David Drew Portrait

David Drew

Labour (Co-op) - Former Member for Stroud

Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Reform of the House of Commons
20th Jul 2009 - 6th May 2010
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 6th May 2010
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Jan 2002 - 5th May 2005
Procedure Committee
31st Jul 1997 - 27th Nov 2001
Agriculture
6th Dec 1999 - 11th May 2001


Division Voting information

David Drew has voted in 1158 divisions, and 147 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Jun 2018 - National Policy Statement: Airports - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour No votes vs 119 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 415 Noes - 119
7 Apr 2010 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 224 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 314 Noes - 49
7 Apr 2010 - Digital Economy Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Labour No votes vs 179 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 197 Noes - 40
7 Apr 2010 - Digital Economy Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour No votes vs 175 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 189 Noes - 47
7 Apr 2010 - Members of Parliament - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 240 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 254 Noes - 158
4 Mar 2010 - Crown Estate (Proposed Sale of Homes) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 234 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 404 Noes - 53
1 Mar 2010 - Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 198 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 85
24 Feb 2010 - Energy Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Labour Aye votes vs 243 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 244 Noes - 252
24 Feb 2010 - Energy Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 261 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 271
24 Feb 2010 - European Union Documents - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 233 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 63
23 Feb 2010 - Children, Schools and Families Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 260 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 177
10 Feb 2010 - Section 5 of the European Communities (Amendment) Act 1993 - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 208 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 216 Noes - 189
3 Feb 2010 - Yemen - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour No votes vs 212 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 403 Noes - 20
3 Feb 2010 - Yemen - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour No votes vs 219 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 196
20 Jan 2010 - Fiscal Responsibility Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 255 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 197
11 Jan 2010 - Children, Schools and Families Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 280 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 288
9 Dec 2009 - Child Poverty Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 271 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 214 Noes - 281
2 Dec 2009 - Equality Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 270 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 77 Noes - 427
2 Dec 2009 - Equality Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 266 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 170 Noes - 314
1 Dec 2009 - European Financial Services Proposals - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 248 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 188
12 Nov 2009 - Coroners and Justice Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour Aye votes vs 236 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 186 Noes - 243
10 Nov 2009 - Welfare Reform Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 278 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 286 Noes - 236
9 Nov 2009 - Coroners and Justice Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Labour Aye votes vs 265 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 274
9 Nov 2009 - Coroners and Justice Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 281 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 342 Noes - 145
26 Oct 2009 - Marine and Coastal Access Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Labour Aye votes vs 236 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 158 Noes - 246
21 Oct 2009 - Climate Change (Political Response) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour Aye votes vs 289 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 226 Noes - 297
13 Oct 2009 - Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 254 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 195 Noes - 265
13 Oct 2009 - Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour Aye votes vs 251 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 260
13 Oct 2009 - Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour Aye votes vs 252 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 261
20 Jul 2009 - Select Committee on Reform of the House of Commons - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour Aye votes vs 196 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 202
14 Jul 2009 - Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 263 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 189 Noes - 270
8 Jul 2009 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 17 Labour Aye votes vs 269 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 83 Noes - 283
7 Jul 2009 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Labour Aye votes vs 295 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 311
6 Jul 2009 - Identity Cards - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 274 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 203
1 Jul 2009 - Parliamentary Standards Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 239 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 250
1 Jul 2009 - Bank Lending Policies - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 241 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 254 Noes - 212
24 Jun 2009 - Iraq Inquiry - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 288 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 299
24 Jun 2009 - Iraq Inquiry - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 294 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 251
17 Jun 2009 - Business Rate Supplements Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 249 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 227
17 Jun 2009 - NHS (Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 242 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 160
20 May 2009 - Planning: National Policy Statements - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour Aye votes vs 254 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 216 Noes - 262
19 May 2009 - Policing and Crime Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour Aye votes vs 272 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 285
13 May 2009 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 293 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 59 Noes - 301
13 May 2009 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 267 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 77 Noes - 278
24 Mar 2009 - Coroners and Justice Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour Aye votes vs 263 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 174 Noes - 328
17 Mar 2009 - Welfare Reform Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Labour Aye votes vs 251 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 85 Noes - 408
17 Mar 2009 - Welfare Reform Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour Aye votes vs 250 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 76 Noes - 396
17 Mar 2009 - Welfare Reform Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 30 Labour Aye votes vs 247 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 260
3 Mar 2009 - Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 260 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 271 Noes - 89
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 93 Labour No votes vs 155 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 176
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Labour No votes vs 157 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 158
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 156 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 153
24 Feb 2009 - Airport Expansion (Parliamentary Approval) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 193 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 203
28 Jan 2009 - Heathrow (Third Runway) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 281 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 297
17 Dec 2008 - Electoral Commission (Remuneration of Chairman) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Labour No votes vs 182 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 324 Noes - 32
8 Dec 2008 - Speaker’s Committee on the Search of Offices on the Parliamentary Estate - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour No votes vs 282 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 270
24 Nov 2008 - Points of Order - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 271 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 279 Noes - 228
24 Nov 2008 - Planning Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 271 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 217
19 Nov 2008 - Counter-Terrorism Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 275 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 284
12 Nov 2008 - Regional Accountability - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Labour Aye votes vs 229 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 239 Noes - 237
12 Nov 2008 - Regional Accountability - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour Aye votes vs 224 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 229 Noes - 231
12 Nov 2008 - Regional Accountability - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour Aye votes vs 212 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 107 Noes - 219
4 Nov 2008 - Employment Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Labour Aye votes vs 212 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 53 Noes - 408
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Labour Aye votes vs 230 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 299
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 49 Labour Aye votes vs 227 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 298
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 194 Noes - 306
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 45 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 183 Noes - 308
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Labour No votes vs 261 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 129
8 Oct 2008 - European Union (Transparency) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 190 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 169 Noes - 202
17 Jul 2008 - Reform of Intelligence and Security Committee - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 17 Labour Aye votes vs 198 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 32 Noes - 205
25 Jun 2008 - Planning Bill (Programme) (No. 3) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour No votes vs 297 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 156
25 Jun 2008 - Planning Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Labour Aye votes vs 294 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 303
25 Jun 2008 - Planning Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 297 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 306
11 Jun 2008 - New Clause 22 - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 37 Labour No votes vs 292 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 315 Noes - 306
10 Jun 2008 - Counter-Terrorism Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 300 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 310
2 Jun 2008 - Planning Bill (Programme) (No. 2) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 242 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 248 Noes - 193
2 Jun 2008 - Planning Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour Aye votes vs 248 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 292
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Labour Aye votes vs 227 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 222 Noes - 290
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Labour Aye votes vs 255 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 71 Noes - 393
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Labour Aye votes vs 251 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 84 Noes - 387
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 39 Labour Aye votes vs 240 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 190 Noes - 332
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Labour Aye votes vs 229 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 173 Noes - 309
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Labour Aye votes vs 231 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 233 Noes - 304
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Labour Aye votes vs 215 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 336
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 62 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 286
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 314
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 233 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 149 Noes - 318
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 225 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 342
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 293
12 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 253 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 340 Noes - 78
6 May 2008 - Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 261 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 271 Noes - 215
22 Apr 2008 - Pensions Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 261 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 195 Noes - 269
31 Mar 2008 - Housing and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Labour Aye votes vs 252 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 210 Noes - 263
31 Mar 2008 - Housing and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 248 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 74 Noes - 259
31 Mar 2008 - Housing and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 268 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 186 Noes - 278
19 Mar 2008 - Post Office Closures - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 279 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 288
19 Mar 2008 - Post Office Closures - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 281 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 251
11 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 288 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 346 Noes - 206
5 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 299 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 248 Noes - 311
5 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour Aye votes vs 299 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 311
5 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 299 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 218
4 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 286 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 471
4 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour Aye votes vs 273 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 57 Noes - 329
4 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 294 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 305
3 Mar 2008 - Point of Order - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour No votes vs 266 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 276 Noes - 198
3 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 276 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 189 Noes - 291
3 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 273 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 326 Noes - 148
3 Mar 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour No votes vs 272 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 324 Noes - 152
26 Feb 2008 - Treaty of Lisbon (No. 7) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 288 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 170 Noes - 299
26 Feb 2008 - Treaty of Lisbon (No. 7) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 286 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 168
26 Feb 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Labour Aye votes vs 277 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 175 Noes - 285
26 Feb 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 283 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 154 Noes - 300
6 Feb 2008 - Treaty of Lisbon (No. 4) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 280 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 345 Noes - 186
30 Jan 2008 - Treaty of Lisbon (No. 2) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour Aye votes vs 295 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 170 Noes - 369
30 Jan 2008 - Treaty of Lisbon (No. 2) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 294 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 169
29 Jan 2008 - Lisbon Treaty (No.1) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 291 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 167 Noes - 360
29 Jan 2008 - Lisbon Treaty (No.1) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 290 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 167
29 Jan 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 289 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 170 Noes - 353
29 Jan 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour Aye votes vs 288 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 352
28 Jan 2008 - Business of the House (Lisbon Treaty) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 291 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 243
21 Jan 2008 - European Union (Amendment) Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 298 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 362 Noes - 224
9 Jan 2008 - Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Labour No votes vs 256 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 481 Noes - 46
9 Jan 2008 - Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Labour Aye votes vs 271 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 169 Noes - 338
24 Oct 2007 - Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 276 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 155
17 Jul 2007 - Pensions Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 294 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 253
27 Jun 2007 - Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 269 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 282
26 Jun 2007 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour Aye votes vs 259 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 269
18 Apr 2007 - Pensions Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 273 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 282
28 Mar 2007 - Ambulance Coverage (Forest of Dean) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour No votes vs 229 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 342 Noes - 49
28 Mar 2007 - Ambulance Coverage (Forest of Dean) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour No votes vs 228 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 54
19 Mar 2007 - UK Borders Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 241 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 100
14 Mar 2007 - Contraception and Abortion (Parental Information) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 123 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 87 Noes - 159
14 Mar 2007 - Trident - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 167 Noes - 413
14 Mar 2007 - Trident - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 89 Labour No votes vs 222 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 409 Noes - 161
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 156 Labour Aye votes vs 157 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
28 Feb 2007 - Offender Management Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 49 Labour Aye votes vs 256 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 111 Noes - 267
28 Feb 2007 - Offender Management Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 283 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 268
7 Feb 2007 - Al-Yamamah Arms Agreement - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Labour Aye votes vs 277 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 233 Noes - 295
11 Dec 2006 - Offender Management Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Labour No votes vs 265 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 411 Noes - 91
11 Dec 2006 - Offender Management Bill - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 271 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 213
6 Nov 2006 - Road Safety Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Labour No votes vs 282 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 289 Noes - 183
1 Nov 2006 - Legislative Process - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Labour Aye votes vs 218 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 122 Noes - 354
1 Nov 2006 - Birmingham New Street Station - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 238 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 226
26 Oct 2006 - A Citizens’ Agenda - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 219 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 256 Noes - 134
17 Oct 2006 - Gambling Act 2005 (Amendment) - View Vote Context
David Drew voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 49 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 240
9 Oct 2006 - Road Safety Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Drew voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 272 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 280
View All David Drew Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all David Drew's debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Drew

30th October 2019
David Drew signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 31st October 2019

South Sudan peace process

Tabled by: Lord Bellingham (Conservative - North West Norfolk)
That this House expresses its support for the people of the Republic of South Sudan; asks all parties to uphold their commitments to peace and dialogue as outlined in the 2018 revitalised peace agreement; calls on the incumbent Government and other signatories of the peace agreement to create a secure …
12 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Dec 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 6
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
28th October 2019
David Drew signed this EDM on Tuesday 29th October 2019

Industrial action of outsources workers in the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House commends the efforts and determination of members of the PCS union, employed by ISS and Aramark based at the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy headquarters who have won their disputes over pay and terms and conditions; notes that these members represent catering, security, portage, cleaning, …
14 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Independent: 1
View All David Drew's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Drew, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


David Drew has not been granted any Urgent Questions

David Drew has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

David Drew has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

David Drew has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


1571 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
28 Other Department Questions
8th Jul 2019
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, if the Commission will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of the new IPSA system.

I have asked IPSA to reply.

The original April 2016 business case for IPSA’s new IT system, IPSA Online, estimated a cost of £4.641 million. IPSA expected the programme to be completed in 2017-18. The full costs incurred to ensure IPSA could go live with IPSA Online at the beginning of the current financial year were £8.253 million.

The increase in cost was due in part to the unexpected General Election of June 2017 which diverted IPSA work for up to nine months to supporting MPs who left or joined parliament, and increased supplier costs. Costs also increased following a change of suppliers in September 2018 to improve the quality of IT support. Testing the system took longer than anticipated in order to ensure it was fully secure and free of technical problems. The increases in cost have been partly mitigated by savings elsewhere in IPSA’s budget. A full internal audit of the programme is currently taking place. IPSA will report to the Speaker’s Committee for the IPSA later in the year on the overall costs and benefits of IPSA Online.

IPSA is committed to supporting MPs and their staff during this transition and will make appropriate adjustments to improve the system as it beds in, while ensuring strong financial control, improvements in value for money, and high data quality and data security.

3rd Jul 2019
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, how much the new system for reimbursing hon. Members' expenses cost to implement.

I have asked IPSA to reply.

The original April 2016 business case for IPSA’s new IT system, IPSA Online, estimated a cost of £4.641 million. IPSA expected the programme to be completed in 2017-18. The full costs incurred to ensure IPSA could go live with IPSA Online at the beginning of the current financial year were £8.253 million.

The increase in cost was due in part to the unexpected General Election of June 2017 which diverted IPSA work for up to nine months to supporting MPs who left or joined parliament, and increased supplier costs. Costs also increased following a change of suppliers in September 2018 to improve the quality of IT support. Testing the system took longer than anticipated in order to ensure it was fully secure and free of technical problems. The increases in cost have been partly mitigated by savings elsewhere in IPSA’s budget. A full internal audit of the programme is currently taking place. IPSA will report to the Speaker’s Committee for the IPSA later in the year on the overall costs and benefits of IPSA Online.

IPSA is committed to supporting MPs and their staff during this transition and will make appropriate adjustments to improve the system as it beds in, while ensuring strong financial control, improvements in value for money, and high data quality and data security.

2nd Jul 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans the Commission has to increase the level of (a) recycling and (b) reuse to reduce the use of single-use plastic.

On increasing recycling and re-use, Parliament’s Environment Team works in close partnership with its waste contractor to respond to new and emerging opportunities to recycle and recover waste. The waste contract includes a requirement for driving continuous improvements in Parliament’s recycling performance.

Parliament achieved a recycling rate of 59% in 2018–19, with a long-term target to recycle 75% of waste (by weight) by 2020–21.

On reducing single-use avoidable plastics, in May 2018 Parliament announced a comprehensive range of initiatives to drastically reduce its consumption of single-use avoidable plastics:

  • Eliminate plastic bottled water
  • Eliminate condiment sachets (through substitution)
  • Eliminate plastic-lined hot drinks cups, alongside introduction of a ‘latte levy’
  • Sell and incentivise the use of re-usable ‘keep cups’
  • Substitute disposable catering take-away items with compostable alternatives, alongside the introduction of a compostable waste stream
  • Substitute plastic tumblers with compostable alternatives
  • Substitute plastic carrier bags with paper ones
  • Implement a ‘green stationery’ catalogue
  • Pilot a re-usable delivery container scheme at the Offsite Consolidation Centre
  • Produce procedures for incorporating the environmental impact of packaging waste into the weighting of relevant procurement exercises


Except for the delivery container pilot scheme, for which a feasibility study has been completed, all single-use plastic initiatives have been fully implemented.

13th Jun 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans the Commission has to (a) increase choice in parliamentary catering for vegetarians and vegans and (b) set prices that reflect the true cost of producing food.

Catering services have increased the number of vegetarian and vegan options across all menus over the past year and there are plans for the range to continue to grow this year. Catering services will continue to support National Vegetarian week and Vegan Month. Some chefs have also attended a two day training course looking at new ideas in plant-based foods to enhance the menus, with further development opportunities planned.

Catering prices are reviewed on an annual basis and amended to reflect one year’s change in the food price index (a subset of the consumer price index) and applied as a standard percentage increase across the whole product range. New prices come into effect in April, at the beginning of each new financial year.

The Finance Committee sets the overall budget direction and targets, and the Administration Committee confirms that the pricing percentages work within the overall budget direction and target once they have been presented to them on an annual basis. The House of Commons Commission is asked for a final decision if agreement cannot be reached with both Committees.

The catering budget set for 2019/20 for food gross profit is to achieve a 62% gross profit margin. This food gross profit covers the cost of food production across all venues on the estate.

Any prices which need to adjust mid-year due to significant market supplier increases (a previous example being the increase in the price of salmon by 40% in 2016/17) will be reported back to Committees separately.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission funds the Parliamentary Review magazine.

The Commission does not fund The Parliamentary Review.

Information about funding of the magazine can be found on The Parliamentary Review’s website:

(https://www.theparliamentaryreview.co.uk/faqs).

25th Mar 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what training and support is available to hon. Members' staff on suicide awareness.

There are three courses available to support Members’ staff whose roles bring them into contact with vulnerable people:

  • Conversations with vulnerable people – which includes how to engage with someone who may present with suicidal feelings;

  • Building emotional resilience – which seeks to develop the emotional skills required to cope with the personal stress of handling emotive situations; and

  • Mental health awareness – which includes being aware of suicidal feelings.


The training is provided by the Samaritans and Mind and is delivered on demand both in Westminster and in City locations around the UK.

Support for Members’ staff is available through an Employee Assistance Programme provided by Health Assured. This is a free confidential helpline that is available 24/7 for all Members’ staff provided on behalf of the House that allows staff to discuss and seek advice on personal and professional issues, including stress at work. Additionally, face-to-face counselling sessions can be offered where appropriate.

18th Mar 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the holding Answer of 17 January 2019 to Question 208188, how much money is now owed by (a) hon. Members and (b) former hon Members for unpaid catering and hospitality bills at the House of Commons (i) in total, and (ii) as a proportion of the turnover of catering and hospitality in the House of Commons; and what steps the Commission is taking to ensure the collection of those debts.

On 17 January a holding answer was provided while the information was being prepared. A substantive answer was provided on 30 January and is available at:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2019-01-14/208188/

14th Jan 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, how much money is now owed by (a) hon. Members and (b) former hon Members for unpaid catering and hospitality bills at the House of Commons (i) in total, and (ii) as a proportion of the turnover of catering and hospitality in the House of Commons; and what steps the Commission is taking to ensure the collection of those debts.

The House of Commons has a debt management process regarding the recovery of monies owed by all parties. In relation to Members’ catering accounts, all sums due are expected to be settled within six weeks. Statements are sent out monthly and undisputed amounts owed are charged ten days later to the Members nominated card. Any amounts outstanding after the settlement date are followed up by emails, letters and telephone calls.

As shown in table 1, a total sum of £440 currently outstanding against catering and banqueting accounts is related to Member expenditure. There are no amounts outstanding in relation to former Members.

Amount outstanding relating to Members

Amount outstanding relating to former Members

FY 2018/19 Budget

£

% of budget

£

% of budget

Banqueting

-

0%

-

0%

£6,502,522

Catering

£440

0.009%

-

0%

£4,668,756

Total

£440

0.004%

-

0%

£11,171,278


Table 2 sets out the outstanding amounts owed to the House, broken into Member and non-member categories, where non-members consist of trade and internal customers.

Outstanding – Trade and internal customers

Outstanding - Members

FY 2018/19 Budget

£

% of budget

£

% of budget

Banqueting

£278,815

4.29%

-

0%

£6,502,522

Catering

£7,233

0.15%

£440

0.009%

£4,668,756

Total

£286,048

2.56%

£440

0.004%

£11,171,278

18th Dec 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will make an assessment of the adequacy of the loop system in the House of Commons for people with hearing difficulties.

Since January 2018, Parliament’s Sound and Vision Contractor, NEP Bow Tie TV, have been conducting monthly checks with the support of the In-House Services Team on 69 assistive listening systems throughout the main rooms on the Parliamentary Estate to the current BS/IEC standards (BS8594 and 601884IEC). Prior to January 2018, these checks were carried out on an annual basis. A report is supplied each month to the contract owner, the Parliamentary Broadcasting Unit, and the In-House Services Team and Diversity and Inclusion teams.

Independent audits are also conducted by Action on Hearing Loss.

In addition to monthly checks, a comprehensive, annual "Commissioning" test is carried out by NEP Bow Tie TV. This checks for Background Noise; Field Strength; Frequency Response; Live Listening; Live Signal; System Noise; Overspill; and Venue Accessibility.

Where high quality sound systems are installed, such as in the Chamber and in committee rooms, audio quality is generally good. However, a report by Wave Science Technology has highlighted that further improvements could be achieved in meeting rooms. The recommendations from the external audio consultant relating to assistive listening will be considered in January as part of an on-going review of audio/video provision in committee and other meeting rooms. This work has been undertaken by Parliament’s AV Programme which has been delivering other improvements to audio video systems across the Estate.

10th Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she has taken to ensure that single people are not discriminated against in relation to those who are married or in civil partnerships.

Although being single is not a protected characteristic (unlike, for example, race or sex) in the Equality Act 2010, single people can particularly benefit from other protec-tions in that legislation - for example, provisions which allow shops and attractions to charge older or younger people less than working-age adults. These concessions, for example cheaper haircuts for pensioners or discounted entry to events and museums for students and pensioners, are likely to be of particular benefit to single people, who are strongly represented in these groups.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Jun 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans the Commission has to improve the capacity and coverage of WiFi on the Parliamentary Estate.

Over the last few weeks the Digital Service has been working closely with our 3rd party providers to resolve issues relating to providing consistent connectivity to the internet direct/WMID WiFi services. Monitoring of the WiFi service has confirmed that the solution has stabilised and consistent connections have been achieved. Further WiFi improvement work is planned, working in conjunction with our providers.

The Digital Service is delivering a major investment programme for Parliament’s network; this is addressing issues around speed, resilience and most importantly security when accessing internet based services. As part of this programme, improvements to WiFi availability are being rolled out across the estate by installing additional WiFi access points. Members' areas have been prioritised, with some already completed and the rest (mainly Portcullis House and Palace of Westminster) will be completed by the end of June 2018.

Further targeted improvements across the estate, forming part of the infrastructure transformation programme, are being scoped including WiFi optimisation and efficiencies. These improvements are scheduled to conclude by February 2019.

27th Mar 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans the Commission has to improve the (a) availability and (b) speed of Wi-Fi provision on the Parliamentary estate; and if he will make a statement.

The Digital Service is delivering a major investment programme for Parliament’s network; this is addressing issues around speed, resilience and most importantly security when accessing internet based services. As part of this programme, improvements to Wi-Fi availability are being rolled out across the estate by installing additional Wi-Fi access points. Members' areas have been prioritised, with some already completed and the rest (mainly Portcullis House and Palace of Westminster) will be completed by the end of June 2018.

Further targeted improvements across the estate, forming part of the infrastructure transformation programme, are being scoped including Wi-Fi optimisation and efficiencies. These improvements are scheduled to conclude by February 2019.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the process and manner of disposal is for Parliament's (a) food waste and (b) unused packaged food.

Food and catering waste from catering facilities is segregated at the kitchens and is recovered offsite by means of anaerobic digestion to produce methane fuel and fertiliser. No catering waste from Parliament is sent to landfill.

Food waste from offices is not currently segregated but the feasibility of this is currently being considered.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, to which incineration facility Parliament's general waste is sent.

All general waste is taken to Bywaters Materials Recovery Facility in Bromley-by-Bow. It is then consolidated with other general wastes for transporting to a licensed Energy from Waste facility in Kent run by Riverside Resource Recovery Limited.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what steps the Commission is taking to comply with the Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment Regulations and to reduce the wastage by the House of goods covered by those regulations.

There is a wide range of Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) disposed of from the Parliamentary Estate. These include, but are not limited to IT wastes (computers, display screens, iPads, printers etc.), ‘white goods’ (desk fans, mini fridges, kettles etc.) and maintenance-based waste (fluorescent tubes, electrical fittings, emergency system batteries, catering fridges etc.), and includes hazardous and non-hazardous items.

A licensed contractor, Bywater Ltd, are engaged to dispose of end of life or non-operational white goods and maintenance WEEE. They use two specialist subcontractors who operate Approved Authorised Treatment Facilities (AATF) to ensure that WEEE waste is processed to the highest standards of licensing available from the Environment Agency. Non-hazardous WEEE is processed by Total Waste Management Ltd in Basildon, Essex, and hazardous WEEE is processed by Electrical Waste Recycling Group Ltd in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

For IT WEEE, Parliamentary Digital Services use the services of a fully licensed contractor, RDC, who likewise operate an AATF for those IT items which are at end of life or non-operational. For items that can be re-used once all data has been erased (to certified security standards), RDC operates a remarketing service aimed at maximising the re-use of IT equipment no longer required by Parliament.

Parliament is currently in the process of developing an electrical heater policy to reduce usage of these across the Estate. One associated benefit of this policy will be a reduction in electrical heaters being disposed of in our white goods WEEE waste stream.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 5 February 2018 to Question 125385, what the reason is for Parliament's general waste not being separated; and whether the Commission plans to take steps to ensure that such waste is separated in order to ensure compliance with the demands of the waste hierarchy.

The term “general waste” refers to non-recyclable items. Instructions for our general waste bins in Parliament are that only non-recyclables and contaminated waste should be deposited in this waste stream. Therefore, there is no value in segregating the elements of this stream. General waste is separated from all other waste that Parliament produces and, as general waste, it remains segregated as such through to its final disposal at an Energy from Waste facility. This is the fourth layer of the waste hierarchy, and the highest level of the waste hierarchy at which such non-recyclables can be disposed of.

All recyclable items have already been removed at this stage as they will have been disposed of in the dry mixed recycling bins or glass bins located in offices and waste hubs.

We focus our efforts on encouraging individuals in offices to segregate their dry mixed recycling from general waste, so there should be no reason to further segregate the general waste. As previously stated, the general waste is sent to an Energy from Waste facility whereas the recycling will go to a Materials Recovery Facility.

Parliament’s Environment Team and waste contractor carry out audits to identify any pattern of recyclable items being incorrectly disposed of to the general waste stream.

31st Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 30 January 2018 to Question 124972, on Incinerators, whether all the contents of the general waste bins in offices are put into the general waste stream and then sent for incineration.

That is the practice. As the House does not separate the contents of the general waste stream onsite, the entire content of the general waste bins is sent for incineration at an ‘energy from waste’ facility.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will set out all contracts to undertake work for the House of Commons worth more than £500,000, stating which of those contracts are PFI projects.

The House Service currently has 14 works contracts worth more than £500,000. None of the contracts let by the House Service are PFI projects. PFIs are not suitable to fund the sort of capital investments the House engages in. Accordingly the House has no formal policy on PFIs.

Contract Reference

Title

COM1115

New Palace Yard Underground Car Park Refurbishment

FWK1085-LSC2222

External Courtyard Conservation Phase One

LSC2101

Cast Iron Roofs Repair and Refurbishment Phase 2 – Palace of Westminster

LSC2149

Medium Term Mechanical & Electrical Project 3C New Substation Fit Out

LSC2157

Fire Safety Improvement Works Palace of Westminster Basement Project

LSC2189

Fire Safety Improvement Works Portcullis House Atrium Roof Vents

LSC2203B

Refurbishment of Elizabeth Tower – Main Contract

LSC2208

Fire Safety Improvement Works Palace of Westminster Compartmentation

LSC2209

1 Canon Row Refurbishment

LSC2209A

1 Canon Row Refurbishment (PSC Delivery Agreement)

LSC2209C

Canon Row Enabling Works Part 1 – Main Works

LSC2226A

Palace of Westminster Life Safety Works-MOA

LSC2230

Westminster Hall Phase 3 (Internal Roof, Lantern and Lighting Installation, and Fire Safety)

LSC2239A

Estate Wide Electrical Infrastructure & Resilience – Stage 2

29th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2018 to Question 122009, how much of the 36.7 per cent of waste which the Parliamentary authorities incinerated at an energy from waste facility was biodegradable.

Parliament’s general waste stream, sent to incineration at an ‘energy from waste’ facility, is not routinely separated onsite or at the facility. Therefore an accurate figure of biodegradable material within this waste stream is unknown.

In November 2015, Parliament commissioned an independent audit of the general waste stream and found that approximately 28% of the sample (by weight) analysed comprised of biodegradable material.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, which wastes are sent for incineration by the Parliamentary authorities; and whether the Commission has made an assessment of alternative sources of disposal for such wastes.

Parliament’s ‘general waste’ stream is sent for incineration at an ‘energy from waste’ facility. General waste bins in offices are clearly marked and are for food, food contaminated packaging, crisps packets, tea bags, coffee grounds, disposable coffee cups and take away meal containers.

The House authorities and their waste contractor carry out audits of the general waste stream to identify opportunities to move general wastes up the waste hierarchy, by avoiding the generation of wastes in the first instance, and to identify ways to increase recycling where possible.

24th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what criteria the Commission applies to people applying for press passes.

Press passes may be applied for via a business case addressed to the Serjeant at Arms. The business case should include:

  • The name of their business organisation
  • Details of circulation (including circulation figures)
  • A copy of their editorial policy
  • Proof of their qualification as a journalist and accreditation to a professional body
  • How they envisage using potential access; i.e. how often they see access being required and what percentage of their coverage they envisage being of a political nature, directly attributable to their access
  • Any other information which would support their request


Applications are considered on a case by case basis and, if agreed, passes are then issued by the Pass Office subject to the successful security vetting of the individual.

Depending on the business case presented passes may be issued for a trial period, with reassessment after that time, before the maximum three years is considered.

For details of current pass holders, individuals who are granted a parliamentary pass also complete a declaration which is recorded in the Register of Journalists’ Interests. This can be found on the parliamentary website here: http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-and-offices/standards-and-financial-interests/parliamentary-commissioner-for-standards/registers-of-interests/register-of-journalists-interests/.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission has discussed plans for the House to stop using plastic.

The Commission has asked the Administration Committee to review the sustainability and environmental management of single use disposable plastics in the House of Commons. The Administration Committee will be considering this matter in March.

15th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans the Commission has to increase the range of food available for both vegetarians and vegans in catering facilities in the House.

Catering services provide a wide choice of dishes to cater for vegans and vegetarians throughout the estate. Menus are changed on a regular basis to provide variety and to reflect seasonality. There has also been an increase in the number of choices for vegans and vegetarians across our venues in recent years.

We gather customer suggestions and feedback through regular surveys and through our customer feedback email address. This assists us with our menu planning and to improve our offers and dishes on our menus where possible.

There are no specific plans to increase the range of food available to vegans and vegetarians. In 2017, all cafeterias supported National Vegetarian Week (15 to 19 May) and World Vegan Month (in November) where we promote and further offer a selection of dishes to our customers. Catering services will continue to promote these in 2018.

10th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what plans Parliament has to recognise Fair Trade Fortnight.

The Houses of Parliament have for many years recognised and supported Fair Trade Fortnight. Catering customers are made aware of Fair Trade Fortnight through promotional screens and posters in the catering venues. In addition, members of the Catering Team speak to interested customers at their tables about the Fair Trade organisation during the fortnight.

The House Service sources products that meet UK or equivalent standards of production, and considers purchasing Fairly Traded products where there is a competitive market. Since 1997, all coffee sold in catering outlets has been Fairtrade. Fairtrade products, including a variety of popular drinks and snacks labelled with the Fairtrade mark, are also sold by Catering Services in Parliament. Additionally, Parliament’s bottled water supplier is a social enterprise that donates proceeds to Water Aid.

10th Jan 2018
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what percentage of parliamentary waste was (a) recycled and (b) incinerated in the most recent period for which data is available.

In the calendar year of 2017, Parliament recycled 48.8% (937,854 kg) of waste. Parliament recovered 13.4% (253,056 kg) of waste, which is a process that applies to food waste, treated to produce methane fuel for energy generation with the solid residues used as soil improver.

In the same timeframe, Parliament incinerated 36.7% (691,464 kg) of waste at an ‘energy from waste facility’. No waste from the Parliamentary Estate goes to landfill.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, if the Commission will assess the potential merits of consolidating WiFi systems on the Parliamentary Estate.

Parliament already has a single wireless network. However, this can appear to be a number of different ones when viewing the WiFi available on estate. This is due to it being segmented into a number of logical virtual networks. This is designed to enable effective cyber security management depending on the end user connecting. For example, guests on the Parliamentary Estate and users of non-Parliamentary devices computers are asked to manually enter an ID and password. However, Members and users of Parliamentary-issued devices automatically connect to the network. PDS plan to rationalise the number of WiFi networks visible on the Parliamentary estate over the course of 2018, the intent being to reduce the number visible to the minimum viable to meet cyber security requirements.

To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what criteria the Commission applies to people applying for press passes.

Press passes may be applied for via a business case addressed to the Serjeant at Arms. The business case should include:

  • The name of their business organisation
  • Details of circulation (including circulation figures)
  • A copy of their editorial policy
  • Proof of their qualification as a journalist and accreditation to a professional body
  • How they envisage using potential access; i.e. how often they see access being required and what percentage of their coverage they envisage being of a political nature, directly attributable to their access
  • Any other information which would support their request


Applications are considered on a case by case basis and, if agreed, passes are then issued by the Pass Office subject to the successful security vetting of the individual.

Depending on the business case presented passes may be issued for a trial period, with reassessment after that time, before the maximum three years is considered.

For details of current pass holders, individuals who are granted a parliamentary pass also complete a declaration which is recorded in the Register of Journalists’ Interests. This can be found on the parliamentary website here: http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-and-offices/standards-and-financial-interests/parliamentary-commissioner-for-standards/registers-of-interests/register-of-journalists-interests/.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the primary causes of mortality are in constituencies where the average life expectancy for males is less than 68 years and for females is less than 70 years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will list the constituencies where average life expectancy is lower now than in 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what analysis his Department has undertaken of the financial viability of those construction companies that have won public procurement projects with a contract value of more than £5m in the last five years.

The Public Contracts Regulations 2015 require public procurers to award contracts through fair and open competition, in line with principles of equal treatment, transparency and non-discrimination.

Suppliers have to meet certain criteria to be able to bid for public contracts, including a minimum level of financial and economic standing as determined by the public body running the procurement. This may be proven through turnover, audited accounts or other financial measures.

These financial checks are carried out by the Contracting Authority who conduct their own risk assessments.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Cabinet Office, which Department is taking the lead on developing free trade deals for food products.

The Department for International Trade is responsible for delivering a new trade policy framework for the UK as we leave the EU. It works closely with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which is responsible for supporting our world-leading food and farming industry.

3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has plans to postpone the 2018 Boundary Commission Review.

The Government's manifesto re-affirms the commitment to deliver equal and updated boundaries and reduce the size of the House of Commons.

Following laws already passed by Parliament, the independent and impartial Boundary Commissions are consulting on their proposals to deliver the boundary changes, and they will submit their final proposals to Parliament in autumn 2018. These reforms will ensure fair and equal representation for the voting public across the United Kingdom.

Equalising the size of constituencies in the Boundary Review will ensure everyone’s vote will carry equal weight. Without such boundary reforms, MPs could end up representing constituencies based on data that is over 20 years’ old, disregarding significant changes in demographics, house building and migration.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of cases heard by the Grocery Code Adjudicator (a) were successfully proven (b) were unsuccessfully proven and (c) dropped before a decision could be made in each years since the establishment of the Adjudicator.

The Groceries Code Adjudicator’s (GCA) remit is set out in the Groceries Code Adjudicator Act 2013. The GCA’s statutory functions are to investigate suspected breaches of the Code based on issues raised and information received and to arbitrate, where requested, in disputes between suppliers and designated retailers. Since June 2013 the GCA has concluded two investigations and seven arbitrations. In each investigation the GCA found the relevant designated retailer had breached the Groceries Supply Code of Practice. The outcome of arbitrations is confidential.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make a comparative assessment of her Department's guidance on the installation of heat pumps through the Renewable Heat Incentive scheme and the criteria by which Energy Performance Certificates are issued.

The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy currently has no plans to carry out a comparative assessment of installation guidance for heat pumps in relation to the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). The Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (OFGEM), who administer both domestic and non-domestic schemes, publish extensive guidance on the RHI, including guidance around the eligibility of heat pumps for the RHI. The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers publishes codes of practice for large scale non-domestic heat pumps.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government is responsible for Energy Performance Certificates. Guidance is available on the gov.uk website.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
6th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans she has to undertake a review of Energy Performance Certificates to ensure that they include the potential energy saving of heat pumps.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans she has to ban antibacterial agents in soap.

All cosmetic products supplied in the UK, whether for consumer or professional use, must comply with EU Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 on Cosmetic Products. The Regulation sets out requirements for product and ingredient safety assessments. It governs the use of ingredients in cosmetic products, banning some, restricting others, and in the case of preservatives, specifying which can be used and their maximum concentrations.

Manufacturers are responsible for ensuring the safety of their products and the products must undergo an expert scientific safety assessment before they are sold. This includes safety assessments of any antibacterial agents used.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) she or (b) the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority will make a decision, following consultation, on whether more nuclear waste from former Magnox Stations will be stored in situ for the indefinite future.

Guidance issued by the environment agencies (Guidance on Requirements for Release of Nuclear Sites from Radioactive Substances Regulation) identifies a credible option of leaving behind some low level radioactive waste as a permitted disposal after a nuclear site has been decommissioned. All Site Licence Companies, including Magnox Ltd, are required to consider the new guidance when defining the optimum end state for each site. In situ disposal of some wastes, rather than retrieving and disposing of it in some other manner, could significantly reduce environmental impacts, health and safety risks and costs and preserve much-needed waste disposal infrastructure capacity.

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) and Magnox Ltd, which became a subsidiary of the NDA on 1 September 2019, will continually review key strategies (including those relating to waste management and end states) and engage with stakeholders where necessary to ensure that plans represent the best and most up-to-date approaches.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the final report of the Magnox inquiry into the award of the Magnox decommissioning contract by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and its subsequent termination will be published.

The final report for the Magnox Inquiry is currently subject to an ongoing judicial review. We hope that the Magnox Inquiry will be able to publish it's report in the near future, subject to the outcome of the Judicial Review.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 274430 and with reference to the Building Research Establishment document quoted, for what reason that methodology of selecting information referred to in para 2.2 and page 5 has been used and what the timetable is for publishing the full review that his Department is commissioning on that methodology.

This paragraph refers to a method of averaging data over time rather than selecting information. This method has been used by the Buildings Research Establishment where raw test data cannot be used directly in its methodology for assessing Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems. This is because the raw data would create anomalous fluctuations in the temperature gradient due to measurement uncertainty in the individual readings. This approach will be considered as part of the review.

The Department is in the process of procuring a third-party organisation to carry out the review. Our aim is to have the review completed around the turn of the year. However, this is subject to the detailed requirements identified by the reviewing organisation, such as the extent of laboratory testing required. Manufacturers will be informed of the outcome of the review when it concludes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
18th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) a different or (b) an amended method of assessing the performance of Canetis GasSaver compared with other flue gas heat recovery technology has been used.

The entry for this product in the Product Characteristics Database (PCDB) is based on amendments to the standard methodology, which have been used on a provisional basis. The Department is commissioning a full review of the methodology for assessing Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems. This is intended to confirm which amendments, if any, are necessary to ensure the methodology can accurately assess all such systems.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 275103 on Carbon Emissions: EU Countries, what dates have been set as targets for net zero emissions by (a) Finland, (b) Denmark, (c) Germany and (d) Portugal.

The UK was the first major economy to legislate for a net zero target. The action we are taking in setting this target will continue our proud tradition of climate leadership.

Finland, Denmark, Germany and Portugal have all set out aspirations or proposals to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions or net zero carbon emissions by 2050. However, none has yet enshrined such a commitment in law.

Finland has stated its intention to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2035. Denmark has set out an intention to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 in its climate plan ‘Together for a Greener Future’. Germany is currently debating a draft climate law which proposes a target for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Portugal has approved a roadmap to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer of 9 July 2019 to Question 272120, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of the statement in BRE's paper of 7 February 2018, that there is therefore an increased risk that boilers will in fact be non-compliant.

BEIS discussed the matter with BRE following release of their paper of February 2018. BRE do not agree with the interpretation of their paper that boilers sold in England do not meet the efficiency standards set by Government, and they have confirmed that they have never held this view.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he had made of the number of new models of boilers introduced since October 2017 that have been tested for compliance with the new boiler plus regulations.

We have not made an estimate of the number of new models of boilers introduced since October 2017.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information he holds on the number of UK households that have installed (a) additional and (b) replacement loft insulation in each year since 2011-12.

The table below presents the number of loft insulations per year delivered through major Government schemes since April 2011. These include an estimate of the lofts insulated using DIY material provide as part of the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target up to December 2012. The total number of insulated lofts will be higher through DIY measures which are not recorded by BEIS.

It is not possible for BEIS to disaggregate loft insulation measures for all schemes between additional and replacement loft insulations.

Loft insulation measures per year (thousands)

Year

Total measures

2011-12

1,243

2012-13

1,413

2013-14

130

2014-15

217

2015-16

75

2016-17

59

2017-18

36

2018-19

37

Total

3,209

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 274430 and with reference to paragraph two of the Building Research Establishment (BRE) document FGHRS Data Processing Changes Relating to Canetis GasSaver GS2 Data Record held in Products Characteristics Database, dated October 2018, if he will require the BRE to publish the method used to assess that technology.

This paragraph refers to a pre-processing (averaging) method that has been used by the Buildings Research Establishment (BRE) where raw test data cannot be entered directly into its methodology for assessing Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems (FGHRS). BRE intends to publish a document that describes the averaging method shortly.

The methodology used by BRE for assessing FGHRS for the Product Characteristics Database is published already at the following URL: https://www.ncm-pcdb.org.uk/sap/filelibrary/pdf/calculation_methodology/SAP_2009/FGHRS_calculation_method_28_10_10.pdf.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2019 to Question 274432 on Waste Heat Recovery, in what ways the entries for certain flue gas heat recovery systems have not been calculated in full accordance with the standard BRE methodology.

The reasons that entries for products from two manufacturers have not been calculated in full accordance with the standard BRE methodology are specific to each product. They have been communicated to the relevant companies.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 9 July 2019 to Question 272120, if he will make an assessment of the compatibility of his statement that the BRE has not changed the assessment with the BRE's statement in its 7 February 2018 article that There is therefore an increased risk that boilers will in fact be non-compliant.

BEIS discussed the matter with BRE following release of their paper of February 2018. BRE do not agree with the interpretation of their paper that boilers sold in England do not meet the efficiency standards set by Government, and they have confirmed that they have never held this view.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258964, how the variable features of a household heating system described in that Answer affect the efficiency of the boiler rather than the heating system.

Condensing boiler efficiency is affected by water return temperature to the boiler. The design, efficacy and maintenance of the heat distribution system can impact this temperature. I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 25th June 2019 to Question 266061 for further details.

10th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 11 of the report entitled, Net Zero, published by the Committee on Climate Change in May 2019 on setting a target of net zero emissions by 2050 and if he will make it his policy to set an earlier target date for reaching net zero.

The Committee on Climate Change make clear in their report that they do not currently consider it credible for the UK to aim to reach net-zero emissions earlier than 2050.

We have considered their advice and legislated in line with it. The UK is the first major economy in the world to set a legally binding target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. This world-leading target will bring to an end our contribution to climate change.

Having set this target, we are calling on other countries to similarly increase their ambition.

10th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many new models of boilers introduced since October 2017 have been tested and submitted to the BRE to comply with the new Boiler Plus regulations.

The testing and registration of new models of boiler by the Buildings Research Establishment (BRE) is not part of compliance with the Boiler Plus regulations.

In order to comply with the Boiler Plus regulations, the boiler unit must meet Energy-related Products (ErP) standards with a minimum ErP efficiency of 92%. Compliance is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notified Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

The BRE maintains the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) for the energy performance of homes. For the purposes of SAP, boiler efficiency values are derived using a calculation known as Seasonal Efficiency of Domestic Boilers in the UK (SEDBUK). This is the value that is recorded by BRE in the Product Characteristics Database.

9th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which EU Member States have adopted targets for zero net emissions by (a) 2050, (b) 2040, (c) another date and (d) a date not yet specified.

The UK was the first major economy to legislate for a net zero target. The action we are taking in setting this target will continue our proud tradition of climate leadership.

The EU Member States that have targets for net zero greenhouse gas emissions in legislation are Sweden (by 2045) and the United Kingdom (by 2050). France is currently in the process of legislating for a 2050 net zero greenhouse target.

In addition, a range of Member States have adopted or are currently publicly considering adopting plans for net zero carbon or greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, and in some cases have stated their intention is to legislate for a target. These include Denmark, Germany, and Portugal and Finland. Other Member States with plans to significantly reduce emissions by 2050 include the Netherlands, which has a law to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 95%, and Spain, which has a draft law proposing an at least 90% reduction (in both cases the reduction is compared to 1990).

The EU is also considering adopting a bloc-wide net zero 2050 target, with a large majority of Member States, including the UK, supporting a net zero EU target by 2050 at the June European Council this year. Through ratifying the Paris Agreement, the EU and its Member States have already committed to aiming for a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of the century, as set out in Article 4.1 of the Agreement.

8th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason passive flue gas heat recovery systems technology is listed by the Building Research Establishment as under investigation.

A label has been applied to entries for certain Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems in the Product Characteristics Database where the entries for those products have not been calculated in full accordance with the standard Buildings Research Establishment methodology and there is a risk that such entries might materially overestimate the energy savings associated with the product. The Department is commissioning a review of the methodology for Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems. Pending the outcome of the review, we intend to change the label to state “The SAP FGHRS methodology is currently being reviewed. This entry may change.” This label is necessary to keep all users of the database appropriately informed as they may base important decisions on the database.

8th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2019 to Question 266065, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of pages 1 and 5 of the Building Research Establishment document FGHRS Data Processing Changes Relating to Canetis GasSaver GS2 Data Record held in Products Characteristics Database dated 30 October 2018 in which the BRE refers to wholesale data manipulation of third-party FGHRS test data on a case-by-case basis and a device-by-device basis.

This paper gives the view of the Building Research Establishment on a proposed amendment to its methodology for assessing Flue Gas Heat Recovery Systems. This will be considered as part of a full review that the Department is commissioning on the methodology.

8th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the whether hydrogen is a green, zero carbon fuel, if carbon capture utilisation and storage is utilised alongside it.

The Government commissioned an assessment on the potential for low carbon hydrogen production with carbon capture utilisation and storage (CCUS). The assessment was conducted by the consultancies Element Energy and Jacobs.

Their report identified that for steam methane reformation, the current dominant UK hydrogen production technology, carbon capture rates of up to 90% could be achieved. It also states that next generation methane reformation technologies and further innovation could deliver increased capture rates and lower costs. To prove this, we launched a £20 million Hydrogen Supply Programme which aims to accelerate the development of low carbon bulk hydrogen supply solutions; the programme will provide real world evidence on the potential for increased capture rates.

In December 2018, we published the report ‘Clean growth: transforming heating’ which included a review of the evidence base on the potential carbon reductions if hydrogen produced from low carbon methods, including from natural gas combined with carbon capture utilisation and storage, is used to providing heating, including to homes, businesses and industry.

4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer 11 June 2019 to Question 258961 on Boilers, whether the variables listed in that answer apply to the heating system and not the boiler.

The variables stated in the answer to Q258961 on 11 June 2019, apply to the in situ test context for the boiler, not to the heating system. The required test conditions for the boiler are described in BS 15502-1, sections 8.1.1 and 8.1.2, unless otherwise specified elsewhere in the standard for specific cases. These conditions include for example requirements on the preparation of test gases, test pressures, test room ventilation, ambient temperature, protection from solar radiation, physical mounting conditions, measurement conditions and tolerances, insulation of the test rig, establishment of thermal equilibrium, conditional control settings and several other similar items requiring closely controlled test room conditions.

4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2019 to Question 266632 on Boilers, if he will publish the (a) country and (b) organisation that each of the 34 members of the CEN committee comes from.

A list of the CEN committee members can be found here:

https://standards.cen.eu/dyn/www/f?p=CENWEB:5.

4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer or 19 June 2019 to Question 266634, Boilers, what information his Department holds on any requirements to disable or remove any parts of the boiler in order to perform or complete the test.

As stated in the Answer of 19 June 2019 to Question 266634, test conditions are specified in BS EN 15502-1 to ensure that the test results are repeatable and comparable. For example section 8.1.2.5 prescribes the requirement for tests to take place under thermal equilibrium conditions, with precautions taken to prevent thermostats or adjustable controls or an electronic temperature control system operating and affecting the gas rate, unless necessary for the specific test being conducted. The standard requires these precautions, where necessary, rather than stating an absolute requirement to disable or remove such boiler controls.

3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to require Whirlpool to pay compensation to people who personally paid for repairs or replacement of their tumbledryer due to their safety concerns prior to the recall of the product.

The priority for the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is public safety.

If any individual consumers have already paid for a replacement due to concerns over safety, they can raise the matter directly with Whirlpool.

2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June to Question 266066 on boilers, for what reasons Building Research Establishment has changed its assessment set out in its paper of 7 February 2018 that there is an increased risk that boilers will in fact be non-compliant.

I understand the Building Research Establishment (BRE) has not changed its assessment. Their position is that their analysis does not conclude that the current Ecodesign regulation results in consumers being mis-sold, nor that boilers sold in England do not meet the efficiency standards set by Government. For further details of their analysis the Honourable Member may wish to contact BRE directly.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the locations of waste incinerators that supply energy for district heating.

The Department works with colleagues in Defra to collate publicly available information on waste-incinerators in England and Wales which received planning permission or environmental permits to be ‘enabled’ to supply heat through district heating facilities. This is published on the Renewable Energy Planning database page on Gov.uk. It is a commercial decision for the enabled facility whether to then supply heat through the district network; this information is not collected centrally.

Based on this information the locations (as of March this year) of waste incinerators which are heat and power ‘enabled’ are as follows:

Coventry & Solihull Waste Disposal Company

West Midlands

Eastcroft Energy-from-Waste

Nottinghamshire

Bolton Thermal Recovery Facility

Greater Manchester

Cross Green Energy Recovery Facility

West Yorkshire

Lincoln Energy-from-Waste

Lincolnshire

Sheffield Energy Recovery Facility

South Yorkshire

North East Energy Recovery Centre

Cleveland

North Yard Energy-from-Waste

Devon

Ardley Energy-from-Waste

Oxfordshire

Trident Park Energy Recovery Facility

South Glamorgan

SELCHP Energy Recovery Facility

London

Fibrepower, Slough

Berkshire

Edmonton EcoPark Energy-from-Waste

London

Runcorn Energy-from-Waste

Cheshire

Twinwoods Heat and Power CHP

Bedfordshire

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the organisations from the (a) medical sector and (b) scientific community that have contacted his Department calling for a net zero target (i) by 2030 and (ii) by any other date earlier than 2050.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers I gave him on 18th June to Question 262226 and on 25th June to Question 266627.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer of 25 June 2019 to Question 266626 on Climate Change, whether any of those councils have set a target of net zero by (a) 2030 and (b) any other date earlier than 2050.

The Department does not maintain a central record of councils that have set a target of net zero by these dates.

The Government welcomes the actions of Local Authorities to tackle climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions locally. We have always been clear that to achieve our climate targets it will take significant ambition at all levels.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps (a) he is taking and (b) proposes to take to ensure that energy efficiency in buildings is adequate to ensure that the target of net zero by 2050 is met.

The UK has a good track record in energy efficiency. In the latest International Energy Efficiency Scorecard[1], the UK is ranked 4th in the world and scores very highly on buildings. Since 1990 we have improved the energy efficiency of non-domestic buildings, including public sector buildings, with respective emissions 18 per cent[2] and 40 per cent[3] lower in 2015.

Building energy efficiency policy forms a key part of our Clean Growth Strategy where we have set ambitious targets for non-domestic buildings:

  • Non-domestic buildings are targeted as part of our commitment to reduce business energy use by 20% by 2030. Various schemes are in place for businesses to improve their energy use such as the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS),and the Boosting Access for SMEs to Energy Efficiency (BASEE) and the Non-Domestic Smart Energy Management innovation competitions.
  • We already have regulations in place that set minimum energy performance standards for buildings in the private rented sector. A building is required to have an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band E or better before being let. We are working to further tighten the minimum standards to deliver additional energy and carbon savings in the non-domestic sector.
  • We will look to take similar steps across the non-domestic owner occupier and new build stock. As part of that process, my Department is working with MHCLG to identify opportunities for driving further energy efficiency improvements in new and existing buildings through a consultation on Part L of the Building Regulations this year.
  • Following the launch of the Buildings Mission, we have commissioned research to understand how to halve the energy use of new buildings by 2030 and to halve the cost of retrofitting existing buildings to the same standard in the same timeframe.
  • By 2025 the government will introduce a Future Homes Standard for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world leading levels of energy efficiency, to create healthy homes that are fit for the future, have low energy bills, and are better for the environment. We will provide additional details of the planned introduction of the Future Homes Standard within the 2019 consultation on the energy efficiency standards of the Building Regulations.
  • We have committed to introduce a new scheme to help small businesses to improve the way they use energy and help them save money on their bills and reduce carbon emissions.
  • In response to a recommendation from the Green Finance Taskforce, we are working with partners to determine the steps necessary for landlords and businesses to understand and, potentially disclose operational energy use. This will not only help businesses reduce their energy use in the existing stock but will also be a key enabler in delivering the Buildings Mission.
  • We’re supporting a range of energy measures in public buildings through the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Loan Scheme. This funding, managed by Salix Finance, has delivered over 17,000 projects to date, improving energy performance in a range of buildings including schools and hospitals.

Progress will be kept under review to ensure we achieve net zero by 2050 and consider what further action will be required across sectors to deliver this.

[1] ACEE, ‘The 2018 International Energy Efficiency Scorecard’, 2018 https://aceee.org/research-report/i1801

[2] BEIS (2017) Final UK greenhouse gas emissions national statistics: 1990-2015 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/final-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics-1990-2015

[3] Compared to 2015 levels. Sustainable Development Unit (2016) Sustainable Development in Health and Care Report – Health Check 2016 https://www.sduhealth.org.uk/policy-strategy/reporting/sustainable-development-in-health-and-care-report-2016.aspx

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to pages 141 and 142 of the report entitled, Net Zero, published by the Committee on Climate Change in May 2019, what steps he plans to take to (a) extend and (b) strengthen plans to improve energy efficiency in homes.

Homes in the UK represent 15% of carbon emissions and meeting the previous 2050 target would require largely eliminating emissions from our housing stock. With the Government’s new legally binding target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions across the UK economy by 2050, our current and future actions to encourage home energy efficiency have become all the more crucial.

Through the Energy Company Obligation, we have supported energy efficiency improvements to over 2 million homes since 2013, and in April 2018 introduced regulations setting minimum energy efficiency standards for privately rented homes. We have committed to extend support for energy efficiency out to 2028, driving more than £6 billion of investment in domestic energy efficiency over the next ten years.

In the Clean Growth Strategy we set out our aspiration for as many homes as possible to achieve EPC Band C where cost effective, affordable and practical by 2035. This provides a good basis for net zero, providing a cost-effective level of energy efficiency to provide the basis for decarbonisation of heating systems.

In order to meet this aspiration, we are working to build a vibrant and sustainable market for energy efficiency through introducing a suite of mutually supporting policies and measures that will drive uptake of energy efficiency amongst homeowners. These policies have been informed in part to responses we received to the 2017 Building a Market for Energy Efficiency Call for Evidence and the recently published Green Finance strategy sets out some of our current and future actions in this area.

By 2025 the Government will also introduce a Future Homes Standard for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world leading levels of energy efficiency, to create healthy homes that are fit for the future, have low energy bills, and are better for the environment. We will provide additional details of the planned introduction of the Future Homes Standard within the 2019 consultation on the energy efficiency standards of the Building Regulations.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 26 June 2019 to Question 266628 on Business: Carbon Emissions, if will he publish the names of the (a) businesses and (b) business organisations that have set targets to achieve net zero by (a) 2030 and (b) a date earlier than 2050.

The Department does not maintain a central record of businesses and business organisations that have set targets to achieve net zero. The business community will have an important role to play in meeting our net zero target, and we welcome commitments from businesses to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

We are engaging closely with businesses – including as part of our second ‘Green GB & NI Week’, which will be launched on 4th November. This will be a week of events and activity where government, businesses, academia and civil society will come together to explore how clean growth will change our futures and how we can contribute to action on climate change. This builds on last year’s successful campaign, which saw over 100 events held across the country, and more than 60 businesses making significant pledges worth millions to cut emissions while continuing to grow the green economy.

More information on Green GB & NI week 2019, what happened during Green GB & NI week 2018 and how different groups can get involved, can be found on the website: https://greengb.campaign.gov.uk/

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he (a) is taking and (b) plans to take to promote the installation of heat pumps in domestic properties.

Heat pumps have an important role to play in decarbonising heat in our homes and businesses. The government is committed to supporting the growth of the UK heat pump industry and through the Renewable Heat Incentive we are spending £2.8bn between 2018 and 2021 to support innovative low carbon heat technologies in homes and businesses, including heat pumps.

By 2025 the Government will introduce a Future Homes Standard for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world leading levels of energy efficiency, to create healthy homes that are fit for the future, have low energy bills, and are better for the environment. The Future Homes Standard will be implemented through an uplift to the Building Regulations, subject to consultation. We will expand on the technical detail of these proposals during the 2019 Part L consultation.

BEIS is considering the future policy framework for supporting electrification of heat and we are looking to launch an electrification of heat demonstration project in 2019 to inform further our thinking on the feasibility of a large-scale transition to heat pumps.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he (a) is taking and (b) plans to take to require that the flow temperature of new heating systems in domestic properties is no more than 55 degrees C.

The Government has gathered evidence on this point through its 2017 Boiler Plus consultation and continues to engage with heating installers on the development of possible future standards. We intend to consult on regulatory options for heat in buildings and will consider installation standards for low carbon heating as part of that consultation.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 June 2019 to Question 259850 on Waste Heat Recovery, whether Canetis Technologies Ltd have discussed the representations of their own products with the Building Research Establishment.

BEIS officials understand that the Building Research Establishment has had discussions with Canetis Technologies Ltd. about the representation of its Flue Gas Heat Recovery System products in the Product Characteristics Database.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2019 to Question 262225 on Business: Carbon Emissions, which organisations made those representations; which businesses signed the letter referred to in the Answer; and how many of those (a) organisations and (b) businesses supported net zero (i) by 2030 and (ii) before 2050.

As noted in my previous answer, a number of organisations have written expressing their support for setting a net zero emissions target. This letter can be accessed here:

http://www.aldersgategroup.org.uk/asset/download/1435/Net%20zero%20business%20letter%20to%20PM.pdf

Our independent advisors - the Committee on Climate Change - make clear in their report that they do not currently consider it credible for the UK to aim to reach net-zero emissions earlier than 2050. We have considered their advice and are legislating in line with it, to end the UK’s contribution to climate change.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258961, which body determines the tests on domestic boilers, and what organisations are represented by that body.

The test for the energy efficiency of boilers is set by CEN, a European Standardisation Organisation. Its national members are the national standardization bodies of 28 European Union countries, the Republic of North Macedonia, Serbia, Turkey, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258965, how test conditions for domestic boilers differ from real world in situ conditions.

The test conditions in labs for domestic boilers assume steady state operation, weighted by full and part power measurements. The energy ratings given to boilers are therefore intended to provide a fair basis for comparison of the energy efficiency of different models. The wide variation in the energy efficiency of buildings that boilers are installed in and in user behaviours makes it difficult to consistently test boiler efficiency in real life conditions.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258965, whether test conditions for domestic boilers allow for any features or functions of those boilers to be changed or disabled during the test.

The required test conditions are given in sections 8.1.1 and 8.1.2 of BS EN 15502-1. These include required fuel characteristics, control mode settings, etc. to ensure that the test results are repeatable and comparable. Limitations are stated, for example section 8.1.2.5 prescribes the requirement for tests to take place under thermal equilibrium conditions, with precautions taken to prevent thermostats or adjustable controls or an electronic temperature control system operating and affecting the gas rate, unless necessary for the specific test being conducted.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2019 to Question 262224, which councils have (a) declared a climate emergency (b) set a target for net zero emissions by 2030; and whether any councils set other dates for net zero greenhouse gas emissions.

A list of councils that have declared a climate emergency can be found here: http://www.caceonline.org/councils-that-have-declared.html

Several of these councils have committed to becoming carbon neutral, with each council responsible for setting its own target date for achieving net zero emissions.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2019 to Question 262226, which (a) organisations from the medical sector and (b) other organisations have contacted his Department; and whether any of those organisations called on the Government to meet the net zero target by (i) 2030 and (ii) by any other date earlier than 2050.

Businesses, the scientific community and civil society have been vocal in encouraging us to set a net zero target.

Our independent advisors - the Committee on Climate Change - make clear in their report that they do not currently consider it credible for the UK to aim to reach net-zero emissions earlier than 2050. We have considered their advice and are legislating in line with it, to end the UK’s contribution to climate change.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258963 on Boilers, how the variables to which he refers affect the efficiency of the boiler itself as distinct from the whole heating system; and if will he make a statement.

Of the variables referred to, those that impact the efficiency of the boiler itself are the heat distribution system, comprising emitters, pipes and pumps and the user controls.

Condensing boiler efficiency is typically improved by a lower water return temperature. The design, efficacy and maintenance of the heat distribution system can impact this temperature. For example, an undersized system will require a higher flow temperature making it more difficult to achieve a low return temperature.

User controls such as timers and thermostats can impact when the boiler turns on and off. The rate of this (cycling) can also impact the efficiency of the boiler with rapid cycling being potentially detrimental to efficiency. User controlled radiator valves can affect the flow rate through the system also impacting flow and return temperatures and cycling affecting boiler efficiency.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 258963 on Boilers, what steps he is taking to ensure that domestic boilers comply in situ with the 92 per cent efficiency rate as set out in the Domestic Building Services Compliance Guide, pages 10 and 18.

Local authorities have powers under the Building Act 1984 to enforce the building regulations, including fixed building services such as boiler installations, and have work altered or removed that does not comply. The Building Regulations and Gas Safe rules of registration require that Gas Safe registered businesses comply with their geographical area regulations by notifying any relevant appliances they have installed to the Local Authority. Failure to comply can result in disciplinary action and can ultimately result in traders being struck off the Gas Safe Register.

An initial assessment of Boiler Plus planned for later this year will reveal if there are significant instances of non-compliance. To date, no evidence has come to light to suggest gas boilers below 92% ErP are being installed in English homes.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the statement in the Answer to Question 255264 on 24 May 2019 that there is no evidence that boilers with an efficiency below 92 per cent continued to be sold beyond the coming into force date of the current standards, with the statement in Answer to Question 245593 on 1 May 2019 that only the majority of boilers on the market met or exceeded the minimum efficiency requirement of 92 per cent when the new standards were introduced.

The statements made with respect to these two questions are fully compatible. The 2016 consultation asked the boiler industry what would be an appropriate lead-in period to allow traders to make preparations, such as clearing old stock, ahead of new standards coming into force. A majority of respondents stated that three months would be sufficient. The government provided a six month lead-in period, to ensure that adequate time was allowed for all market participants.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 June 2019 to Question 259850, which parties were shown the results of the standard assessment procedure scientific integrity group findings.

The feedback from the Standard Assessment Procedure Scientific Integrity Group (SAPSIG) was supplied to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the secretariat of SAPSIG (Robust Details Ltd.), the Building Research Establishment, and the company concerned.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 June 2019 to Question 259850, which manufacturers of flue gas heat recovery systems have discussed the representations of their own products with the Building Research Establishment.

All manufacturers of flue gas heat recovery systems and other products in the Product Characteristics Database (PCDB) communicate with the Building Research Establishment (BRE) on the representation of their products in the database.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the finding that there is therefore an increased risk that boilers will in fact be non-compliant, in the Building Research Establishment's briefing of 7 February 2018 entitled The future of domestic boiler performance metrics in the UK, what steps his Department (a) has taken and (b) plans to take to tackle that risk.

The Building Research Establishment (BRE) paper does not find that there is an increased risk that boilers will be non-compliant. BEIS officials worked closely with BRE to assess this risk when the matter was first raised in 2018, and agreed that non-compliance is not the correct interpretation of their paper. They have since published a clarification on their own website, to ensure their work is not misused to make inappropriate claims. That clarification can be found at the following url: https://www.bregroup.com/press-releases/statement-regarding-energy-efficiency-labelling-of-boilers/

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his Answer of 12 June 2019 to Question 259850 on Waste Heat Recovery, if he will publish the standard assessment procedure scientific integrity group findings with personal details and the names of the manufacturers redacted.

The analysis of the Standard Assessment Procedure Scientific Integrity Group contains information which is of a commercially sensitive nature for the companies involved. Redacting company names would not obviate the risk that disclosure presents to their commercial interests. The Department took this into account in its decision not to publish the analysis more widely.

13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of ensuring that the housing stock in each local authority area up to Energy Performance Certificate bands (a) B and (b) C.

In the Clean Growth Strategy, we set out our aspiration that as many homes as possible will be upgraded to an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035, where practical, cost effective and affordable.

We estimate that, to meet our stated ambition, cost-effective improvements to homes would cost in the region of £35-65bn, though there would also be significant benefits to consumers from lower energy bills. We do not hold data on how this cost breaks down by local authority area, which would depend on a wide range of factors.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received from medical organisations in support of a policy of net zero carbon emissions by 2030.

We have received calls from a number of organisations, including in the medical sector, to adopt the Committee on Climate Change’s recommendation of a new emissions target for the UK of net zero greenhouse gases by 2050.

I am pleased to confirm that on 12 June, the Government laid draft legislation to set a new net zero greenhouse gas emissions target for the UK, to be delivered by 2050. This world-leading target will bring to an end our contribution to climate change.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which (a) businesses and (b) business organisations have declared an intention be net-zero carbon by 2030.

We received representations from a number of organisations, including a letter from over 120 businesses, to adopt the Committee on Climate Change’s recommendations on net zero. I am pleased to confirm that on 12 June, the Government laid draft legislation to set a new net zero greenhouse gas emissions target for the UK, to be delivered by 2050. This world-leading target will bring to an end our contribution to climate change.

Delivering a net zero target must be a joint endeavour, crossing political boundaries, and encompassing all parts of society. We have already seen many businesses set their own ambitious targets and intentions to be net zero.

As part of Green GB and NI Week 2018, more than 60 businesses made significant pledges worth millions to cut emissions while continuing to grow the green economy. As we prepare for Green GB and NI Week 2019 (launching on 4th November), we continue to encourage and support businesses in setting such targets.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which local authorities have (a) declared a climate emergency and (b) resolved to go carbon net zero emissions by 2030.

I am pleased to confirm that on 12th June, the Government laid draft legislation to set a new net zero greenhouse gas emissions target for the UK, to be delivered by 2050. This world-leading target will bring to an end our contribution to climate change. Already we have made great progress – since 1990 we have reduced our emissions by 42% while growing our economy by 72%.

Delivering a net zero target must be a joint endeavour, crossing political boundaries, and encompassing all parts of society. To date, 128 Councils in the UK (including dependencies and territories) have declared a climate emergency with several also setting a target for net zero carbon emissions by 2030.

7th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans does the Government have for the (a) future and (b) funding of the renewable heat initiative.

The budget for the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) has been set out to the end of March 2021. Decisions on the future funding for the RHI will be set out in the Spending Review.

As announced by the Chancellor in the Spring Statement, Government also intends to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025, for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world-leading levels of energy efficiency. We also intend to increase the proportion of green gas in the grid. Government will consult on the details and appropriate mechanisms to deliver these commitments later this year.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 4 June 2019 to Question 257639 on Smoke and Chimney Gases: Heating, to what date as soon as possible refers.

Interested parties have now been informed of the decision.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy if he will publish all the (a) evidence and (b) assessments provided by the (i) Building Research Establishment and (ii) Standard Assessment Procedure Scientific Integrity Group on that group's investigation into the efficiency of flue gas heat recovery systems.

The Department does not intend to publish such information as it is of a commercially sensitive nature. Manufacturers may discuss the representation of their own products in the Product Characteristics Database directly with the Building Research Establishment. Details of the investigation of recent review carried out by the Standard Assessment Procedure Scientific Integrity Group concerning a particular entry for a Flue Gas Heat Recovery System have been shared with the parties involved, with appropriate redactions for personal data.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 255265 on Boilers: Natural Gas and with reference to page 27 paragraph 3.1.13.2 of BSI Standards Publication BS EN 15502-1:2012+A1:2015, whether boiler efficiency must be measured in situ rather than under test conditions.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 255264, in what way (a) the nature of buildings and (b) the use of a product by the consumer affects the efficiency of the boiler.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 225264 on Boilers: Natural gas, if he will indicate where the research carried out on real-world performance of boilers is to be found on the www.brgroup.com website.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 May 2019 to Question 245593 on Boilers: Natural Gas, what proportion of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards met or exceeded the minimum energy efficiency standard of 92 per cent.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 255264 on Boilers: Natural Gas, who carries out those tests.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure that boilers comply with the 2018 Boiler Plus regulations and are at least 92% energy efficient.

The 2018 uplifts to boiler installation standards were made through an amendment to the 2018 Building Regulations. Compliance with Building Regulations is enforced by Building Control.

Compliance with Energy-related Products (ErP) standards is carried out by Notified Bodies, as defined by EU Directive 92/42/EEC: Hot Water Boilers. A list of Notifying Bodies can be found at the following URL: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.print&refe_cd=92%2F42%2FEEC

In response to his question on the percentage of boilers sold after the introduction of the current standards, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th May 2019 to Question 255264.

The details of the research carried out on real-world boiler performance are available here:

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2767

https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3619

Boilers operate within a household heating system comprising pumps, pipes, emitters and controls. The efficient operation of the system depends on the proper sizing, positioning and maintenance of these components to ensure how water is distributed as it should around the building. The heating system has a dynamic relationship with the fabric of the building such that efficiency is also affected by the level of insulation, ventilation, the extent to which doors and windows are kept open, and ambient heat from other household systems. Performance is also affected by the manner in which the consumer makes use of timers, thermostats and individual radiator controls, and by variation in gas content.

Boiler efficiency must be measured under test conditions to ensure comparability between products. There are too many variables in situ, as described above, to allow fair comparability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what funding is available for communities that wish to become carbon neutral.

Community and local energy projects are an important element of carbon reduction and government continues to support communities who wish to become carbon neutral or reduce their carbon footprint.

At the end of May, the Rural Community Energy Fund reopened to support communities seeking to develop a wide range of low carbon activities. The £10m fund provides grants to communities for the feasibility studies into their ideas for action and where viable another grant to help develop the project to investment readiness.

The Rural Community Energy Fund will be delivered through the local energy hubs, created as part of the BEIS Local Energy Programme. The 5 hubs cover all the Local Enterprise Partnerships and the South West hub is managed by the West of England Combined Authority. The hubs provide wider commercial, technical and project management support to Local Authorities on their low carbon energy projects.

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his plan is for the removal of the Under investigation marker from Flue Gas Heat Recovery products in the Government's Standard Assessment Procedure product characteristic database.

The decision on the ‘Under investigation’ marker in the product characteristics database is currently being considered. Interested parties will be informed of the outcome as soon as possible.

16th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May 2019 to Question 250740, for what reason the 35 per cent of boilers that did not comply with the legal efficiency standards were allowed to be sold.

The assessment referred to in answer of Question 250740 was carried out before the Boiler plus standard came into force. There is no evidence that boilers with an efficiency below 92% continued to be sold beyond the coming into force date of the current standards.

Efficiency standards for products are always carried out under standard test conditions. This ensures a reliable value for the product itself, irrespective of the capability of the installer, the diverse range of buildings into which they are installed, or how optimally the product is used by the consumer. This provides the ability to compare products fairly.

The research carried out on real-world boiler performance is available from the SAP website:

www.bregroup.com.

16th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May 2019 to Question 250740, whether the boilers that met or exceeded the minimum efficiency requirement of 92 per cent were in test situations or in real-world situations when installed.

The assessment referred to in answer of Question 250740 was carried out before the Boiler plus standard came into force. There is no evidence that boilers with an efficiency below 92% continued to be sold beyond the coming into force date of the current standards.

Efficiency standards for products are always carried out under standard test conditions. This ensures a reliable value for the product itself, irrespective of the capability of the installer, the diverse range of buildings into which they are installed, or how optimally the product is used by the consumer. This provides the ability to compare products fairly.

The research carried out on real-world boiler performance is available from the SAP website:

www.bregroup.com.

16th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May 2019 to Question 250741 on boilers: natural gas, if he will publish (a) the research carried out on real-world boiler performance referred to in that answer and (b) where on the BRE website further information can be found.

The assessment referred to in answer of Question 250740 was carried out before the Boiler plus standard came into force. There is no evidence that boilers with an efficiency below 92% continued to be sold beyond the coming into force date of the current standards.

Efficiency standards for products are always carried out under standard test conditions. This ensures a reliable value for the product itself, irrespective of the capability of the installer, the diverse range of buildings into which they are installed, or how optimally the product is used by the consumer. This provides the ability to compare products fairly.

The research carried out on real-world boiler performance is available from the SAP website:

www.bregroup.com.

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the names are of each Local Enterprise Partnership; and which partnerships have appointed a board member with responsibility for rural issues.

The 38 Local Enterprise Partnership (LEPs) areas are Black Country; Buckinghamshire Thames Valley; Cambridge and Peterborough; Cheshire & Warrington; Coast to Capital LEP; Cornwall & Isles of Scilly; Coventry and Warwickshire; Cumbria; Derby, Derbyshire, Nottingham and Nottinghamshire (D2N2); Dorset LEP; Enterprise M3; Gloucestershire (GFirst) LEP; Greater Birmingham and Solihull; Greater Lincolnshire; Greater Manchester; Heart of the South West; Hertfordshire; Humber LEP; Lancashire LEP; Leeds City Region; Leicester & Leicestershire; Liverpool City Region LEP; London; New Anglia LEP; North East LEP; Oxfordshire LEP; Sheffield City Region LEP; Solent LEP; South East LEP; South East Midlands LEP; Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire LEP; Swindon and Wiltshire LEP; Tees Valley LEP; Thames Valley Berkshire; The Marches; West of England LEP; Worcestershire LEP and York and North Yorkshire LEP.

The following 12 LEPs have appointed a board member with an explicit responsibility for rural issues: Cheshire & Warrington; Cornwall & Isles of Scilly; Dorset LEP; Enterprise M3; Heart of the South West; New Anglia LEP; North East LEP; South East LEP; South East Midlands LEP; Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire LEP; Swindon and Wiltshire LEP; and York and North Yorkshire LEP.

Other Local Enterprise Partnerships manage rural issues in a variety of ways, for example in Gloucestershire (GFirst) there is a member of the LEP agri-food & rural business sector group on the board, by the appointment of an agri-food champion (The Marches), through engagement at SME boards (Coventry and Warwickshire) and by drawing on the expertise of rural organisations (Worcestershire).

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has plans to include a heightened role for rural areas in the Government’s Industrial Strategy.

The Industrial Strategy is the Government’s long term plan to boost productivity by backing businesses to create high quality, well paid jobs for all throughout the United Kingdom. Industrial Strategy policies recognise that different areas require flexibility to respond to local needs and to build on local strengths, this includes people living and working in rural areas, which is why the Industrial Strategy is investing in skills, industries and infrastructure. The Strategy’s Foundations consider rural needs, and will continue to do. For example:

  • The Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund enables investment in agritech
  • Apprenticeships are becoming a strong rural training route
  • We are investing in digital connectivity including 5G Rural First, and 5G Rural Integrated testbed pilots
  • Business productivity in SMEs are being tackled through Local Enterprise Partnerships and support from the British Business Bank

Furthermore, we have committed to developing Local Industrial Strategies with every Local Enterprise Partnership and Mayoral Combined Authority. Local Industrial Strategies provide an important opportunity for all rural areas to grow their economy by creating a bespoke approach to supporting the local economy and driving productivity. The government is committed to Local Industrial Strategies so that:

  • All places are able to increase productivity and realise their potential
  • We can set out the spatial impacts of national and local policy across our cities, towns and rural areas.

Building on local evidence, Local Industrial Strategies will therefore look to address challenges and opportunities across the foundations of productivity so that all rural communities can contribute to and benefit from economic prosperity.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and which Local Enterprise Partnerships have undertaken a rural proofing review for policies adopted during 2018-19.

The Department does not collect information relating to rural proofing reviews.

In Strengthened Local Enterprise Partnerships, Government set out its expectation that all LEPs should seek to be representative of their local economies and ensure that through their development of economic strategy for their areas, LEPs prioritise action needed to boost productivity, earning power and competitiveness across their local economies, rural as well as urban.

In line with the Industrial Strategy, we have set Local Enterprise Partnerships a single mission to deliver Local Industrial Strategies to promote productivity. This should include a focus on the foundations of productivity and identify priorities across Ideas, People, Infrastructure, Business Environment and Places.

For many LEP areas this will involve identifying weaknesses in productivity across their local areas, such as in isolated rural or urban communities, promoting inclusive growth by using existing national and local funding.

3rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 May 2019 to Question 245593 on Boilers: Natural Gas; what the evidence base is for the statement that in April 2018 the majority of boilers on the market met or exceeded the minimum efficiency requirement of 92 per cent.

In 2017, BEIS undertook an internal assessment of the Products Characteristic Database, the database containing product performance data used in the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP). This assessment found that 65 per cent of the 492 boilers added to the database between 2014 and August 2016 met or exceeded the minimum efficiency requirement of 92 per cent according to the Energy-related Product (ErP) standard.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
3rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 1 May to Question 245593 on Boilers: Natural Gas, what assessment his Department has made of the operational efficiency of domestic boilers once installed between 2005 and 2019.

Current standards require all new gas boilers installed in English homes to be A rated. Research on real-world boiler performance has been carried out to inform the representation of gas boilers in the government’s Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP). Further information can be found on the Building Research Establishment (BRE) website. BRE deliver the SAP contract on behalf of the government.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 10 April 2019 to Question 241381 on Boilers: Natural Gas, whether he has read the BRE's briefing paper, BRE Briefing Note: The future of domestic boiler performance metrics in the UK, published in 2017; and if he will make a statement.

BEIS officials are aware of BRE’s report and have considered its content.

I can confirm that when the Energy-related Product (ErP) Directive standards were introduced in April 2018, the majority of boilers on the market met or exceeded the minimum efficiency requirement of 92 per cent. Since coming into force, all boilers installed in England must meet this standard. 87 per cent of responses to the 2016 consultation Heat in Buildings: The Future of Heat in Domestic Buildings supported the new efficiency rating in recognition of the opportunities this provided for households and UK industries.

5th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the efficiency of condensing A rated domestic gas boilers in normal consumer operation.

Current standards require all new gas boilers installed in English homes to be A rated. The representation of gas boilers in the government’s Standard Assessment Procedure has been informed by research, to align it with real-world boiler performance. Further information can be found here: https://www.bre.co.uk/sap2012/page.jsp?id=2768.

25th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance he has provided to Ofgem on how it checks that energy companies approach customers and other householders in an appropriate manner on the installation of smart meters; and whether there is a protocol to ensure that companies have clear guidelines on that process.

Ofgem have set out their expectations in relation to energy suppliers’ engagement of their customers on smart meters.

In addition, the Smart Metering Installation Code of Practice, designated by Ofgem in 2013, sets out mandatory minimum standards for energy suppliers to follow in relation to the smart meter installation experience. Ofgem is responsible for ensuring relevant licensees compliance with the Code.

4th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the consent process for acidising is the same as for fracking; how many applications for acidising have been granted in the last five years for which figures are available; and what health and safety critieria have to be met as part of that consent process.

Acidisation refers to a number of techniques used to clean wells to improve productivity. Activities at oil and gas sites (including acidisation) are controlled under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2016 and regulated by the Environment Agency.

When assessing an environmental permit application the Environment Agency considers the proposed activity, the chemicals and products used in the process, waste management and the environmental setting. The permit ensures that there are appropriate mitigation measures in place to protect people and the environment. If the proposed activity poses an unacceptable risk to the environment it will not be permitted.

There are currently 78 onshore oil and gas sites permitted by the Environment Agency, some of these sites will be allowed to use the acidisation technique as part of their processes.

14th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Office for Product Safety and Standards will investigate the manufacture, importation and installation of notice boards in schools, colleges and universities that are not fire safe compliant with European BS EN 13501 class B standard; and if he will publish the results of that investigation.

There are no plans for an investigation into the safety of noticeboards, but should evidence emerge of a product safety issue, the Office for Product Safety and Standards would work with Local Authority Trading Standards to consider whether further action was required.

8th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to revisit the registration process for energy supply organisations.

Ofgem, as expert regulator, are currently undertaking a review of their approach to licensing suppliers to ensure customer interests are protected in an evolving market. The review will consider enhanced criteria for market entry and ongoing monitoring.

8th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of (a) the number of energy companies that have ceased trading over the last two years and (b) the number of customers affected by those cessations; and which companies took on those customers in each case.

There are now over 60 domestic energy suppliers in the market, up from 13 in 2010. There have been 14 domestic energy supplier exits since November 2016, with an approximately 1 million customer accounts affected. The details of what company took them on is publicly available.

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require companies manufacturing notice boards for schools, colleges and universities to promote clear information on the product’s compliance with fire standards.

Under the General Product Safety Regulations 2005 any product that is intended for or likely to be used by consumers, including where the product was originally intended for professional use, must be safe before it can be placed on to the market.

Under the Consumer Protection Act 1987 producers and importers are responsible for any damage caused by an unsafe product. This will apply to any noticeboards which are for sale to businesses or public bodies, for use at work. Products used in the workplace by workers are also subject to health and safety legislation.

There are no plans to legislate to require mandatory information on compliance with specific standards to be provided by manufacturers of noticeboards.

3rd Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness and affordability for industry of his energy efficiency policies.

Regulatory impact assessments are routinely prepared as part of the policy making process setting out the costs and benefits for industry of new energy efficiency policies. For example:

We also undertake evaluations to tell us what works and what does not, including the extent to which our policies are achieving their objectives and their impact on industry. We are currently conducting a number of evaluations, including of the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme and Climate Change Agreements to inform future policy development.

In developing further policies to meet our ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy to support businesses to improve their energy efficiency by at least 20% by 2030, we issued a call for evidence to seek views from industry and other stakeholders on our proposed approach. We are currently analysing the responses and we will publish further details in 2019.

At Budget 2018, we announced the establishment of a £315M Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to help businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future cutting their bills and carbon emissions. We also announced the issue of a call for evidence on introducing a new Business Energy Efficiency Scheme focused on smaller businesses. We are planning to publish further details on these announcements in 2019.

3rd Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on homeowners of energy efficiency measures required to obtain EPC band C; and if he will make a statement.

In the Clean Growth Strategy we set out our aspiration that as many homes as possible will be upgraded to an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035, where practical, cost effective and affordable.

1. On average, it can cost £2,100 more per year to run the least inefficient homes (Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) “G” rated) compared to the most efficient ones (“A” rated).

2. We want to ensure that everyone has a home that is comfortable, healthy and affordable to run. The effect on home owners of upgrading to an EPC Band C will be different depending on the type of home and the measures that are appropriate to improve it. Typical energy efficiency measures might include installing insulation, a more energy efficient boiler or new heating controls.

3. Energy efficiency brings a wide range of benefits to households, society and the energy system as a whole. More efficient homes mean lower energy bills and improved health and comfort for homeowners, as well as wider benefits such as improvements to air quality.

30th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what criteria his Department use to assess the affordability of energy efficiency measures required to obtain EPC band C; and if he will make a statement.

The Clean Growth Strategy set out our aspiration that as many homes as possible will be upgraded to an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective and affordable. Alongside the Clean Growth Strategy, we issued a call for evidence on building the market for energy efficiency, and will shortly be publishing an action plan, that will set out a range of measures to shape the market for the future in line with that aspiration. As part of the Action Plan we will set out our approach to meeting the criteria of cost-effectiveness and affordability set out in the aspiration.

30th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what criteria his Department use to assess the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency required to obtain EPC band C; and if he will make a statement.

The Clean Growth Strategy set out our aspiration that as many homes as possible will be upgraded to an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective and affordable. Alongside the Clean Growth Strategy, we issued a call for evidence on building the market for energy efficiency, and will shortly be publishing an action plan, that will set out a range of measures to shape the market for the future in line with that aspiration. As part of the Action Plan we will set out our approach to meeting the criteria of cost-effectiveness and affordability set out in the aspiration.

16th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding from the EU is proposed to be allocated to (a) improve the energy efficiency of the housing stock and (b) to reduce fuel poverty in England in the next (i) five years and (ii) ten years; and whether that funding from the EU will still be available in the event that the UK leaves the EU.

Under the EU’s 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework there are several funding streams that bodies within England may bid for to help them address fuel poverty and the energy efficiency of the housing stock, such as the European Regional Development Fund and Horizon 2020. However, this funding is not automatically allocated and must be successfully applied for by interested entities, and is not specifically ringfenced for energy efficiency or fuel poverty. The precise amount of EU funding allocated to address these issues therefore varies year-on-year. Given this variability, it is not possible to confirm what EU funding could be allocated in future years.

In December 2017 the UK Government secured the agreement of the EU to continue providing funding until the current programmes end in 2020, and also undertook to underwrite current EU commitments. As such, any existing contracts will be honoured by either the UK Government or the EU until 2020. Following our departure from the EU we will create the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF), a domestic investment programme aimed at tackling inter-community inequality. We will be consulting on the UKSPF's design later this year, with the final decisions on its detail and operation being made following the 2019 Spending Review.

15th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information he holds on local authority spending plans to reduce fuel poverty over the next (a) five and 10 years.

The Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 (HECA) requires local authorities to prepare and publish reports every two years on their plans to achieve improved energy efficiency in their areas. These are not spending plans, but contain actions, policies, initiatives, grants, match funding and other measures offered in the local authority that encourage home energy efficiency improvements and tackle fuel poverty. Local authorities were last required to report in 2017, and their full reports are available on their websites. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will be issuing guidance to local authorities on the content of their 2019 reports shortly.

Under the Energy Company Obligation local authorities are able to refer low income and vulnerable households for receipt of energy efficiency measures under ‘flexible eligibility’. Obligated energy suppliers can deliver up to 25% of their obligation by installing measures under this mechanism, which could be worth around £560m between now and March 2022.

15th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information he holds on local authority spending plans to increase the energy efficiency of houses over the next (a) five and (b) 10 years.

The Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 (HECA) requires local authorities to prepare and publish reports every two years on their plans to achieve improved energy efficiency in their areas. These are not spending plans, but contain actions, policies, initiatives, grants, match funding and other measures offered in the local authority that encourage home energy efficiency improvements and tackle fuel poverty. Local authorities were last required to report in 2017, and their full reports are available on their websites. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will be issuing guidance to local authorities on the content of their 2019 reports shortly.

Under the Energy Company Obligation local authorities are able to refer low income and vulnerable households for receipt of energy efficiency measures under ‘flexible eligibility’. Obligated energy suppliers can deliver up to 25% of their obligation by installing measures under this mechanism, which could be worth around £560m between now and March 2022.

14th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to amend the regulations on the sale or use of fireworks to (a) further restrict the sale of fireworks and (b) restrict the use of fireworks to certain specified occasions.

Government takes firework safety very seriously and the Office for Product Safety and Standards is working with industry, retailers, charities and others, including the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents. Promoting the safe and responsible use of fireworks, whilst taking robust action against those that break the rules, is the best way to reduce risk. We have reached more than a million people through social media, GP surgeries and post offices in our recent campaign on firework safety.

Strict legislation is in place to regulate the supply and use of fireworks, including restricting their availability to the public via a licensing scheme for retailers which only allows for their sale without a license during the traditional firework periods of November 5th, New Year’s Eve, Diwali and the Chinese New Year.

We have no plans to amend legislation to further restrict their sale or use.

30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons the warm home discount scheme is only eligible for use with some electricity suppliers; and whether he plans to extend that list of suppliers for the scheme.

We set a threshold of a minimum number of customer accounts for supplier participation in the Warm Home Discount to ensure small suppliers are not disproportionately burdened and to avoid creating excessive barriers to entry to the market. Following the Warm Home Discount consultation earlier this year, we decided to retain the customer threshold at 250,000 domestic accounts for participating suppliers in 2018/19, but to lower it to 200,000 in 2019/20 and 150,000 in 2020/21. We intend to reduce the threshold to zero or a small minimum, if the evidence on the impacts of reducing the threshold on the energy markets supports this approach. This gradual reduction will give smaller suppliers time to prepare for delivery, adjust their business models and help minimise the risk of non-compliance.

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Energy Company Obligation measures have been delivered to off-gas grid homes using (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum gas broken down by (a) ECO1 (b) ECO2 and (c) ECO2t in each year for which information is available.

The tables below show the number of measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

Total

2013

1,888

373

-

172

50

-

2,483

2014

7,504

4,341

-

698

429

-

12,972

2015

2,023

9,225

-

185

1,102

-

12,535

2016

-

13,180

-

-

1,349

-

14,529

2017

-

7,229

14,669

-

684

1,687

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

-

-

10,862

-

-

1,368

12,230

Total

11,415

34,348

25,531

1,055

3,614

3,055

79,018

Note – some ECO 2 measures were completed prior to April 2015 as the scheme included a carryover mechanism that allowed measures that were delivered in ECO1 to be transferred to the ECO 2 scheme.


ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

1,552

517

192

77

100

45

2,483

2014

8,829

1,531

1,485

796

222

109

12,972

2015

8,407

1,354

1,487

924

214

149

12,535

2016

7,804

3,001

2,375

779

327

243

14,529

2017

13,479

4,786

3,633

1,602

506

263

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

6,134

3,189

1,539

1,011

249

108

12,230

Total

46,205

14,378

10,711

5,189

1,618

917

79,018

The table below shows the number of households receiving measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

Households receiving ECO Rural Sub-Obligation measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

7

1

14

4

-

-

26

2014

4,315

256

586

394

18

46

5,615

2015

2,543

145

357

287

63

37

3,432

2016

957

52

209

118

5

22

1,363

2017

1,100

69

530

152

13

67

1,931

2018 (Jan-Jun)

846

196

537

133

34

47

1,793

Total

9,768

719

2,233

1,088

133

219

14,160

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Energy Company Obligation measures have been delivered to off-gas grid homes using (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum gas in (a) England (b) Wales and (c) Scotland in each year for which information is available.

The tables below show the number of measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

Total

2013

1,888

373

-

172

50

-

2,483

2014

7,504

4,341

-

698

429

-

12,972

2015

2,023

9,225

-

185

1,102

-

12,535

2016

-

13,180

-

-

1,349

-

14,529

2017

-

7,229

14,669

-

684

1,687

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

-

-

10,862

-

-

1,368

12,230

Total

11,415

34,348

25,531

1,055

3,614

3,055

79,018

Note – some ECO 2 measures were completed prior to April 2015 as the scheme included a carryover mechanism that allowed measures that were delivered in ECO1 to be transferred to the ECO 2 scheme.


ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

1,552

517

192

77

100

45

2,483

2014

8,829

1,531

1,485

796

222

109

12,972

2015

8,407

1,354

1,487

924

214

149

12,535

2016

7,804

3,001

2,375

779

327

243

14,529

2017

13,479

4,786

3,633

1,602

506

263

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

6,134

3,189

1,539

1,011

249

108

12,230

Total

46,205

14,378

10,711

5,189

1,618

917

79,018

The table below shows the number of households receiving measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

Households receiving ECO Rural Sub-Obligation measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

7

1

14

4

-

-

26

2014

4,315

256

586

394

18

46

5,615

2015

2,543

145

357

287

63

37

3,432

2016

957

52

209

118

5

22

1,363

2017

1,100

69

530

152

13

67

1,931

2018 (Jan-Jun)

846

196

537

133

34

47

1,793

Total

9,768

719

2,233

1,088

133

219

14,160

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) heating oil boilers and (b) liquefied petroleum gas boilers have been replaced under the Energy Company Obligation under (a) ECO1 (b) ECO2 and (c) ECO2t in each year for which information is available.

The table below shows the number of oil and LPG fired boilers replaced through the Energy Company Obligation.

ECO Oil and LPG fired boilers replaced: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

Total

2013

331

-

-

86

-

-

417

2014

210

150

-

40

75

-

475

2015

5

511

-

5

129

-

650

2016

-

3,648

-

-

449

-

4,097

2017

-

4,244

11,250

-

431

2,033

17,958

2018 (Jan-Jun)

-

-

8,133

-

-

1,588

9,721

Total

546

8,553

19,383

131

1,084

3,621

33,318

Note – some ECO 2 measures were completed prior to April 2015 as the scheme included a carryover mechanism that allowed measures that were delivered in ECO1 to be transferred to the ECO 2 scheme.

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many off-gas grid households using either (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum gas have qualified for support under the rural sub-obligation of the Energy Company Obligation in each year for which information is available.

The tables below show the number of measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

ECO 1

ECO 2

ECO 2t

Total

2013

1,888

373

-

172

50

-

2,483

2014

7,504

4,341

-

698

429

-

12,972

2015

2,023

9,225

-

185

1,102

-

12,535

2016

-

13,180

-

-

1,349

-

14,529

2017

-

7,229

14,669

-

684

1,687

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

-

-

10,862

-

-

1,368

12,230

Total

11,415

34,348

25,531

1,055

3,614

3,055

79,018

Note – some ECO 2 measures were completed prior to April 2015 as the scheme included a carryover mechanism that allowed measures that were delivered in ECO1 to be transferred to the ECO 2 scheme.


ECO measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

1,552

517

192

77

100

45

2,483

2014

8,829

1,531

1,485

796

222

109

12,972

2015

8,407

1,354

1,487

924

214

149

12,535

2016

7,804

3,001

2,375

779

327

243

14,529

2017

13,479

4,786

3,633

1,602

506

263

24,269

2018 (Jan-Jun)

6,134

3,189

1,539

1,011

249

108

12,230

Total

46,205

14,378

10,711

5,189

1,618

917

79,018

The table below shows the number of households receiving measures delivered through the Energy Company Obligation to homes identified as off the gas grid who used heating oil or liquid petroleum gas prior to receiving the measure.

Households receiving ECO Rural Sub-Obligation measures delivered to off-gas grid homes using oil / LPG heating: 2013 – June 2018

Oil

LPG

England

Wales

Scotland

England

Wales

Scotland

Total

2013

7

1

14

4

-

-

26

2014

4,315

256

586

394

18

46

5,615

2015

2,543

145

357

287

63

37

3,432

2016

957

52

209

118

5

22

1,363

2017

1,100

69

530

152

13

67

1,931

2018 (Jan-Jun)

846

196

537

133

34

47

1,793

Total

9,768

719

2,233

1,088

133

219

14,160

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many off-gas grid households using (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum have an Energy Efficiency Rating of (a) Band D (b) Band E and (c) Band F or lower.

Of the households off the gas grid using heating oil as the main fuel in Great Britain in 2014, 37,000 households are estimated to have an energy efficiency rating of A-C, 373,000 are at Band D, 448,000 are at Band E, 317,000 are at band F or lower.

For the existing survey data, the sample sizes for households off the gas grid using LPG as the main fuel is too small for us to provide robust estimates on their EPC ratings.

Source: Analysis of National Housing Model input data, drawing from English Housing Survey 2014, Scottish Housing Condition Survey 2014, Welsh Housing Conditions Survey 2014.

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of off-gas grid households using (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum gas have an Energy Efficiency Rating of Band C or higher.

Of the households off the gas grid using heating oil as the main fuel in Great Britain in 2014, 37,000 households are estimated to have an energy efficiency rating of A-C, 373,000 are at Band D, 448,000 are at Band E, 317,000 are at band F or lower.

For the existing survey data, the sample sizes for households off the gas grid using LPG as the main fuel is too small for us to provide robust estimates on their EPC ratings.

Source: Analysis of National Housing Model input data, drawing from English Housing Survey 2014, Scottish Housing Condition Survey 2014, Welsh Housing Conditions Survey 2014.

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many exemptions have been granted to landlords with off-gas grid properties using either (a) heating oil and (b) liquefied petroleum gas under Regulation 25 of the Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property) (England and Wales) Regulations 2015.

Landlords of EPC F or G rated domestic privately rented properties may register an exemption under Regulation 25 if they have made all the relevant energy efficiency improvements available for their property and it remains below E, or if there are no relevant energy efficiency improvements that can be made. The gas-grid status is not a relevant factor in whether a property qualifies for this exemption.

To the end of September, 2,194 exemptions have been registered under Regulation 25. A proportion of these may relate to off-gas grid properties, but this information is not required from the landlord when registering an exemption.

19th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to provide alternatives to the disposal of nuclear waste into the Irish Sea; and if he will make a statement.

The UK Government’s policy is to manage nuclear waste through responsible storage and disposal to permitted facilities on land, not disposal into the sea.

Disposal of nuclear waste into the sea from vessels is prohibited under the London Convention.

As a party to the OSPAR Convention, the UK has committed to reduce liquid radioactive discharges to the marine environment by nuclear site operators. These discharges are tightly regulated and discharge levels are low. A review of the UK’s Radioactive Discharges Strategy, published in June this year, shows that the UK is meeting its international commitments with significant reductions in discharges.

18th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of full-time direct jobs in nuclear energy reprocessing and generation in the UK..

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 24th October 2018 to Question 180093.

16th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of the Office for National Statistics' conclusions that there are 12,400 full-time direct jobs in nuclear energy reprocessing and generation in the UK.

Since 2015, the Department and its predecessor the Department for Energy and Climate Change have used the industry-recognised dataset for jobs in nuclear: the Nuclear Workforce Assessment (NWA). The Nuclear Skills Strategy Group (NSSG) – of which BEIS is a member – conducts a labour market intelligence gathering exercise across the sector to produce the NWA, which is used by the sector to inform employers’ recruitment practices. The latest NWA, published in July 2017, estimates there are currently 18,700 Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) employed in fuel processing and generation.

The ONS figure is based on a Low-Carbon & Renewable Energy Economy Survey from 2015. That survey uses a different dataset and weighting factor from the NWA which explains the difference between the two estimates.

6th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much each of the Big Six energy companies allocated to the Energy Company Obligation in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme started in January 2013 and requires obligated energy suppliers to install energy efficiency and heating measures to people’s homes in England, Scotland and Wales.

ECO is funded at £640 million per annum (2017 prices, rising with inflation). At the start of each scheme, suppliers have been set targets (measured in either carbon emission reductions or bill saving reductions) that they need to achieve.

The table below sets out which suppliers have been obligated under the scheme between 2013 and 2018. There are currently fifteen obligated suppliers. More suppliers are likely to be obligated under ECO3, starting later this year, as the obligation thresholds will be lowered from 250,000 customer accounts to 200,000 and then 150,000.

The report on how obligated suppliers met their ECO1 targets is available at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/energy-companies-obligation-eco1-final-report

The report on how obligated suppliers met their ECO2 targets is available at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/energy-company-obligation-eco2-csco-final-report

Energy Company Obligation 2013 – 2018: Obligated Energy Suppliers

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

EDF Energy Customers plc

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

EON

EDF Energy

EDF Energy

EDF Energy

Economy Energy

First Utility Ltd

EON

EON

EON

EDF Energy

Npower

First Utility Ltd

First Utility Ltd

Extra Energy

EON

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Npower

Npower

First Utility Ltd

Extra Energy

SSE

Ovo

Ovo

Npower

First Utility

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Ovo

Flow Energy

SSE

SSE

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Npower

The Utility Warehouse

The Utility Warehouse

SSE

Ovo

Utilita

The Utility Warehouse

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Utilita

Spark Energy

SSE

The Utility Warehouse

Utilita

6th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the energy companies that have contributed to the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) in each of the last five years; and how much has been allocated to the ECO by each of those companies.

The Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme started in January 2013 and requires obligated energy suppliers to install energy efficiency and heating measures to people’s homes in England, Scotland and Wales.

ECO is funded at £640 million per annum (2017 prices, rising with inflation). At the start of each scheme, suppliers have been set targets (measured in either carbon emission reductions or bill saving reductions) that they need to achieve.

The table below sets out which suppliers have been obligated under the scheme between 2013 and 2018. There are currently fifteen obligated suppliers. More suppliers are likely to be obligated under ECO3, starting later this year, as the obligation thresholds will be lowered from 250,000 customer accounts to 200,000 and then 150,000.

The report on how obligated suppliers met their ECO1 targets is available at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/energy-companies-obligation-eco1-final-report

The report on how obligated suppliers met their ECO2 targets is available at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/energy-company-obligation-eco2-csco-final-report

Energy Company Obligation 2013 – 2018: Obligated Energy Suppliers

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

British Gas

EDF Energy Customers plc

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

Co-operative Energy

EON

EDF Energy

EDF Energy

EDF Energy

Economy Energy

First Utility Ltd

EON

EON

EON

EDF Energy

Npower

First Utility Ltd

First Utility Ltd

Extra Energy

EON

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Npower

Npower

First Utility Ltd

Extra Energy

SSE

Ovo

Ovo

Npower

First Utility

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Ovo

Flow Energy

SSE

SSE

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Npower

The Utility Warehouse

The Utility Warehouse

SSE

Ovo

Utilita

The Utility Warehouse

Scottish Power Energy Retail Limited

Utilita

Spark Energy

SSE

The Utility Warehouse

Utilita

9th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether an energy company has the right to pursue court enforcement action on an estimated fuel bill.

Energy supply companies can take enforcement action to recover charges on the basis of estimated consumption.

Ofgem Licence Conditions however, require suppliers to take all reasonable steps to obtain a meter reading at least once a year and customers can provide a meter reading to correct an estimate. Ofgem Supply Licence Conditions also require companies to take all necessary steps before exercising any action to recover debts.

Customers can raise a complaint with their supplier if the charges are disputed and take this complaint to the Ombudsman Service: Energy, should it not be resolved within 8 weeks.

5th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many current contracts his Department has with Serco; and what the (a) value, (b) start date and (c) end date of each of those contracts is.

Since January 2011, details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published prior to 26 February 2015 can be viewed at:

https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive

Those published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to commission an investigation on the newspaper supply chain to examine the effect of wholesaler dominance on the newspaper industry.

Investigations into competition issues are a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority, the UK’s independent competition authority.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what financial support his Department (a) offered and (b) granted to the international fur trade in each year since 2010.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not offered or granted financial support to the international fur trade.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what meetings have taken place between Ministers or officials of his Department and representatives of the International Fur Traders Association from 2010 to date.

Neither BEIS Ministers or officials have met with representatives of the International Fur Federation.

6th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans he has undertake a review of the regulatory and standards framework for the biotechnology industry after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK has one of the strongest and most productive biotechnology sectors in the world. This Government is committed to ensuring a positive outcome for the sector, that enhances competitiveness and builds on the success that we are rightly proud of, as we exit the European Union. The EU (Withdrawal) Bill will ensure existing EU law continues to have effect in UK law after exit, providing businesses and stakeholders with maximum certainty as we leave the EU.

6th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and which (a) electricity and (b) gas supply companies are registered with Ofgem.

As of December 2017 there were a total of 69 domestic energy supply companies registered by Ofgem. This included 7 supplying gas only, 5 supplying electricity only and 57 supplying both electricity and gas. A full list of licenced electricity suppliers can be found here:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/list-all-electricity-licensees-registered-or-service-addresses

A full list of licenced gas suppliers can be found here:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/list-all-gas-licensees-registered-or-service-addresses

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the membership is of the Local Energy Contact Group.

We made a commitment in the Clean Growth Strategy to establish a Local Energy Contact Group. The Group is not a formal public body but rather, it is designed to provide insight for the department on the unique value, impacts and opportunities of policy options on local and community energy schemes.

The first meeting will take place shortly. I am pleased to announce that Pete Capener MBE has agreed to be the first chair of the group.

As this is an advisory group and not a public body, formal minutes of the meetings will not be published. We will however, make sure that agendas are available in advance so interested parties can raise issues with members of the Group.

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that all agendas, minutes and papers of meetings of the Local Energy Contact Group are published online.

We made a commitment in the Clean Growth Strategy to establish a Local Energy Contact Group. The Group is not a formal public body but rather, it is designed to provide insight for the department on the unique value, impacts and opportunities of policy options on local and community energy schemes.

The first meeting will take place shortly. I am pleased to announce that Pete Capener MBE has agreed to be the first chair of the group.

As this is an advisory group and not a public body, formal minutes of the meetings will not be published. We will however, make sure that agendas are available in advance so interested parties can raise issues with members of the Group.

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Local Energy Contact Group was established; how many meetings of that group have taken place to date; and what the outcomes have been of those meetings.

We made a commitment in the Clean Growth Strategy to establish a Local Energy Contact Group. The Group is not a formal public body but rather, it is designed to provide insight for the department on the unique value, impacts and opportunities of policy options on local and community energy schemes.

The first meeting will take place shortly. I am pleased to announce that Pete Capener MBE has agreed to be the first chair of the group.

As this is an advisory group and not a public body, formal minutes of the meetings will not be published. We will however, make sure that agendas are available in advance so interested parties can raise issues with members of the Group.

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on supporting the development of new community energy projects.

This Government is committed to empowering communities and these projects, which put local people in the driving seat, are an important part of a clean, secure and affordable energy system.

To deliver this ambition, we announced a new Local Energy Programme in the Clean Growth Strategy and to date have committed £7m with a further £1m allocated for this year. This will support communities in all their forms, local authorities and local enterprise partnerships design and develop low carbon projects locally.

Since 2013, the UK Government has committed over £16 million to support community energy, including:

- a joint £15m Defra/BEIS Rural Community Energy Fund (RCEF), which continues to offer support and feasibility and development finance for community-scale renewable energy projects in England

- a local authority best practice community energy programme with Bristol City and supporting Greater Manchester through their Devolution deal and London on their community energy funds.

- by supporting the Community Energy Hub, a digital platform owned and run by the community energy sector to enable peer networking and knowledge transfer.

1st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which (a) principal and (b) parish councils have set up (i)by themselves and (ii) with others local energy generation schemes.

The Department does not hold a register of local authority local energy schemes.

National Planning Policy Guidance and Planning Policy Guidance stipulate that plans should provide a positive strategy for renewable and low carbon energy and heat. Planning authorities should support community-led initiatives for renewable and low carbon energy, including developments outside areas identified in local or strategic plans that are being taken forward through neighbourhood planning.

In 2017, the Clean Growth Strategy, which supports the Industrial Strategy, announced a Local Energy Programme, which supports local actors, community groups, local authorities and combined authorities to develop their own energy strategies and deliver their own energy programmes.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will meet with representatives of manufacturers to discuss the merits of making antifreeze less attractive to cats to prevent poisoning.

Antifreeze supplied for domestic use is regulated under the General Product Safety Regulations 2005. This requires it to be safe in normal or reasonably foreseeable use when placed on the market. In addition, chemical products including antifreeze are also regulated by European Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on the classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures. This aims to protect people and the environment from the effects of hazardous chemicals by requiring suppliers to provide information about the hazards present and to package them safely.

The Government advises users to read the label carefully and always use in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If there is a label on the product warning that it is harmful to consume the contents then it should also be assumed that this applies to animals.

The Department would consider positively any representations from the antifreeze industry to meet to discuss the safety of their products.

1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much fossil fuel co2e is reported to the United Nations Framework Commission on Climate Change as emitted for each tonne of municipal waste incinerated by the UK.

No fossil fuel CO2e is reported to the UNFCCC for municipal waste incineration – combustion of coal, oil and natural gas is reported in the energy sector. However, 0.3508 tonnes CO2 equivalent (t CO2e) is reported to the UNFCCC as emitted for each tonne of municipal waste combusted in Energy from Waste installations in the UK. This includes 0.3378 t CO2 from the incineration of waste that derives from fossil sources, e.g. plastics. These figures are according to the April 2017 publication of UK Greenhouse Gas Inventory, 1990 to 2015: Annual Report for submission under the Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Source: Energy Background Data, available from: http://naei.beis.gov.uk/reports/reports?report_id=929

31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to commitments set out in his Department's report entitled Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive: Eligible Heat Uses: Changes to eligible heat uses: Government Response to Chapter 2 of consultation, published in January 2018, when he plans to (a) introduce the new tariff guarantees to new biomethane-to-grid projects and (b) increase payments for anaerobic digestion plants that are built in order to encourage deployment.

The Government remains fully committed to these reforms.

The regulations to enact the remaining reforms, including provision for tariff guarantees and biomethane/biogas tariff uplift, require the affirmative resolution procedure in Parliament. The Department intends to lay these regulations shortly, following pre-legislative scrutiny by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments (JCSI).

31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide support for people in households whose boiler is condemned as a result of the smart meter roll-out.

The smart metering programme is presenting a unique opportunity for installers to identify pre-existing opportunities for safety improvement, unrelated to smart meters, in homes and small businesses across Great Britain.

Energy UK has issued a Good Practice Guidance Document on this topic to energy suppliers. A key principle is that whenever a safety issue is identified, either with the gas (or electricity) installation or with an unsafe appliance or other equipment, the meter installer’s first priority is seek to make the situation safe. The guidance also sets out the steps installers should take when either an emergency or non-emergency issue is identified with customer or landlord-owned appliances or equipment.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will withdraw support from oil-heated properties where that property is off the gas grid and fuel inefficient.

Government will be consulting shortly on reforms to the Energy Company Obligation which will run from October 2018 to March 2022. The consultation will include proposals for supporting rural properties and the types of measures eligible. The Renewable Heat Incentive is targeted at off grid buildings using high carbon fuels, with a £4.5bn budget between 2016 and 2021.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the merits of using the current gas grid to transport hydrogen.

Using the gas grid to transport hydrogen is one of a number of potential approaches to decarbonise how we heat our homes, businesses and industry in order to meet our 2050 emissions reduction targets. As outlined in the Clean Growth Strategy, approaches with potential include decarbonising the gas grid using hydrogen or biogas, increased use of heat networks and electrification of heating. At present, it is not clear which approaches will work best at scale. The Department is carrying out work to consolidate and improve the evidence base on different approaches and plans to publish a report on this work in summer 2018.

Last year, the Department commenced a £25m innovation project to explore the potential use of hydrogen in UK homes and businesses, including through development and testing of hydrogen appliances. Also last year, Ofgem awarded £8.9m to the gas distribution networks, under the Network Innovation Competition, to provide evidence on the suitability and safety of using existing distribution infrastructure to transport hydrogen.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of homes are not currently attached to the gas grid by region.

The below table gives estimates of the proportion of homes not attached to the gas grid by Government Office Region as of 31 December 2016, which are the most recent estimates available. The estimates are based on the difference between the number of households and the number of domestic gas meters as published in the sub-national gas consumption data. Further details of the methodology, and additional data are published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sub-national-estimates-of-households-not-connected-to-the-gas-network

Great Britain`

14%

England

13%

North East

6%

North West

7%

Yorkshire and The Humber

8%

East Midlands

10%

West Midlands

11%

East

18%

Inner London

20%

Outer London

12%

South East

14%

South West

21%

Wales

17%

Scotland

20%

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the number of community-owned (a) shops and (b) pubs that operate in the UK; whether his Department offers support to such enterprises; and if he will make a statement.

Ministers regularly engage with stakeholders from both retail and hospitality to understand their priorities and work with colleagues across Government to optimise trading conditions.

The Government has introduced the Great British High Street Competition, now in its third year, which celebrates the achievements of local areas in creating vibrant and dynamic high streets and is open to applications from any community large or small. The £3.62m More than a Pub: The Community Business Support Programme, launched in March 2016 and co-funded by the Government and Power to Change, is helping to support communities across England to own their local pub.

We do not hold data on the number of community-owned shops or pubs that operate in the UK.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make funding available for the delivery of the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy to homes and businesses (a) off and (b) on the gas grid in rural areas.

Funding for the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) of £4.5 billion has been agreed to support low carbon heat technologies in homes and businesses, on and off the gas grid, between 2016 and 2021. Over the scheme lifetime, we expect payments to be around £23bn. .

Beyond the RHI, our ambition is to help homes off the gas grid to start to move to cleaner heating options during the 2020s. We will work with consumers as we develop policy, starting with new build, and will consult further on policy options during 2018.

A key focus of our policy development will be the cost difference between low and high carbon technologies. We are investing £10 million in an innovation challenge fund to support low carbon heating systems, which will help drive down costs.

Alongside Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments, policies such as the Warm Home Discount and Energy Company Obligation deliver vital support to millions of low income and vulnerable homes each year with heating and insulation measures as well as direct reductions in their energy bills. As set out in the Autumn Statement, a domestic supplier obligation with a value of £640m, will continue to be in place until 2022.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to reduce fuel poverty in rural areas.

The current Energy Company Obligation (ECO), which runs until September 2017, has a requirement that suppliers deliver 15% of the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO – a sub-obligation within ECO) to rural areas.

The Warm Home Discount provides a rebate of £140 off the bills of over 2 million low income and vulnerable customers each winter. Rebates are typically deducted from electricity bills as to not disadvantage households who do not have a mains gas supply.

The Department will shortly consult on the ECO scheme that will run from October 2018 until March 2022. We intend to propose focusing the scheme on low income and vulnerable households and will also make proposals with regard to rural delivery.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that a greater proportion of ECO funding is made available to rural areas.

The current Energy Company Obligation (ECO), which runs until September 2017, has a requirement that suppliers deliver 15% of the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO – a sub-obligation within ECO) to rural areas.

The Warm Home Discount provides a rebate of £140 off the bills of over 2 million low income and vulnerable customers each winter. Rebates are typically deducted from electricity bills as to not disadvantage households who do not have a mains gas supply.

The Department will shortly consult on the ECO scheme that will run from October 2018 until March 2022. We intend to propose focusing the scheme on low income and vulnerable households and will also make proposals with regard to rural delivery.

24th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to implement the EU Insolvency, Restructuring and Second Chance Directive.

The proposed Directive on preventive restructuring frameworks, second chance and insolvency measures is currently still under negotiation in Brussels. Given this stage of the process and the ongoing negotiations on withdrawal from the EU, it is not possible to say whether, if adopted, the provisions would be implemented in the UK.

24th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect on subcontractors in the construction industry of the liquidation of Carillion; and whether he plans to set up a taskforce to support those companies.

The nature of Carillion’s business was to sub-contract significant proportions of its work and a significant number of those sub-contractors have sub-contracted further elements. The complexity of the contracting structure is such that it is not possible for Government at this stage in the liquidation process to have a complete picture of subcontractors affected. The Official Receiver is continuing to work through Carillion’s systems to identify all contracts.

We have established a Taskforce to support businesses affected by the Carillion. The taskforce includes representatives from leading business bodies, the construction sector, unions, banks and government to advise how to mitigate impacts on the supply chain and employees. My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State and I have held three meetings with them so far and we have already made good progress in exchange of information and collaborations and to identify key actions that need to be taken.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the data reported by his Department to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change were for (a) biogenic and (b) non-biogenic CO2e emissions from UK waste incineration in each year since 2010; and if he will make a statement.

Defra commissioned a report “Biodegradability of municipal solid waste” (project reference WR1003) which provides measurements of the biogenic content of waste by mass. Waste incinerators which are in receipt of government support are required by OfGEM to either provide assessments of the biogenic content of the waste or to use a disadvantageous default value. The Defra report is available on their science and research project website:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=12266_WR1003BiodegradabilityofMSWReportfinal.pdf.

Emissions from UK waste incineration are included in the UK Greenhouse gas emissions inventory annually:

http://unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/items/10116.php.

These emissions estimates are split by biogenic and non-biogenic, however this is not possible for municipal solid waste (MSW).

Emissions from UK waste incineration, including waste incineration with energy recovery, for the years 2010-2015 were as follows:

Million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e)

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total UK waste incineration (includes waste incineration with energy recovery)1

2.2

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.8

3.6

Of which:

Non-biogenic (including all MSW)

2.1

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.7

3.5

Biogenic

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

1 Totals may not sum due to rounding

This includes emissions from methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

These emissions are included in our annual submission to the UNFCCC. Waste incineration can be found in table 5 of the Convention tables on the UNFCCC website:

http://unfccc.int/files/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/application/zip/gbr-2017-crf-13apr17.zip

The numbers above do not match the numbers presented in the table 5 of the Convention tables submitted to the UNFCCC as waste incineration with energy recovery is reported under the energy supply sector (table 1).

Source: http://unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/items/10116.php

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on biogenic CO2e emissions from waste incineration with energy recovery; and where such information is published.

Defra commissioned a report “Biodegradability of municipal solid waste” (project reference WR1003) which provides measurements of the biogenic content of waste by mass. Waste incinerators which are in receipt of government support are required by OfGEM to either provide assessments of the biogenic content of the waste or to use a disadvantageous default value. The Defra report is available on their science and research project website:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=12266_WR1003BiodegradabilityofMSWReportfinal.pdf.

Emissions from UK waste incineration are included in the UK Greenhouse gas emissions inventory annually:

http://unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/items/10116.php.

These emissions estimates are split by biogenic and non-biogenic, however this is not possible for municipal solid waste (MSW).

Emissions from UK waste incineration, including waste incineration with energy recovery, for the years 2010-2015 were as follows:

Million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e)

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total UK waste incineration (includes waste incineration with energy recovery)1

2.2

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.8

3.6

Of which:

Non-biogenic (including all MSW)

2.1

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.7

3.5

Biogenic

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

1 Totals may not sum due to rounding

This includes emissions from methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

These emissions are included in our annual submission to the UNFCCC. Waste incineration can be found in table 5 of the Convention tables on the UNFCCC website:

http://unfccc.int/files/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/application/zip/gbr-2017-crf-13apr17.zip

The numbers above do not match the numbers presented in the table 5 of the Convention tables submitted to the UNFCCC as waste incineration with energy recovery is reported under the energy supply sector (table 1).

Source: http://unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/national_inventories_submissions/items/10116.php

19th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the amount of CO2e that is emitted for every tonne of waste that is incinerated.

According to the latest Conversion Factors for Company Reporting, published in August 2017, the conversion factor of incineration of any waste material is 21.8 kg CO2e per tonne. Therefore each tonne of waste that is incinerated will release 21.8 kg CO2e of emissions.

Source: Conversion Factors 2017, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/635632/Conversion_factors_2017_-_Condensed_set__for_most_users__v02-00.xls

18th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department plans to take to encourage the development of (a) SMEs and (b) other businesses in the bio-energy Industry.

The Industrial Strategy white paper sets out a long-term plan to boost the productivity and earning power of people throughout the UK. Through the Clean Growth Grand Challenge we will maximise the advantages for UK industry from the global shift to clean growth. The upcoming UK Bioeconomy Strategy will build on these themes to set out a framework for growth for companies within the bioeconomy, including those working in the bioenergy sector.

15th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many recommendations from the Farmer Review of the UK Constrction Model have been (a) fully and (b) partly accepted or implemented to date.

The recommendations made in Mark Farmer’s review of the UK Construction Labour Model are directed at the construction industry, its clients and Government. Government supports the implementation, in full or in part, of nine (from a total of ten) of the headline recommendations of the Review. This is set out in detail in a Ministerial letter to the Construction Leadership Council of 19 July 2017:

http://www.constructionleadershipcouncil.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Government-Response-to-the-Farmer-Review_19-July-2017.pdf

Since July, further developments include publication of a review of the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) and CITB’s own reform plan (6 and 15 November); the announcement of £34m for construction skills as part of the National Retraining Scheme and a ‘presumption in favour of offsite’ (by 2019) across five major procuring Departments, both in the Autumn Budget; and the announcement of a Sector Deal for construction in the Industrial Strategy White Paper (27 November).

In addition, the Construction Leadership Council continues to support the agenda set out in the Farmer Review through its innovation, business models and skills work streams.

11th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to concerns about water usage in the Government's Chief Scientific Advisor's report, From Waste to Resource Productivity, published on 14 December 2017, if he will take steps to promote stored passive flue gas heat recovery systems which enable consumers to save on water use as well as energy use.

Under the right circumstances flue gas heat recovery technology can lead to significant savings for householders. In October 2017 my department published new standards for domestic boiler installations that will come into force in April 2018. The new standards will require installers to ensure, whenever they are employed to install a boiler, that the household heating system is equipped with an appropriate energy saving device. The standard is flexible to empower consumers to decide what kind of energy saving measure is best for their home. One of the options is flue gas heat recovery, which means that from April I expect to see this technology being installed wherever it is the best option for driving efficiency and reducing consumers’ bills.

With regards to more general flue gas heat recovery system, my Department has just finished consulting on an Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme, which I aim to launch in the summer.

5th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much energy has been produced from each energy from waste facility currently operating and receiving local authority waste.

The Department does not publish data on individual waste facilities. The Department estimates that in 2016 electricity generation from waste was 5,483GWh, with heat generation of 213.3 thousand tonnes of oil equivalent (ktoe). [1]

[1] Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2017, Tables 6.4 and 6.6

5th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much planned additional renewable energy capacity is estimated for each of the next five years, broken down by sector.

In setting out the Control for Low Carbon Levies commitment*, the Government estimated the generation capacity of renewable electricity technologies supported by policies every year to 2024/2025. Supported renewable electricity capacity is estimated to rise from 35.17GW in 2016/17 to 46.80GW in 2022/2023.

The Government response to the consultation on reforms to the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) gives estimates of renewable generation by technology to 2020/21**. The Government policy to increase the share of biofuels in the UK energy mix, to 2032, is set out in the Government Response to its consultation on amendments to the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligations Order***.

Additional renewable energy, unsupported by government policies, is also likely to come online over the next five years.

* page 5, table 1.B: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/660986/Control_for_Low_Carbon_Levies_web.pdf

** RHI Impact assessment, page 22, Table 6: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/the-renewable-heat-incentive-a-reformed-and-refocused-scheme

***https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/renewable-transport-fuel-obligations-order-government-response

5th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the membership of the Green Finance Taskforce and each such member's business interests and affiliation.

The list of Green Finance Taskforce members, including their full job titles and organisations, is published on the Department’s webpage on green finance: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/green-finance

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether Ofgem plans to review its social obligations reporting system relating to vulnerable energy consumers.

As the independent regulator, it is for Ofgem to decide when to review its social reporting system. Ofgem set the terms in the licence that require suppliers to provide information on their performance in relation to their social obligations. This includes their dealings with domestic customers in relation to payment methods, levels of debt and debt repayment rates, prepayment meters, disconnection rates and non-financial support for consumers in vulnerable situations.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish evidence of the merits of (a) an absolute and (b) a relative price cap for gas and electricity consumers on standard variable tariffs.

The Government has published a draft Bill for a temporary cap on domestic standard variable and default energy tariffs. The impact assessment that accompanies the draft Bill includes analysis of the merits of a relative and absolute price cap.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to encourage investment in community energy generation.

This Government has put clean growth at the heart of its Industrial Strategy. As set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, we will ensure that local communities and Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) are empowered to take advantage of the opportunities presented by the clean energy economy. This will ensure they are better able to make use of local skills and energy resources in order to drive widespread inclusive economic growth. We expect local areas to consider clean energy and the economy-wide shift to clean growth as important elements in the development and implementation of Local Industrial Strategies.

Since 2013, the UK Government have committed over £16m to directly support community energy. This includes the Rural Community Energy Fund which continues to offer feasibility and development finance for renewable energy projects. In addition, community renewable energy projects remain eligible to apply for the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) and Feed-In Tariff (FiT) schemes. The Government is also currently considering options for the design and delivery of the main scheme of the £320m Heat Networks Investment Project (HNIP), including opening it out to community groups.

The UK Green Finance Taskforce has been convened to provide government with recommendations on how to accelerate the growth of green finance, and the Terms of Reference include the question of connecting small-scale, local projects to sources of finance.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect on small energy providers of the cost of the roll-out of smart meters.

The smart meter programme has been carefully designed to limit the impact on small suppliers, where appropriate. There are a number of derogations for small suppliers, for example they submit data to Government less regularly, reflecting the burden that data requests can have for small businesses. In addition, there are differences for small suppliers which help facilitate their success and minimise costs – such as not having to pay for Smart Energy GB’s capital costs. Moreover, costs are based on market share rather than a flat rate.

In time, smart metering will deliver cost savings for small suppliers, through reductions in meter readers and back office activity. This will lower the barriers for new independent energy suppliers to enter the market.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide assistance for those currently off-grid to receive the Energy Company Obligation.

Households off the gas grid already receive assistance under the Energy Company Obligation and there are incentives within the scheme to deliver measures to off-gas grid homes.

Early next year we intend to consult on proposals for the future Energy Company Obligation which are expected to run from October 2018 to March 2022.

13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to reduce the potential cost of energy efficiency schemes to off-gas-grid households in rural areas.

Since 1 April 2017, the Carbon Savings Community Obligation is no longer part of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO). However, we introduced a rural safeguard of 15% in the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO) of the current ECO scheme. In addition, the scoring mechanism under ECO is such that it incentivises delivery of measures in properties off the gas grid. Early next year we intend to consult on proposals for the future Energy Company Obligation which are expected to run from October 2018 to March 2022. The consultation will include proposals on rural delivery and on moving to a 100% focus on vulnerable and low income households.

13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has further to strengthen rural safeguards in the Carbon Savings Community obligation.

Since 1 April 2017, the Carbon Savings Community Obligation is no longer part of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO). However, we introduced a rural safeguard of 15% in the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO) of the current ECO scheme. In addition, the scoring mechanism under ECO is such that it incentivises delivery of measures in properties off the gas grid. Early next year we intend to consult on proposals for the future Energy Company Obligation which are expected to run from October 2018 to March 2022. The consultation will include proposals on rural delivery and on moving to a 100% focus on vulnerable and low income households.

13th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will change the Energy Company Obligation to give higher priority to helping rural communities that are off the mains gas grid.

Since 1 April 2017, the Carbon Savings Community Obligation is no longer part of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO). However, we introduced a rural safeguard of 15% in the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO) of the current ECO scheme. In addition, the scoring mechanism under ECO is such that it incentivises delivery of measures in properties off the gas grid. Early next year we intend to consult on proposals for the future Energy Company Obligation which are expected to run from October 2018 to March 2022. The consultation will include proposals on rural delivery and on moving to a 100% focus on vulnerable and low income households.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what comparative assessment he has made of available evidence on the efficiency of disposing food waste by (a) anaerobic digestion and (b) incineration.

Government supports Anaerobic Digestion (AD) and incineration of waste to produce Combined Heat and Power (CHP) as they are both efficient renewable technologies that offer significant carbon savings.

Both AD and incineration to produce CHP act as a form of waste management, reducing the amount of waste going to landfill and so reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

We have not undertaken a comparative assessment as food waste is more suited to anaerobic digestion than incineration processes. It has a high moisture content which needs to be removed by heat before it will burn. Incineration technologies will tend to use other fuels such as municipal solid waste.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the National Grid on its investment portfolio and its plans for future investment in the UK.

The Government has regular discussions with National Grid across a range of energy matters, including investment in the UK. As the electricity Transmission Owner for England and Wales, National Grid is investing approximately £9 billion over the current RIIO price control period of 2013-21. Over the same period, National Grid is investing £2 billion in the gas transmission network. National Grid Ventures, National Grid’s commercial development arm separate from the core regulated business, is investing around £2 billion in new electricity interconnectors, including the 1 gigawatt (GW) Nemo Link to Belgium, the 1 GW IFA2 link to France, and the 1.4 GW North Sea Link to Norway. It is also planning further links, including the 1.4 GW Viking Link interconnector to Denmark.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential for generation of (a) electricity and (b) gas by anaerobic digestion by 2030.

Government has supported growth of the Anaerobic Digestion (AD) sector and the Clean Growth Plan highlights potential future uses of biogas for transport biofuels or gas grid injection.

The 2011 Anaerobic Digestion Strategy and Action Plan estimated the potential generation of between 3 and 5 TWh of electricity by 2020. To date, we have not undertaken any additional assessments of the potential for generation by ADs to 2030.

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much electricity was consumed by incinerators in (a) 2015 and (b) 2016; and how much (i) CO2 and (ii) CO2e was emitted as a result of that consumption in each of those years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) does not hold data on electricity consumption at this level of disaggregation; however, for calculating the UK energy balance we estimate that on average sites generating electricity (including combined heat and power schemes) from waste use approximately 10 per cent of electricity generated for their own use.

Estimated electricity consumed for own use by sites generating electricity from waste(1)(2), 2015-16

Consumption (GWh)

2015

2016

Electricity consumed for own use

520

550

(1) Based on data from DUKES table 6.4, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/renewable-sources-of-energy-chapter-6-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes

(2) Biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste. Non-biodegradable waste includes the non-biodegradable part of municipal solid waste plus waste tyres, hospital waste and general industrial waste.

Using emission conversion factors published by BEIS(3), estimated emissions for own use by sites generating electricity from waste were:

2015

2016

CO2 emissions from electricity consumed for own use (million tonnes of carbon dioxide)

0.181

0.192

CO2e emissions from electricity consumed for own use (million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent)

0.183

0.193

(3) Emission conversion factors are available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-conversion-factors-for-company-reporting

1st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much electricity and gas was generated by anaerobic digestion in (a) 2015 and (b) 2016; and how much CO2 or CO2e, CO2 equivalent, was emitted by anaerobic digestion in each of those years.

The table below shows how much electricity and heat (on a fuel input basis) was generated by anaerobic digestion (AD) in 2015 and 2016, as well as emissions from Anaerobic digestion in 2015. Emissions from anaerobic digestion include methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the anaerobic digestion process; carbon dioxide emissions from anaerobic digestion are not included in the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions inventory because this is biogenic source. Emissions data for 2016 will be available in February 2018.

2015

2016

Electricity generated from AD (GWh)

1,471

2,052

AD used for heat generation (GWh)

1,110

2,087

Greenhouse gas emissions from Anaerobic Digestion (million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent/MtCO2e)

0.116

N/A

Source: Digest of UK Energy Statistics, tables 6.4 and 6.6, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/renewable-sources-of-energy-chapter-6-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes

and final UK greenhouse gas emissions national statistics: 1990-2015, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/final-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics-1990-2015

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will bring forward proposals to introduce a Geo-Engineering Act.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 21 November 2017 to Question 113158.

Geo-engineering is the deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth’s natural systems to counteract climate change. A wide range of different geo-engineering techniques has been proposed, in two broad categories: those to remove greenhouse gases directly from the atmosphere and those to reflect some of the Sun’s energy that reaches Earth back into space.

Some forms of geo-engineering are already regulated. For instance, in England, large-scale afforestation is covered by Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations. Oceans are protected from ocean fertilisation activities and, potentially, other forms of marine geo-engineering by the Protocol to the London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter.

Under the Convention on Biological Diversity the 196 Parties, including the UK, have agreed to take a precautionary approach on geo-engineering activities that may affect biodiversity until there is an adequate scientific basis to justify such activities, with the exception of small-scale, controlled scientific research studies.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to continue to participate in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change when the UK leaves the EU.

The UK is a world leader in climate change and has always been a party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) individually as well as through the EU and we are bound by all the obligations of the Paris Agreement under international law.

The UK’s commitment to action to tackle climate change and to the UNFCCC process is not in doubt; we remain firmly committed to the Paris Agreement and to our emissions reduction and climate finance efforts under it. We have demonstrated our commitment domestically – we were the first country to introduce legally binding emissions reduction targets through the Climate Change Act, and we have recently published our highly praised Clean Growth Strategy, which is ambitious and robust in setting out how we will decarbonise the UK economy through the 2020s. The UK is also committed to phasing out unabated coal power generation by 2025, and at the recent twenty-third Conference of the Parties (COP23) the UK, joint with Canada, announced the Powering Past Coal Alliance which gained the support of more than 20 partners. Internationally, through our International Climate Finance we have committed to provide at least £5.8bn between 2016 and 2020 to developing countries, to help them mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Whatever the nature of the future UK-EU relationship, the UK will remain committed to international efforts to tackle climate change, and working closely with the EU will remain very important.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much electricity was generated by incineration in (a) 2015 and (b) 2016; and how much CO2 or CO2e, CO2 equivalent, was emitted by incinerators in each of those years.

Table 6.4 in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics (DUKES) [i] shows electricity generation from renewable sources. Figures for generation from waste in 2015 and 2016 are shown below:

Generation (GWh)

2015

2016

Biodegradable energy from waste (1)

2,585

2,741

Non-biodegradable wastes (2)

2,586

2,742

Total waste

5,171

5,482

(1) Biodegradable part only.

(2) Non-biodegradable part of municipal solid waste plus waste tyres, hospital waste and general industrial waste.

The latest greenhouse gas emissions inventory, published in February 2017, estimates that emissions from incineration plants were 3.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) in 2015. Figures for 2016 will be published in February 2018.

[i] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/renewable-sources-of-energy-chapter-6-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to implement the tariff guarantee proposal of the December 2016 consultation response on the renewable heat incentive.

The Government remains committed to introducing the remainder of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) Reforms announced in December 2016 as soon as possible. This includes introducing tariff guarantee proposals.

The Department aims to lay the remaining RHI reforms before Parliament shortly, followed by a six to eight week period for parliamentary debates.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to protect investments made by biomethane-to-grid develop who met the criteria to be eligible for a tariff guarantee based on the December 2016 consultation response in the renewable heat incentive.

The Government remains fully committed to these reforms.

Biomethane applicants will be eligible for tariff guarantees when they are introduced to the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme. In addition, for biomethane applicants, the RHI reforms announced in December 2016, introduced tariff uplifts, feed stock restrictions and removal of digestate drying.

Applicants entering the scheme between 14 December 2016 and the date on which the regulations come into force, will be able access the higher tariff from the date of coming into force, provided that they also accept the feedstock restrictions and restriction on digestate drying from this same date. Applicants can apply now and access the higher tariffs set out in the government response as soon as the regulations come into force.

15th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals for the regulation of geo-engineering.

Geo-engineering is the deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth’s natural systems to counteract climate change. A wide range of different geo-engineering techniques has been proposed, in two broad categories: those to remove greenhouse gases directly from the atmosphere and those to reflect some of the Sun’s energy that reaches Earth back into space.

Some forms of geo-engineering are already regulated. For instance, in England, large-scale afforestation is covered by Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations. Oceans are protected from ocean fertilisation activities and, potentially, other forms of marine geo-engineering by the Protocol to the London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter.

We are not proposing to bring forward legislative proposals for further regulation of geo-engineering at this time.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Green Investment Bank on the number of incinerator projects it is supporting financially.

The Green Investment Bank (GIB) was moved in to the private sector in August of this year. Ministers meet regularly with GIB. Questions with regard to their support for incineration or other projects should be directed to the greeninvestmentgroup.com.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of levels of energy obtained from waste plants on the achievement of carbon reduction targets.

BEIS' Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2017 (DUKES) indicates that the installed electricity generation capacity of energy from waste plants was over 1,000MW at the end of 2016.

Our recently published Clean Growth Strategy made clear that the waste sector as a whole has become an important contributor to electricity generation while also delivering significant emission reductions.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the levels of emissions of greenhouse gases from incinerator plants; and if he will make a statement.

The latest GHG emissions inventory, published in February 2017, estimates that emissions from incineration plants were 3.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) in 2015.

16th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the cost of removing the parental support inequality that exists for self-employed fathers who wish to take parental leave to care for a new-born child.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not estimated the cost of extending employee rights to parental leave to self-employed fathers.

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to regulate third-party intermediaries for business customers in the (a) water, (b) energy and (c) telecommunications industries.

The marketing activities of third party intermediaries in all sectors are subject to regulation, with the Competition and Markets Authority and trading standards having roles in ensuring business customers are not misled, under the Business Protection from Misleading Marketing Regulations 2008.

We have no current plans to further regulate third party intermediaries for business customers in the water, energy and telecommunications industries.

3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much electricity was produced from (a) wind, (b) tidal, (c) biomass, (d) solar, (e) hydro and (f) geothermal power in (i) Gloucestershire and (ii) England in each of the last five years.

The amount of electricity (in gigawatt hours) generated by wind, tidal, biomass, solar, and hydro generation in England in each of the last five years is as follows:

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 (provisional)

Generation

GWh

Wind

9,054

14,240

16,525

20,981

19,657

Wave / tidal

0

0

0

-

-

Solar PV

1,198

1,789

3,624

6,746

9,261

Hydro

88

83

101

103

87

Landfill gas

4,324

4,336

4,257

4,106

3,961

Sewage sludge digestion

645

685

773

815

872

Other biomass (inc. co-firing)

7,515

11,024

15,174

21,441

22,127

Total

22,824

32,158

40,453

54,192

55,966

Source: statistics from the latest quarterly edition of Energy Trends, tables ET 6.1, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/energy-trends-section-6-renewables

There is no electricity generation from geothermal sources in the UK.

Official statistics on renewable electricity generation are not collected at county level. However, they are available at local authority level (for 2014 and 2015 currently). The table below gives the combined figure for Gloucester, South Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, Tewkesbury, Cotswold, Forest of Dean and Stroud local authorities for the two years available. Figures for 2016 will be available on 28 September 2017.

2014

2015

Generation

GWh

Wind

3.1

5.5

Wave / tidal

-

-

Solar PV

83.6

170.6

Hydro

0.3

0.2

Landfill gas

85.7

84.9

Sewage sludge digestion

10.1

9.5

Other biomass (inc. co-firing)

31.6

54.8

Total

214.3

325.6

Source: Renewable electricity by local authority, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/regional-renewable-statistics

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether reference copies of statutory instruments are available in hard copy via the public library service; and if she will make a statement.

Hard copies of statutory instruments are not available from public libraries, but can be purchased from The Stationery Office at https://www.tsoshop.co.uk, or accessed online from legislation.gov.uk.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans she has to continue to provide funding for the Football Association Parklife project.

The Government recognises the benefits of the Football Association Parklife project. Further investment in Parklife will continue to be considered at future fiscal events.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans she has to continue to provide funding for the Football Association Parklife project.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether reference copies of statutory instruments are available in hard copy via the public library service; and if she will make a statement.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to introduce electromagnetic white zones in relation to 5G technology.

Mobile Network Operators will lead the rollout of 5G in the UK and provide the vast majority of commercial investment in 5G networks. The Government is setting the policy and regulatory environment needed to ensure the right conditions for investment in the development of 5G networks.

5G spectrum frequencies that have been granted licenses have similar properties to those which are currently used in mobile communications technologies. A considerable amount of research has been carried out on radio waves and Public Health England (PHE) have concluded that exposures of radio waves to the public are well within the international health-related guideline levels that are used in the UK. All 5G technology will also have to adhere to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) exposure guidelines.

23rd May 2019
5G
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to request information from mobile operators on the localised effects of the installation of 5G on (a) people and (b) the natural environment.

We are committed to becoming a world leader in 5G, and for the majority of the population to have access to a 5G signal by 2027. Following the Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review which sets out the Government’s national, long-term strategy for delivering world leading telecoms infrastructure across the UK, the Government is working to create the right conditions for the deployment of 5G.

Ministers have regular discussions with Mobile Network Operators on a full range of subjects relating to mobile coverage and future digital infrastructure development, including 5G. Specific issues relating to health concerns and the natural environment are the responsibility of DHSC/Public Health England (PHE) and DEFRA respectively.

A considerable amount of research has been carried out on radio waves and we anticipate no negative effects on public health.

PHE’s Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards (CRCE) takes the lead on public health matters associated with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, or radio waves, used in telecommunications.

Central to PHE advice is that exposures to radio waves should comply with the guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). ICNIRP is formally recognised by the World Health Organization (WHO).

23rd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on the potential military applications of 5G technology.

Ministers have regular discussions with their Cabinet colleagues on a wide range of issues, but have not discussed the specific issue of the potential military applications of 5G technology.

21st May 2019
5G
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment has been made of the potential effect of 5G on (a) plants, (b) animals and (c) insects.

Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has the potential to impact the movement of insects and some species of animals, but there is currently no evidence that human-made EMR, at realistic field levels, has population level impacts on (a) plants, (b) animals or (c) insects.

30th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will hold discussions with broadcast media on ensuring balanced coverage of people who claim benefits.

The government does not influence programming decisions, as broadcasters are editorially independent of government. Ofcom, as the independent communications regulator, is responsible for enforcing the Broadcasting Code which sets rules for licensed broadcasters to follow. This includes a requirement for broadcasters to treat individuals within programmes fairly, and material facts must not be presented in a way that is unfair to an individual.

The government is committed to supporting the broadcasting sector to ensure that it provides for and reflects the whole of the UK population, including individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds.

8th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the planned timescale is for implementation of the voluntary ban on advertising on television by betting companies during sporting events.

In December the Industry Group for Responsible Gambling (IGRG) announced changes to its advertising code. These include a ‘whistle to whistle’ ban on all TV betting adverts during pre-watershed live sport, including for 5 minutes before and after play, an end to betting adverts around highlight shows and re-runs, and an end to pre-watershed bookmaker sponsorship of sports programmes. The IGRG announced that the changes are expected to come into effect in summer.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what protections there are to ensure that a personal CCTV system located in a residence or business does no film people on public property; and what recourse there is in the event that an owner of such a CCTV system does not provide film material of people on public property taken with that system when requested to do so.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) regulates and enforces the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) which covers images recorded by CCTV cameras. The DPA places obligations on individuals and organisations to process personal data in a lawful, fair and transparent manner.

The ICO has a number of tools available to ensure compliance with data protection rules which include criminal prosecution, non-criminal enforcement and audits. For those who commit serious breaches there are significant financial penalties including fines up to £18 million or 4% of global turnover that can be applied as well as the backstop of criminal prosecution.

5th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many current contracts his Department has with Serco; and what the (a) value, (b) start date and (c) end date of each of those contracts is.

Since January 2011, details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published prior to 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive

Those published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search


1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has had discussions with the (a) Premier and (b) Football Leagues on improving the gender balance among its Chief Executives; and if he will make a statement.

No such discussions have taken place. The Premier League and English Football League are private companies, wholly owned by their member clubs. It is entirely up to the boards of those organisations whom they appoint to the role of Chief Executive. Sports organisations are aware of the importance of good governance and more diversity into leadership positions can only be good for the sport.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has had discussions with both terrestrial and satellite television companies on the number of betting adverts shown during major sporting events; and if he will make a statement.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with broadcasters on a range of issues. Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on gov.uk

The Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility consultation, published on 31st October, looked at issues around advertising and outlined a package of measures to further strengthen protections, including a major responsible gambling advertising campaign, funded by broadcasters and industry. In addition, the Committees of Advertising Practice intend to publish new guidance to protect those at risk of problem gambling as well as children and young people, and the Gambling Commission are consulting on increasing sanctions available where operators breach the codes.

The consultation closed on 23 January and the Department will consider all responses and publish its response and next steps in due course.

25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will take steps to prioritise access to broadband in rural areas to enable the advancement of telecare .

We have long supported improved rural broadband connectivity through a range of actions, ensuring innovations such as telecare can be deployed to those that need it.

The Government is currently investing £1.7 billion of public money in superfast broadband coverage across the UK, offering speeds of over 24Mbps. The BDUK Superfast Programme reached its target of 95% coverage of the UK by the end of 2017, and is continuing to support delivery with at least a further 2% coverage likely to be achieved.

These actions have made a substantial contribution to connectivity improvements in rural areas. My department is working with Defra to continue to look for new ways to ensure people in rural areas get the connectivity they need. This includes looking at how DEFRA's Rural Development Programme funding can bolster BDUK's superfast rollout programme. We have also launched a £190 million Challenge Fund to support Local Full Fibre Networks across the UK.

Thinking further ahead, we are assessing what market models can best support broadband infrastructure investment in different areas of the UK, including hard-to-reach rural areas. The Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review will report back in the summer on the options available to government to ensure digital connectivity is seamless, reliable, and widely available.

However, to ensure no one is left behind, we are also introducing a broadband Universal Service Obligation so that by 2020 everyone across the UK will have a clear, enforceable right to request high speed broadband. Connectivity at these speeds allows for future demands of improved telemedicine services, including accessing GPs through video-conferencing.

9th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that providers respond to demands from consumers for access to superfast broadband.

In addition to coverage by commercial broadband providers, the Government’s Superfast Broadband Programme has extended superfast broadband coverage with speeds of at least 24Mbps to approximately 4.75 million additional homes and businesses. A further 600,000 premises are contracted to gain coverage, and additional procurements undertaken by local authorities and the devolved administrations will extend coverage further beyond that. For all premises that do not have access to superfast broadband the government will ensure universal broadband of at least 10Mbps by 2020.

20th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to facilitate access to superfast broadband for people who live in remote rural areas and cannot afford that service; and how those people can apply for support to access superfast broadband.

The Government's Superfast Broadband Programme has provided access to superfast broadband (speeds of more than 24Mbps) to over 4.65 million premises that would otherwise not have got it. Coverage will continue to be extended further both through the Government's programme and further roll-out by the private sector.

For the remaining premises that do not have access to superfast broadband, the Government will ensure universal broadband of at least 10Mbps by introducing a regulatory broadband Universal Service Obligation (USO) to give everyone access to high speed broadband by 2020.

31st Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 9 October 2017 to Question 105258, on football: commercial agents, if she will make it her policy that any proposals from the Football Association on the future regulation of football agents are discussed with her Department.

I meet regularly with the football authorities and discuss a range of issues affecting the sport, include aspects of regulation. The FA’s Regulations of Intermediaries are kept under regular review. Changes are made on the basis of operational experiences and ongoing discussions with relevant stakeholders.

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with the Football Association on catalysing grass roots football.

Sport England is working with the Football Association on a new programme of support for grassroots football. Details of the new funding award for the period 2017-2021 and how this will align with the objectives set out in the government's sport strategy Sporting Future and Sport England's strategy Towards an Active Nation will be announced shortly.

14th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will commission a review of the role, responsibilities and financial compliance of football agents.

The Football Association has responsibility for the regulation of intermediaries in the game. Their role includes proper investigation of any evidence of inappropriate behaviour. The integrity of sport is absolutely paramount, and the UK Sports Governance code, which the FA has signed up to, sets out clearly what we expect in terms of the highest standards of governance and transparency from all our sports governing bodies.

21st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what representations he has received on the merits of mandatory installation of fire sprinklers in all (a) new and (b) refurbished schools in England; and if he will bring forward legislative proposals to make such installation mandatory.

Earlier this year, a Call for Evidence was held on the review of the Department’s Building Bulletin 100: ‘Design for Fire Safety in Schools’. This included questions on fire suppression systems, such as sprinklers. The responses have been analysed and follow up technical studies are being carried out by consultants. Until this work is completed, the Department’s policy on installing sprinklers in schools remains unchanged.

As part of this review, Department officials will be liaising further with their counterparts in Scotland and Wales on the impact of requiring sprinkler installation in new and refurbished school buildings.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
21st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will request assessments from the (a) Scottish and (b) Welsh governments on the potential effect of requiring compulsory installation of fire sprinklers in (i) new and (ii) refurbished schools in Scotland and Wales; and if he will publish an assessment of the potential benefits of such legislation in England.

Earlier this year, a Call for Evidence was held on the review of the Department’s Building Bulletin 100: ‘Design for Fire Safety in Schools’. This included questions on fire suppression systems, such as sprinklers. The responses have been analysed and follow up technical studies are being carried out by consultants. Until this work is completed, the Department’s policy on installing sprinklers in schools remains unchanged.

As part of this review, Department officials will be liaising further with their counterparts in Scotland and Wales on the impact of requiring sprinkler installation in new and refurbished school buildings.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will undertake an independent evaluation on what the evidential basis is for his Department's proposed test standard of BS 7176 for school noticeboards and if he will publish the results of that evaluation.

The Department is currently working with independent testing houses on developing and assessing the protocols for meeting the proposed British Standard for specifying noticeboards in schools. The Department will, in due course, issue a short note to responsible bodies on these new standards, which will also be included in the updated 'Building Bulletin 100: Design for Fire Safety in Schools' in 2020.

The Department’s output specification is primarily for use in setting construction and design standards for centrally delivered school building projects and is not a statutory guidance document. This specification is available to other responsible bodies in support of any school building construction activities.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to notify local education authorities and other approved education providers of their duties under the ESFA Output Specification Annex 3 Section 7.1.1.5 relating to fire standards and school notice boards.

The Department is currently working with independent testing houses on developing and assessing the protocols for meeting the proposed British Standard for specifying noticeboards in schools. The Department will, in due course, issue a short note to responsible bodies on these new standards, which will also be included in the updated 'Building Bulletin 100: Design for Fire Safety in Schools' in 2020.

The Department’s output specification is primarily for use in setting construction and design standards for centrally delivered school building projects and is not a statutory guidance document. This specification is available to other responsible bodies in support of any school building construction activities.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress is being made on the commitment to offer free sanitary products to schools by the start of the 2019-20 school year.

The former Chancellor of the Exchequer (Philip Hammond), my right hon. Friend, the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge, announced in his Spring Statement on 13 March 2019 that the Department for Education will lead a scheme to provide access to free sanitary products in all secondary schools and colleges across England. On 16 April 2019, the former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Children and Families (Nadhim Zahawi). my hon. Friend, the Member for Stratford-upon-Avon, announced that funding would be extended to cover need in primary schools and that national roll-out would take place in early 2020.

The invitation to tender for the period products scheme closed on 15 July 2019. The department is also working with stakeholders to develop guidance that will support institutions in embedding this scheme.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children (a) are on the home education register and (b) have been removed from school by their parents or guardians in each local authority area in the South West in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Data on numbers of children educated at home or those removed from school for that purpose are not collected by the department. Consultation on proposals for the creation of a mandatory register of children not enrolled at state-funded or registered independent schools closed on 24 June 2019. If the proposals were to be brought into effect, they would make such data available.

24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children who are being educated at home but who are not listed in the Home Education register in each South-west Authority in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Data on numbers of children educated at home or those removed from school for that purpose are not collected by the department. Consultation on proposals for the creation of a mandatory register of children not enrolled at state-funded or registered independent schools closed on 24 June 2019. If the proposals were to be brought into effect, they would make such data available.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will adopt the recommendations relating to fire safety and classroom notice boards submitted by the British Educational Suppliers Association to his review of Building Bulletin 100.

Schools must be safe places in which to work and study. The Department, as part of the regular review of its standards for school buildings, has recently completed research into the flammability of notice boards used in schools. The outcome of this work has been used to clarify the specification the Department uses in relation to noticeboards in new school buildings. The updated specification can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/school-design-and-construction.

The British Educational Suppliers Association responded to our recent call for evidence on Building Bulletin 100, which will be followed by a full public consultation on the guidance and its supporting tools.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the eligibility criteria for remission of student debt are if a person trains or returns to become a teacher; and what the rationale is for (a) those criteria and (b) the geographical scope of the application of those criteria.

The Government announced the Teachers’ Student Loan Reimbursement scheme in October 2017, fulfilling our manifesto commitment to help new teachers stay in the profession by forgiving their student loan repayments. The scheme is a pilot that is testing the impact of offering this incentive on teacher retention. It is aimed at early career teachers of languages and science who qualified since 2013/14, and is available in specific local authorities. Information on the scheme is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teachers-student-loan-reimbursement-guidance-for-teachers-and-schools.

The scheme has been designed in this way because retention is most challenging early in teachers' careers, and because science and languages are in high demand by schools.

The local authorities where teachers’ student loan reimbursement applies have high need for teachers. This is determined by the 'Defining Achieving Excellence Areas' methodology, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/defining-achieving-excellence-areas-methodology.

High need areas not included in the scheme are in the control group, which will enable the Department to conduct a robust evaluation.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
9th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) Local Education Authorities and (b) Academy Chains undertook a rural proofing review of policies adopted in 2018-19.

​The information requested is not held centrally.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has published guidance on rural proofing for which local authorities, and others, can apply if they wish. The information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rural-proofing.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will conduct a comparative fire risk assessment of school notice boards which meet European BS EN 13501 (a) class B and (b) class E standard; and if he will publish the results of that assessment.

For all Department for Education delivered school buildings, the Department sets out the design and construction requirements in its specification documents including the fire safety requirements for notice boards. As part of the annual review of that specification, the department will be assessing the current approach to classification of notice boards.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
20th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people over the age of 18 have used the Staying Put arrangements to stay with foster parents in Gloucestershire since 2014; and how many time was such a person not granted continuity of care.

The Children and Families Act (2014) introduced a new duty on local authorities in England to advise, assist and support fostered young people to stay with their foster families when they reach 18, if both parties agree. This allow the young person to transition to adulthood when they wish and from the security and stability of an established family base. As with other young people, some care leavers will choose to live independently at age 18; others will choose to live in a staying put arrangement for a short period whilst they complete their education; some will want and need ongoing support within a staying put arrangement until they reach their 21st birthday.

Information on the number of children in Gloucestershire who ceased to be looked after in a foster placement on their 18th birthday who were eligible for care leaver support and were still living with their former foster carer (“staying put”) at age 18 or age 19 to 20 are shown in the attached tables.

In the table, figures on the number of 18 year old care leavers are presented in a separate tab to figures on 19 and 20 year olds. They were only collected for the first time on an individual level basis in 2016 and are still classed as experimental statistics.

Information on the number of times a child looked after is not granted continuity of care is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has (a) commissioned and (b) funded an assessment of the correlation between student mental health and (i) the number of contact hours they have and (ii) other aspects of the type of course they study; and if he will make a statement.

Mental health is a priority for this government, which is why the government is working closely with Universities UK on embedding the Step Change programme within the sector. Step Change calls on higher education leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority. Step Change also advocates a whole-institution approach to transform cultures and embed mental health initiatives beyond student services teams.

The University Mental Health Charter announced in June 2018 is backed by the government and led by the sector, and will drive up standards in promoting student and staff mental health and wellbeing. The charter will reward institutions that deliver improved student mental health outcomes.

UK Research and Innovation launched eight new mental health networks in September, including the SMARTEN Network. This will work with researchers with a range of expertise and key stakeholders across the Higher Education sector to improve the understanding of student mental health.

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he provides to the higher education sector on providing a safe and understanding environment for students who (a) have existing and (b) develop mental health conditions at college.

Mental health is a priority for this government, which is why the government is working closely with Universities UK on embedding the Step Change programme within the sector. Step Change calls on higher education leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority. Step Change also advocates a whole-institution approach to transform cultures and embed mental health initiatives beyond student services teams.

The University Mental Health Charter announced in June 2018 is backed by the government and led by the sector, and will drive up standards in promoting student and staff mental health and wellbeing. The charter will reward institutions that deliver improved student mental health outcomes.

UK Research and Innovation launched eight new mental health networks in September, including the SMARTEN Network. This will work with researchers with a range of expertise and key stakeholders across the Higher Education sector to improve the understanding of student mental health.

11th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make and assessment of adequacy of the guidance issued to schools, local education authorities and other responsible bodies to ensure that classroom notice boards are installed correctly and in accordance with fire standards that are legally compliant.

The Department’s guidance documents, under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, highlight schools’ responsibilities to carry out risk assessments for their Fire Safety Management Plans.

The Department also specifies the fire safety requirements for notice boards in the ‘Output Specification’ documents that set out the design and construction requirements for all Department for Education delivered school buildings. In order to fully address the issue, the Department needs to carry out background research. Should the research show there is further guidance to give, the Department would then update the Output Specification and consider releasing a technical note to responsible bodies on the specification and installation of noticeboards.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of changes in the time allocated to teachers for planning, preparation and assessment.

All teachers who participate in the teaching of pupils are entitled to reasonable periods of Planning, Preparation and Assessment (PPA). PPA time must amount to not less than 10% of the teacher’s timetabled teaching time. A teacher must not be required to carry out any other duties during the teacher’s PPA time.

There have been no changes in the time allocated to teachers for planning, preparation and assessment: this requirement has been in place since 2004.

The Department continues to work with unions, teachers and Ofsted to challenge and remove unnecessary workload so that teachers can focus on tasks which make the most positive impact on their pupils. For example, a workload reduction toolkit has been published which provides schools with practical tools and evidence-based solutions to enable them to streamline practice in their schools. This includes a section on reviewing curriculum planning with case studies on how schools have successfully reduced workload associated with planning.

The workload reduction toolkit can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/workload-reduction-toolkit.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
21st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children who have been off-rolled in each of the last two years; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold information centrally on the number of pupils who have been officially taken off roll by schools. Local authorities have a duty to make arrangements to establish the identities of children of compulsory school age in their area who are not registered pupils at a school and are not otherwise receiving suitable education.

The law is clear that a pupil’s name can only be deleted from the admission register on the grounds prescribed in regulation 8 of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006 as amended. All schools must notify the local authority when a pupil’s name is to be deleted from the admission register under any of the grounds prescribed in regulation 8.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
21st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Gloucestershire have posted a deficit budget for the years (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-2019.

The Government trusts schools to manage their own budgets and the vast majority are operating with a cumulative surplus, with only a small percentage having a deficit.

The Department will be publishing 2017-18 data on maintained school reserves in December 2018; this will show the schools in Gloucestershire which reported a deficit. 2018-19 data is expected to be published in December 2019. Academy trusts are the legal entities responsible for academies, including their finances, and are accountable at trust level. The accounts for each trust are submitted for publication on the Companies House website by May of each year; the latest accounts, published this year, relate to 2016-17.

The latest figures for Gloucestershire’s maintained schools showed one hundred and eighty-eight primary schools and five secondary schools reporting a cumulative surplus or breaking even, compared to fifteen primary schools and one secondary school reporting a deficit in the financial year 2016-17.

Forty-four primary and thirty secondary academies in Gloucestershire were in trusts that reported a surplus in the academic year 2016-17, compared to one primary and three secondary academies in trusts that reported a deficit. An academy in a local authority may belong to a trust outside the local authority.

Academy trust accounts allow for a significantly higher level of public scrutiny than is required of maintained schools. This is because maintained schools are not required to prepare individual statutory accounts – their financial performance is instead summarised within local authorities’ accounts.

Academy trust accounts are consolidated in the Sector Annual Report and Accounts (SARA). The SARA provides a sector-level overview and does not break down the data by trust or local authority. The Department published the 2016-17 SARA on 6 November and it is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/academies-consolidated-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
19th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information he holds on the amount that Gloucestershire County Council has spent on legal activity regarding education, health and care plans in each of the last three years for which figures are available.

The Department for Education does not collect specific information regarding the amounts that local authorities spend on legal activity around education, health and care (EHC) plans.

Local authorities must adhere to legal requirements when making EHC needs assessments, when producing EHC plans and when meeting challenges from parents, young people and others. These are set out in the Children and Families Act (2014), supporting regulations and the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-code-of-practice-0-to-25.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of education, health and care (EHC) plans produced by Gloucestershire County Council in each of the last three years; and on how many occasions that Council did (a) not proceed with an EHC Needs Assessment, (b) not produce an EHC plan when one had been requested and (c) receive an appeal against the support included in the plan in each of the last three years.

The number of initial requests for assessment for an education, health and care (EHC) plan that were refused during the calendar year and the number of children and young people assessed during the calendar year for whom it was decided not to issue an EHC plan are shown in the table below for Gloucestershire local authority for the calendar years 2015 to 2017.

Gloucestershire local authority, 2015 to 2017 calendar years.

Calendar Year 2015

Calendar Year 2016

Calendar Year 2017

Number of children and young
people for whom EHC plans were made for the first time

240

373

514

Number of initial requests for assessment for an EHC plan that were refused during the calendar year

25

0

0

Number of children and young people assessed during the calendar year for whom it was decided not to issue an EHC plan

10

22

19

Source: SEN2 data collection

The information requested on the number of appeals against the support included in the plan in each of the last three years is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's consultation on draft regulations, statutory guidance, and regulatory impact assessment relating to Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education, which opened on 19 July 2018, for what reason his Department is providing discretion to schools on whether they teach same sex relationships in the regulations being consulted on.

The Department is making Relationships Education compulsory in all primary schools, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory in all secondary schools and Health Education compulsory in all state-funded primary and secondary schools.

A guiding principle of the subjects is that teaching will start from the basis that pupils, at age appropriate points, need to know the laws on relationships and sex to ensure they act appropriately and can be safe. The draft guidance is also clear that there should be an equal opportunity to explore the features of stable and healthy same-sex relationships.

As with other aspects of the curriculum, schools will have flexibility over how they deliver this content; and, in the case of schools with a religious character, in accordance with their faith. All schools must comply with the Equality Act.

The Department hopes as many people as possible will contribute to the consultation, which closes on 7 November.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that schools are offering adequate help and support for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

It is important that children with medical conditions, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are supported to receive a full education. Under Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, governing boards are required to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and to have regard to statutory guidance.

The guidance is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3, and covers a range of areas including the preparation and implementation of school policies for supporting pupils with medical conditions, the use of individual healthcare plans, staff training, medicines administration, roles and responsibilities, consulting with parents and collaborative working with healthcare professionals. It was developed with a range of stakeholders including the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance (HSA), school leaders, academy organisations, unions, young people and their parents, and Department of Health and Social Care officials and is based on good practice in schools.

We continue to work with organisations such as the HSA to help raise further awareness of the duty on schools.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to commission an independent investigation into trends in the level of school exclusions; and if he will make a statement.

In March, the Government launched an externally led review of exclusions practice, led by Edward Timpson CBE. The review will explore how head teachers use exclusion in practice, and why pupils with particular characteristics are more likely to be excluded from school. It will also consider the differences in exclusion rates between areas and schools across England.

The review will aim to report by the end of the year. The full terms of reference for the review can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-exclusions-review-terms-of-reference.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of including additional educational needs funding in the base budget for schools as part of the new funding formula.

Core schools funding is increasing to £43.5 billion by 2020, and within that total the high needs budget is £6 billion this year, the highest on record.

All the evidence shows that pupils from deprived families, those with low prior attainment, those who do not speak English as a first language, and those who start school part-way through the year are most likely to fall behind their peers. The national funding formula protects the £5.9 billion of funding directed towards pupils with additional needs, to help them catch up. This funding is provided to schools through their base budgets. In addition to the schools formula, the pupil premium will provide schools with over £2.4 billion to improve the support provided to children who have been in receipt of free school meals in the last 6 years. Beyond this, the national funding formula for high needs provides funding for local authorities to direct to the most vulnerable children and young people. In 2018-19, the high needs national funding formula totalled £6 billion; £140 million more than in 2017-18.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
11th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of permanent exclusions from school as a proportion of the overall school population in each local authority area in each of the last five years where figures are available.

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England: 2015 to 2016’ includes numbers and rates of exclusions. The full release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2015-to-2016.

Table 15 of the ‘Local Authority tables: SFR35/2017’ includes a breakdown of exclusion rates for each local authority in England in the 2015/16 academic year. Historic information (from the 2006/07 academic year onwards) is also available in the release’s Underlying data: SFR35/2017 section, in file ‘SFR35_2017_national_region_la_school_data.csv’. The figures can be filtered by the ‘la_name’ column.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many current contracts his Department has with Serco; and what the (a) value, (b) start date and (c) end date of each of those contracts is.

Since January 2011, details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. Contracts published prior to 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive.

Those published after 26 February 2015 can be viewed at: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of his Department's reform of apprenticeship on progress on meeting the Government's target of three million new apprenticeships by the end of the 2017 Parliament.

Our apprenticeship reforms will give employers and apprentices the skills they need to grow and progress in the long term.

Our reforms are making apprenticeships higher quality, at all levels, with a minimum duration of one year and 20 per cent off-the job training, and with a proper end point assessment. The 20 per cent off the job training rule, the shift to higher quality standards with a longer average duration, and the drop off in use of frameworks, have already contributed to a 20 per cent rise in expected apprenticeship training hours over the past year. Nearly 37 per cent of starts are now on the new, employer-designed apprenticeship standards, compared to just 3 per cent in the same period last year. More information on the progress of our reforms can be found at the link below: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/707896/Progress_report_on_the_Apprenticeships_Reform_Programme_May_2018.pdf.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the apprenticeship levy has been invested in apprenticeships in each region of the UK.

Information on the apprenticeship levy collected by HM Treasury and invested in each region of the UK is not available in the format requested.

The majority of levy-paying employers operate across multiple geographical areas which means we cannot reasonably attribute the levy collected and spent in individual locations within the UK.

In England, these employers are free to spend their apprenticeship funding wherever they wish, in locations that best meet the skills needs of the business.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will receive their fair share of the levy so the devolved administrations will receive £460 million (in 2019/20). As skills is a devolved matter it will be for the devolved administrations to decide how funds raised from the levy should be used in their administrations.

We publish regular statistics on apprenticeships here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/apprenticeship-and-levy-statistics-june-2018.

These reflect the way that the levy is collected and spent.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to ensure that apprentices enrolled and training on a Standard Appenticeship Course, and working towards their end-date have an end-point assessment organisation in place.

All new apprenticeship standards will have an end point assessment. Apprentices cannot start until the relevant assessment plan has been approved and published. Apprentices will know what their end point assessment will involve before they start on a standard.

Over 99 per cent of apprentices on programmes have an end point assessment organisation registered against the standard. However, there are a small number of standards with starts which have not yet confirmed the end point assessment organisation. We are tracking these starts so that we can confirm an end point assessment organisation for these standards at the earliest opportunity.

The number of end point assessment organisations on the register and coverage of standards is increasing each month; and we are confident that we will have assessment organisations in place for all apprentices taking their end point assessment.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that the procedures for students with dyslexia taking external exams are compliant with the Equality Act 2010.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its Chief Regulator, Sally Collier, to write to the hon. Member for Stroud and copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to make an assessment of the adequacy of support provided to registered disabled students (a) at and (b) about to enter further or higher education.

Higher education providers (HEPs) are responsible under the Equality Act 2010 to make reasonable adjustments and offer other support for disabled students to ensure they are not placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled students.

Disabled students should have their needs met through inclusive learning practices and individual reasonable adjustments made by their HEP. We expect HEPs to take primary responsibility for less specialist non-medical help. Information on the ways in which HEPs offer such support can be found at: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rereports/year/2017/modelsofsupport/.

Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) provide valuable, more specialist support for eligible disabled students, enabling them to participate in higher education alongside non-disabled students. The department has commissioned a research project to explore the impact of DSAs on eligible students.

Further education providers also have responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010 to support disabled students. Ofsted and Care Quality Commission jointly inspect local areas to see how well they fulfil their responsibilities for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities. Outcome letters from 53 local areas have been published to date.

Individual post-16 institutions are inspected by Ofsted, who may grade and report on provision for high needs learners. These learners are defined as young people aged 16-18, or aged 19-24 with an Education Health and Care plan, who require additional support over £6,000.

23rd Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many registered disabled students in (a) further and (b) higher education have received support from his Department in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

A number of financial support schemes are available to eligible 16-19 year olds (up to 25 years of age if they have an Education, Health and Care Plan) to help with the costs associated with staying in post-16 education. This can include support for travel, educational trips, and course equipment costs, childcare funding (for young parents under 20) and support with accommodation costs. In particular, the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund targets support at young people who most need help with the costs of staying on in post-16 education and training. Students in defined vulnerable groups – young people in care, care leavers, those on income support (or Universal Credit) and disabled young people in receipt of both Employment and Support Allowance (or Universal Credit) and Disability Living Allowance (or Personal Independence Payments) – may receive yearly bursaries of £1,200 a year (pro-rata for part-timers). For learners aged 19 and above, providers are able to access Learner Support funding to help learners with a specific financial hardship to help meet costs such as transport, accommodation, books, equipment and childcare.

The table below provides information on the numbers of eligible English-domiciled students who have applied for and received higher education Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) in the last five years.

Full-time undergraduate students

Part-time undergraduate students

Postgraduate students

Academic year

Number of students

Amount paid

Number of students

Amount paid

Number of students

Amount paid

2011/12

53,300

£125.1m

3,000

£7.9m

4,700

£11.8m

2012/13

56,600

£127.6m

3,000

£7.3m

4,900

£10.9m

2013/14

60,200

£134.2m

2,700

£6.6m

5,600

£11.9m

2014/15

59,900

£132.2m

3,500

£8.6m

5,800

£11.0m

2015/16

58,900

£115.6m

3,800

£8.9m

5,600

£10.6m

2016/17*

54,900

£92.1m

3,400

£6.4m

7,100

£11.4m

*Figures for 2016/17 are provisional.

(Source: Student Loans Company. http://www.slc.co.uk/official-statistics/financial-support-awarded/england-higher-education.aspx).

Although we do not yet have full-year data for 2016/17, we expected to see a reduction in DSAs’ take-up from 2016/17 as higher education providers are now expected to provide less-specialist non-medical help for disabled students as part of their responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010.

2nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the (a) annual budget of and (b) the cost of build or refurbishment of each University Technical College in the most recent financial year.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency and the Department accounts, which include capital expenditure on Free Schools, Studio Schools and University Technical Colleges (UTC), are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/education-funding-agency-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017.

For reasons of commercial confidentiality, we do not disclose the Department’s capital budgets for individual schools. The costs of individual schools, including land purchase costs are also not disclosed before completion and overall costs are finalised. Capital funding for open Free Schools, UTCs and Studio Schools, where costs have been finalised, are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/capital-funding-for-open-free-schools.

Additional finalised capital data is due to be published in the coming months.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his Department’s strategy is on increasing the number of people who seek to become head teachers.

The Department supports a range of programmes designed to bolster the leadership pipeline. Our recently reformed suite of national professional qualifications help better prepare leaders for the range of roles in today’s school system through from middle leadership to headship and beyond.

The Department also funds targeted programmes that aim to boost leadership capacity in challenging schools such as the High Potential Senior Leaders and High Potential Middle Leaders programmes. The second round of the £75 million Teaching and Leadership Innovation Fund opened on 31 January 2018 and seeks to build leadership capacity in the schools and areas that need it most.

The Department is also committed to supporting more teachers with protected characteristics into leadership through the Leadership Equality and Diversity Fund and Women Leading in Education networks and coaching pledge.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that school governing boards produce publicly accessible minutes of their meetings.

The School Governance (Roles, Procedures and Allowances Regulations (2013)) sets out the requirement for the governing bodies of maintained schools to make their minutes available for inspection to any interested person. The current model articles of association for academies require the same of them.

We are satisfied that these requirements help to ensure that there is transparency and public accountability about governing body meetings for all schools and have no plans for additional legislation in this area.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make it his Department's policy to make all school governor’s meetings minutes public.

Maintained school governing bodies are required to make the minutes of their meetings available for inspection to any interested person. Our current model articles of association also require academies to do this.

We are satisfied that these requirements help to ensure that there is transparency and public accountability around governing body decision-making.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of young people who leave care and later take their own lives; and what steps she is taking to reduce the number of young people who leave care and later take their own lives.

The department does not record data on the reason for deaths of care leavers.

We are committed to ensuring that care leavers are able to access the mental health support that they need to maintain positive emotional health and well-being. A joint Department of Health and Department for Education Expert Working Group has recently published its proposals for improving the mental health of looked after children and care leavers. A copy of their report is available at: https://www.scie.org.uk/children/care/mental-health/report.

Work to address the Expert Group’s findings is already underway. We are putting a record £1.4 billion into children and young people’s mental health and a further £3 million has been committed to support the recently published Children and Young People’s Mental Health Green Paper. We will now consider the Expert Working Group’s report in the context of the green paper with a view to taking further action.

More broadly, the government published its third progress report on preventing suicide in England in 2016, including the measures it is taking to prevent suicides among children and young people. A copy of the report is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/582117/Suicide_report_2016_A.pdf.

We published our new cross-government strategy, Keep on Caring, in July 2016 which set out the measures we will take to improve the overall outcomes for care leavers. A copy is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/535899/Care-Leaver-Strategy.pdf.

The department publishes data annually on care leavers aged 17 to 21, which includes information on their main activity and whether or not they are in suitable accommodation. The latest data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to monitor the development of young people who have left care.

The department does not record data on the reason for deaths of care leavers.

We are committed to ensuring that care leavers are able to access the mental health support that they need to maintain positive emotional health and well-being. A joint Department of Health and Department for Education Expert Working Group has recently published its proposals for improving the mental health of looked after children and care leavers. A copy of their report is available at: https://www.scie.org.uk/children/care/mental-health/report.

Work to address the Expert Group’s findings is already underway. We are putting a record £1.4 billion into children and young people’s mental health and a further £3 million has been committed to support the recently published Children and Young People’s Mental Health Green Paper. We will now consider the Expert Working Group’s report in the context of the green paper with a view to taking further action.

More broadly, the government published its third progress report on preventing suicide in England in 2016, including the measures it is taking to prevent suicides among children and young people. A copy of the report is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/582117/Suicide_report_2016_A.pdf.

We published our new cross-government strategy, Keep on Caring, in July 2016 which set out the measures we will take to improve the overall outcomes for care leavers. A copy is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/535899/Care-Leaver-Strategy.pdf.

The department publishes data annually on care leavers aged 17 to 21, which includes information on their main activity and whether or not they are in suitable accommodation. The latest data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2017 to Questions 110785, 110786 and 110787, how many children diagnosed with autism have received a permanent or fixed period exclusion in each of the last five years.

The table attached provides the number of pupils with autism as their primary need who received fixed period and permanent exclusions.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children with an (a) Education, Health and Care Plan and (b) Statement of Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) received a permanent or fixed-term exclusion in each local authority in the South West in each of the last five years.

The accompanying table provides information on permanent and fixed-period exclusions of pupils with Education, Health and Care plans and Statements of Special Educational Needs in each local authority in the South West in each of the last five years.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the Government plans to introduce legislative proposals to remove the 50 per cent cap for Catholic schools.

The proposals set out in the ‘Schools that work for everyone’ consultation document to remove the 50% cap on faith admissions in faith free schools do not require any legislative changes. The department is considering carefully the results of the consultation and plan to respond on this in due course.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the methods schools will use to raise the first £6,000 for high-needs intervention required by the new funding formula.

Pupils with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities in mainstream schools attract funding to their schools through the formula set by the school’s local authority. The funding formula is decided by each local authority in consultation with its schools, and local authorities are required to delegate funds through the formula to a level that enables schools to meet the additional cost of pupils with SEN up to £6,000 per annum. This constitutes each school’s notional SEN budget. Local authorities use various factors to give an estimate of the number of children with SEN a school is likely to have, and consequently the notional SEN budget that the school will receive. The introduction of a national funding formula for determining schools and local authorities’ funding from April 2018 will not change this arrangement.

The School and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations 2017 state that local authorities must identify each school’s notional SEN budget from which schools are expected to meet the additional costs of their pupils with SEN, up to £6,000 per annum. Schools should therefore discuss with their local authority how much is needed for this purpose.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how his Department reached a figure of £4,800 as the assumed figure to deliver secondary education according to the new funding formula.

Following consultation on the national funding formula, the Government examined how best it can support schools with lower levels of additional needs funding. A number of consultation replies requested the Government set a minimum level of funding per pupil. A range of different minimum levels of per pupil funding were proposed, but the most commonly suggested level for secondary schools was £4,800. We believe that setting a minimum amount of £4,800 in 2019-20 strikes an appropriate, affordable balance in the formula.

The Government does not suggest that £4,800 per pupil is the minimum amount needed to run a secondary school. There is no consensus on the minimum operating cost of a school and we believe it should be for heads and governors to decide their operating model.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average rate of exclusion for children with autism as their primary need was in (a) Gloucestershire and (b) the UK in each of the last five years.

The attached tables provides information as requested on the number of pupils receiving permanent and fixed period exclusions by special educational needs provision in schools in Gloucestershire local authority and the number and rate of exclusions for pupils with autism as their primary need in Gloucestershire local authority and England.

Exclusions of pupils with Learning Difficulties Assessments and for schools outside of England are not collected by the department.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children in Gloucestershire with autism as their primary need received a permanent or fixed period exclusion in each of the last five years.

The attached tables provides information as requested on the number of pupils receiving permanent and fixed period exclusions by special educational needs provision in schools in Gloucestershire local authority and the number and rate of exclusions for pupils with autism as their primary need in Gloucestershire local authority and England.

Exclusions of pupils with Learning Difficulties Assessments and for schools outside of England are not collected by the department.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children with an (a) Education, Health and Care plan, (b) Statement of SEN or (c) Learning Difficulties Assessment received a permanent or fixed exclusion within Gloucestershire in each of the last five years.

The attached tables provides information as requested on the number of pupils receiving permanent and fixed period exclusions by special educational needs provision in schools in Gloucestershire local authority and the number and rate of exclusions for pupils with autism as their primary need in Gloucestershire local authority and England.

Exclusions of pupils with Learning Difficulties Assessments and for schools outside of England are not collected by the department.

16th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her policy is on the use of finger printing of school children for identification purposes.

Some schools in England use fingerprinting for the purposes of administering payment for school meals. Biometric systems can have a number of advantages, including removing issues around lost money, reduced queueing times and reducing the stigma associated with free school meals. Many children are already familiar with this technology as used, for example, to unlock a smart phone. However, the government does not endorse any particular approach, and governing boards are responsible for the day to day running of schools.

Further information on “Protection of children's biometric information in schools” is available on our website at: http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/advice/f00218617/biometric-recognition-systems.

16th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the new funding formula for schools includes funding for students with high needs; and if she will make a statement.

On 14 September, we published our decisions on the introduction of a national funding formula for schools (which provides core funding for all mainstream schools), and a national funding formula for high needs (which provides place funding for special schools, and top-up funding for high needs pupils in both special and mainstream schools).

Under the national funding formulae, mainstream schools will be expected to contribute the first £6,000 of additional funding for any pupil on their roll with high needs from their schools block funding. When a school can demonstrate that the costs of additional support required for a pupil with high needs exceed £6,000, the local authority should allocate additional top-up funding from their high needs budget to cover the excess costs. This process is the same as under the previous funding system. This is explained in paragraph 54 of the High Needs funding 2018 to 2019 operational guide, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/high-needs-funding-arrangements-2018-to-2019. If a school has concerns about the level of funding they receive for their pupils with high needs, it should discuss it with their local authority in the first instance.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons funding that was previously directed to support specific additional needs is now to be directed towards minimum levels of per pupil funding.

The national funding formula protects the £5.9 billion total for funding directed towards additional needs, as proposed in our consultation. It distributes that funding in line with the best available evidence: using a broad measure of deprivation to include all those who are likely to need extra help; and increasing the proportion of additional needs spending allocated on the basis of low prior attainment, to give additional support to those who need help to catch up.

We heard throughout the consultation that we could do more through our formula to support those schools that attract the lowest levels of per pupil funding. We have listened carefully, and with the additional investment of £1.3 billion, have decided that it is appropriate both to raise the basic amount that each pupil attracts, and to target additional funding to the lowest funded. We believe that this will help ensure that every school has the resources it needs to provide appropriate support to all of its pupils. None of this additional funding has been found by reducing funding directed towards additional needs.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the level of funding in the new funding formula for schools that have a large number of pupils with additional needs and those that do not.

The national funding formula allocates the majority of funding, 72.9%, through the basic per-pupil allowance, while protecting the funding directed towards children with additional needs, with a total spend of £5.9 billion and overall weighting of 17.8%.

Funding will be distributed according to the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country. This will direct resources where they are needed most, and provide transparency and predictability for schools.

The attached table shows the unit values, total funding and proportion of funding for each factor in the formula.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the Government's policy is on secondary school inclusion; and how that policy has been taken account of in the new funding formula.

We are committed to an inclusive education for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), and progressively removing the barriers to education and participation in mainstream education. The Children and Families Act 2014 secures the general presumption in law of mainstream education in relation to decisions about where children and young people with special educational needs should be educated; and the Equality Act 2010 provides protection from discrimination for disabled people. The 2014 Act also requires local authorities to ensure the views, wishes and feelings of children, young people and parents are taken into account when deciding what support children and young people with SEND need.

The introduction of national funding formulae for schools and high needs is supported by significant extra investment of £1.3 billion across 2018-19 and 2019-20, over and above the budget announcement at the 2015 spending review. We are therefore able to provide additional funding for every school and allocate extra high needs funding to every local authority, both of which will support schools in providing for their pupils, including those with SEND. Both schools and high needs national funding formulae reflect the number of children and young people with SEND who are attending mainstream or specialist provision.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has plans to provide additional school places in (a) Stroud constituency and (b) Gloucestershire.

Supporting local authorities to create sufficient school places is one of the Government’s top priorities. Since 2015 we have committed £5.8 billion to deliver new school places, on top of our investment in the free schools programme.

Gloucestershire County Council has been allocated £85.1 million in basic need funding allocations for the period 2011 to 2020 to create new school places, and has created 3,339 places between 2010 and 2016.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/basic-need-allocations

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-school-places-scorecards-2016

The Department has opened two free schools in Gloucestershire since 2010, and we have plans to open a further two free schools and one university technical college up to 2018. These schools are providing approximately 1451 additional school places in the area.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/free-schools-open-schools-and-successful-applications


Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
18th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 7 October 2019 to Question 290620 on Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control, what steps she is taking to ensure that badgers from the Animal and Plant Health Agency’s Woodchester Park research centre are not inadvertently killed in surrounding cull zones.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency’s ongoing study of the wild badger population at Woodchester Park can adapt to assess any new impacts on the badger population, including from licensed badger culling taking place across Gloucestershire, which is in the Bovine TB High Risk Area of England. Woodchester Park’s work will continue to support policy and research in line with our TB strategy’s adaptive and evidence-based approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 7 October 2019 to Question 290620 on Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control, whether it is her Department's policy that a marked badger from the Woodchester study area found in a cull zone would be shot.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency’s ongoing study of the wild badger population at Woodchester Park can adapt to assess any new impacts on the badger population, including from licensed badger culling taking place across Gloucestershire, which is in the Bovine TB High Risk Area of England. Woodchester Park’s work will continue to support policy and research in line with our TB strategy’s adaptive and evidence-based approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 7 October 2019 Question 290620 on Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control, whether she has made an assessment of the potential effect on research outcomes of the culling of animals that are part of that research programme.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency’s ongoing study of the wild badger population at Woodchester Park can adapt to assess any new impacts on the badger population, including from licensed badger culling taking place across Gloucestershire, which is in the Bovine TB High Risk Area of England. Woodchester Park’s work will continue to support policy and research in line with our TB strategy’s adaptive and evidence-based approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions has she had with the Welsh Government on strategies for the eradication of bovine TB.

Regular meetings are held with the Welsh Government, Scottish Government and the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs Northern Ireland to discuss bovine TB eradication strategies and ways forward to tackle the disease. These meetings involve both policy officials and Chief Veterinary Officers.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its response to the Godray Report on bovine TB.

The Government response to Professor Sir Charles Godfray’s 2018 review of Defra’s Bovine TB eradication strategy will be published in due course.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons there has been a change to permitted levels of gaseous tritium discharges at former Magnox Nuclear Stations as a result of the operation of the waste encapsulation plants.

The Environment Agency (EA) has been discussing with Magnox Ltd its intention to treat intermediate level waste (ILW) at the Berkeley Site, and at Hinkley Point A, by encapsulating it in concrete boxes. This is to make the waste safe for long term storage, and enable its subsequent disposal.

The need to apply for increased tritium limits arises from the heat generated during the encapsulation process driving off some of the tritium within the waste. Magnox Ltd anticipates that this may increase discharges of gaseous tritium above the low limit specified in Berkeley’s current environmental permit. While Magnox plans to apply to the EA to change this limit, the EA has not yet received any application from Magnox to increase the limit for gaseous tritium for this purpose.

The EA will only change the permit limit if it is satisfied that this is necessary and that people and the environment remain properly protected.

The EA will continue to keep local stakeholders informed of any developments with the Berkeley Site environmental permit, through the local Stakeholder Group.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its response to the Farm Inspection and Regulation Review, published on 13 December 2018.

We welcome the findings of the Farm Inspection and Regulation Review, including the notion of a changed regulatory culture encouraging constructive partnerships between Government and industry and a “shared endeavour” as it sets out. The Government will set out its response in due course.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 August 2019 to Question 280135 on Agriculture: Subsidies, if she will publish a list of the 46 pilots which have been signed up to the Environmental Land Management Scheme; and whether those pilots are receiving financial compensation for taking part in that scheme.

To support the development of Environmental Land Management Schemes, we are undertaking a number of tests and trials working with farmers and land managers to co-design elements of the new scheme. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 46 proposals are currently being taken forward in phase 1 and we anticipate that a number of these will begin soon with Defra reimbursing agreed costs incurred in their delivery. We have received a further 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals from phase 2 that fill gaps identified from the coverage of phase 1 proposals. We will communicate the results of our analysis of the phase 2 proposals to stakeholders later this month.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will investigate reports of badger culling within the FERA Woodchester Park research centre.

I can confirm that no badger culling is taking place specifically within the Animal and Plant Health Agency’s Woodchester Park research centre.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons the minimum size of enclosures for snakes was changed from the requirement stated in the draft Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 guidance.

The draft statutory guidance relating to pet sales that accompanies The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 (the 2018 Regulations) contained two minimum accommodation size lengths for snakes in pet selling establishments. One was two thirds snake length and related to the minimum length of the enclosure in order to comply with the 2018 Regulations; and the other was 1x snake length which was the minimum length needed to attain the optional higher welfare standard.

During consultation on the draft guidance a group of specialist exotic animal veterinary and keeping professionals advised that there was no welfare basis for the higher welfare standard. We therefore withdrew the higher minimum welfare standard for snake accommodation sizes from the final published guidance. However, the minimum welfare size needed to comply with the 2018 Regulations remains at two thirds snake length. We have not made an estimate of the costs to businesses if they were required to increase the size of their snake enclosures.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish correspondence between her Department and businesses on the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 guidance on the size of snake enclosures; and what estimate she has made of the costs to businesses of increasing the size of snake enclosures.

The draft statutory guidance relating to pet sales that accompanies The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 (the 2018 Regulations) contained two minimum accommodation size lengths for snakes in pet selling establishments. One was two thirds snake length and related to the minimum length of the enclosure in order to comply with the 2018 Regulations; and the other was 1x snake length which was the minimum length needed to attain the optional higher welfare standard.

During consultation on the draft guidance a group of specialist exotic animal veterinary and keeping professionals advised that there was no welfare basis for the higher welfare standard. We therefore withdrew the higher minimum welfare standard for snake accommodation sizes from the final published guidance. However, the minimum welfare size needed to comply with the 2018 Regulations remains at two thirds snake length. We have not made an estimate of the costs to businesses if they were required to increase the size of their snake enclosures.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of funding and other Government support for the tree nursery industry to ensure that it is able to plan and invest in the infrastructure required to increase the numbers of trees that the Government estimates will be required to be planted to help meet its climate change and biodiversity targets.

We do not provide direct support to tree nurseries. Our sustained support for new woodland creation helps ensure that there is ongoing demand for forest trees. The Forestry Commission has regular contact with representative bodies, sharing information on the expected level of tree planting and demand for trees to aid the planning of tree production.

We are looking at how we can support the nursery industry in improving biosecurity and improve tree seed viability.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to (a) collate statistics on the number of trees in the UK and (b) ensure that existing trees are adequately maintained.

The National Forest Inventory Forest Research, part of the Forestry Commission, gathers data on the number of trees within woodland in Britain. In addition it monitors the canopy area of trees outside of woodland within. More details of the work carried out and information it publishes can be found here: https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/national-forest-inventory/about-the-nfi/

All woodland is protected against unauthorised removal through the control of tree felling in the Forestry Act 1967, the Environmental Impact Assessment (Forestry) Regulations and the planning system. Activities authorised and supported by the Forestry Commission, including woodland management which has grant support available through Countryside Stewardship and Felling Licences applications, are expected to meet the UK Forestry Standard, the Government’s approach to sustainable forestry.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will make an assessment of the effect of urban trees on levels of human physical health and well being; and if she will make a statement.

The Social and Economic Research Group of Forest Research, part of the Forestry Commission, focuses on understanding the complex relationships between forestry, the environment and society. The importance of peri urban woods and urban woods for people’s wellbeing, both physical, mental and social is well known. The group is currently participating in a number of activities which will help increase our understanding of the health and wellbeing benefits of trees and greenspace.

The Forestry Commission also supports the Urban Forest and Woodland Advisory Committee Network, which advises the Forestry Commission on forestry. The network has produced various publications on the benefits of a resilient urban forest, including for human health and quality of life.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require each local authority to employ suitably qualified public-realm tree officers to ensure that (a) statistics are collated on the number of trees and (b) existing trees are adequately maintained in each local authority area.

A public consultation on policies to improve the management of our trees and woodlands by Local Authorities was opened in December 2018. The consultation ended in February 2019. This document set out Government’s view on the importance of trees, especially in an urban environment, and the need for more policies to enhance the status and protection of urban trees.

The Government committed in the 25 Year Environment Plan to introduce a duty on Local Authorities to consult the public on felling street trees. This will increase the transparency of decision-making and give the public a say in the management of these important natural assets. It will encourage local authorities to consider concerns raised and have regard to these when making decisions. This duty will be introduced in the forthcoming Environment Bill.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require each local authority to employ suitably qualified public-realm tree officers to ensure that (a) statistics are collated on the number and condition of trees and (b) existing trees are adequately maintained in each local authority area.

A public consultation on policies to improve the management of our trees and woodlands by Local Authorities was opened in December 2018. The consultation ended in February 2019. This document set out Government’s view on the importance of trees, especially in an urban environment, and the need for more policies to enhance the status and protection of urban trees.

The Government committed in the 25 Year Environment Plan to introduce a duty on Local Authorities to consult the public on felling street trees. This will increase the transparency of decision-making and give the public a say in the management of these important natural assets. It will encourage local authorities to consider concerns raised and have regard to these when making decisions. This duty will be introduced in the forthcoming Environment Bill.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its response to the Farm Inspection and Regulation Review, published on 13 December 2018.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 August 2019 to Question 280135 on Agriculture: Subsidies, if she will publish a list the 46 pilots which have been signed up to the Environmental Land Management Scheme; and whether those pilots are receiving financial compensation for taking part in that scheme.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons there has been a change to permitted levels of gaseous tritium discharges at former Magnox Nuclear Stations as a result of the operation of the waste encapsulation plants.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding her Department is making available for planting or replanting urban trees to replace trees that have been removed due to disease or decay.

There are no grants available specifically for the replacement of trees removed due to disease or decay, but there are opportunities for funding or new planting in and around our towns and cities under the recently launched £10 million Urban Tree Challenge Fund. This fund will support the planting of up to 130,000 trees across towns and cities in England, and contributes to our manifesto commitment to plant one million urban trees by 2022.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has commissioned research on the potential effect of electro-magnetic waves on levels of premature deaths in farm animals.

Defra manages an active programme of research to support the health and welfare of livestock. The research programme focusses on prevention and control of infectious diseases as well as covering animal welfare issues. There is no current research funded on electro-magnetic waves and their potential impact from this programme.

Defra does have a regular, consistent systematic process for identifying and assessing new threats to animal health and welfare through the Veterinary Risk Group and the issue has not been raised which could inform future research requirements.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with (a) China and (b) countries in east Africa on ending the international trade in donkey skins; and what recent steps he has taken to help implement an international ban on the trade in donkey skins.

Defra takes the welfare of donkeys and other equids very seriously and has taken an active role in global efforts to monitor and strengthen welfare standards for these species. This included contributing to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Code chapter on Welfare or Working Equids adopted by OIE members in 2016, which provides species specific guidance to complement the general welfare principles applying to all animals. In addition we have contributed to the EU voluntary initiative developing guidance on responsible ownership and care of equidae. Influencing the raising of global standards through international fora can be an effective and sustainable way to address these issues across the world and therefore have a broader impact than bilateral meetings with particular countries. This is part of the Government’s strong commitment to strengthening welfare standards.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many pilot environmental land management schemes have been agreed, where those pilots will take place; and what the start date is for each such pilot.

Tests and trials allow us to co-design and test the operability of elements of the new system and to understand if and how new elements of the Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme work in a real life environment. Tests and trials are not analysing methods of delivery of environmental outcomes rather how the scheme or innovative mechanism will operate.

We received 113 proposals from stakeholders to conduct tests and trials of the new ELM scheme in phase one. We identified 49 of these which most closely matched the identified priorities and would help us test critical elements or building blocks of the new scheme. Of these 49, two have subsequently merged with other phase 1 proposals and one has withdrawn from the process, leaving 46.

The national pilot is due to start in 2021. It will test different types of possible approaches to deliver the new ELM scheme, and the underlying scheme mechanics (such as the payments system) before the ELM scheme launches in 2024.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2019
[Suggested redraft] To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of farms at risk of closing down as a result of a new systems of agricultural payments as outlined in the Government's policy paper of 12 September 2018 on health and harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a green Brexit, what the size of those farms are; and the type of farming undertaken by those farms.

In September 2018, alongside the Agriculture Bill and policy statement, the Government published an ‘Analysis of the impacts of removing Direct Payments’. This provided an overview of the potential impacts to different farm types and sizes of moving away from direct payments and introducing a new system of public money for public goods.

Direct payments are arbitrary payments based on land area that tend to favour larger land owners rather than smaller family farming businesses. In England we will phase out direct payments during an agricultural transition, giving time for farmers to adjust. Phasing out direct payments will free up money so we can reward farmers for delivering public goods, including environmental outcomes and animal welfare.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report entitled, Business Management Practices on Farms, England 2016/17, published by his Department in February 2018, what steps he is taking to increase the number of farm businesses that undertake (a) business and (b) land management planning; and what assessment he has made of the effect of new Environmental Land Management system as outlined in the statement of 12 September 2018 on the ability of farmers to produce land management plans.

The new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme will give farmers and land managers incentives to deliver a wide variety of environmental benefits. We are exploring the role of land management plans in the ELM scheme, including through undertaking a number of tests and trials on the use of land management plans.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what measures will be included in a future environmental land management scheme as outlined in the policy statement of 12 September 2018 on health and harmony: the future for food farming and the environment in a green Brexit, to ensure all farm businesses can create land management plans and participate in the new payment schemes.

The new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme will give farmers and land managers incentives to deliver a wide variety of environmental benefits through paying public money for delivering environmental public goods. In developing ELM, we are exploring how to maximise participation to increase the environmental benefits that are delivered. To support this, we are undertaking a number of tests and trials which include the role of land management plans and expert advice for farmers and land managers.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what measures will be included in a future environmental land management scheme as outlined in the policy statement of 12 September 2018 on health and harmony: the future for food farming and the environment in a green Brexit, to promote farm cluster working and landscape-scale enhancement projects.

The new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme will give farmers and land managers incentives to deliver a wide variety of environmental benefits through paying public money for delivering environmental public goods. In developing the ELM scheme we are exploring the role of farm cluster working and landscape scale enhancement, and how to incentivise this to maximise the delivery of environmental benefits.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential effect on volumes of food waste collected in the event of local authorities introducing food waste collections separate to other waste collections.

Our analysis shows that if all local authorities provide at least kerbside properties (as opposed to flats) with a separate food waste collection service, this would increase the amount of food waste collected by 1.35 million tonnes by 2029.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of delinking basic payments from the land as outlined in paragraphs 91 to 99 of the explanatory notes to the Environment Bill on patterns of land ownership in rural areas.

Alongside the introduction of the Agriculture Bill last September we published an analysis of the impacts of phasing out and delinking Direct Payments. Delinking may encourage a faster transition of farming businesses and may help those who choose to leave farming. This could increase the ease with which new entrants can acquire land for farming.

15th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure the equity of the transition to environmental land management payments for farms of different sizes.

The seven year agricultural transition period in England, as set out in the Agriculture Bill, will make sure there is a gradual transition from the current system to the new, avoiding a cliff edge for farm businesses of all sizes. It will give all farmers sufficient time to adapt and prepare for the new Environmental Land Management system which will be piloted and rolled out during the transition.

During the transition, we will apply reductions to Direct Payments in a fair way, with higher reductions initially applied to amounts in higher payment bands.

This method balances the views of those who feel recipients of the highest payments should initially face higher reductions with the strong calls for the reductions to be shared amongst all farmers from the start of the transition.

10th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report of the Committee on Climate Change entitled, Progress in preparing for climate change, published on 10 July, for what reasons good progress was not made in any of the 33 sectors assessed by that Committee on actions needed to manage climate change risks.

The Government welcomes the report by the Committee on Climate Change. We are committed to taking robust action to improve resilience to climate change, and will formally respond to the Committee’s detailed recommendations in October, in line with the timetable set out in the Climate Change Act.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page five of the Public Health England position statement on The Impact on Health of Emissions to Air from Municipal Waste Incinerators, what information he holds on the development of work in that area.

I refer the Hon. Member to the reply given on 26 June 2019 to PQ 266068, which details PHE’s research in this area. PHE undertakes various air quality research projects, working with academic partners, to review the evidence for the health effects of air pollutants, regarding the health effects of particulate matter (PM0.1 and PM1).

PHE is a partner in two health protection research units funded by the National Institute for Health Research, whose remit includes air pollution research. These projects can be viewed at the following link: http://www.hpru-ech.nihr.ac.uk/

PHE also draws on scientific studies and reviews published in the peer reviewed literature and by authoritative bodies.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to improve the quality of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in National Parks.

Our 25 Year Environment Plan commits to restoring 75% of our one million hectares of land and freshwater in protected sites to favourable condition including in National Parks.

We will continue to provide funding for the positive management of Sites of Special Scientific Interests through our agri-environment schemes. In advance of the introduction of the new Environmental Land Management System, we are using our tests and trials programme as a means to work with farmers, land managers and stakeholders, including the National Parks so that they can contribute to the contents and design of the new system.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what comparative data and analysis his Department holds on (a) operational practice and (b) waste content in municipal waste incineration sites in (i) England and (ii) Italy (iii) Scandinavia and (iv) other Member States of the EU.

None; however data and analysis on these systems is held on the European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau’s (EIPPCB) Best Available Techniques Information System.

Information on the operational practice of waste incineration plants across Europe is also contained within the current draft of the Best Available Techniques (BAT) Reference Document published by the EIPPCB, available here http://eippcb.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reference/BREF/WI/WI_BREF_FD_Black_Watermark.pdf

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations he has received from (a) the US Administration and (b) lobbyists from the US pork production sector on the import of pork products from pigs fed with the additive ractopamine.

According to our records, the Secretary of State has not received any representations from the US on the import of pork products from pigs fed with the additive ractopamine.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect on local authority recycling rates of combining business waste with household recycling statistics; and if he will make a statement.

Municipal waste is the combination of household waste collected by local authorities and household-like business waste. The impact assessment on consistency of municipal recycling collections produced by the Government and the Waste and Resources Action Programme estimates a baseline recycling level of 40% for municipal waste. Measures announced in the Resources and Waste Strategy can increase the overall municipal recycling rate to 65%.

Our consultation on ‘Consistency in Household and Business Recycling in England’, which closed on 13 May, sought views on how to increase the quantity and quality of materials collected for recycling from businesses. We are analysing the responses to the consultation and will be publishing the Government’s response to it shortly.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of a deposit return scheme on the size of local authority household recycling collections; and if he will make a statement.

The effect of a deposit return scheme (DRS) on household recycling collections is set out on page 32 of the DRS impact assessment: https://consult.defra.gov.uk/environment/introducing-a-deposit-return-scheme/supporting_documents/depositreturnconsultia.pdf

The Department has recently consulted on introducing a DRS. This closed on May 13, and the Impact Assessment will be updated in due course to reflect any new evidence received.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, by which date do operators of municipal waste incineration sites have to submit information to the Environment Agency on their emissions of (a) PM2.5 and (b) PM 10 for 2018.

Operators were required to submit information on the total annual emissions of all relevant pollutants (including PM2.5 and PM10) by the end of February 2019.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many Environmental Land Management scheme pilots have been identified and agreed; what the names are of those pilots; how many of those pilots are (a) underway and (b) pending; and how many applications were rejected.

Environmental Land Management schemes (ELM) are scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a national pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme, and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and it covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing shortly. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals. At the present time, no proposals have been rejected.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

19th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the potential benefits for the farming sector of the (a) introduction of E10 and (b) future use of bioethanol.

The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has not had any meetings with the Secretary of State for Transport on the potential benefits for the farming sector of the introduction of E10 or future use of bioethanol.

In increasing targets under the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation in April, the Government made clear that moving to E10 fuel could make achieving the UK’s renewable energy targets easier and provide wider economic benefits including in the agricultural sector.

The Department for Transport ran a call for evidence last year on whether, and how best, E10 could be introduced in the UK. Any decision to introduce the new grade of petrol must balance the needs of consumers with the emissions reductions it could help to deliver. The Government will be publishing its next steps on E10 petrol later in the year.

18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, by which date municipal waste incineration sites are required to submit their emissions of (a) PM2.5 and (b) PM10 for 2018.

The Government will request data from local authorities on both PM 2.5 and PM10 emitted from municipal waste incineration sites in June 2019. Emissions data for both must be submitted during September.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what additional steps he plans to take to tackle the illegal trade in eels and elvers.

The Government takes the issue of illegal trade in eels very seriously and is keen to ensure that at all stages of development – glass eel, elver, or mature eel - they are appropriately protected.

The glass eel fishery in England is highly regulated, and we remain confident we have a good traceability of the catch from the riverbank to the point of export. All known exports of catch from the UK glass eel fishery in recent years have been destined for the known legal market in the EU for restocking and aquaculture.

Moreover, the UK continues to contribute to and support Operation Lake – Europol’s operation to tackle illegal eel trafficking across international borders. We work closely with our European and other international partners in a number of international fora, such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), to ensure we are taking strong and effective measures to deter any illegal trade.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
11th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what separate workstreams his Department has established to develop (a) agricultural policy and (b) operational delivery after the UK leaves the EU; what processes are in place for (i) cross-team integration and (ii) co-ordinated stakeholder engagement to deliver integrated and efficient schemes and avoid duplication and complexities for end users; and how much budget has been allocated for the development of each workstream in (A) 2019-20, (B) 2020-21, (C) 2021-22.

Defra has established the Future Farming and Countryside Programme to develop agricultural policy. Operational delivery after the UK’s departure from the EU has been organised as a Department Portfolio containing seven programmes, with a number of cross-cutting enablers providing cross-team integration.

Coordinated stakeholder engagement is provided through an Operations Centre and the running of Management Board and Portfolio Board meetings.

Defra has been allocated a budget of £410 million for 2019-2020, with no further allocations made as the spending review has not taken place yet.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staff at each grade are working full-time on the environmental land management scheme programme.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the risk register for the environmental land management scheme programme.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timetable is for the roll out of (a) detailed objectives, (b) tests and trials, (c) payment methodology, (d) sufficient advisor numbers, (e) the pilot scheme and (f) the final launch of the environmental land management scheme.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding has been allocated to individual environmental land management scheme projects to test and trial (a) climate change mitigation and adaptation, (b) supporting public access to farmland and better understanding of the countryside, (c) preventing, reducing or protecting from environmental hazards (including pesticides) and (d) widening the range of farm sectors represented, including agri-environment programmes, horticulture, pigs and poultry.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many individual environmental land management scheme projects he plans to establish to test and trial (a) climate change mitigation and adaptation, (b) supporting public access to farmland and better understanding of the countryside, (c) preventing, reducing or protecting from environmental hazards (including pesticides) and (d) widening the range of farm sectors represented, including agri-environment programmes, horticulture, pigs and poultry.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

10th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many individual projects he plans to establish to test and trial the environmental land management scheme in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

These questions have been answered as one to enable the Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELM) approach to be outlined in full in a single place.

An ELM is being developed to pay land managers public money for delivering environmental public goods. This is a large programme of work with 81 full time staff with grades ranging from Administrative Officer to Deputy Director.

The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure it has strong risk and programme management foundations in place and will continue to assess and manage these as appropriate. It is not Government policy to publish departmental risk registers given the inherent risks involved.

ELM is scheduled to be rolled out from late 2024, with a National Pilot beginning in late 2021. Detailed planning of the pilot is in train. The pilot will run for three years, and will aim to assess the end-to-end operability and deliverability of the scheme and allow us to identify and refine any issues or barriers that occur in practice.

To support the development of ELM we are undertaking a number of test and trials. The work is being facilitated by a range of stakeholders, including farmer groups, representative bodies and non-governmental organisations, and covers a range of geographies and sectors. 47 proposals are being taken forward in phase 1. We are working closely with stakeholders to finalise these. Depending on the complexity of the test or trial we anticipate the first of these commencing in Autumn 2019. We have received over 200 proposals for phase 2. We will prioritise those proposals that fill gaps in scheme delivery components, outcomes and land management sectors identified from the coverage of the first 47 proposals.

We are working with stakeholders to understand how much funding they might require from the Government to support the delivery of the tests and trials in line with value for money principles.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the total emissions were in England of (a) PM2.5, (b) PM1 and (c) PM0.1 in (i) 2018 and (ii) 2017.

Defra publishes the report: ‘Air Pollutant Inventories for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland’ in the autumn each year. This report provides the total annual emissions in England of PM2.5. 2018 total emissions of PM2.5 in England will be published in autumn 2020, and 2017 total emissions of PM2.5 in England will be published in autumn 2019. The URL for the latest report is:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/cat09/1810160958_DA_Air_Pollutant_Inventories_1990-2016_Issue1.pdf

Emissions of PM1 and PM0.1 are not estimated for England, however they are estimated for the UK. The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) website holds the database of UK annual emissions for a wide range of air pollutants including PM2.5, PM1 and PM0.1.

The database for UK emissions of particulate matter from 1970 to 2017 can be accessed from the following URL: http://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/data-selector?view=pms.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons the number of pilot projects initially envisaged as part of the environmental land management scheme has been reduced.

My officials are currently developing plans for the National Pilot of the Environmental Land Management scheme. Among other things, this will involve deciding how many farmers and other land managers will take part. Decisions on specific numbers have not yet been made. The pilot is likely to begin with relatively small numbers of participants to help test the prototype system, identify problems and make improvements. The intention is to increase numbers of participants throughout the three year pilot period to test the system on a larger scale.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the 2012 revisions to the Statutory Guidance on dealing with contaminated land.

The 2012 Statutory Guidance was issued following an extensive review with the contaminated land sector, local authorities, other interested Government departments and agencies. In 2014, Defra funded research to assess the level of understanding and impact of the revised guidance. This assessment is publicly available: http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=12496_SP1011-AssessmentoftheImpactoftherevisedStatutoryGuidance.pdf.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure the maintenance of access to the EU’s rapid alert system for food and feed after the UK leaves the EU.

Food safety is one of the Government’s top priorities on leaving the EU. The UK Government is committed to maintaining a strong relationship with the EU Commission on Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF). The exact arrangements for UK participation in RASFF will be a matter for the next phase of the negotiations and part of wider discussions on the co-operation of UK authorities with EU agencies.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to publish a regular progress report on the operation of the Environmental Land Management Scheme’s tests and trials; and the funding from the public purse is available to participants in those trials.

In advance of the introduction of the new Environmental Land Management System, we will use tests and trials as a means to work with farmers, land managers and stakeholders so that they can contribute to the contents and design of the new system. This will enable us to test and trial elements of the new system with different user groups to understand how and if they work in a real life environment. We expect to be able to approve the first of the tests and trials in the near future. The level of funding will be based on an assessment of the expected outcomes of the individual proposals and the provision of value for money.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has for funding for rural development after the end of the LEADER programme and when the UK ceases to have access to EU Structural Funds; and what priority will rural businesses, communities and the environment receive in relation to the Shared Prosperity Fund.

Through the socio-economic schemes within the Rural Development Programme for England we are investing over £500 million in rural business and communities. This includes over £250 million for rural business growth and broadband infrastructure through the Growth Programme and £150 million for locally-identified business and community priorities through LEADER.

Our manifesto committed to establishing the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) to reduce inequalities between communities by raising productivity, following our departure from the EU. The Fund will operate across the UK in rural and urban areas. It will tackle inequalities between communities, especially in those parts of our country whose economies are furthest behind. Leaving the EU will allow us to spend money according to our own priorities rather than those set by the EU.

It is intended that simplified administration will ensure that investments are targeted effectively to align with the challenges faced by places across the country and supported by strong evidence about what works at the local level. This includes considering current European investments in rural economies and lessons from the community-led LEADER programme.

We want to ensure that the UKSPF works for rural businesses, communities and the environment, and the design of the fund will take into account the dynamics of rural economies and the particular challenges faced by rural communities. The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) is responsible for delivering the UKSPF. Defra officials are working closely with MHCLG to develop the ways in which the UKSPF will support the rural economy after we leave the EU.

We will consult widely on the design of the UKSPF. Over the past year we have held 25 engagement events across the UK with over 500 representatives from a breadth of sectors, in order to aid policy development. The consultation will build upon these early conversations with decisions on how it will operate, its priorities and budget to be determined at the forthcoming spending review.

22nd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 14 May 2019 to Question 254107 on Farmers: Suicide, if he will set up a round table for hon. Members representing agricultural constituencies to discuss what steps can be taken to reduce the number of suicides of farmers and farm workers.

This is a good suggestion and I would welcome the opportunity to explore further with colleagues representing agricultural constituencies these important issues that were raised in debate on 22 May.

Defra and the Department for Health and Social Care work closely together to monitor and improve mental health and wellbeing in rural communities and I suggest that officials from both departments join us in this discussion.

22nd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he (a) has taken and (b) is planning to take in response to the recommendations on planting trees made by the Climate Change Committee in its report Net Zero – The UK’s contribution to stopping global warming, published in May 2019.

The Committee on Climate Change published its report on 2 May. We very much welcome this analysis and will be responding in a timeframe that reflects the urgency of this crucial issue.

The Government is driving forward its manifesto commitment to plant 11 million trees over the course of this parliament.

We have kick started a vast Northern Forest, which will see 50 million trees planted from Liverpool to Hull; allocated £10 million to plant new trees in our towns and cities through the urban trees challenge fund; and appointed a Tree Champion to lead our engagement on a new English Tree Strategy. In the Autumn Budget, the Chancellor announced £50 million to help plant new woodlands through the Woodland Carbon Guarantee.

We have recently consulted on Best Practice Guidance and issued the Urban Tree Manual, which support the sustainable management of trees. The National Planning Policy Framework, published in July 2018, encourages better recognition of trees and woodlands for the wider natural capital benefits they can provide.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
22nd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he (a) has taken and (b) is planning to take to encourage local authorities to implement the recommendations on planting trees made by the Climate Change Committee in its report Net Zero – The UK’s contribution to stopping global warming, published in May 2019.

The Committee on Climate Change published its report on 2 May. We very much welcome this analysis and will be responding in a timeframe that reflects the urgency of this crucial issue.

The Government is driving forward its manifesto commitment to plant 11 million trees over the course of this parliament.

We have kick started a vast Northern Forest, which will see 50 million trees planted from Liverpool to Hull; allocated £10 million to plant new trees in our towns and cities through the urban trees challenge fund; and appointed a Tree Champion to lead our engagement on a new English Tree Strategy. In the Autumn Budget, the Chancellor announced £50 million to help plant new woodlands through the Woodland Carbon Guarantee.

We have recently consulted on Best Practice Guidance and issued the Urban Tree Manual, which support the sustainable management of trees. The National Planning Policy Framework, published in July 2018, encourages better recognition of trees and woodlands for the wider natural capital benefits they can provide.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the (a) names and (b) locations by region of each of the Environmental Land Management Scheme pilots.

The Environmental Land Management (ELM) pilot is planned to run for three years starting from late 2021 and will cover the whole of England. The first tests and trails, informing different elements of ELM, should start shortly and the proposals ELM have received to date are spread across the whole of England.