Caroline Flint Portrait

Caroline Flint

Labour - Former Member for Don Valley

First elected: 1st May 1997

Left House: 6th November 2019 (Defeated)


Caroline Flint is not a member of any APPGs
6 Former APPG memberships
Apprenticeships, Children of Alcoholics, Film Industry, Northern Powerhouse, Responsible Tax, Women and Work
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
16th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
7th Oct 2011 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Minister of State (Europe)
3rd Oct 2008 - 5th Jun 2009
Minister of State (Department of Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
24th Jan 2008 - 3rd Oct 2008
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions) (Employment and Welfare Reform)
28th Jun 2007 - 25th Jan 2008
Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (Yorkshire and the Humber)
28th Jun 2007 - 9th Jan 2008
Minister of State (Department of Health) (Public Health)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jun 2003 - 10th May 2005
Administration Committee
30th Jan 2001 - 19th Jan 2005
Education & Employment
14th Jul 1997 - 13th Dec 1999


Division Voting information

Caroline Flint has voted in 2306 divisions, and 36 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 299
22 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 233 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 322
19 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Acts - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 231 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 306
4 Sep 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 224 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 495
12 Jun 2019 - Leaving the EU: Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 222 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 309
3 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 228 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 310
3 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 230 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 311
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 230 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 315 Noes - 310
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 230 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 220 Noes - 400
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 229 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 313 Noes - 312
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Labour No votes vs 185 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 282
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 203 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 292
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 121 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 292
29 Mar 2019 - United Kingdom’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 234 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 286 Noes - 344
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 42 Labour No votes vs 143 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 111 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 184 Noes - 293
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 27 Labour No votes vs 198 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 295
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 302
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 228 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 311 Noes - 314
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 300
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 25 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 85 Noes - 334
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 231 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 314
12 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 238 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 242 Noes - 391
27 Feb 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the EU - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 225 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 288 Noes - 324
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 226 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Labour No votes vs 224 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 322
13 Jun 2018 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 74 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 126
20 Dec 2017 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 9 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 23 Noes - 319
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 73 Labour Aye votes vs 91 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 152 Labour No votes vs 162 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 416 Noes - 163
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 126 Labour Aye votes vs 184 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 418
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 96 Labour No votes vs 207 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 337 Noes - 224
2 Mar 2007 - Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Flint voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour No votes vs 98 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 19
View All Caroline Flint Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Ed Davey (Liberal Democrat)
(169 debate interactions)
John Bercow (Speaker)
(39 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(95 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(56 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(45 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Smart Meters Act 2018
(5,348 words contributed)
Criminal Finances Act 2017
(4,314 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Caroline Flint's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Caroline Flint

30th October 2019
Caroline Flint signed this EDM on Monday 4th November 2019

Into Film

Tabled by: Lisa Cameron (Conservative - East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow)
That this House recognises the achievements of Into Film in giving every child and young person aged 5 to 19 in the UK the chance to experience film creatively; commends the organisation's ability to develop a passion for cinema in children through the creation of film clubs and stimulating discussion; …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Conservative: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
24th October 2019
Caroline Flint signed this EDM on Monday 28th October 2019

Timetable for the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill

Tabled by: Lord Field of Birkenhead (Crossbench - Birkenhead)
That this House calls on the Government, if it is granted a flexible extension to Article 50 by the European Union, to work to a 14-day timetable for passing the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, and to bring to an immediate end the flexible extension as soon as the Bill …
14 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 7
Independent: 3
Conservative: 3
Crossbench: 1
View All Caroline Flint's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Caroline Flint, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Caroline Flint

Thursday 18th October 2012

2 Adjournment Debates led by Caroline Flint

Monday 21st November 2016
Monday 7th June 2010

1 Bill introduced by Caroline Flint


A Bill to require certain multinational enterprises to include, within their annual financial reporting, specified information prepared in accordance with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's requirements for Country-by-Country reporting; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 15th March 2016

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
50 Other Department Questions
30th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate she has made of the effect on the wholesale price of electricity of an increase in low carbon generation.

DECC estimates that wholesale electricity prices were around £1/MWh lower (equivalent to £5 lower for an average household energy bill) in 2014 than they would have been in the absence of policies to incentivise investment in low-carbon generation, and reduce electricity demand. In 2020, wholesale electricity prices are estimated to be around £4/MWh lower (or £12 lower for an average household energy bill) than they would be in the absence of the same policies.1


[1] All figures are real 2014 prices. Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimated-impacts-of-energy-and-climate-change-policies-on-energy-prices-and-bills-2014.


3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent steps she has taken to encourage co-operation between EU countries on the development of carbon capture and storage technology.

The UK works actively in Europe and internationally to advance the development of CCS technologies. We maintain regular dialogue with other EU Member States. The UK played a leading role in securing CCS’s place in a technology neutral approach to meeting our joint 2030 climate and energy targets. Last month we hosted the Government Group of the European Technology Platform for Zero Emission Fossil Fuel Power Plants (ZEP) at which we showcased the work of the Teesside Collective in developing an industrial CCS project, as well as the UK CCS competition projects. In May, we submitted a joint bid with seven other Member States plus Norway to pool our CCS research and development budgets and leverage further funding from the European Commission. The UK has also successfully pushed for the Commission to set up a new cross-Europe group from this Autumn to promote CO2 transport network projects which could access funding from the Connecting Europe Facility.

3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate she has made of how many GW of carbon capture and storage capacity will be installed in the UK by (a) 2020, (b) 2025 and (c) 2030.

The Government is committed to helping realise the potential of Carbon Capture and Storage, and is investing £1bn to help commercialise it through the CCS Competition. The Government is currently providing the majority of funding for engineering and design studies for two UK-based projects which, if they were to proceed to construction, would result in the generation of around 0.6GW of carbon free electricity by the end of the decade.

DECC publishes scenarios for a range of technologies, including CCS, as part of its annual energy projections. The projections are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/updated-energy-and-emissions-projections-2014.

3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent steps her Department has taken to support the development of carbon capture and storage for industrial processes and manufacturing.

DECC and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) have jointly taken a number of steps to support the development of industrial carbon capture and storage.

In 2014 the Government commissioned and published a techno-economic study (“Demonstrating CO2 capture in the UK cement, chemicals, iron and steel and oil refining sectors by 2025: A Techno-economic Study by Element Energy, PSE, Imperial College London and University of Sheffield”) which identified the most relevant technologies for industrial CCS in each sector that can be implemented by 2025, alongside their costs and technology readiness levels.

DECC and BIS held workshops with stakeholders from energy intensive industry, CCS industry and academics in November 2014 to review the findings of the techno-economic study.

DECC funded the Tees Valley Unlimited local enterprise partnership to undertake a series of feasibility studies into an industrial carbon capture and storage scheme for the Tees Valley industrial cluster, capturing carbon dioxide from four industrial installations: SSI steel, BOC hydrogen, Growhow ammonia and Lotte plastics. The results were published in July 2015.

In March 2015, DECC and BIS jointly published the results of the eighteen month collaborative Industrial 2050 Roadmaps project (by Parsons Brinckerhoff and DNV-GL) covering the iron vand steel, cement, chemical, ceramics, glass, paper and pulp, food and drink, and oil refining sectors. The results concluded that industrial carbon capture and storage technologies could deliver over 20 million tonnes CO2 abatement per year by 2050, in particular from the iron and steel, cement, chemical and oil refining sector.

3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much the Government has spent to support carbon capture and storage technology in each year since 2010-11.

The Government has in place a comprehensive programme of financial support for CCS, comprising R&D and innovation funding, support for commercialisation through the £1bn CCS Competition, and work to develop an enabling policy environment for power and industrial CCS in the UK and internationally. We are currently negotiating the first Contract for Difference for CCS as part of the Competition.

Since 2010/11, Government has spent the following in support of Carbon Capture and Storage technology:

  • £55.96million between 2010 and 2012;
  • £9.79million in 2012/13;
  • £24.74million in 2013/14; and
  • £54.99million in 2014/15.
29th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps her Department is taking to improve its delivery of major projects.

We are improving the skills of the project leaders of our major projects through attendance at the Major Projects Leadership Academy established by the Major Projects Authority.

Similar training is available to others working on major projects. The Department also has a range of guidance, in-house training and specialist support available to those working on its projects and work to establish the Project Delivery profession in DECC is underway.

DECC’s major projects also benefit from assurance provided within the department from their own governance structures, scrutiny of progress from the relevant corporate governance Committees and external assurance provided through the Major Projects Authority.

The effectiveness of all of these activities is regularly assessed so that improvements can be made when needed.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Retail Market Review-Implementation of Simpler Tariff Choices and Clearer Information, published in August 2013, in enabling energy bill payers to save money.

In July last year Ofgem committed to reporting annually on the progress of competition in the retail markets, including the impact of its retail market review measures. Ofgem is looking at a wide range of indicators and will publish its first year’s findings this summer.

I have asked Ofgem to brief me on the findings shortly before they are published.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many households pay (a) the Standard Variable Tariff and (b) other tariffs in each income decile.

DECC estimates, from our Domestic Fuels Inquiry that around 19 million households (75%) pay standard variable tariffs for electricity and 15 million households (72%) for gas. These figures include those on variable rates who receive dual fuel or online discounts and include all payment types including direct debit and pre-payment.

DECC do not produce statistics for tariffs by customers’ income.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the statement of 22 June 2015, Official Report, columns 617-36, on onshore wind subsidies, if she will place in the Library a list of all the onshore wind projects to which the grace period will apply.

Under our proposed grace period allowing entry to the Renewables Obligation beyond the proposed closure date of 1 April 2016, projects must, by 18 June 2015, have planning consent, a grid connection offer and acceptance, and evidence of land rights for the site on which their project will be built. The precise grace period eligibility requirements will be determined through the legislative process and are subject to approval by Parliament. It will be for the developer of each individual project to determine whether they meet those eligibility requirements and to apply for the grace period. It will only be possible to publish a list once it is clear to us which projects choose to apply for the grace period and have produced the evidence necessary to qualify.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the cost of the Competition and Markets Authority energy market investigation has been to date.

The cost to the Competition and Markets Authority of its investigation into the supply and acquisition of energy in Great Britain was around £2,478,000, as at 31 May 2015.

19th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if she will make an assessment of the effect of the removal of the Renewables Obligation from onshore wind in 2016 on investor confidence in renewable energy in the UK.

Onshore wind has made a valuable contribution to the UK energy mix in recent years but there is now enough capacity in the pipeline to help the UK meet its 2020 renewable commitments. We will consider carefully the level of investment that developers are likely to bring forward under the proposals announced by my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State on 18th June.

6th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2015 to Question 220905, when he plans to announce his Department's decision on the provision of state aid to UK Coal in respect of Thoresby and Kellingley coal mines.

The Government expects to announce a decision shortly.

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what discussions his Department had with (a) Network Rail and (b) the Department for Transport on the costs to electricity network operators of rail electrification and their effect on consumer energy bills.


Since the 1960s, it has been routine for the electricity network operators to re-site or remove electricity network assets as a result of railway works, under the terms of a Master Wayleave agreement.

The current programme of rail electrification may result in the need for extensive works on the electricity network infrastructure.

The Department is in discussion with the industry, the Department for Transport and Cabinet Office about appropriate funding arrangements.

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, with reference to page four of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's Corporate Assessment Management Plan from May 2013, what area of equivalent land NDA Properties Ltd (a) holds and (b) expects to be sold in (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16.

NDA Properties Limited holds approximately 2620 acres of land. It expects to sell approximately 520 acres in 2014-15 and 190 acres in 2015-16.

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2015 to Question 222829, what categories of support and overhead spending have increased over £10 million between 2009-10 and 2013-14; and for each such category, what the reasons are for the increase in spending.

The only category that has increased by more than £10m during the period is Security. The reasons for this can be summarised as being the increased security requirements at nuclear sites across the country (particularly Sellafield) which has required additional expenditure on both capital investment and operating costs.

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222817, what the (a) performance, (b) efficiency and (c) other fees earned by Nuclear Management Partners were in each year since it was appointed as the parent body organisation for that company.

No fees are paid to Nuclear Management Partners (NMP).

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2015 to Question 224209, how much NDA and NDA Properties Limited paid in fees to third parties to manage properties in each of the last five years.

The information requested is as follows:

NDA PL

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

136,401.48

83,515.00

184,272.05

133,438.53

212,283.97

NDA

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

201,309.00

448,008.00

470,875.58

396,363.00

257,794.00

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what the average domestic (a) electricity and (b) gas bill was in each quarter in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) in quarter 1, 2015.

DECC publish energy bills on an annual basis. Bills for 2013 and provisional estimates of bills in 2014 are published in Quarterly Energy Prices (QEP) available on the DECC web site (table 2.2.1 for electricity and table 2.3.1 for gas). Energy price indices are published monthly by the Office for National Statistics and republished by DECC within QEP, with quarterly data available in table 2.1.3.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many compensation packages for consumers Ofgem has secured in each year since 2001; and what the value was of each such package.

The attached table sets out information on compensation packages for consumers obtained by Ofgem since 2001. The table reflects cases where final notifications of fines and redress have been issued and so recent notices of intention to issue penalties and redress have not been counted.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many non-financial penalties Ofgem has imposed in each year since 2001; and what each such penalty was.

For the first time, the Energy Act 2013 gave the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority (GEMA) powers to issue non-financial penalties as part of the remedial action package stemming from consumer redress orders, such as variation or termination of contracts with affected consumers, for any breaches that occur on or after 18th February 2014.

In addition, GEMA has issued three Provisional Orders (one in 2010 (First Utility with respect to disconnections of customers in debt) one in 2011 (MA Energy –compliance with Energy Codes) and one in 2014 (Economy Energy – complaints handling and transfer blocking)). It has also accepted commitments on two occasions (once in 2005 (SP Manweb– delays in connections services) and once in 2012 (Electricity North West – connection charges). In 2014, Ofgem agreed sets of targets to improve customer service at Npower and Scottish Power. These cases are ongoing.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many fines Ofgem has imposed in each year since 2001; and what the value was of each such fine.

The attached table sets out information on fines imposed by Ofgem using its enforcement powers since 2001. The table reflects cases where final notifications of fines have been issued and so recent notices of intention to issue penalties have not been counted.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214542, if he will place a copy of research referred to in that Answer in the Library.

Information about suppliers’ charges if an incoming customer wants to switch from a prepayment meter to a credit meter and the approach to security deposits are available from the individual company’s website or customer service team.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214565, whether his Department has made an estimate of the proportion of households which meet the criteria of the Affordable Warmth Group which is in fuel poverty.

Eligibility criteria for ECO were adopted before the Low Income High Cost indicator, now used for measuring fuel poverty, came into use.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214565, whether his Department has made an estimate of the proportion of fuel poor households which meets the criteria of the Affordable Warmth Group.

Eligibility criteria for ECO were adopted before the Low Income High Cost indicator, now used for measuring fuel poverty, came into use.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the oral contribution by the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye of 14 January 2015, Official Report, column 931, what the evidential basis is for the statement that the number of independent suppliers has trebled to 19 since 2010.

I would like to update the answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Hastings and Rye.

In May 2010 there were 7 independent companies supplying gas and/or electricity to households in Great Britain. Since 2010, thanks to the pro-competition, pro-consumer policies of this Government, as part of our long term economic plan, the number of independent suppliers has not just trebled, but almost quadrupled.

The Domestic Energy Market Snapshot 31 October 2014, published by Energy UK, notes that the number of suppliers in the domestic market has reached an all-time high of 26 suppliers.

http://www.energy-uk.org.uk/publication.html?task=file.download&id=5017

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate his Department has made of the wholesale cost of (a) electricity and (b) gas in each year since 2001.

DECC does not itself estimate wholesale market prices for electricity and gas. These prices are provided to us on a commercial basis by Marex Spectron and ICIS Heren for electricity and gas respectively.

We have calculated yearly averages of the day-ahead wholesale electricity and gas prices (respectively) provided to DECC by Marex Spectron and ICIS Heren respectively on license. These are shown in the table below. Wholesale gas data provided to DECC is only available from 2007.

Year

Wholesale gas (p/therm) price

Electricity (£/MWh)

(Source: NBP day-ahead price from ICIS Heren)

(Source: day-ahead price from Marex Spectron)

2001

18.40

2002

16.70

2003

21.20

2004

22.60

2005

39.00

2006

42.60

2007

30

31.10

2008

58

74.50

2009

31

37.50

2010

42

41.90

2011

56

48.20

2012

60

45.10

2013

68

50.60

2014

50

42.40

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the oral contribution by the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye of 14 January 2015, Official Report, column 931, on energy prices, what the evidential basis is for the statement that the market share of independent suppliers is 10.5 per cent.

The Domestic Energy Market Snapshot 31 October 2014, published by Energy UK, notes that the aggregate major supplier share of the domestic dual fuel energy market had dropped to 89.5%.

http://www.energy-uk.org.uk/publication.html?task=file.download&id=5017

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of domestic customers who are on their supplier's standard tariff.

DECC estimate, from our Domestic Fuels Inquiry, that 71 per cent of gas customers and 73 per cent of electricity customers were on their supplier’s standard variable rate tariffs. These percentages include those on standard variable rates who receive dual fuel or online discounts. This survey does not cover most of the independent suppliers.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much funding has been allocated to the power to switch campaign.

Final spends are not yet available.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, for how long the power to switch campaign will run.

The Campaign is running for a period of 5 weeks up till 21 March 2015.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214542, in what circumstances each supplier identified by his Department requests a refundable security deposit.

All supply companies may ask for a deposit of money as security for the future payment of energy charges if a customer’s credit status is unsatisfactory, they have repeatedly failed to pay their energy bills or have broken an agreed payment arrangement, or a new customer is unable to provide proof of identity and/or details of previous place of residence. Deposits must not exceed a reasonable rate.

Suppliers will not ask for a security deposit when a customer agrees to have a prepayment meter installed to repay a debt, or their personal circumstances means it would be unreasonable to require one.

Supply companies will refund a security deposit in full when a customer has demonstrated their ability to pay their energy bills by paying each bill in full during an agreed period - often 12 months.

The Department does not hold information on the approach of individual suppliers to security deposits.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214542, which suppliers his Department has identified as requesting a refundable security deposit.

All supply companies may ask for a deposit of money as security for the future payment of energy charges if a customer’s credit status is unsatisfactory, they have repeatedly failed to pay their energy bills or have broken an agreed payment arrangement, or a new customer is unable to provide proof of identity and/or details of previous place of residence. Deposits must not exceed a reasonable rate.

Suppliers will not ask for a security deposit when a customer agrees to have a prepayment meter installed to repay a debt, or their personal circumstances means it would be unreasonable to require one.

Supply companies will refund a security deposit in full when a customer has demonstrated their ability to pay their energy bills by paying each bill in full during an agreed period - often 12 months.

The Department does not hold information on the approach of individual suppliers to security deposits.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2014 to Question 214542, how much each of the suppliers identified by his Department requests as a refundable security deposit.

All supply companies may ask for a deposit of money as security for the future payment of energy charges if a customer’s credit status is unsatisfactory, they have repeatedly failed to pay their energy bills or have broken an agreed payment arrangement, or a new customer is unable to provide proof of identity and/or details of previous place of residence. Deposits must not exceed a reasonable rate.

Suppliers will not ask for a security deposit when a customer agrees to have a prepayment meter installed to repay a debt, or their personal circumstances means it would be unreasonable to require one.

Supply companies will refund a security deposit in full when a customer has demonstrated their ability to pay their energy bills by paying each bill in full during an agreed period - often 12 months.

The Department does not hold information on the approach of individual suppliers to security deposits.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the contribution by the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye of 14 January 2015, Official Report, column 932, on energy prices, what the evidential basis is for the statement that customers would be £100 a year worse off if prices had been frozen in October 2013.

Using average annual consumption of 3,200kW/h per year for electricity and 13,500kW/h per year for gas, the annual cost of the cheapest deal on the market (in London) was £913 on the 15 January 2015. DECC estimate that this is around £100 lower than the cheapest deal a year earlier.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the contribution of 14 January 2015, Official Report, column 904, on energy prices, what the evidential basis is for the statement that switching rates have fallen because of the end of doorstep selling.

New rules to tighten up doorstep sales practices were introduced in 2009 and investigations into the doorstep selling practices of larger suppliers were launched by Ofgem, with the larger suppliers’ voluntarily ceasing doorstep selling from 2011/ 2012.

The time series data DECC publishes on switching [1] shows a downward trend following the cessation of doorstep sales.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/quarterly-domestic-energy-switching-statistics

23rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what the cost to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority would have been of terminating its contract with Nuclear Management Partners at its break point.

Contractual termination costs are determined based upon the terms of the contract with Nuclear Management Partners. The precise terms of the contract are commercially confidential but these costs equate to approximately one per cent of average annual fee.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222816, what estimate he has made of (a) the total number of hours, (b) full-time equivalent staff employed and (c) costs of reachback support in 2014-15 to date.

Reachback Summary

Actual Cost £k

Hours

Roles

14/15 Year End Forecast as at Pd9

10,821

68,933

63

15/16 Forecast

6,008

37,050

33

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2015 to Question 220911, how much the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority expects to award Nuclear Management Partners in efficiency fees in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16.

As owners of Sellafield Ltd, under the terms of the Parent Body Organisation (PBO) contract, Nuclear Management Partners is paid dividends funded by the fees earned by Sellafield Limited. The estimated fee payable to Sellafield Limited for 2014-15 is commercially sensitive and will not be disclosed until after it has been determined following the end of the financial year. For financial year 2015-16 the amount of fee pool available is still subject to discussion between Sellafield Limited and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate he has made of the cost to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority of termination of its contract with Nuclear Management Partners.

Contractual termination costs will be determined based upon the terms of the contract with Nuclear Management Partners. The precise terms of the contract are commercially confidential but these costs will equate to approximately one per cent of average annual fee (this arrives at around £430K plus interest from the start of 2014/15). NMP will earn fees in line with its contract over the course of its contract notice period.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222829, how much of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's expenditure on support costs was for (a) research and technology, (b) IT, (c) security, (d) facilities, (e) programme management, (f) procurement, (g) human resources, (h) finance, (i) head-office costs, (j) environment, health safety and quality, (k) regulatory engagement and (l) communications in each of the last five years.

The information requested is in the table below:

£m

13-14

12-13

11-12

10-11

09-10

[A] Research & technology

5.0

5.0

4.9

4.7

5.9

[B] IT

2.4

2.2

3.9

3.6

3.7

[D] Facilities

1.9

1.6

3.2

2.5

2.8

[E] Programme Management

12.5

11.0

11.4

13.7

18.0

[G] HR

2.1

2.1

1.8

1.9

2.5

[H] Finance

4.3

4.4

3.7

3.6

6.5

[L] Communications

1.8

1.6

1.4

1.6

1.5

Support costs for security, procurement, head office costs, environment health safety and quality, regulatory engagement cannot be accurately disaggregated from wider NDA expenditure.

Due to internal reporting changes and/or organisational structure changes, certain headings may not be consistent across the five years.

Finance costs include internal audit costs and NAO audit fees, in each year.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222829, what the (a) research and technology, (b) IT, (c) security, (d) facilities, (e) programme management, (f) procurement, (g) human resources, (h) finance, (i) head-office costs, (j) environment, health safety and quality, (k) regulatory engagement and (l) communications support costs were for each of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's site licence companies in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not available.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222816, how many full-time equivalent staff were employed under reachback contracts in each of the last five years.

The NDA did not record the number of individuals employed full-time under reachback contracts between 2009-2011. The number of full-time equivalent staff employed under reachback contracts in each of the last three years are:

  • 2011-12 126
  • 2012-13 149
  • 2013-14 134.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much Nuclear Management Partners has received in executive staff costs in each year since it became the parent body organisation for Sellafield Ltd.

The information requested is below:

£k

  • 2008/09 3,211
  • 2009/10 8,463
  • 2010/11 9,068
  • 2011/12 11,066
  • 2012/13 8,629
  • 2013/14 6,658
12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2015 to Question 222816, what estimate he has made of (a) the total number of hours, (b) full-time equivalent staff employed and (c) costs of reachback support in (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16.

Reachback Summary

Actual Cost £k

Hours

Roles

14/15 Year End Forecast as at Pd9

10,821

68,933

63

15/16 Forecast

6,008

37,050

33

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much land is currently held by NDA Properties Limited; and what the use, value and location is of that land.

NDA Properties Limited holds, in approximate figures: 30 acres of land at Berkeley, Gloucestershire; 130 acres at Bradwell, Essex; 220 acres at Chapelcross, Dumfriesshire; 340 acres at Dounreay, Caithness; 10 acres at Harwell, Oxfordshire; 5 acres at Hunterton, Ayrshire; 30 acres at Drigg, Cumbria; 1,570 acres in West Cumbria; 14 acres at Springfields, Lancashire; and 270 acres at Trawsfynydd, Gwyndd. The land covers a wide variety of uses, including agricultural land, woodland, land used for operational purposes, and offices. For commercial reasons, NDA Properties does not make public its valuations of land held.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much land has been sold by NDA Properties Limited in each of the last five years; and how much has been raised as a result of those sales.

NDA Properties Ltd has completed five land sales in the last five years, with a total net sale price of £867,000. The sales were at Dounreay in August 2011, at Grange-over-Sands, Cumbria in June 2013, at Springfields in July and November 2013, and at Dungeness in January 2014. The largest sale was of agricultural land at Springfields (November 2013) for £548,000.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate he has made of the amount of land that will be sold by NDA Properties Limited in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16; and what estimate he has made of the revenue likely to be raised by those sales.

NDA Properties Ltd will consider selling land at Dounreay, Harwell, Springfields and in West Cumbria in the next two or three years, depending on market conditions. For commercial reasons it does not make public its valuations of its holdings.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much NDA Properties Limited receive in income from its land and property holdings in each of the last five years.

NDA Properties Limited received from its land and property holdings income of £6.402m in 2009-10, £6.234m in 2010-11, £6.107m in 2011-12, £5.589m in 2012-13 and £6.115m in 2013-14.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what the annual staff costs and other operating expenditure of NDA Properties Limited, including through third-party management fees, was in each of the last five years.

NDA Properties Limited’s staff costs and other operating expenditure was £44,662 in 2009-10, £122,244 in 2010-11, £163,652 in 2011-12, £315,420 in 2012-13 and £402,140 in 2013-14. The increase in expenditure reflects increased activity, notably relating to the Albion Square development in Whitehaven.