, in line with the recommendations of the review. Appointments to the Implementation Board and steering groups are made by industry where members provide expertise from across the sector, reflecting the scope of recommendations identified by the review. Board members participate on a voluntary basis, and receive no remuneration for doing so.

The Board has encouraged constructive stakeholder participation and a broad range of industry stakeholders have been involved in Each Home Counts, including representatives from the heating sector. The Chair of the Board last met representatives of the heating industry on 6 July and is due to meet them again on 24 October.

All members of the Implementation Board and workstream leads are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified individuals are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Due to the independent nature of the Implementation Board, it would be for the Chair and members to consider sharing minutes of their meetings. Information about Board meetings is shared with stakeholders in the fortnightly Each Home Counts newsletter.

20 Oct 2017, 11:21 a.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure transparency in the appointment of members to the Each Home Counts steering group and implementation board.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Each Home Counts was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry with the support of Government, in line with the recommendations of the review. Appointments to the Implementation Board and steering groups are made by industry where members provide expertise from across the sector, reflecting the scope of recommendations identified by the review. Board members participate on a voluntary basis, and receive no remuneration for doing so.

The Board has encouraged constructive stakeholder participation and a broad range of industry stakeholders have been involved in Each Home Counts, including representatives from the heating sector. The Chair of the Board last met representatives of the heating industry on 6 July and is due to meet them again on 24 October.

All members of the Implementation Board and workstream leads are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified individuals are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Due to the independent nature of the Implementation Board, it would be for the Chair and members to consider sharing minutes of their meetings. Information about Board meetings is shared with stakeholders in the fortnightly Each Home Counts newsletter.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the dates when he and Ministers of his Department met the Each Home Counts implementation board since December 2016.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total cost to the public purse is of the Each Home Counts review.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review: Pay Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether industry members of the Each Home Counts implementation board receive a payment from his Department.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Energy: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential financial effect on consumers of implementation of the recommendations set out in the Each Home Counts review.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Energy: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has conducted an economic impact assessment of the recommendations set out in the Each Home Counts review; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Energy: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the total cost to industry of the quality mark proposals recommended by the Each Home Counts implementation board.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Consumer Advice, Protection, Standards and Enforcement for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Independent Review: Business Interests Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Each Home Counts implementation board has no financial interest in the outcome of its recommendations.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Natural Gas: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to consult gas-safe registered installers on the Each Home Counts implementation board's recommendations.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

19 Oct 2017, 4:32 p.m. Natural Gas: Housing Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he is taking to steps to ensure that gas-safe registered installers are not required to undertake additional work as a result of the Each Home Counts review.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Each Home Counts review was an independent review, led by Dr. Peter Bonfield, which published its report in December 2016. Implementation of Each Home Counts is being led by industry, with the support of Government. All members of the Implementation Board participate on a voluntary basis with no remuneration and are required to declare any conflicts of interest. Where conflicts are identified members are excluded from any decision making process in which they would have an actual or perceived conflict. Ministers have not met with the Implementation Board since December 2016, but Departmental officials are present at meetings as observers.

The approach taken by the Board has been to encourage constructive stakeholder participation and engage across the sector. A broad range of stakeholders have been involved, including members representative of GasSafe installers.

One of the main recommendations from the Review was to establish a quality mark for retrofit energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, and for companies operating in this sector.

It is for industry to propose how the new quality mark framework will be structured and financed. As indicated in the Review it is intended that action build on good practice so reducing bureaucracy and potential duplication and reducing cost for industry and consumers overall.

The Each Home Counts review recognised that there is already good practice in the sector and many organisations operate to high standards. Where the quality mark requirements are already being met, companies will be able to apply to operate under the quality mark without further improvements. There is no intention from Government to make participation in the proposed Each Home Counts quality mark mandatory for any business or sector. As there is no regulatory requirement, Government does not plan to conduct a dedicated economic impact assessment for Each Home Counts.

5 Sep 2017, 4:32 p.m. Natural Gas: Storage Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will direct the Oil and Gas Authority under the provisions of the Energy Act 2016 in the public interest to consider the decision to close the Rough gas storage facility.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

There has been significant investment in the UK’s natural gas supply infrastructure over the last decade. As a result we benefit from highly diverse and flexible sources of natural gas, including: production from the North Sea; six international gas pipelines with Norway, Belgium and the Netherlands; three Liquefied Natural Gas terminals that can bring gas from anywhere in the world; and a number of modern, responsive gas storage facilities. On this basis I do not consider it appropriate to invoke the provisions under Section 8 of the Energy Act 2016. The Department has recently undertaken a full strategic assessment of our long-term gas security, and we will publish this in due course.

5 Sep 2017, 4:31 p.m. Natural Gas: Storage Sir Alan Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will direct the Oil and Gas Authority under the provisions of the Energy Act 2016 to investigate the financial viability of gas storage operations in the UK.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

It is not the role of the Oil and Gas Authority to conduct such an assessment. The Department has recently undertaken a full strategic assessment of our long-term gas security, and we will publish this in due course.