David Hanson Portrait

David Hanson

Labour - Former Member for Delyn

Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
16th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Justice Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
20th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Justice Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Panel of Chairs
14th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Draft Investigatory Powers Bill (Joint Committee)
5th Nov 2015 - 11th Feb 2016
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
18th Sep 2015 - 28th Oct 2015
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
7th Oct 2011 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Home Office) (Crime and Policing)
5th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th May 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
5th May 2005 - 5th Apr 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Wales Office)
29th Jul 1999 - 7th Jun 2001
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
28th Jul 1998 - 29th Jul 1999
Welsh Affairs Committee
27th Apr 1992 - 15th Jan 1996


Division Voting information

David Hanson has voted in 2460 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 48 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Labour Aye votes vs 57 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
4 Mar 2010 - Chair (Terminology) - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 119 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 279 Noes - 31
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 93 Labour No votes vs 155 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 176
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Labour No votes vs 157 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 158
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 156 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 153
12 Nov 2008 - MODERNISATION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS (STANDING ORDERS) - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 33 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 87
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Labour Aye votes vs 215 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 336
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 62 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 286
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 152 Labour No votes vs 162 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 416 Noes - 163
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Hanson voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 111 Labour Aye votes vs 197 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 196 Noes - 375
View All David Hanson Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Theresa May (Conservative)
(100 debate interactions)
James Brokenshire (Conservative)
(92 debate interactions)
John Bercow (Speaker)
(72 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(588 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(323 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(219 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(139 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all David Hanson's debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Hanson

15th October 2019
David Hanson signed this EDM on Thursday 24th October 2019

Fair pay and treatment of outsourced staff at Northwick Park Hospital

Tabled by: Gareth Thomas (Labour (Co-op) - Harrow West)
That this House expresses concern that many of the 400 outsourced catering, porters, cleaners and ward hostesses employed by Medirest, which is part of the Compass Group, at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow are being paid £8.21 an hour rather than the Living Wage Foundation rate of £9 an hour …
32 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Scottish National Party: 2
Independent: 1
25th July 2019
David Hanson signed this EDM on Wednesday 4th September 2019

BRAZIL DEFORESTATION

Tabled by: Graham P Jones (Labour - Hyndburn)
That this House condemns the policies pursued by the Administration of President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil, which are destroying the Amazon rainforest; notes that more than 3,700 square kilometres of forest has been deforested in 2019 with July being the worst month on record so far; further condemns the violence …
39 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Independent: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Green Party: 1
View All David Hanson's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Hanson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by David Hanson

Wednesday 24th June 2015

David Hanson has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by David Hanson


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 to remove the by-election system for the election of hereditary peers; to provide for the exclusion of hereditary peers from the House of Lords over time; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Thursday 7th September 2017
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 to remove the by-election system for the election of hereditary peers; to provide for the exclusion of hereditary peers from the House of Lords over time; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 20th December 2016

A Bill to amend the House of Lords Act 1999 to remove the section 2 exception under which 90 persons have the right to sit, speak and vote in the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 26th April 2016
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require individuals standing for elected office in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to declare any political party of which they are a member when registering to stand; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 26th March 2013

850 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
26 Other Department Questions
9th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assistance she plans to provide for the development of tidal stream power technology.

That the UK has deployed the world’s first commercial scale tidal stream turbine MCT SeaGen, a 1.2MW project.

The world’s first multi-turbine tidal stream array, MeyGen 1A, received £10m in DECC innovation funding and will be deployed in the UK this year.

We are looking at what more we can do to support these developing technologies.

19th Feb 2016
To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what the average hourly earnings for their (a) female and (b) male (i) full-time and (ii) part-time employees was in each of the last five years.

The following information relates to employees of the Church of England's National Church Institutions (NCIs). Senior salaries, gender and race information are published each year in the annual reports of Archbishops’ Council, Pensions Board and Church Commissioners.

Women make up 55% of the total workforce and hold just over 40% of the roles at a senior level. Most roles fit into a pay banding structure which pays the same for equivalent jobs in each band. The equal pay draft regulations have just been published and the NCIs will be reporting in line with the requirements when they have been passed into law.

Clergy officeholders, as distinct from employees, are paid a stipend rather than a salary. For information female and male Bishops in office receive the same level of stipend. All other clergy officeholder stipends are based on a national stipend benchmark which is set by post and is the same for female and male clergy in each diocese.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of the Government Equalities Office were in each of the last five years.

The Government Equalities Office (GEO) transferred into the Department for Education on 1 September 2015. Prior to September, GEO were part of DCMS. We are therefore not able to provide historical salary data.

The Government Equalities Office (GEO) pays annual salaries. These have been converted to hourly rates using the calculation ((Gross Basic Salary*FTE)/52)/Weekly hours.

Please find details of the average hourly earnings of the groups of GEO staff requested below:

Mar-11

Mar-12

Mar-13

Mar-14

Mar-15

Jan-16

Male

-

-

-

-

-

£25.33

Female

-

-

-

-

-

£23.38

Full-time

-

-

-

-

-

£24.06

Part-time

-

-

-

-

-

£23.94

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

Average earnings are published by the Office for National Statistics, for all departments on an annual basis. The latest publication date was 8 October 2015. Breaking these figures down to an hourly basis could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Detailed breakdowns of mean and median salaries for female, male, full time and part time staff are contained in the Civil Service Statistics Statistical Bulletin Tables available here:

2011: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-229310

2012: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-279335

2013: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-319802

2014: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-375368

2015: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-414427

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of her Department were in each of the last five years.

The average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of DECC for each of the last five years are set out in the table below:

Year

Average hourly earnings (£)

Female

Male

Full-time

Part-time

2011

23.80

25.80

24.70

25.70

2012

23.80

25.80

24.70

26.00

2013

22.80

25.80

24.30

25.40

2014

23.30

25.50

24.40

25.40

2015

23.20

25.70

24.30

26.80

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Prime Minister, what the (a) job description, (b) budget and (c) selection criteria is for each of his trade envoys.

Information regarding trade envoys can be found on the gov.uk website.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Prime Minister, who he has appointed as a trade envoy to which countries since May 2010.

Information regarding trade envoys can be found on the gov.uk website.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the construction industry who already pay into the Construction Industry Training Board Levy scheme; and if he will make a statement.

We have ongoing discussions with the construction sector about the CITB Levy scheme on how existing arrangements are affected, and whether any changes are required, including whether they may wish to see changes to the CITB levy regime when the apprenticeship levy takes effect.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to ensure that businesses which contribute to the Construction Industry Training Board Levy scheme do not also pay the apprenticeship levy; and if he will make a statement.

The apprenticeship levy is economy wide. It will apply to all employers with a pay bill over £3,000,000 including those in the construction and engineering construction sectors.We are aware that the industry is concerned about the potential impact of paying two levies. We are working closely with the Industry Training Boards who will consult with their members ahead of the introduction of the apprenticeships levy on how their existing arrangements will be affected.


1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, when she plans to make a further announcement about Contracts for Difference; and whether she plans for onshore wind developments to be able to qualify for such contracts.

We will be confirming our plans for future competitive CFD allocation rounds in due course and are considering how we use the tools available under the CFD to implement the manifesto commitment to end new subsidies for onshore wind.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2015 to Question 221259, on how many occasions banks which have accessed funds on behalf of borrowers under the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme have subsequently made a claim on the public purse following default.

Lenders participating in the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme originate loans to eligible business entities using their own capital.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2015 to Question 221259, how many companies which accessed funds under the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme subsequently received public funds following liquidation.

The Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) is provided in favour of the Lender and consequently no companies in receipt of a loan facilitated by the scheme have received public funds through the EFG scheme following liquidation.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2015 to Question 221259, how many companies which accessed funds from each lender under the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme have defaulted.

Delivery of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) is fully devolved to the participating lenders and loans can be made to several types of businesses, including limited companies. Up to the 31st December 2014, the number of businesses that have been recorded by all lenders as having defaulted on the terms of their loan, at some stage during the life of their loan, is 4,495. Not all defaults will necessarily lead to a claim being made against the guarantee.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if his Department will undertake a review of the use of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme in response to the review announced by the Royal Bank of Scotland of its own practices relating to that scheme.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 20 January 2015 to Question UIN 220931.

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the total value was of the loans underpinned by the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme in each year since its inception; and what the value was of the loans underpinned by that scheme made by each financial institution in each of those years.

Information on the total value of the loans underpinned by the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme in each year since its inception, and the value of the loans underpinned by that scheme made by each financial institution in each of those years, is attached.

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether he plans to meet the Chairman and Chief Executive of the Royal Bank of Scotland to discuss the review announced by that bank of its practices relating to the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills maintains contact with Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) executives throughout the year covering a range of matters of mutual interest. His most recent meeting to discuss RBS’s proposed course of action on the Enterprise Finance Guarantee was with Alison Rose, CEO of Commercial and Private Banking at RBS, on 14 January 2015.

16th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent estimate he has made of the number of (a) domestic and (b) commercial properties that use LED lighting.

We have not estimated the number of buildings domestic or commercial that use LED lighting. We estimate that sales of LED lighting in 2013 had increased to 2.5% of the total sales of lighting. From a recent report that DECC published in the summer of 2014 consumers using these more efficient light bulbs, compared to incandescent, can save over £300 by 2030:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/328083/Energy_efficient_products_-helping_us_to_cut_energy_use_-_publication_version_final.pdf.

9th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps he is taking to encourage the use of LED lighting in domestic properties.

Energy Efficient Luminaires were introduced into the domestic Green Deal Assessment Software on 7 December 2014 allowing an assessor to recommend low energy lighting to consumers to improve the overall efficiency of their home. This means that Energy Efficient Luminaires can appear on a Green Deal Advice Report, which can be used to take forward a Green Deal Finance Plan. Energy Efficient Luminaires are complete light fittings which must be fixed to the dwelling and that can only take low energy lamps (e.g. such as LEDs).

11th Nov 2014
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, what the Government's policy is on reform of the House of Lords.

The Government remains fully committed to the principle of House of Lords Reform. In a modern democracy, there should be elected members in both Houses, which was the intention of the Government’s House of Lords Reform Bill in 2012.

The Government continues to favour a reformed upper House containing mostly elected members even though it has not been possible to pass legislation to achieve this in this Parliament.

30th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the prevalence of the practice of retentions as a means of insurance in the construction industry; and if he will make a statement.

The withholding of a retention is a common contractual practice in the construction industry. Through the Construction Leadership Council the Government is working with the construction industry to move towards a position where retentions are no longer needed, as part of a more general set of measures on good payment practices.

30th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what guidance his Department issues on the use of retentions as insurance in the construction industry; and if he will make a statement.

This Department has issued no guidance on the use of retentions in the construction industry.

16th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the number of (a) cases of mediation undertaken between banks and individuals or companies and (b) outcome of mediation following use of the enterprise finance guarantee scheme.

Operation of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) is devolved by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) to the participating lenders. BIS monitors lenders’ administration of EFG but does not intervene in individual disputes between lenders and borrowers.

If a borrower has a complaint regarding their loan they should initially follow their lender’s internal complaints process. If that does not provide a satisfactory outcome then in most cases they have the option of approaching the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Use of mediation as a means of resolving any disputes which may have arisen between participating lenders and borrowers who have received an EFG-backed loan is a matter for the lender and borrower.

16th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many complaints about the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme his Department has received in each year since the inception of that scheme.

Delivery of EFG is fully devolved to over 40 participating lenders, each of which has their own arrangements for handling customer complaints. The Department does not mediate in disputes between individual borrowers and lenders. Any business complaining to BIS or the British Business Bank is guided in the first instance to follow their lender’s complaints procedure. Upon exhaustion of that process the next step for dealing with an unresolved dispute in most instances will be to refer it to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

16th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many applications to the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme have been (a) submitted, (b) approved and (c) terminated following approval by his Department since the inception of that scheme.

Delivery of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) is fully devolved to over 40 participating lenders. As such the Department for Business Innovation and Skills does not directly receive, approve or terminate any EFG applications.

Participating lenders do not report to the Department numbers of applications submitted or terminated. Since inception of the scheme in January 2009, participating lenders have made offers of 26,189 EFG-backed loans and other types of debt facilities.

2nd Jul 2014
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the recall of hon. Members.

The Government's intention to bring forward a recall Bill in this session was announced in the Queen's speech on 4 June.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Attorney General, how much was spent by the UK Government in undertaking legal action in the (a) Cherry and others (Respondents) v Advocate General for Scotland (Appellant) (Scotland), (b) R (on the application of Miller) (Appellant) v The Prime Minister (Respondent) in the Supreme Court, (c) case number CO/3385/2019 in the High Court, (d) reclaiming motion by Joanna Cherry QC MP and others against the Advocate General in the Outer Court of Scotland and (e) (First) Joanna Cherry QC MP and others for judicial review in the Outer Court of Scotland cases.

No estimate has been made of the total costs of the prorogation litigation, which only recently concluded. We expect to know the final figures in November.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Jun 2019
To ask the Attorney General, what his Department's policy is on the reimbursement of travel expenses to people who have been in the criminal justice system.

It is essential that victims are supported in the criminal justice system, and the Government has made this a key priority. The reimbursement of travel expenses can be made to those who have been called as a witness in the Criminal Justice System.

The payment of expenses and allowances to prosecution witnesses, where the Crown Prosecution Service is the prosecuting authority, is governed by the Crown Prosecution Service (Witnesses’ etc. Allowances) Regulations 1988. Full guidance on expenses and allowances for prosecution witnesses can be found here: https://www.cps.gov.uk/publication/witness-expenses-and-allowances

The rates or scales of expenses for defence witnesses are determined by the Ministry of Justice. The payment of expenses incurred by those called as a witness on behalf of a defendant are set out in Regulations made under Sections 19 and 20 of the Prosecution of Offences Act 1985. Full guidance on expenses and allowances can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/592291/guide-allowances-under-part-v-costs-criminal-cases-general-september-2016.doc. In addition, any acquitted defendant whose costs are ordered by a court to be paid out of central funds may be allowed the same travelling and subsistence allowances as if they attended to give evidence (i.e. an ordinary witness subsistence allowance, plus travelling expenses).

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Oct 2016
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the use of the European Arrest Warrant.

The European Arrest Warrant (EAW) provides a basis for a swift and cost-efficient extradition process between EU Member States implementing the principle of ‘mutual recognition’ of judicial decisions. The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute EAW following the referendum.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment he has made of the reasons for variations across police force areas in conviction rates for rape offences.

There are a number of factors at various stages that are likely to have an impact on conviction rates for rape, but the Crown Prosecution Service is committed to improving the conviction rate for rape by working closely with partners in all police force areas.

In order to provide consistency of approach, the CPS has also established networks of Violence against Women and Girls co-ordinators.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Attorney General, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of the Law Officers' Departments were in each of the last five years.

The information requested is contained in the attached tables.

18th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many 18 to 25-year olds in Delyn constituency are recorded (a) in the latest census estimate and (b) on the electoral register; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency worked in the public sector in each year for which data is available.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many incidents of metal theft have been reported in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

11th Oct 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths from the abuse of nitrous oxide were recorded for each region of England and Wales for each (a) age and (b) gender in 2015.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

11th Oct 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths from volatile substance abuse were recorded in each region of England and Wales for each (a) substance, (b) age and (c) gender in 2015.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government plans to take to reduce the size of the House of Lords.

Given the very large and urgent list of other constitutional reforms currently underway, it’s hard to justify giving Lords reform a higher priority than other manifesto promises. We will continue to consider steps that are able to command support from all sides of the House. The Leader of the House of Lords has convened cross-party talks to discuss these issues, and those talks continue.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of 10 Downing Street were in each of the last five years.

The information is not available.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The information is not available.

8th Dec 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people of what age and sex have died as a result of volatile substance abuse in each region of England and Wales in each year since 2013.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

8th Dec 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people of what age and sex have died as a result of the abuse of nitrous oxide in each region of England and Wales in each year since 2013.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

29th Oct 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the daily rate or fee will be for members of the proposed review committee on securing the decisive role of the House of Commons on financial matters and secondary legislation.

The Government has asked Lord Strathclyde to lead a review to examine how to secure the decisive role of the elected House of Commons in relation to (i) its primacy on financial matters; and (ii) secondary legislation. Lord Strathclyde will be supported by a panel of experts and further details will be announced in due course.


28th Oct 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans the Government has to pay a daily rate or fee to members of the review committee he has proposed on securing the decisive role of the Commons on financial matters and secondary legislation; and what rate he plans to set for that work.

The Government has asked Lord Strathclyde to lead a review to examine how to secure the decisive role of the elected House of Commons in relation to (i) its primacy on financial matters; and (ii) secondary legislation. Lord Strathclyde will be supported by a panel of experts and further details will be announced in due course.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many pension payments to retired civil servants have been (a) missed and (b) delayed by MyCSP, in each month since September 2014.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Leicester South on 8 January 2015 to UIN: 219343.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government plans to take to reduce the size of the House of Lords.

Given the very large and urgent list of other constitutional reforms currently underway, it’s hard to justify giving Lords reform a higher priority than other manifesto promises. We will continue to consider steps that are able to command support from all sides of the House. The Leader of the House of Lords has convened cross-party talks to discuss these issues, and those talks continue.

14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 27 December 2018 to Question 202714 on Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme, when he plans to write to the Right Hon. Member for Delyn on the Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme.

I shall be writing to the rt. hon. Member on this matter within the next two weeks.

5th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) RP02a and (b) RP07 forms Companies House has received in each of the last five years.

The table below shows how many (a) RP02A and (b) how many RP07 forms were received in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Year

RP02 Received

RP07 Received

2014

3,499

N/A

2015

4,791

N/A

2016

5,189

2,969

2017

5,981

6,804

2018

5,591

8,070

Figures for RP02 include both RP02a and RP02b, as historical statistics are not broken down. However, RP02b forms are estimated to be less than 10% of total number of RP02 forms received.

Figures for RP07 began in April 2016, which is when the relevant legislation was implemented.

5th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many prosecutions have been made in each of the last five years for fraudulent use of an address through Companies House.

There have been no prosecutions for fraudulent use of an address through Companies House. The Department is currently considering a broad package of reforms to Companies House and plan to consult on these reforms in due course.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how often the Retail Sector Council meets; and whether the dates of these meetings are in the public domain.

The Retail Sector Council meets approximately three times a year. They first met in March, then June and November of 2018. Their next meeting is scheduled for February.

The UK retail sector is one of the largest employers in the country, with a workforce of over three million and accounting for around 5.1% of economic output with sales of nearly £360 billion in 2017.

The latest ONS retail briefing shows that for the whole of 2018, retail sales in terms of quantity bought increased by 2.7% and Total Retail sales in 2018 increased to £368bn in 2018, an increase of 3%, but we and the Council recognise that the sector faces some key challenges.

The Council is prioritising its work to address the key challenges facing the sector and will initially focus on; costs to business, skills and lifelong learning, employment protection, consumer protection, the circular economy and the Industrial Strategy. The priority areas were selected by the industry and each workstream will be led by a senior industry figure.

17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to his letter of 25 September 2018 to the right hon. Member for Delyn on Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme, when he plans to provide an update.

BEIS officials have continued to receive information on this matter from the rt. hon. Member’s constituent, and from RBS. I will write to the rt. hon. Member shortly with a further update.

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff were employed at the Intellectual Property Office in each year since 2010.

The headcount at the Intellectual Property Office from 01 April 2010 is as follows:

Date

Headcount

01/04/2010

907

01/04/2011

899

01/04/2012

920

01/04/2013

982

01/04/2014

1017

01/04/2015

1108

01/04/2016

1169

01/04/2017

1171

01/04/2018

1215

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications for a patent lodged at the Intellectual Property Office have been pending a decision for over (a) two, (b) three and (c) 4 years.

The number of patent applications which have been pending a decision for over two, three and four years are:

(a) Over two years: 8233

(b) Over three years: 3863

(c) Over four years: 1241

The IPO has a Ministerial Target, offering faster handling of patent applications by providing an examination report with a search report when both are requested at the application date, and meeting at least 90% of requests for an accelerated two-month turnaround for search, publication and examination. All requests to receive the search and examination reports together are acceded to; and 97% of all accelerated examination requests have been completed within 2 months of request for the current financial year.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of notice periods for people on agency contracts with regard to dismissal procedures.

The termination arrangements for agency workers are determined by the contract of engagement.

In recognition of a need for greater transparency to better support agency workers, the Government set out in its response to the Taylor review of modern employment practice the intention to introduce a “key facts” page for agency workers, which will set out clearly all the information needed by an agency worker to make an informed decision prior to entering into a contract.

12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people who have been employed as agency workers for (a) less than one year, (b) between one and two years and (c) more than two years.

The Department holds no information on how long agency workers have been employed on contracts for specific periods of time.

12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with employers who use agency contracts on access to bereavement or compassionate leave.

The Department’s discussions with employers about bereavement or compassionate leave have not referred to agency contracts.

Our manifesto made a commitment that bereaved parents should be able to take some time away from work to grieve for a lost child. To achieve that, the Government is supporting the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Bill. Consultations with business representatives took place last summer and further consultation will take place this year on the details.

Acas has developed guidance for employers on managing bereavement in the workplace, in conjunction with Cruse Bereavement Care. It recognises the effect that bereavement might have on employees in undertaking their duties, sets out the law in this area and provides guidance on good practice, including having a bereavement policy in place.

12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect on the level of workers' rights of people being employed on agency contracts.

The Taylor review into modern employment practices highlighted several areas where the protections of agency workers’ rights could be strengthened.

In response, the Government is currently consulting on the regulation of umbrella companies, and intermediaries; state enforcement of the Agency Worker Regulations; whether “pay between assignments” contracts for agency workers (known as the Swedish derogations) should be repealed; and on the essential information that should be included in a ‘key facts’ summary of an agency worker’s contract.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number and proportion of people in Delyn constituency covered by the Government's proposals to safeguard customers on the poorest value energy tariff.

Ofgem is considering options to protect vulnerable consumers and has yet to announce a formal proposal. Alongside this Ofgem has announced a package of measures to help consumers move away from poor value tariffs.

23rd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the cost to the public purse has been of installing charging points for electric vehicles in each year since 2010.

Please find below a breakdown of funding provided by the Government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) to support the installation of electric vehicle chargepoints in each financial year since 2010/11:

Financial Year

Total OLEV Spend

2010/11

£2.23m

2011/12

£2.58m

2012/13

£9.71m

2013/14

£14.86m

2014/15

£41.65m

2015/16

£16.88m

2016/17

£7.06m

In addition, £22.9m of funding under the Government’s £40m Go Ultra Low City Scheme is for charging infrastructure, and is being awarded across four years from 2016.

23rd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to ensure that the roll-out of charging stations for electric vehicles is spread evenly across all regions and parts of the UK.

The Government is supporting an increase in provision of electric vehicle chargepoints as part of its programme for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). At Autumn Statement 2016, the Chancellor announced additional funding of £80m for charging infrastructure for the period to 2020 and Government is considering how best to allocate this funding to meet the needs of drivers across the UK and deliver value for money.

Alongside this, Highways England has £15m to expand the existing rapid chargepoint network to ensure that across 95 per cent of the strategic road network there will be a chargepoint at least every 20 miles.

In addition, the Government is proposing to take forward powers under the forthcoming Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill that will enable the Government to require Motorway Service Areas, and large fuel retailers to install sufficient provision of electric vehicle chargepoints.

Additional grant funding is also available UK-wide to support the installation of chargepoints at workplaces, at homes, and on residential streets. Further detail of how to apply is available online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-grants-for-low-emission-vehicles

23rd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many charging points for electric vehicles there are in (a) Wales, (b) England, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland at the latest date for which information is available.

Public chargepoints funded by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles must be registered on the Government’s National Chargepoint Registry, an open source data set containing information on the type and geographical location of chargepoints. The registry is available online at: www.national-charge-point-registry.uk

Operators of public chargepoints can also choose to add other chargepoints to this dataset. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill is due to include new powers that could require operators of public chargepoints to make openly available key information about all chargepoints that they operate, including geographic location.

The current dataset from the National Chargepoint Registry shows the following statistics for chargepoints in the UK:

  1. Wales - 37

  2. England - 4909

  3. Scotland - 997

  4. Northern Ireland - 346

Additional chargepoints will also have been installed with support from the private sector that are not listed on this data set but can be found on websites such as Zapmap (www.zap-map.com)

23rd Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department provides to local authorities to increase the roll-out of charging points for electric vehicles.

The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) ‘On-street Residential Scheme’ is providing up to £2.5m for Local Authorities to fund the installation of chargepoints in residential streets where homeowners have no access to off-street parking. £22.9m is being provided to Local Authorities for electric vehicle infrastructure through OLEV’s ‘Go Ultra Low Cities’ scheme and a further £14m through their ultra low emission taxis scheme.

Between 2010 and 2014 more than 6400 chargepoints were installed in 8 local authority regions though the Plugged in Places support scheme. Between 2013 and 2015, following a competitive bidding process open to all UK Local Authorities, more than 580 fast chargepoints and 250 rapid chargepoints were installed under the National Infrastructure Grant Schemes.

9th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to reply to the letter from the right hon. Member for Delyn of 10 January 2017 on construction industry blacklisting which sought a response to a letter from the right hon. Member for Delyn transferred to his Department by the Prime Minister on 28 October 2016.

A reply was sent to the Rt Hon Member on 22 February 2017.

9th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to consult on the recommendations of the Hendry review into tidal lagoons before a decision on the future development of such lagoons is taken.

The Government is grateful for the hard work that has gone into the Review, and will now consider this report as part of the evidence base to determine whether this technology could play a cost effective role in the UK’s energy mix. The Government will respond to the Hendry Review report in due course.

24th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his oral contribution of 8 November 2016, Official Report, column 1395, on the Royal Bank of Scotland, when he plans to write to the right hon. Member for Delyn.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State wrote to the right hon. Member for Delyn on 28 November.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with employers who use agency contracts on access to bereavement or compassionate leave.

The Department’s discussions with employers about bereavement or compassionate leave have not referred to agency contracts.

Our manifesto made a commitment that bereaved parents should be able to take some time away from work to grieve for a lost child. To achieve that, the Government is supporting the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Bill. Consultations with business representatives took place last summer and further consultation will take place this year on the details.

Acas has developed guidance for employers on managing bereavement in the workplace, in conjunction with Cruse Bereavement Care. It recognises the effect that bereavement might have on employees in undertaking their duties, sets out the law in this area and provides guidance on good practice, including having a bereavement policy in place.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect on the level of workers' rights of people being employed on agency contracts.

The Taylor review into modern employment practices highlighted several areas where the protections of agency workers’ rights could be strengthened.

In response, the Government is currently consulting on the regulation of umbrella companies, and intermediaries; state enforcement of the Agency Worker Regulations; whether “pay between assignments” contracts for agency workers (known as the Swedish derogations) should be repealed; and on the essential information that should be included in a ‘key facts’ summary of an agency worker’s contract.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people who have been employed as agency workers for (a) less than one year, (b) between one and two years and (c) more than two years.

The Department holds no information on how long agency workers have been employed on contracts for specific periods of time.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of notice periods for people on agency contracts with regard to dismissal procedures.

The termination arrangements for agency workers are determined by the contract of engagement.

In recognition of a need for greater transparency to better support agency workers, the Government set out in its response to the Taylor review of modern employment practice the intention to introduce a “key facts” page for agency workers, which will set out clearly all the information needed by an agency worker to make an informed decision prior to entering into a contract.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on competition of the decision by Betfred to close on-site bookmakers at UK racecourses.

The provision of on-site bookmakers at racecourses is a commercial matter for the racing and betting industries. Racegoers have access to a variety of betting options at the racecourse including fixed odds betting provided by on-course bookmakers at the side of the track, pool betting provided at the racecourse and online betting via smartphones.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assurances her Department secured in 2011 on the longevity of on-site bookmakers after the sale of the Tote to Betfred.

The provision of on-site bookmakers at racecourses is a commercial matter for the racing and betting industries. Racegoers have access to a variety of betting options at the racecourse including fixed odds betting provided by on-course bookmakers at the side of the track, pool betting provided at the racecourse and online betting via smartphones.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The information requested is already in the public domain. The Office for National Statistics publishes average salary information for each Civil Service Department by gender, and by working pattern. These figures are published as an annual salary.

The Civil Service statistics can be found at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics

18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which areas of Wales (a) have access to 4G and (b) are planned to receive access to 4G by 2016-17; and if he will make a statement.

Improving mobile coverage is a priority for Government. Government reached a landmark agreement with mobile network operators in 2014 to provide coverage to 90% of UK landmass, and the licence obligation on Telefonica (O2) will provide indoor 4G coverage to at least 95 per cent of premises in Wales by 2017. Ofcom is responsible for monitoring and enforcing this requirement and publishes coverage information on its online maps available at www.maps.ofcom.org.uk

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with UNESCO on ensuring that world heritage sites (a) are protected from development by extraction industries and (b) encourage eco-tourism.

Officials from DCMS regularly meet with UNESCO, and discuss a range of issues covered in the Department's portfolio.This Government is committed to theprotectionofCulturalHeritage here and abroad.

23rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many fibre broadband hub stations there are in each local government area in Wales; how many such hubs are live; and what the expected roll-out date is for each station.

Superfast broadband coverage in Wales has now reached over 1 million premises, over two-thirds of the total in Wales. 345,000 premises have gained coverage as a result of the Superfast Cymru broadband programme which has funding from the UK government, Welsh Government and European funds.

The contract for Superfast Cymru is not based on delivery of cabinet or exchange upgrades, but instead requires target numbers of premises able to access superfast broadband. A list of exchanges and deployment status by local authority area is available on the Superfast Cymru website: http://www.superfast-cymru.com/where-and-when


Openreach publishes a list of exchanges accepting orders which can be searched at: https://www.superfast-openreach.co.uk/where-and-when/

20th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2017 to Question 107455, how many women born between (a) 6 April 1950 and 5 April 1953, (b) 6 April 1953 and 5 December 1953 and (c) 6 December 1953 and 5 April 1960 have (i) started and (ii) completed an apprenticeship in each of the last seven years.

The tables attached show the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements by women in each of the last six academic years.

It should be noted that older people are less inclined to undertake an apprenticeship compared to those of a younger age, as shown in the table below comparing the 45-59 age group to the 60+ age group. Since 2013/14 the number of apprenticeship starts has been increasing year on year for both of these age groups.

Age group

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

(provisional) 2016/17

45-59

62,200

61,060

41,850

55,730

57,780

58,110

60+

3,680

3,260

2,480

3,410

3,560

3,680

In addition, overall female apprenticeship starts are greater than those for males as shown in the table below.

Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

(provisional) 2016/17

Female

276,220

279,000

232,940

264,750

268,730

262,820

Male

244,360

231,210

207,480

235,140

240,630

228,520

Note: The Starts and Achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take two years to complete.

Data on apprenticeship starts and achievements by age band, and by gender are available in the apprenticeship demographic tools:

Starts: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624584/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-starts-v1.xlsx

Achievements:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624824/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-achievements-v1.xlsx

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) men and (b) women over 60-years of age have (i) started and (ii) completed an apprenticeship in each of the last seven years.

The tables below show the number of apprenticeship starts and achievements of those aged over 60-years of age in the last six academic years:

i) Apprenticeship Starts for those aged over 60 years by Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Provisional 2016/17

Female over 60

1,130

980

740

1,090

1,160

1,320

Male over 60

1,510

1,280

960

1,330

1,330

1,330

ii) Apprenticeship Achievements for those aged over 60 years by Gender

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Provisional 2016/17

Female over 60

520

460

360

330

420

460

Male over 60

590

720

460

510

590

560

Note: The Starts and Achievements statistics should not be used to measure percentage progress within a year. They are independent performance metrics. Typically, apprenticeships can take two years to complete.

Data on apprenticeship starts and achievements by age band, and by gender are available in the apprenticeship demographic tools:

Starts: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624584/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-starts-v1.xlsx.

Achievements: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/624824/apprenticeships-demographics-data-tool-achievements-v1.xlsx.


10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of her Department were in each of the last five years.

The Department for Education pays annual salaries. These have been converted to hourly rates using the calculation ((Gross Basic Salary*FTE)/52)/Weekly hours:

Mar-12

Mar-13

Mar-14

Mar-15

Jan-16

a) Male

£21.62

£22.25

£22.30

£22.37

£22.30

b) Female

£19.73

£19.85

£20.09

£20.36

£20.54

c) Full-time

£20.64

£21.02

£21.16

£21.24

£21.28

d) Part-time

£19.65

£19.70

£20.15

£21.01

£21.25

This illustrates a positive trend as over the five year period the pay gap between men and women has reduced from 8.7% to 7.9% and the pay gap between full-time and part-time employees has reduced from 4.8% to 0.1%.

24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the effect of plasticulture on the environment; and what support his Department is giving to farmers to tackle plastic waste within their businesses.

This is a devolved matter and the answer applies to England only.

Our Resources and Waste Strategy, published in December last year, builds on commitments in our 25 Year Environment Plan and sets out plans to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste. This is a seismic shift – it is not just about single use plastics, for example, but about all plastics, including those used in agriculture.

Plastics are used on farms for a number of reasons. Wrapping hay and silage bales, transporting feed and fertiliser, and insulating and protecting soil and horticultural crops, for example. The materials used are mostly recyclable, however attempts to collect it for recycling have often been unsuccessful, due to high levels of contamination making the recycling process uneconomic. The Government recognises the issues caused by inappropriate disposal of agricultural plastic, and we are working with the Environment Agency and the Waste and Resources Action Programme to explore how Government policy can address them.

Plastics used in agriculture are ultimately a small proportion of the total volume of plastics used, and the Government is taking a prioritised approach to tackling the overarching problem of plastic pollution. Earlier this year we published consultations on a number of key policy measures to significantly change the way that we manage our waste and to reduce the impacts of plastic on the environment: reforming existing packaging waste regulations; exploring the introduction of a deposit return scheme for drinks containers; and increasing consistency in the recycling system, along with a parallel consultation on the plastic packaging tax that the Chancellor announced in the Budget last year. We will publish the Government responses to these consultations on the GOV.UK website in due course.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many hours Dame Glenys Stacey will be working on the review of the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system.

Dame Glenys Stacey has been appointed to work for two days per week, between 1 March and 31 December 2018, on the Farm Inspection Review.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what arrangements his Department has made with the Ministry of Justice to ensure that Dame Glenys Stacey will be able to continue her work as HM Chief Inspector of Probation whilst undertaking the review into the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system.

HMI Probation has recently recruited two new director and head of function posts, as part of a new organisational design. This increases HMI Probation senior staff capacity substantially, and enables some delegation. It is anticipated that the organisation will continue to inspect and report exactly as planned.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial remuneration Dame Glenys Stacey will receive from his Department for undertaking the review of the rules associated with the current subsidy payments system; and how many staff will be assisting her in that review.

Dame Glenys’s salary will not change as a result of her appointment to this review. The review will be supported by a small secretariat function based in Defra, the details of which are currently being finalised.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many Article 10 certificates for ivory items have been (a) applied for and (b) issued in the last 10 years for which records are available.

These are listed in the table below:

Date

Ivory Article 10 applications Received (a)

Ivory Article 10 certificates Issued (b)

2006

35

31

2007

62

42

2008

64

61

2009

47

39

2010

63

42

2011

25

21

2012

68

55

2013

48

43

2014

63

53

2015

112

87

2016 to 07/12/16

58

57

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many exports of end-of-life vehicles were found to (a) not have and (b) have the required consent for each year since 2010.

The number of end-of-life vehicles found not to have the required consent is set out in the answer to PQ 54514. No figures are available for the numbers of end-of-life vehicles that had consent because vehicles categorised as B1250 are classed as green list waste, which is not automatically subject to notification.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to support the Indian government in its efforts to protect Indian elephants.

The then Prime Minister David Cameron and Prime Minister Narendra Modi met in London in November 2015 and issued a joint statement in which they resolved to work together to improve protection for both captive and wild Asian elephants. Further official level discussions have taken place with the Indian High Commission to clarify the issues and discuss specific areas on which we might work constructively beyond the international forums such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) which already exist.

Within CITES the UK has led on securing agreement to measures to increase focus on protecting Asian elephants. These include the strengthening of national legislation and enforcement to combat illegal trade in live Asian elephants, for range countries to develop strategies to manage their captive domestic populations and to develop and apply a regional registration and marking system covering domestic Asian elephants.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of her Department were in each of the last five years.

The table below provides details of the average hourly earnings of each group of employees in the core-Department as at 30th June 2015 in each of the last five years.

Year

Female

Male

Full-time

Part-time

2015

£19.79

£21.31

£20.51

£20.84

2014

£19.36

£21.43

£20.32

£20.80

2013

£18.62

£20.88

£19.76

£19.44

2012

£18.23

£20.94

£19.64

£19.04

2011

£18.69

£21.20

£19.80

£20.92

The difference in hourly rate of pay for male and female staff can be explained by a greater proportion of male staff at the higher grades.

A recent equal pay review, analysing pay by grade, found that there were no significant equal pay differences based on gender.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she has taken to ensure that organic food producers are subsidised under the Common Agricultural Policy.

Organic farmers in England are eligible to claim Common Agricultural Policy support under the Basic Payments Scheme and are also eligible to apply for funding under the Countryside Stewardship Scheme.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much support from EU agricultural funding has been awarded to UK organic food producers in each of the last five years.

In England between 2010 and 2014, support for organic farmers was provided under the Organic Entry Level Stewardship scheme (OELS) and Organic Higher Level Stewardship scheme (OHLS), which were set up under the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE). The following table provides details of the annual funding provided during this period. Organic farmers were also eligible for payments under the Single Payment Scheme.


OELS and OHLS funding in England 2010-2014:


Year

Annual funding for OELS:

Annual funding for OHLS:

2010

£1,986,129

£17,454,578

2011

£4,285,822

£21,059,841

2012

£6,088,660

£24,443,405

2013

£7,503,473

£27,495,231

2014

£8,665,682

£29,486,762

Total Funding:

£28,529,766

£119,939,817


Footnote 1: Because agriculture is a devolved matter, separate schemes operate in other UK countries. Data on other funding provided is available from devolved administrations.


Footnote 2: These data include payments to organic farmers under conventional land management options in combined organic and conventional agreements and include payments for existing and new agreements each year.


Footnote 3: RDPE funding comprises EU funding allocated under the CAP for England and relevant Exchequer match funding.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much her Department spent on tackling the illegal wildlife trade in each of the last five years.

Over the past five years, the total amount of funding committed by Defra to tackling the illegal wildlife trade is as follows:


Financial Year

Total committed

2010/11

£224,535

2011/12

£226,000

2012/13

£162,000

2013/14

£2,089,773

2014/15

£5,278,744


In December 2013, Defra and DFID announced that £10m of funding would be made available over the period 2014/15 – 2017/18 to help developing countries tackle the illegal wildlife trade, to be administered by Defra. In March 2015, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Development announced that an additional £3m would be made available for this purpose.


The DFID funding is largely distributed through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, for which I announced the opening of a second round of applications in August 2015. In addition, Defra has supported projects which will help tackle the illegal wildlife trade through the Darwin Initiative and through direct awards to organisations such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). We also supported the London Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade in February 2014 and the Kasane Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade in March this year.

7th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what costs (a) have been incurred and (b) are expected in (i) R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the EU and (ii) the appeal to the Supreme Court against the judgment reached in that case.

As the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union said in his statement to the House on 7 November 2016, all those figures will be published in due course. We do not comment on ongoing legal proceedings.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much overseas development aid funding has been allocated to the construction of prisons in each country in receipt of such funding since 2010.

DFID does not collate figures on how much ODA funding has been specifically allocated to prison construction. However, we have supported the reform and rehabilitation of prisons in developing countries, such as £2.3 million in Somalia.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding the Government has allocated to the costs of a new prison in Jamaica since September 2015; and what the status is of the construction of that prison.

In January 2017 the Government of Jamaica formally declined the UK Government’s offer to support the costs of building a new prison in Jamaica. No cost allocation has therefore been made.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of her Department were in each of the last five years.

The figures given in the table below represent the average (mean) salary for each of the defined categories requested as at the 31st of January in each of the last three years. Providing information for 2012 and 2013 could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Year
(as at 31/01)

Average Female Hourly Rate
(£)

Average Male Hourly Rate
(£)

Average Full Time Hourly Rate
(£)

Average Part Time Hourly Rate
(£)

2014

24.95

26.53

25.76

25.05

2015

24.95

27.03

25.79

27.10

2016

25.15

27.18

26.08

25.68

DFID pay is set within Civil Service rules defined by HM Treasury, and grade specific scales operate regardless of gender. Differences in hourly rates apply due to the grade and location profile of the organisation.

5th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many fixed penalty notices have been issued to people crossing the Mersey Gateway bridge in each of the last five years.

The Mersey Gateway Bridge and its tolling operation are the responsibility of Halton Borough Council and its operational company the Mersey Gateway Crossings Board. It is contracted to Merseyflow.

The Department of Transport does not hold the information requested.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
5th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many unpaid fixed penalty notices for crossing the Mersey Gateway bridge resulted in action from a bailiff in each of the last five years.

The Mersey Gateway Bridge and its tolling operation are the responsibility of Halton Borough Council and its operational company the Mersey Gateway Crossings Board. It is contracted to Merseyflow.

The Department of Transport does not hold the information requested.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to ensure that taxi and private hire vehicle drivers are aware that it is illegal to refuse travel to a passenger with an assistance dog.

Taxis and private hire vehicles (PHVs) provide vital services for disabled people, and it is unacceptable for drivers of these vehicles to refuse the carriage of passengers with assistance dogs.

In February, the Government published its response to the report of the Chair of the Task and Finish Group on Taxis and PHV licensing, indicating its intention to introduce mandatory disability awareness training as part of National Minimum Standards.

In the meanwhile, I would urge licensing authorities to use their existing licensing powers to ensure that all taxi and PHV drivers have the knowledge and skills necessary to provide every passenger with the assistance they require.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many meetings his officials had with executives of Seaborne Freight; and what the (a) length and (b) cost of those meetings was.

Several meetings involving executives of Seaborne Freight were held during contract negotiations and subsequently to discuss implementation. The full information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether any expenses were claimed by civil servants undertaking their duties to establish contractual arrangements with Seaborne Freight.

Limited incidental travelling expenses were claimed by civil servants during the course of discussions. The precise total involved could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost of legal advice was to his Department during the (a) due diligence, (b) contract management and (c) contract cancellation process for the Seaborne Freight contract.

Combined costs of external legal, financial and project assurance advice on all three freight contracts including legal advice up to the end of December 2018 were approximately £800,000. Subsequent costs up to termination cannot yet be derived as contracts are still live and invoices pending.

9th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department (a) agreed and (b) made any payments to Seaborne Freight between 30 December 2018 and 29 March 2019.

I refer the hon Member to my Rt Hon Friend's Written Statement of 7 January. Payments for services will not be made until the services are provided.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the average hourly earnings for (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of the Department for Transport which includes:

  • Department for Transport (c)
  • Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency
  • Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency
  • Maritime and Coastguard Agency
  • Vehicle Certification Agency
  • Government Car Service
  • Highways Agency

Year

FY 2010/11

FY 2011/12

FY 2012/13

FY 013/14

FY 2014/15

[a] Female

£13.58

£13.85

£14.28

£14.75

£15.21

[b] Male

£15.25

£15.43

£15.77

£16.22

£16.50

[c] Full Time

£14.85

£15.05

£15.43

£15.91

£16.23

[d] Part time

£14.00

£14.24

£14.52

£14.78

£15.17

Please note: the Government Car Services (GCS) does not hold information on FY 2010/2011 and FY 2011/2012 and is therefore not included in the Department return for these years.

6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what alternative arrangements have been made for residents of Flintshire to take driving tests during the temporary closure of the Chester driving test centre.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) are committed to providing testing in the Chester area, from mid-February DVSA will offer both car and motorcycle practical tests from Cheshire County Sports Club as a temporary measure. In the meantime, DVSA is continuing to look for a new permanent site in the Chester area.

15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many residents of (a) Flintshire and (b) Wrexham county have used driving test centre facilities in Chester in each year since 2010.

The number of residents of (a) Flintshire and (b) Wrexham county that have used the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency test centre facilities in Chester in each year since 2010 is shown below –

Year

County

Residents

2010

Flintshire

2,624

Wrexham

72

Wrexham/Flintshire

101

2011

Flintshire

2,640

Wrexham

93

Wrexham/Flintshire

77

2012

Flintshire

2,388

Wrexham

89

Wrexham/Flintshire

93

2013

Flintshire

2,415

Wrexham

75

Wrexham/Flintshire

77

2014

Flintshire

2,594

Wrexham

94

Wrexham/Flintshire

93

01/01/2015 - 30/11/2015

Flintshire

2,618

Wrexham

71

Wrexham/Flintshire

83

The above figures reflect the individual residents who have taken a test at Chester in each year. Where someone has used the test centre in more than one year, they will be counted in each of those years.


The number of individuals is based on the number of unique driver licence numbers. If someone has been issued with a new driver licence number, for example if they have changed their name, both driver licence numbers will be counted.


4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the estimated cost to the public purse of Operation Stack has been since June 2014.

The Government has not estimated the cost of implementation of Operation Stack on the public purse.

Government firmly views the implementation of Operation Stack as a last, not first resort, and that it is implemented only when necessary by Kent Police. The priority is to keep traffic and goods moving on the roads, while minimising the impact on the public purse.

The Government continues to work with Kent County Council, Kent Police, and Highways England on a range of short to long term solutions to support Operation Stack.

28th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether any research has been conducted on the number of home visits being proactively offered to vulnerable claimants of universal credit.

The Department are continuously reviewing and improving the services for vulnerable people who need to claim Universal Credit to ensure that it is supportive and responsive to their needs. Where claimants are unable to make or manage their claim on-line, telephone and face to face support is available. Where appropriate, home visits can be arranged for claimants when it is the most appropriate method of providing relevant support.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people leaving prison in England and Wales were released in the last 12 months with (a) a valid photo ID, (b) a bank account and (c) a JobCentre appointment for universal credit.

The Department has dedicated Prison Work Coaches, who will support prisoners to complete their benefit claims and proceed to payment as quickly as possible. Our aim is to ensure claimants can access Universal Credit on the day of release in a bid to cut re-offending.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of people applying for an advance claim for universal credit receive the payment (a) on the same day as their application, (b) on the following day, (c) within two days, (d) within three days, (e) within four days and (f) after four days.

The data requested is not held. We aim to pay advances on Universal Credit within 72 hours. However, an advance can be paid on the same day to the claimant, where necessary.

Applications for a Universal Credit advance can be made in a number of ways: in person, by telephone and also online. To identify and collate the total number of applications made would incur disproportionate cost. Consequently, we do not hold the information requested.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for universal credit have been closed due to the claimant not responding to an email or online request broken down by length of time in each year since its introduction.

The information requested is not held by the Department.

The following table shows the number of claims closed and reason for closure for both new claims prior to payment and claims that were in payment:

http://qna.files.parliament.uk/qna-attachments/964153/original/Universal%20Credit%20claim%20closurer%20reasons.pdf

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for universal credit from prison leavers have been (a) turned down and (b) delayed due to lack of ID in each year since its introduction.

Currently, we cannot identify and collate data on prison leavers on the Universal Credit platform in a systematic way. Due to this, we do not hold the information requested.

We are committed to gathering better data to support claimants with complex needs and have prioritised this as part of the wider work programme for Universal Credit, anything we do will be introduced incrementally and would be broad across complex needs rather than focusing on one particular group.

DWP and MoJ are working closely to deliver an improved Universal Credit claim process for prison leavers. We continue to work collaboratively with MoJ to explore options to overcome a number of issues, including the use of prison documentation as proof of identity for Universal Credit claims. We also continue to explore options for claims to be made via telephony channels.

At present, there are various ways in which a claimant can verify their identity for Universal Credit purposes: online using the gov.uk verify service; in person using primary and secondary ID verification or; by using biographical questions, for those who do not have identity documents.

28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of prison leavers who applied for universal credit through a work coach have received an advance payment on the day of release in each year since its introduction.

Currently, we cannot identify and collate data on prison leavers on the Universal Credit platform in a systematic way. Due to this, we do not hold the information requested.

We are committed to gathering better data to support claimants with complex needs and have prioritised this as part of the wider work programme for Universal Credit, anything we do will be introduced incrementally and would be broad across complex needs rather than focusing on one particular group.

DWP and MoJ are working closely to deliver an improved Universal Credit claim process for prison leavers. We continue to work collaboratively with MoJ to explore options to overcome a number of issues, including the use of prison documentation as proof of identity for Universal Credit claims. We also continue to explore options for claims to be made via telephony channels.

At present, there are various ways in which a claimant can verify their identity for Universal Credit purposes: online using the gov.uk verify service; in person using primary and secondary ID verification or; by using biographical questions, for those who do not have identity documents.

28th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the reasons for unsuccessful applications for universal credit.

Where claim closure is considered, a number of checks are conducted before claim closure is undertaken.

The assessment we have made of the Universal Credit Full Service claims that were declared in January 2019 is as follows: Applications were unsuccessful and closed prior to the first payment for a variety of reasons. These include ineligibility, nil entitlement, insufficient evidence, claim withdrawal and non-compliance with the Universal Credit process.

For claimants that need support with their Universal Credit application, the Citizen’s Advice Help to Claim service is available, offering tailored, practical support online, over the phone, and face-to-face.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when the pilot scheme to help homeless ex-offenders conducted by the Norfolk Community Foundation and Norfolk’s former High Sheriff in Norwich will be (a) launched and (b) concluded; and what criteria will be used to assess the scheme's effectiveness.

This provision is expected to start in early June 2019, subject to standard DWP partnership checks and procedures being completed. It is planned to run for one year and will support approximately 24 ex-offenders recently released from prison. Evaluation will be conducted by the Norfolk Foundation in the form of an impact study.

DWP is committed to providing the best possible support for all our claimants, including the most vulnerable in society. We are continuously reviewing and improving the service for vulnerable people to ensure that it is accessible and responsive to their needs.

We encourage all our Jobcentre teams to consider opportunities for partnership-working, where local circumstances allow. Local areas have the flexibility to work alongside local and national organisations to help meet the needs of their communities, assisting our most vulnerable claimants, including those effected by homelessness.

In addition, all Jobcentres in England refer claimants considered to be homeless or at risk of homelessness, to the local authority to receive further housing support.

5th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he plans to reply to the letter of 4 October 2018 from the hon. Member for Delyn on statutory maternity pay and maternity allowance.

The Department takes the issue seriously and we are in the process of responding.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of enabling working women in receipt of maternity allowance who have not met the qualifying period for Statutory Maternity Pay to claim full universal credit payments.

Universal Credit is a means tested system of support. Where claimants already receive Maternity Allowance to meet their living costs it is right that their Universal Credit award is adjusted to take account of the support that they are already receiving (as currently is the case with other DWP legacy means tested working age benefits).

Information about the number of women in receipt of maternity allowance who have applied for universal credit that have worked for less than 26 weeks continuous weeks is not available, and to provide it would incur disproportionate request.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many women in receipt of maternity allowance have applied for universal credit that have worked for less than 26 weeks continuous weeks.

Universal Credit is a means tested system of support. Where claimants already receive Maternity Allowance to meet their living costs it is right that their Universal Credit award is adjusted to take account of the support that they are already receiving (as currently is the case with other DWP legacy means tested working age benefits).

Information about the number of women in receipt of maternity allowance who have applied for universal credit that have worked for less than 26 weeks continuous weeks is not available, and to provide it would incur disproportionate request.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been deemed to be living in in-work poverty in each (a) constituency in Wales and (b) ward in Delyn in each year since 2010.

National statistics on the number of people living in in-work relative low income are set out in the annual "Households Below Average Income" publication. The numbers of people living in in-work relative low income is not available at constituency or ward level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography.

The percentage of working age adults living in relative low income by economic status at a UK level can be found in file “5_workingage_timeseries_risk.ods”, table 5_11ts and the number of working age adults living in relative low income for Wales can be found in file “5_workingage_timeseries_region.ods”, table 5.18ts.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/599136/hbai-2015-2016-supporting-ods-files.zip

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions her Department has had with the Ministry of Justice on the merits of awarding universal credit to prisoners who are nearing completion of their sentence before they leave prison.

We are currently working with the Ministry of Justice to look at ways of developing the service for prison leavers claiming Universal Credit on release.

In the month leading up to their release, Prisoner Work Coaches can support prisoners in preparation to make a claim to Universal Credit. Following recent improvements to Universal Credit advances, claimants, including prison leavers, can now apply to receive up to 100% of their expected monthly entitlement from day one of their claim. Ministry of Justice and DWP are working collaboratively to ensure that prison leavers receive financial support and gain stability to find work on their day of release.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to Answer of 29 January 2018 to Question 124093, on Social Security Benefits: Appeals, how many people waited (a) less than one month, (b) less than two months, (c) less than three months, (d) less than four months, (e) less than five months, (f) less than six months and (g) six months or more for mandatory reconsideration for universal credit in each year since its introduction.

The information requested is shown in the table below:

Universal Credit (UC)

Mandatory Reconsiderations (MR) cleared within each time period

-

1 month

2 months

3 months

4 months

5 months

6 months

6 months +

Total

Apr 2014 – Mar 2015

1,890

30

#

#

#

#

#

1,920

Apr 2015 – Mar 2016

16,370

150

10

10

#

#

#

16,550

Apr 2016 – Mar 2017

18,000

3,910

3,890

1,320

60

30

30

27,260

Apr 2017 – Dec 2017

24,480

7,190

870

240

130

40

40

32,990

Notes:

Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.

‘#’ means fewer than 5 in this category.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
29th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit payments have been made to credit unions in each month since its introduction.

The information requested is not available.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people waited (a) less than one month, (b) less than two months, (c) less than three months, (d) less than four months, (e) less than five months, (f) less than six months and (g) six months or more for mandatory reconsideration in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the table below:

Mandatory Reconsiderations cleared within each time period

-

1 month

2 months

3 months

4 months

5 months

6 months

6 months +

Total

Apr 2014 - Mar 2015

158,700

67,800

31,200

3,900

1,300

600

500

264,000

Apr 2015 - Mar 2016

225,800

3,900

2,300

700

200

100

300

233,100

Apr 2016 - Mar 2017

264,900

5,500

4,600

2,000

1,300

200

300

278,700

Apr 2017 - Dec 2017

209,300

7,700

1,000

500

900

500

700

220,700

Notes:

The data provided relates to all DWP benefits apart from Disability Living Allowance, Attendance Allowance, Child Maintenance Group and Personal Independence Payment who do not record clearance time data in this format.

The data provided is counting the number of Mandatory Reconsideration claims cleared within each given time period, no claim will appear in more than one column.

- Less than one calendar month

- More than 1 month less than 2 months etc.

- More than 6 calendar months

The calculation for a cleared claim is the number of days from the Mandatory Reconsideration being received by the Department to the date a decision was made.

The data has been provided in financial years, 01st April to 31st March with the exception of this financial year which runs from 01st April to 31st December

Data is only available from 1 April 2014. This is because The Social Security, Child Support (Decision and Appeals) Regulations 1999, were amended on 28th October 2013 and only from then could the Secretary of State require a person to apply for a decision to be revised (i.e. apply for a mandatory reconsideration), before appeal. Pre October 2013 data is not comparable to current volumes. Volumes from October 2013 – April 2014 (initial Appeals Reform roll-out) were small and so not reflective of normal trend.

Annual figures cannot be directly compared to each other as different benefits have been included over time for example Universal Credit (UC) did not commence until November 2014

Source:

Decision Making and Appeals Case Recorder (DMACR)

The data provided is internal management information that does not form part of the official statistics outputs that are released by the Department in accordance with the UK Statistics Authority’s Code of Practice.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency who had been categorised as lifelong recipients of disability living allowance have subsequently been judged as ineligible for personal independence payments in each year for which data is available.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of constituents in Delyn constituency have had their personal independence payments overturned as a result of (a) mandatory reconsideration and (b) an appeal hearing in each year for which data is available.

The latest available data on personal independence payment (PIP) clearances split by type of clearance (i.e. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/.

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Table 1 below shows the number of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Mandatory Reconsideration decisions where the award was changed by year since the introduction of PIP in the Parliamentary Constituencies of Torfaen, Delyn and Jarrow.

Table 1 - Number of Mandatory Reconsiderations decisions where the award changed by financial year of decision.

Year of Mandatory Reconsideration

2013/14

2014/ 15

2015/ 16

2016/ 17

2017/18 (April 17 only)

Total

Torfaen

Less than 5

80

70

110

20

280

Delyn

Less than 5

30

30

60

10

130

Jarrow

Less than 5

20

40

80

10

150

Tables 2-4 below show the Number of appeals found in favour of appellant by financial year, data from Ministry of Justice.

Table 2

Jarrow1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

0

0%

2014-153

PIP4

15

58%5

2015-163

PIP4

76

49%

2016-173

PIP4

123

51%

Table 3

Torfaen constituency1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

Less than 5

Less than 5

2014-153

PIP4

80

69%

2015-163

PIP4

488

74%

2016-173

PIP4

516

70%

Table 4

Delyn constituency1

Number Found in Favour of Appellant

Percentage Found in Favour of Appellant (at hearing)2

2013-143

PIP4

0

0%

2014-153

PIP4

22

42%

2015-163

PIP4

194

52%

2016-173

PIP4

479

67%

1 Social Security and Child Support data are attributed to the hearing venue nearest to the appellants’ home address. For appellants living in Jarrow appeals are attributed to the South Shields venue. For appellants identified as living in Torfaen Constituency this would be Langstone Tribunal venue. For appellants identified as living in Delyn Constituency this would be this would be either Prestatyn or Wrexham Tribunal Venues.

2. Percentage Found in favour of Appellant this is based on the number found in favour as a percentage of the appeals cleared at hearing. In line with the published stats, data are not available at a level more-detailed than hearing venue.

3 By financial year - from April to March.

4 PIP replaced Disability Living Allowance for people aged 16 to 64 and rolled out from 8 April 2013. As such, appeal volumes in HM Courts & Tribunals Service in the Year 2013-2014 are low.

5 Indicates the population where the decision was in favour with 30 appeals or less

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what percentage of children were living in poverty in Delyn constituency in each year for which data is available.

National statistics on the number of children in relative low income are set out in the annual "Households Below Average Income" publication. The number and proportion of children in relative low income is not available at local authority or constituency level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography.

Latest 3-year estimates for Wales of the proportion and number of children in low income are available in Table 4.16ts and Table 4.17ts in the file “4_children_timeseries_risk” from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/599136/hbai-2015-2016-supporting-ods-files.zip

6th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment assessment appointments have been cancelled by Capita in each year since 2010.

From the start of the contract with Capita in 2013 to the latest data available, January 2017, the number of claimants arriving at an assessment centre for their appointment and unable to be seen is:

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Number

25

213

277

274

23

Percentage

0.8%

0.7%

0.5%

0.3%

0.3%

The data has been provided by our contracted supplier. The Department does not publish data on the number of Personal Independence Payment assessments cancelled and to check the validity of the data would incur disproportionate cost

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on improving pension transition arrangements for women born in the 1950s.

The Government has been clear that the introduction of further transitional arrangements cannot be justified, given the imperative to focus public resources on helping those who are most in need.

There are no plans to go beyond the £1.1 billion concession introduced when Parliament considered the changes.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he expects Capita to respond to the right hon. Member for Delyn in relation to correspondence dated 1 February, 14 April and 10 June 2016 relating to Mrs M. of Flint.

The letters to which you refer were received by Capita but not processed in line with their standard procedures. Capita apologises for the delay and any inconvenience caused and are investigating why their procedures were not followed.

Capita sent their reply to the honourable Member on Friday, 17 June.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what service standard he expects of Capita for response times for correspondence from hon. Members relating to personal independence payments.

Capita aims to respond to correspondence within 20 working days but this is not a contractual service level agreement

16th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average duration has been of face-to-face consultations for personal independence payments in (a) Wales and (b) each postcode area in Wales in each of the last three financial years.

The average duration of Personal Independence Payment consultation times in (a) Wales and (b) by postcode area of Wales (in minutes) were:

Postcode

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

CF

56

54

51

CH

58

57

57

GL

76

67

66

HR

76

73

59

LD

67

60

57

LL

58

57

56

NP

59

59

53

SA

61

60

54

SY

73

66

59

Wales (Total)

60

58

54

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wales were awarded personal independence payments in each of the last three years.

Such information as is available on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims in payment, registrations, clearances, awards and average clearance times for both new claims and reassessed claims (for those previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA)) are available at a Regional, Parliamentary Constituency and Local Authority level and published on Gov.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-independence-payment-statistics

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wales have (a) been unsuccessful in claims for personal independence payments and (b) had personal independence payments stopped in each of the last three years.

Such information as is available on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims in payment, registrations, clearances, awards and average clearance times for both new claims and reassessed claims (for those previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA)) are available at a Regional, Parliamentary Constituency and Local Authority level and published on Gov.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-independence-payment-statistics

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in (a) Wales and (b) each postcode area in Wales will see a reduction in their personal independence payments as a result of changes to the assessment criteria announced on 11 March 2016.

As confirmed by my right honourable friend the Secretary of State in his statement to the House on 21 March, the proposed changes to PIP will not be going ahead.

We spend around £50bn every year on benefits alone to support people with disabilities or health conditions, with spending on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) having increased by more than £3 billion since 2010. The government is committed to talking to disabled people, their representatives, healthcare professionals and employers to ensure the welfare system works better with the health and social care systems and provides help and support to those who need it most.

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wales his Department has contacted to notify them of their transfer from disability living allowance to personal independence payments.

The Department only holds data on the number of Full PIP Rollout claimants they have notified/invited to claim since July 2015. Information on the number of natural reassessment claims notified since October 2013 is not held within our systems. Therefore the information you have requested is not available.

Information on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim registrations for both new claims and reassessed claims (for those previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA)) are available at a Regional, Parliamentary Constituency and Local Authority level and published on Gov.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-independence-payment-statistics.

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Wales on (a) standard mobility, (b) enhanced mobility, (c) standard daily living and (d) enhanced daily living were receiving personal independence payments in each of the last three financial years.

Such information as is available on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims in payment, registrations, clearances, awards and average clearance times for both new claims and reassessed claims (for those previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA)) are available at a Regional, Parliamentary Constituency and Local Authority level and published on Gov.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-independence-payment-statistics

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what average time was taken for personal independence payment assessments for claimants with (a) non-terminal and (b) terminal conditions to be completed in (i) Wales and (ii) each postcode area in Wales in each of the last three financial years.

Such information as is available on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims in payment, registrations, clearances, awards and average clearance times for both new claims and reassessed claims (for those previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA)) are available at a Regional, Parliamentary Constituency and Local Authority level and published on Gov.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/personal-independence-payment-statistics

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of personal independence payment assessments took place face-to-face in (a) Wales and (b) each postcode area in Wales in each of the last three financial years.

The information requested is not readily available, and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the value is of his Department's contract with Capita Business Services Ltd for assessing personal independent payments.

The available information may be found in Contract Finder via this link http://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive/contract/740844/

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what targets his Department has set for the performance by Capita Business Services Ltd on its provision of personal independence payment services in Wales.

The Department has agreed a range of performance measures with Capita Business Services Ltd. Specifically, targets have been agreed on the timescales for undertaking assessments, the quality of assessments, and the claimant experience.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The Department for Work and Pensions pays employees an annual salary rather than an hourly rate.

The Department uses a grade structure to determine salary rates. The grade structure is underpinned by Job Evaluation and Grading Support (JEGS), an analytical job evaluation tool which meets all requirements of legislation and EHRC (Equality and Human Rights Commission) statutory codes of practice on Equal Pay. The use of JEGS and its application in determining the appropriate grade for a role enables us to determine where employees are doing equal work based on “work rated as equivalent”.

DWP Equality data is published on an annual basis on https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-work-pensions/about/equality-and-diversity .This includes the average male and female pay for each year.

In 2015, the gender pay gap in DWP was 3.7%. ONS reported that the mean gender pay gap within the UK was 19.2%, indicating that the gender pay gap within the DWP is considerably narrower than the UK gender pay gap.

Part time employees receive a ‘pro-rated’ salary based on their working hours. Below, we have provided average salaries for part time employees based on the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) salary rate.

2015 Average FTE Salary

Full time

Part time (FTE)

£24,005

£22,195

2014 Average FTE Salary

Full time

Part time (FTE)

£23,663

£21,882

2013 Average FTE Salary

Full time

Part time (FTE)

£23,383

£21,680

2012 Average FTE Salary

Full time

Part time (FTE)

£22,935

£21,513

2011 Average FTE Salary

Full time

Part time (FTE)

£22,830

£21,393

The main factor influencing the DWP gender and working pattern pay gap is the difference in distribution of staff within each of these groups across the grades. DWP continues to regularly review ways to address the pay gap.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment applications in Wales have waited longer than (a) one month, (b) three months and (c) six months to be assessed by Capita; what progress has been made in reducing such waiting times in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

Information on the number of cases awaiting individual assessments is not routinely supplied and is not published data. Departmental statisticians are continuing to develop measures around clearance times and waiting times to ensure they provide a rounded and representative picture of Personal Independence Payment system performance, improvement activity and the claimants’ experience. These statistics will be published when they are ready, with the release pre-announced in line with United Kingdom Statistics Authority release protocols.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government’s policy is for NHS England receiving patients from Wales for healthcare.

Detailed arrangements for delivering healthcare between the National Health Service in England and the NHS in Wales across the England-Wales border are set out in the new ‘Statement of Values and Principles’ which can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/part-rel/x-border-health/

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what representations he has received on the decision of Liverpool Royal Hospital to reduce treatment for patients located in Wales for urinary tract care; and what steps the Government has taken to mitigate the effect of that decision on patients' health.

Liverpool University Hospital Trust contacted Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board in March 2019 to outline its position regarding urology services for residents of North Wales. This position was twofold:

The Trust and the Health Board agreed that new referrals of bladder cancer patients for radical cystectomy would cease from 5 April 2019. This was due to reduced specialist surgical cover following a 12 month period of maternity leave from June 2019. Despite rigorous attempts, the Trust had been unable to provide short term cover in this area of national staff shortage. Whilst the Trust committed to treating all patients referred prior to 5 April, the acceptance of new referrals ended after this date. It was therefore considered that the best course of action for patients was for the Health Board to make alternative arrangements for new referrals.

The Trust informed the health board that it would be enacting Trust policy ensuring that specialist urological cancer surgery was prioritised for patients within its immediate locality.

The attached table contains the number of patients that have been treated from English and Welsh postcode at Liverpool Royal Hospital for urinary tract care in each of the last five years.

The Urinary Tract Outpatient number of patients will give the overall number of patients from Wales receiving treatment or review.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients from (a) English and (b) Welsh postcode areas have been treated at Liverpool Royal Hospital for urinary tract care in each of the last five years.

Liverpool University Hospital Trust contacted Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board in March 2019 to outline its position regarding urology services for residents of North Wales. This position was twofold:

The Trust and the Health Board agreed that new referrals of bladder cancer patients for radical cystectomy would cease from 5 April 2019. This was due to reduced specialist surgical cover following a 12 month period of maternity leave from June 2019. Despite rigorous attempts, the Trust had been unable to provide short term cover in this area of national staff shortage. Whilst the Trust committed to treating all patients referred prior to 5 April, the acceptance of new referrals ended after this date. It was therefore considered that the best course of action for patients was for the Health Board to make alternative arrangements for new referrals.

The Trust informed the health board that it would be enacting Trust policy ensuring that specialist urological cancer surgery was prioritised for patients within its immediate locality.

The attached table contains the number of patients that have been treated from English and Welsh postcode at Liverpool Royal Hospital for urinary tract care in each of the last five years.

The Urinary Tract Outpatient number of patients will give the overall number of patients from Wales receiving treatment or review.

21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

Information is not collected centrally on how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

The Government has not made an assessment of the effectiveness of the use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of Project NEPTUNE in prisons.

No such assessment has been made.

NHS England is currently revising the National Substance Misuse Specification which will be published in December 2017. The Project NEPTUNE clinical guidance will be referenced within the specification.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many emergency callouts for prisoners suffering the effects of drug usage there have been (a) in each prison and (b) broken down by primary healthcare provider in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not collected centrally.

In February 2013, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) (now HM Prison and Probation Service) issued guidance to prisons and immigration removal centres operated by NOMS concerning emergency ambulance call-outs. This guidance, Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 03/2013 Medical Emergency Response Codes outlines the medical symptoms in a prisoner, but not behaviours such as drug misuse, for which a prison must always call out an emergency ambulance. This PSI is mandatory in all prisons in England.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions emergency services have attended prisoners affected by illegal drug use by (a) prison and (b) primary healthcare provider in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not collected centrally.

In February 2013, the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) (now HM Prison and Probation Service) issued guidance to prisons and immigration removal centres operated by NOMS concerning emergency ambulance call-outs. This guidance, Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 03/2013 Medical Emergency Response Codes outlines the medical symptoms in a prisoner, but not behaviours such as drug misuse, for which a prison must always call out an emergency ambulance. This PSI is mandatory in all prisons in England.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

Information is not collected centrally on how many prisons use the National Early Warning Score to respond to symptoms of new psychoactive substances.

The Government has not made an assessment of the effectiveness of the use of the National Early Warning Score in prisons in Liverpool.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much has been spent by his Department on drug rehabilitation for (a) men and (b) women in prisons in (i) England and (ii) Wales in each year since 2010.

The information requested on what drug rehabilitation programmes are operated, the budget, number of prisoners using them and the location of the prison is either not collected centrally or not available in the format requested.

NHS England estimates that it spends approximately 20% of all prison healthcare spending on substance misuse services. In the financial year 2016/17, NHS England allocated approximately £405 million for all health expenditure in the adult prison estate. Comparable data is not available prior to 2013/14 when NHS England became operational.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what programmes his Department has operated in prisons for drug rehabilitation in each year since 2010 broken down by (a) budget, (b) number of male and female prisoners who used the programme and (c) location of prison.

The information requested on what drug rehabilitation programmes are operated, the budget, number of prisoners using them and the location of the prison is either not collected centrally or not available in the format requested.

NHS England estimates that it spends approximately 20% of all prison healthcare spending on substance misuse services. In the financial year 2016/17, NHS England allocated approximately £405 million for all health expenditure in the adult prison estate. Comparable data is not available prior to 2013/14 when NHS England became operational.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress has been made on producing an implementation plan for England for the UK Strategy for Rare Diseases; and when he expects such a plan to be in place.

There are no plans to consult on the implementation plan for England on the UK Strategy for Rare Diseases. NHS England published a Statement of Intent to implement the UK Strategy in February 2014. Implementation of the Strategy is also included in NHS England’s Five Year Forward View.

The UK Rare Disease Forum is responsible for monitoring progress on implementation of the Strategy across the United Kingdom. It published its first progress report on 29 February 2016. This recognises that significant progress has been made against majority of the 51 recommendations in the report. Further reports will be published in 2018 and 2020.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what consultation he expects to undertake on the implementation plan for England for the UK strategy on rare diseases.

There are no plans to consult on the implementation plan for England on the UK Strategy for Rare Diseases. NHS England published a Statement of Intent to implement the UK Strategy in February 2014. Implementation of the Strategy is also included in NHS England’s Five Year Forward View.

The UK Rare Disease Forum is responsible for monitoring progress on implementation of the Strategy across the United Kingdom. It published its first progress report on 29 February 2016. This recognises that significant progress has been made against majority of the 51 recommendations in the report. Further reports will be published in 2018 and 2020.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department has taken to review the definition of stillbirth since January 2014; and whether he has had discussions with his ministerial colleagues on changing the procedure on the registration of stillbirths to allow for the registration of deaths before 24 weeks.

The Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953, as amended, provides for the registration of babies born without signs of life after 24 weeks’ gestation, which is the legal age of viability. Parents of babies who are stillborn after 24 weeks’ gestation receive a medical certificate certifying the stillbirth and, upon registration, can register the baby's name and receive a certificate of registration of stillbirth.

Parliament supported a change to the stillbirth definition from “after 28 weeks” to “after 24 weeks” in 1992, following a clear consensus from the medical profession at that time that the age at which a foetus should be considered viable should be changed from 28 to 24 weeks. Medical opinion does not currently support reducing the age of viability below 24 weeks of gestation. Therefore, there are no plans to amend the stillbirth definition.

We are aware that some parents find it very distressing that they may not register the birth of a baby born before 24 weeks. However, it is important to recognise there would also be parents distressed at the possibility of having to do so. When a baby is born without signs of life before 24 weeks’ gestation, hospitals may issue a local certificate to commemorate the baby's birth.

In November 2015, the Government announced a national ambition to halve by 2030 the rates of stillbirths, neonatal and maternal deaths and brain injuries occurring during or soon after birth. The announcement also committed to publishing an annual report to update the public, health professionals, providers and commissioners on the progress we are making towards achieving the ambition.

To support the system in achieving this ambition we also announced:

― A £2.24 million capital fund for equipment to improve safety.

― Over £1 million to roll out training programmes to make sure staff have the skills and confidence they need to deliver world-leading safe care.

― £500,000 to develop a new system that can be used consistently across the National Health Service to enable staff to review and learn from every stillbirth and neonatal death.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the average hourly rates of pay for all Civil Servants in the Department by gender and by working pattern for the last five years. The average hourly rate calculation uses net hours for both full-time and part-time staff.

March 2012

March 2013

March 2014

March 2015

January 2016

Female

£22.34

£22.23

£22.23

£22.45

£22.48

Male

£25.37

£25.41

£21.69

£24.40

£24.56

Part-time

£22.95

£22.64

£23.60

£24.08

£23.95

Full-time

£23.74

£23.75

£23.12

£23.11

£23.21

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what targets his Department has for the transfer of documents between GP surgeries when a patient moves to a different area.

The Department does not collect information on the time taken to transfer documents between general practitioner (GP) surgeries.

The GP contract requires GP practices to use the electronic facility known as “GP2GP” for the safe and effective transfer of any computerised patient records where they have access to this system. As at end September 2015, 97.2% of GP practices were using GP2GP. 5,859,890 patient electronic health records have been transferred by GP2GP to the patient’s new GP since 2007.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with the devolved administrations in (a) Wales, (b) Scotland and (c) Northern Ireland on the speed and efficiency of transfer of patient records between administrations.

We do not have any record of discussions that have taken place between the Secretary of State for Health and the devolved administrations on the speed and efficiency of transfer of patient records between administrations. However, we are aware that Wales has been conducting a pilot of the GP2GP system, which enables patient records to be electronically transferred between one practice and another, and Scotland has also been rolling out the system. In the future this should enable faster, more effective transfer of patient records between administrations.

Additionally, the Summary Care Record Programme in England has a four nations forum with Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland that focuses on best practice and lessons learned from the respective national record sharing solutions.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP surgeries have adopted the use of the GP2GP system developed by the Health and Social Care Information Centre.

7,547 general practitioner practices in England were live with the GP2GP system at the end of November 2015; this equates to 97.7% of all GP2GP eligible practices within England.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average time taken for the transfer of documents between GP surgeries when a patient move to a different health area was in each of the last five years.

The Department does not collect information on the time taken to transfer documents between general practitioner (GP) surgeries.

The GP contract requires GP practices to use the electronic facility known as “GP2GP” for the safe and effective transfer of any computerised patient records where they have access to this system. As at end September 2015, 97.2% of GP practices were using GP2GP. 5,859,890 patient electronic health records have been transferred by GP2GP to the patient’s new GP since 2007.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment (a) his Department and (b) the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency have made of (i) the rate of reported faults in heart pacemakers and (ii) research from UK and non-UK sources on heart pacemakers since 2010.

Clinicians are encouraged and manufacturers are mandated to report deaths and other incidents to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) if they suspect a device fault.

The numbers of United Kingdom deaths reported annually since 2010 to the MHRA involving patients implanted with approved pacemakers, are as follows:

Year

Deaths reported involving pacemaker patients

2015 - present

1

2014

8

2013

3

2012

3

2011

1

2010

4

According to registry data from 2014, over 35,000 pacemakers are implanted annually in the UK. Therefore the number of reported patient deaths listed above which could have potentially related to pacemaker failure represents no more than 0.01% of this population.

Analysis of MHRA investigation conclusions revealed that none of the above deaths resulted from a faulty pacemaker.

As the UK regulatory authority, the MHRA is responsible for monitoring the safety of medical devices once they have been approved for market. Although the majority of pacemakers are well functioning, the MHRA actively monitor the performance of implants using a variety of methods.

One key element involves the investigation of device-related adverse incidents, where manufacturers’ mandatory reports are supplemented by voluntary reports from clinicians and members of the public using the yellow card system.

The MHRA challenges manufacturers if it is believed that the proposed post-investigation action is inadequate to protect public health.

Every new incident, including those involving pacemakers, is assessed and assigned to an appropriate type of investigation according to its severity and the likelihood of obtaining further information on the cause of the event. All reports, even those unsuitable for further investigation, are fully recorded and subject to periodic trend analysis by the MHRA to look for signals suggesting any possible device-related problems.

In addition to scrutinizing manufacturers’ device data provided in incident investigations, and their published product performance reports, the MHRA also monitors relevant published research and articles on potential safety concerns as part of its surveillance of the medical device market. If evidence emerges that affects the safety of UK pacemaker patients, the Agency issues advice to the health service and takes any necessary regulatory action.

Furthermore the Agency actively engages with the clinicians and professional bodies to gauge their opinion on early indications for failure and problems encountered with device usage.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many deaths there have been as a result of faulty heart pacemakers in each year since 2010.

Clinicians are encouraged and manufacturers are mandated to report deaths and other incidents to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) if they suspect a device fault.

The numbers of United Kingdom deaths reported annually since 2010 to the MHRA involving patients implanted with approved pacemakers, are as follows:

Year

Deaths reported involving pacemaker patients

2015 - present

1

2014

8

2013

3

2012

3

2011

1

2010

4

According to registry data from 2014, over 35,000 pacemakers are implanted annually in the UK. Therefore the number of reported patient deaths listed above which could have potentially related to pacemaker failure represents no more than 0.01% of this population.

Analysis of MHRA investigation conclusions revealed that none of the above deaths resulted from a faulty pacemaker.

As the UK regulatory authority, the MHRA is responsible for monitoring the safety of medical devices once they have been approved for market. Although the majority of pacemakers are well functioning, the MHRA actively monitor the performance of implants using a variety of methods.

One key element involves the investigation of device-related adverse incidents, where manufacturers’ mandatory reports are supplemented by voluntary reports from clinicians and members of the public using the yellow card system.

The MHRA challenges manufacturers if it is believed that the proposed post-investigation action is inadequate to protect public health.

Every new incident, including those involving pacemakers, is assessed and assigned to an appropriate type of investigation according to its severity and the likelihood of obtaining further information on the cause of the event. All reports, even those unsuitable for further investigation, are fully recorded and subject to periodic trend analysis by the MHRA to look for signals suggesting any possible device-related problems.

In addition to scrutinizing manufacturers’ device data provided in incident investigations, and their published product performance reports, the MHRA also monitors relevant published research and articles on potential safety concerns as part of its surveillance of the medical device market. If evidence emerges that affects the safety of UK pacemaker patients, the Agency issues advice to the health service and takes any necessary regulatory action.

Furthermore the Agency actively engages with the clinicians and professional bodies to gauge their opinion on early indications for failure and problems encountered with device usage.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of whether there is a differential in waiting times for hospital services provided by hospital trusts in England for residents of (a) Wales and (b) England; and what guidance he has issued to such trusts on that matter.

No such assessment has been made, though a number of studies that include a comparison of elective waits between England and Wales have been published, including that by the Nuffield Trust.

25th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients with a postal address in Wales have used hospital services in (a) Countess of Chester, (b) Arrowe Park, Wirral, (c) Clatterbridge, Wirral, (d) The Christie, Manchester, (e) Agnes Hunt, Gobowen and (f) Liverpool Children's Hospital in the most recent year for which figures are available.

The information is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is shown in the table below.

Counts of accident and emergency (A&E) attendances1, admitted patient finished admission episodes2 and outpatient attendances3 for patients with an Area Team of residence4 of Wales by the selected hospital providers5, 2013-14

Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector

Hospital provider

A&E attendances

Finished admission episodes

Outpatient attendances

Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust

155

2,942

6,703

Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

14,404

14,185

66,514

The Christie NHS Foundation Trust

-

285

3,167

The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

-

4,520

40,577

Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

330

383

1,282

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Notes:

1 Official Source of A&E activity data

HES is not the official source of total A&E activity, this is the NHS England situation reports collection - http://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/

However, HES permits further analysis of A&E activity as there are a range of data items by which HES can be analysed.

2 Finished admission episodes

A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

3 Outpatient Attendances

Attendances at outpatient clinics. Includes first and follow-up attendances and telephone consultations, excludes did not attends (DNAs) and cancellations.

4 Area team of residence

The area team containing the patient’s normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another area for treatment.

5 Hospital Provider

A provider code is a unique code that identifies an organisation acting as a health care provider (eg NHS trust or primary care trust). Data from some independent sector providers, where the onus for arrangement of dataflows is on the commissioner, may be missing. Care must be taken when using this data as the counts may be lower than true figures.

15th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department is providing funding to the International Centre for Drug Policy to produce a National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths to report for 2014.

Public Health England officials are in discussions with St George's, University of London, concerning the production of a National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths report covering the year 2013.

15th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether he plans to publish the number of deaths caused by volatile substance abuse in England and Wales in (a) 2013-14 and (b) future years.

The Department has asked Public Health England to consider how future data on volatile substance abuse deaths might be collected and reported. Additionally, on 17 October 2014, the Office for National Statistics published a one-off report providing data on drug related deaths involving volatile substances and nitrous oxide in England and Wales, 1993–2013. A copy of the report is attached.

14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the Written Statement of 14 January 2019 on Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting: Update on delivery, HCWS1247, which Commonwealth member states are supported by his Department and the World Bank to deliver national cyber security reviews; what funding he has allocated to that programme; and when those reviews will report.

​Following the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in April 2018, the UK will fund at least ten national cyber security capacity reviews before the next Heads of Government meeting in 2020. The ten member states currently planned for a review are: Nigeria, the Gambia, Mauritius, Lesotho, Botswana, Cameroon, Namibia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Malaysia. £0.7 million has been currently set aside from the Commonwealth 18-20 Fund and the UK Prosperity Fund for these reviews.

14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement of 14 January 2019 on Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting: Update, HCWS1247, which member states will receive training on tackling online child exploitation; what funding he has allocated to that training; and when that training is planned to be completed.

In support of commitments made at the 2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM), the UK has allocated £2 million to projects which tackle online child sexual exploitation. The Home Office is supporting work in Sri Lanka to build the evidence base, protect those at risk, and strengthen the co-ordination and implementation of efforts amongst multiple authorities and law enforcement agencies. The Home Office is also working with the African Union (AU) to strengthen regional and national capacity to address online child sexual exploitation, including in nine Commonwealth countries: Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, and Uganda. The project will also build capacity in several non-Commonwealth members of the AU.

5th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the letter from the Minister of State for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 24 April 2018 to schools that participated in the Safe Schools Declaration, what steps he is taking to encourage international partners to endorse that Declaration.

The UK is actively encouraging international partners to endorse the Safe Schools Declaration at both official and ministerial level. I was pleased to see the recent endorsements of the Declaration by Germany and by Djibouti. At a UN Security Council Open Debate on Children and Armed Conflict on 9 July, the UK called upon all UN Security Council members and UN member states to endorse the Declaration. We will continue to make representations to countries who have yet to endorse the Declaration.

4th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how the Government is supporting young LGBT+ people in line with the Safe Schools Declaration.

The UK is fully committed to the promotion and protection of LGBT rights. The Safe Schools Declaration is a humanitarian pledge to protect all children, students and education personnel in schools and educational facilities from attack during armed conflicts and protracted crises. The Government is in the process of implementing the Declaration and its supporting guidelines. The Declaration and its guidelines do not make specific reference to matters relating to LGBT persons.

5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help facilitate a negotiated solution to the dispute over the status of Cyprus.

The UK continues to be a strong supporter of a settlement to reunite Cyprus. I am disappointed that the Conference on Cyprus in Switzerland ended without agreement. We are encouraging all the parties to reflect on the outcome and consider next steps.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office pays salaries according to a fixed banding structure. Pay rates, including hourly rates, for each band are the same for male and female employees.

The average hourly earnings for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office UK based staff, taken as a snapshot on the 31st of December each year, are:

Female

Male

Full-time

Part-time

2015

£18.63

£22.58

£20.83

17.98

2014

£18.33

£22.19

£20.54

17.74

2013

Data not yet available

2012

Data not yet available

2011

Data not yet available

Average earnings and average salaries are determined by a number of factors – length of service, levels of performance, promotions, type of work etc but a key factor is the distribution of staff throughout the FCO grading structure.

Further information on average salaries of staff is available on pages 6, 10 and 11 of the FCO Diversity & Equality report 2015.
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/450587/FFFCO827_Equality_Report_2015_v5.pdf


The figures do not include local staff directly employed by our embassies and missions overseas. To obtain this data would incur disproportionate cost.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will undertake a review into how his Department advises British citizens on the ethical rating of nations in line with performing to international standards on the illegal wildlife trade.

The UK plays a leading role in encouraging countries to take action to stop poaching of endangered species and to reduce demand for illegal wildlife products. For example, the UK drafted both the London Declaration from the London Conference on IWT in 2014 and the Kasane Statement from the Botswana Conference of March 2015 to push countries into committing themselves to ambitious actions to tackle the illegal wildlife trade. A review was compiled for the Botswana Conference showing progress by countries on the commitments to action agreed at London. These documents have been made publicly available on www.gov.uk.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will work with his international counterparts to request that the UN Secretary General appoint a Special Envoy for Sustainable Development.

Effective follow up and implementation of the now-agreed 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is one of the UK’s top priorities at the United Nations. We continue to discuss this with the UN Secretary General, the wider UN system, and Member States. It would need to be clear what value any new UN special envoy would add to existing UN activity before the UK advocated such an idea, over and above existing sustainable development activities.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many diplomatic staff whose work includes tackling the illegal wildlife trade are based in (a) China, (b) Vietnam, (c) Laos, (d) Malaysia, (e) Botswana, (f) Mozambique, (g) Gabon, (h) South Africa, (i) Thailand and (j) India.

The numbers requested of diplomatic staff whose work includes illegal wildlife trade are as follows:

China - 5
Vietnam- 3
Laos- 2
Malaysia – 1
Botswana -2
Mozambique- 2
Gabon -2
South Africa -2
Thailand- 2
India -1

In most cases our diplomatic staff in these Posts spend a proportion of their overall time on this issue and are supported by locally engaged staff who also work on tackling illegal wildlife trade.

25th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of acts of criminal damage or violence undertaken in the pas de Calais region against vehicles owned by UK companies or citizens since July 2014; and what representations he has made to French authorities on that matter.

Policing in the Pas de Calais region is a matter for the French authorities. The UK Government therefore does not hold details on the number of acts of criminal damage or violence undertaken in the Pas de Calais region. I and my Ministerial colleagues regularly discuss matters of law and order in the region with our French counterparts. The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Ms May), was in Paris on 2 July to meet her French counterpart, M Cazeneuve, the Interior Minister. Law and order was among the topics they discussed.
13th May 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of (a) email or web form or webchat and (b) letter correspondence from (i) firms and (ii) consumers the Financial Conduct Authority provides a substantive response to within two working days of receipt; and how many such substantive responses in total there were in each of the last five years.

This is a matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which is operationally independent from Government. The question has been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the right honourable member by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Jun 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of losing access to the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme on tackling terrorism in the UK.

No decisions have been taken regarding how the UK will continue to cooperate with the EU on tackling cross-border crime and security threats as this will be a matter for negotiations. The Government has been clear that one of the 12 negotiating objectives is continuing to work with the EU to preserve European security, to fight terrorism, and to uphold justice across Europe. We are examining a number of options and as part of the negotiations, we will discuss with the EU and its Member States how best to continue cooperation on security, law enforcement and criminal justice, including access to the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking terrorism.

13th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what records his Department holds on how many (a) free to use ATM machines and (b) charging ATM machines there have been in each local authority area in England and Wales in each year since 2010.

The Treasury does not hold any information on the number of free to use or charging ATMs broken down by local authority.

The Treasury does hold aggregate figures for the UK, published by the LINK payment system.

The number of ATMs in the UK is at an all-time high of nearly 70,000 machines, having risen from 36,000 in 2001. The number of free-to-use ATMs is also at an all-time high of over 53,000 and over 98% of all ATM cash withdrawals by UK cardholders in the UK are made free of charge.

LINK, the network which connects the UK’s ATM machines, runs a financial inclusion programme which subsidises some independent ATM providers to allow them to offer a free cash withdrawal service in those areas of greatest need. LINK has identified 1,694 rural and/or deprived ‘target’ areas, and 87% of these areas are now served by 916 subsidised cashpoints, up from up from 171 in 2007.

17th Oct 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people who had completed their VAT return through the Government Gateway by the deadline date received an incorrect late-filing penalty of £100 in each financial year since 2010-11.

VAT does not have a £100 penalty for late filing of returns. Nevertheless, the number of surcharges reviewed, varied and cancelled are published in the ‘Tax Assurance Commissioner’s Annual Report’, which can be found on gov.uk at; https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/how-we-resolve-tax-disputes.

18th Jul 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessments has HM Revenue and Customs made of the effectiveness of repaying overpaid national insurance and income tax to NHS trainees under the widening access fund.

For claims from 2013-14 NHS trusts are responsible for repaying any overpaid tax or National Insurance contributions in respect of trainees on the Widening Access Scheme. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is working closely with the Trusts to ensure that the rules are correctly applied and NHS trainees receive refunds as quickly as possible. For earlier years HMRC is working through claims from trainees and repaying them directly.

18th Jul 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many NHS trainees under the Widening Access fund received a refund for their overpaid (a) national insurance and (b) income tax contributions in each of the last six years.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not keep records of the average time taken to process such refunds. HMRC only holds records for the number of NHS trainees receiving refunds under the widening access scheme from April 2013. A total of 8209 refunds have been processed since then, as follows:

2013/14

252

2014/15

1115

2015/16

4100

2016/17

2742

19th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Oral Contribution of the Economic Secretary to the Treasury of 1 February 2016, Official Report, column 748, what further progress has been made on investigations into the Connaught Income Fund, series 1.

The issues raised are a matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) who are operationally independent from Government.

The questions have been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the Honorable Member by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

11th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Financial Conduct Authority staff are (a) seconded to his Department and (b) work in the private office of each Minister of his Department.

HM Treasury currently has 3 secondments in from the Financial Conduct Authority. None of these work in any ministerial private office.

10th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of his Department were in each of the last five years.

This information is published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on their website http://www.ons.gov.uk. ONS figures include both the mean and median gender pay gaps for the Civil Service and HM Treasury. The ONS headline estimates are also calculated using hourly earnings excluding overtime.

6th Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people with post codes in Wales paid inheritance tax in each year since 2010.

This information is published as Official Statistics together with the Inheritance Tax National Statistics at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/inheritance-tax-statistics.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much tax relief was provided for mortgage interest payments by buy-to-let residential property investors at the (a) basic income tax marginal rate, (b) higher income tax marginal rate and (c) additional income tax marginal rate in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13.

The information is not available. HMRC's administrative systems do not separately identify mortgage interest payments against residential property from other financial costs incurred across all types of property businesses (both residential and non-residential). Moreover property income is grouped with other income in the calculation of tax liabilities, and consequently the amounts of specific deductions effective against each rate of tax is not precisely defined.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much of each type of tax relief was provided to buy-to-let residential property investors at the (a) basic income tax marginal rate, (b) higher income tax marginal rate and (c) additional income tax marginal rate in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13.

The information is not available. HMRC's administrative systems do not distinguish between residential and non-residential property businesses nor the nature of rental property businesses such as buy-to-let investors. Moreover property income is grouped with other income in the calculation of tax liabilities, and consequently the amounts of specific deductions effective against each rate of tax is not precisely defined.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much tax relief was provided to buy-to-let residential property investors at the (a) basic income tax marginal rate, (b) higher income tax marginal rate and (c) additional income tax marginal rate in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13.

The information is not available. HMRC's administrative systems do not distinguish between residential and non-residential property businesses nor the nature of rental property businesses such as buy-to-let investors. Moreover property income is grouped with other income in the calculation of tax liabilities, and consequently the amounts of specific deductions effective against each rate of tax is not precisely defined.

12th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for visitor visas from (a) US, (b) Russian, (c) Indian and (d) Chinese citizens were (i) granted and (ii) declined in each of the last five years.

Applications for visit visas are considered against Appendix V of the Immigration Rules and on a case by case basis. Detailed information on how UK Visas and Immigration makes decisions on visitor cases is published at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/visit-guidance.

Information on total entry clearance visas (the majority of which are visitor visas) broken down by nationality and outcome (grants, refusals, withdrawals, lapsed) is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics Visas volume 1 table vi_02_q at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2019-data-tables.

Please note that the large majority of US nationals coming to the UK as visitors do not require an entry clearance visa, as shown in the Immigration Rules at (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigration-rules/immigration-rules-appendix-v-visitor-rules).

12th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average waiting time was for a decision on visitor visa application from (a) US, (b) Russian, (c) Indian and (d) Chinese citizens in each of the last five years.

Information on performance against service standards for UKVI international operations is published in the Migration transparency data, the latest publication of which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-operations-transparency-data-may-2019.

These indicate that the large majority of straightforward non-settlement visas (the large majority of which are visitor visas), 98.7%, are completed within the service standard of 15 working days.

12th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what performance targets his Department has put in place for the time taken to make a decision on a visitor visa application form (a) US, (b) Russian, (c) Indian and (d) Chinese citizens.

Under our published customer service standards we aim to process straightforward non-settlement applications within 15 working days.

The information for the latest quarter available is published online.


Data on entry clearance visa processing times, including the percentage and number of visas that are processed within service standards, is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data (then listed by publication date under ‘UK Visas & Immigration’).

26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Written Question 230648, Airguns: Reviews, when his Department plans to publish its response to the review on the regulation of air weapons which was launched on 10 October 2017.

We intend to publish our conclusions to the review of air weapons regulation as soon as possible, alongside a consultation on firearms safety issues to which the Government committed during the passage of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019.

7th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if the Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability will meet with the Charity Retail Association to discuss the extent of violence and abuse in the charity retail sector.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

That is why on 5 April the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff. It will run to 28 June and is open to all organisations and individuals affected by this issue, including those working in charity shops. The call for evidence will strengthen our understanding of the issue and inform our next steps.

In addition, I co-chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group which brings together a wide range of representatives to help ensure our response to retail crime is as robust as it can be. Membership of the Group is kept under regular review and we will ensure the charitable sector is appropriately represented.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability is taking to ensure her investigation into violence and abuse toward shop staff takes into account the views and experiences of charity shop volunteers.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

That is why on 5 April the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff. It will run to 28 June and is open to all organisations and individuals affected by this issue, including those working in charity shops. The call for evidence will strengthen our understanding of the issue and inform our next steps.

In addition, I co-chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group which brings together a wide range of representatives to help ensure our response to retail crime is as robust as it can be. Membership of the Group is kept under regular review and we will ensure the charitable sector is appropriately represented.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Jun 2019
To ask Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment the Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability has made of the extent of (a) violence towards and (b) abuse of shop staff and volunteers in the charity retail sector.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

That is why on 5 April the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff. It will run to 28 June and is open to all organisations and individuals affected by this issue, including those working in charity shops. The call for evidence will strengthen our understanding of the issue and inform our next steps.

In addition, I co-chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group which brings together a wide range of representatives to help ensure our response to retail crime is as robust as it can be. Membership of the Group is kept under regular review and we will ensure the charitable sector is appropriately represented.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much was allocated to (a) individual police forces in England and Wales, (b) individual government departments, (c) individual local authorities and (d) other bodies through the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme in each year since 2010.

Data on asset recovery is published annually, the latest published figures are available on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/asset-recovery-statistics.

The Home Office runs the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme (ARIS). With over 250 agencies participating in the Scheme, it would take disproportionate time and resource to provide a detailed breakdown of these individual payments.

The amounts recovered in respect of confiscation orders, together with amounts paid from this amount in compensation is provided in the attached table. This information was taken from the live database, JARD (Joint Asset Recovery Database) on 9 May 2019.

There are no immediate plans for changing the distribution allocations in the ARIS, but the Government keeps it under review. The upcoming Asset Recovery Action Plan will make wider recommendations to improve the use and effectiveness of powers and practice in this area.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much money has accrued to the public purse in confiscation orders; and how much of that money has been allocated in compensation to victims of crime in each year since 2010.

Data on asset recovery is published annually, the latest published figures are available on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/asset-recovery-statistics.

The Home Office runs the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme (ARIS). With over 250 agencies participating in the Scheme, it would take disproportionate time and resource to provide a detailed breakdown of these individual payments.

The amounts recovered in respect of confiscation orders, together with amounts paid from this amount in compensation is provided in the attached table. This information was taken from the live database, JARD (Joint Asset Recovery Database) on 9 May 2019.

There are no immediate plans for changing the distribution allocations in the ARIS, but the Government keeps it under review. The upcoming Asset Recovery Action Plan will make wider recommendations to improve the use and effectiveness of powers and practice in this area.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has plans to change the redistribution mechanism in the Asset Recovery Incentivisation scheme so that (a) local authorities and (b) police forces receive higher payments for successful investigations.

Data on asset recovery is published annually, the latest published figures are available on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/asset-recovery-statistics.

The Home Office runs the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme (ARIS). With over 250 agencies participating in the Scheme, it would take disproportionate time and resource to provide a detailed breakdown of these individual payments.

The amounts recovered in respect of confiscation orders, together with amounts paid from this amount in compensation is provided in the attached table. This information was taken from the live database, JARD (Joint Asset Recovery Database) on 9 May 2019.

There are no immediate plans for changing the distribution allocations in the ARIS, but the Government keeps it under review. The upcoming Asset Recovery Action Plan will make wider recommendations to improve the use and effectiveness of powers and practice in this area.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
7th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he plans to instruct police forces in England and Wales to record dog attacks on livestock.

The Government recognises that dog attacks on livestock can cause considerable stress to livestock owners, as well as causing serious injury to the animals.

A range of powers are available to the police to tackle this issue, including offences provided for by the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 and Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and civil orders introduced by the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 which can be used to address nuisance behaviour involving dogs.

The police should record and investigate all crimes reported to them.

26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department of 22 March 2019, Official Report, column 1404, how much of the £100 million in funding will be allocated to the police, by each police force.

On 13 March the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an additional £100 million of funding for serious violence in 2019/20 to help the police’s immediate response to the rise in serious knife crime, and also to support investment in Violence Reduction Units. It is important that we recognise that greater law enforcement on its own will not reduce serious violence and that we must continue to focus on prevention.

The majority of the investment will go towards supporting police forces where violent crime is impacting the most, to take immediate action to suppress the violence we are seeing, to make our streets safer. We are engaging with partners including the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and we are developing the criteria by which forces will receive this funding.

11th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when his Department plans to publish its response to the review into air weapons which was launched on 10 October 2017.

The Government fully understands the interest that Members of Parliament and others have in the outcomes of the Home Office review of the regulation of air weapons. It remains our intention to set these out as soon as we can.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidences of online fraud there were where the value of theft was greater than £200 in each year since 2012.

The Home Office collects and publishes data quarterly on police recorded crime, broken down by Police Force Area, which can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables


This includes the number of recorded offences of violence with injury, robbery of business property and fraud. However, information on the value of theft or whether or not fraud was committed online is not held centrally by the Home Office.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidences of online fraud there were where the value of theft was under £200 in each year since 2012.

The Home Office collects and publishes data quarterly on police recorded crime, broken down by Police Force Area, which can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables


This includes the number of recorded offences of violence with injury, robbery of business property and fraud. However, information on the value of theft or whether or not fraud was committed online is not held centrally by the Home Office.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidences there were of robberies from business properties where the value of theft was valued at over £200 in each year since 2012.

The Home Office collects and publishes data quarterly on police recorded crime, broken down by Police Force Area, which can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables


This includes the number of recorded offences of violence with injury, robbery of business property and fraud. However, information on the value of theft or whether or not fraud was committed online is not held centrally by the Home Office.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidences there were of robberies from business properties where the theft was valued at under £200 in each year since 2012.

The Home Office collects and publishes data quarterly on police recorded crime, broken down by Police Force Area, which can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables


This includes the number of recorded offences of violence with injury, robbery of business property and fraud. However, information on the value of theft or whether or not fraud was committed online is not held centrally by the Home Office.

7th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidences there have been of (a) violence with injury crimes and (b) robberies from business properties in each year since 2012 by police force area.

The Home Office collects and publishes data quarterly on police recorded crime, broken down by Police Force Area, which can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables


This includes the number of recorded offences of violence with injury, robbery of business property and fraud. However, information on the value of theft or whether or not fraud was committed online is not held centrally by the Home Office.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases the Independent Office for Police Conduct considered which lasted (a) less than six months, (b) six to 12 months, (c) 12 to 24 months, (d) 24 months or longer before a conclusion was reached in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold data on IOPC investigations. The Independent Office of Police Conduct will write to my hon. Friend and I will place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many dangerous driving cases the Independent Office for Police Conduct has considered which have resulted in (a) misconduct not found, (b) no further action, (c) management advice, (d) a written warning, (e) a final written warning, (f) an extension of a final written warning, (g) a dismissal with notice and (h) a dismissal without notice in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold data on IOPC investigations. The Independent Office of Police Conduct will write to my hon. Friend and I will place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

6th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many dangerous driving cases by (a) police officer rank and (b) police force area the Independent Office for Police Conduct has considered in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold data on IOPC investigations. The Independent Office of Police Conduct will write to my hon. Friend and I will place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what the planned timescale is for the (a) completion of draft questions, (b) evidence gathering exercise, (c) closing date and (d) Government's response to the call for evidence on attacks against retail employees.

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what steps his Department is planning to take to deliver the targeted communications activity to raise awareness of the existing legislation that covers assaults against an individual when working in a retail environment; and what the budget is for that communications activity.

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, when he plans to publish details on the outcomes of the retail group meeting held in February 2019.

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the Library, what the (a) outcomes were and (b) response was to the letter to the Commissioner of the City of London Police on retail crime and attacks on retail employees.

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to the letter from the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 22 January 2019.

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Commonwealth nationals who are members of the British Armed Forces have applied for their (a) partner and (b) children to settle in the UK; and how many of those applications were (i) accepted and (ii) rejected due to lack of income in each year since 2013.

We do not publish this specific data. This information could only be obtained by a manual case by case review to collate the data which would be disproportionately expensive.

8th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Under-Secretary of State for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability plans to respond to the Right hon. Member for Delyn on the rountable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018.

I have considered the proposals raised at the roundtable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018 and am committed to providing the Rt. Hon Member for Delyn a response before the tabling deadline for Lords amendments to the Offensive Weapons Bill.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, How many police officers have completed the training contained within the National Disclosure Plan by police force area.

Statistics published by the College of Policing on 20 December 2018 show the number of officers and staff that had completed new 'disclosure and relevancy – conducting fair investigations' training as at 30 November 2018. This includes a breakdown by police force area. These are available at https://www.college.police.uk/News/College-news/Documents/Disclosure_programme_completion_figures191218v3.pdf

5th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to reply to the letter of the 29 June 2018 from the hon. Member for Delyn on the Offensive Weapons Bill.

I replied to the Rt Hon Member on 12 March 2019.

18th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were employed at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Border Force does not release location specific statistics on the deployment of its resources as doing so could compromise border security.
For information on Border Force staffing from 2010 I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to the Hon. Member for Westmorland and Lonsdale on 7 February 2017, UIN 60627.

The latest published staffing figures for Border Force can be found in the Home Office Annual Report for 2016 – 17 on page 66 at:
/ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Data for staffing levels in 2017/18 will be available when the Annual Report for 2017 – 18 is published

18th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many days were lost to sick leave by UK Border Force officers at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

18th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were (a) recruited, (b) dismissed and (c) retired at (i) Heathrow, (ii) Gatwick, (iii) Stansted and (iv) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

16th Jul 2018
What steps he is taking to reduce shop theft.

I chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group with the British Retail Consortium. This brings retailers and the police together to ensure an effective response to crimes affecting retailers and includes work to reduce shop thefts.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many right of abode certificates have been (a) applied for and (b) granted to (i) males and (ii) females by country of origin following a change of name in each year since 2010; and how much has accrued to the public purse from those applications in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not record the information requested as this is not part of the application process. To provide the requested information would require manual examination of all applications for right of abode and exceed the dispropotionate cost limit.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, whether his Department has undertaken a review of the guidance it issues on good character for young persons; and what discussion his Department has had with stakeholders on the definitions used.

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many young people, as defined by the British Nationality Act 1981, have been (a) refused and (b) granted citizenship in each year since December 2012.

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, how many young people have been refused British citizenship as a result of being found to not be of good character under each classification; and how many young people have faced restrictions in applying as a minor in each year since December 2012.

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many rest days are owed to police officers by forces in England and Wales as at 1 June 2018; and if he will make a statement.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested centrally. It is the responsibility of chief constables to manage working time and support the workforce effectively, ensuring police officers are able to take the rest days they are entitled to.

2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to publish the outcome of the Government's review of air weapon regulation, announced on 12 December 2017.

The Government’s review of the regulation of air weapons received a large number of representations from interested parties and members of the public. We are considering these carefully and will publish our findings in due course.

27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the implications for its policies of the Office for National Statistics report into solvent abuse, published on 26 March 2018.

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what funding the Government has committed to reduce deaths associated with solvent abuse via each (a) Department, (b) Agency, (c) Local authorities, and (d) voluntary organisation?

Funding decisions in relation to substance misuse services have been devolved to local authorities through the public health grant. It is for local authorities to commission the appropriate health services to address the use of volatile substances based on an assessment of local need.

Local areas need to consider how best to prevent and treat volatile substance use through age appropriate services. Local specialist services can support young people to address their substance misuse, and should operate as part of a wider network of services which aim to support young people with a range of issues and help them to build their resilience.

Adults who have problems with volatile substances can also access support from community drug and alcohol services, which should be able to provide appropriate psychosocial interventions to help them stop using these substances and medicines for symptomatic relief if needed.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people waited longer than (a) 14 days, (b) 18 days, (c) 25 days and (d) 60 days to receive their Disclosure and Barring Service reports; and what the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring Service reports was by police force in each year since 2010.

The tables below set out the number of people who have waited longer than 14, 18, 25 and 60 days to receive their disclosure certificates*:

2010/11:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,880,214

1,578,142

1,243,836

453,391

Standard

9,222

4,926

2,784

674

Total

1,889,436

1,583,068

1,246,620

454,065

2011/12:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

688,549

519,641

368,941

104,773

Standard

4,456

2,960

1,794

487

Total

693,005

522,601

370,735

105,260

2012/13:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

790,299

613,596

380,402

42,520

Standard

3,917

2,935

1,961

319

Total

794,216

616,531

382,363

42,839

2013/14:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

834,288

751,147

593,457

405,014

Standard

3,221

3,063

2,151

946

Total

837,509

754,210

595,608

405,960

2014/15:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,038,411

736,329

490,198

181,338

Standard

15,125

4,420

1,473

216

Total

1,053,536

740,749

491,671

181,554

2015/16:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,972

675,921

446,212

209,613

Standard

3,688

1,646

897

217

Total

921,660

677,567

447,109

209,830

2016/17:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

948,522

725,014

516,048

204,482

Standard

2,579

998

617

124

Total

951,101

726,012

516,665

204,606

2017-Feb 2018:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,339

675,261

404,637

39,940

Standard

11,021

3,157

698

137

Total

928,360

678,418

405,335

40,077

*To include Standard and Enhanced checks.

Data relating to the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring checks carried out by each police force in each year since 2010 is available, but due to the volume of data, it is not in a reportable format. Officials will ensure a hard copy of this data is placed in the House library.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of deaths associated with solvent abuse.

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the misuse of nitrous oxide.

Psychoactive substances, such as nitrous oxide, have already cost far too many lives. That is why we changed the law in 2016 to make it illegal to supply substances that are capable of having a psychoactive effect.

The introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act sent out a clear message – we will take whatever action is necessary to keep our families and communities safe.

Since the Act came into force, over 300 retailers across the United Kingdom have either closed down or are no longer selling psychoactive substances, police have arrested suppliers and action by the National Crime Agency has resulted in the removal of these drugs for sale on UK based websites.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Local Shop Report 2017, published by the Association of Convenience Stores, what steps she is taking the reduce the level of convenience store crime.

The Government takes retail crime very seriously. We recognise the damage and disruption that different crimes can have on businesses including smaller businesses and convenience stores.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, which I co-chair with the British Retail Consortium, we bring together representatives from government departments, the police and the retail sector, including the Association of Convenience Stores, to focus on the crime issues that affect businesses of all sizes. This includes addressing the crimes that affect retail establishments and improving the safety of the staff who work in them.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that violence against shopworkers is recorded by police forces.

Violence is unacceptable wherever it takes place, and violence or abuse against retail staff should not be tolerated. We encourage all victims, including shopworkers, to report these crimes to the police whenever they occur so that they can be recorded and investigated and the perpetrators brought to justice.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, we are working with our partners across government, the police and in the retail sector to explore what more can be done to prevent and tackle violence and abuse against retail staff.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
12th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what is the expected (a) completion and (b) publication date of her Department’s review of the operation of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

The Home Office is committed to publishing the review 30 months after the introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Feb 2018
What discussions she has had with Police and Crime Commissioners on the level of the police precept for 2018-19.

Before the police funding settlement, I spoke and received written submissions from leaders in police forces in England and Wales. Police leaders - especially in England where referendum limits apply - were clear that they wanted additional flexibility to increase funding through precept. I heard their messages and responded by allowing increases of an average £1 per month in England, enabling each PCC to maintain their funding in real terms next year.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department took to minimise risk in response to the National Audit Office report on The Home Office's oversight of forensic services, published in January 2015.

This was a briefing paper for the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. The Home Office published its Forensic Science Strategy in March 2016 setting out how policing would deliver a national approach to forensic science delivery, supported by the Home Office.

6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have ongoing case work with Key Forensic Services.

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many pending cases Key Forensic Services was handling in each police force area prior to its collapse.

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on police forces of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who will be responsible for the provision of forensic science services following the collapse of Key Forensic Services; and how much financial support will be given to establish that provider.

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the cost to the public purse of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that businesses who are required to provide statements on their supply chains (a) provide such a statement and (b) complete their statements to a sufficient standard; and what steps her Department is taking to monitor the performance of businesses in providing those statements.

As a result of the world-leading provisions in the Modern Slavery Act 2015, we have seen thousands of transparency statements published and businesses are now more focused on this issue than ever before. The legislation was designed to harness pressure from civil society, consumers and investors rather than set up a burdensome system of Government monitoring. We are pleased that civil society organisations are using company statements to hold businesses to account, including contacting businesses that have not yet published statements.

The Government has strengthened guidance for businesses and recently wrote to over 10,000 businesses that may be required to publish statements reminding them of their obligations and providing useful resources. We expect this activity will further increase the number and quality of statements published.

In October the Government also launched a new ‘Business Against Slavery Forum’ which will establish a new partnership between Government and business to accelerate progress in tackling modern slavery. It will focus on sharing best practice and building new initiatives to tackle modern slavery, including improving business engagement with the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to implement framework options for monitoring performance and progress in reducing modern slavery, as recommended by the National Audit Office.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The UK Government has had an ambitious Modern Slavery Strategy in place since 2014 and the world-leading Modern Slavery Act was introduced in 2015. Significant progress has been made in implementing the Strategy which have been monitored through performance indicators relating to individual parts of the Strategy. The Home Office will continue to develop its performance framework as necessary, in cooperation with other government departments and agencies.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will undertake a review of the funding allocated across Government to tackle modern slavery and how effective that expenditure is.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Home Office works collaboratively with other government departments and agencies to tackle modern slavery and we monitor the Department’s direct spend on tackling modern slavery. This includes measures such as £8.5 million grant funding from the Police Transformation Fund to transform the police response to modern slavery, and the Modern Slavery Fund of £33.5 million official development assistance managed by the Home Office, to tackle modern slavery across the globe.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department will introduce an all-encompassing cross-Government governance structure for tackling modern slavery.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Government has a co-ordinated policy and operational response, with a Modern Slavery Taskforce chaired by the Prime Minister.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for her Department to implement improvements to the National Referral Mechanism.

Improvements to the National Referral Mechanism were announced in October 2017. The reforms cover 16 work streams some of which will be implemented more quickly than others. A number of reform measures are subject to commercial tender for provision of services. The detailed implementation plans for each work stream are being developed, which will identify the likely timescales.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people seeking asylum are being considered under the National Referral Mechanism.

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department will set a target for the time taken for cases of modern slavery to be processed under the National Referral Mechanism.

The time taken to process National Referral Mechanism (NRM) cases varies by complexity. As part of the ongoing reform of the NRM, changes will be made to ensure a quicker, more certain decision making process, that victims have confidence in.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to collect information on outcomes for victims once they leave support for people rescued from modern slavery.

The Home Office does not routinely collect data on victims after they have left the National Referral Mechanism. In October 2017, the Government announced a package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism including the development of a digitised casework system. It is anticipated that the digital system will improve our ability to collate and report on the progress of victims through the National Referral Mechanism.

The reform package additionally includes an extended period of move on support for confirmed victims. This will enable a more robust transition for victims leaving government funded support. In addition, the provision of a 6 month drop-in service will present the opportunity for continued engagement between support providers and confirmed adult victims.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals have been made under the National Referral Mechanism by police forces in England and Wales by police force in each month since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. However, the October 2017 report from the police inspectorate (HMICRFS) on the police response to modern slavery includes data on NRM referrals made by police forces by year.

This report can be accessed at the following link:

www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/wp-content/uploads/stolen-freedom-the-policing-response-to-modern-slavery-and-human-trafficking.pdf

The National Crime Agency also regularly publishes statistics relating to the number of potential victims of modern slavery referred to the National Referral Mechanism, broken down by police force area. These can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many outstanding decisions UK Visas and Immigration has on victims of modern slavery who have been referred under the National Referral Mechanism.

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to put in place data sharing arrangements between all parties involved in tackling modern slavery.

The Home Office has a number of agreements with partner agencies to enable data to be shared for the purposes of tackling modern slavery. We are considering the impact of the proposed Data Protection Bill in relation to these agreements. We are exploring options to put in place improved data sharing arrangements with international partners to tackle modern slavery up stream.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many National Referral Mechanism forms were (a) not completed properly by first responders and (b) missing information in each year since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

The recently announced reform of the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), includes measures aimed at improving the identification of potential victims and, decision-making timescales. The digitisation of the NRM and a review of the role of First Responders will address the quality of the initial referrals received by the Competent Authority and better support their decision-making.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the average waiting time for victims of modern slavery and human trafficking to access English courses provided by the Salvation Army as part of the victim care contract.

The Victim Care Contract for adult victims of modern slavery, delivered for the Government by The Salvation Army does not include the provision of English courses and therefore the Home Office does not have data on average waiting times for victims to access classes. Through the Victim Care Contract, victims of modern slavery receive accommodation, subsistence, access to mental, physical and dental health services, and signposting to legal support.

Recently announced reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) will mean that confirmed victims have access to this support for a minimum of 90 days, and when victims leave central-government funded support they will have access to drop-in services for a further 6 months

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of subcontractors of the modern slavery victim care contract use the Human Trafficking Foundation Care Standards.

As part of the recently announced package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), Government committed to adopting the Trafficking Survivor Care Standards, drafted by the Human Trafficking Foundation with contributions from a range of non-governmental organisations, including a number of subcontractors of the Victims Care Contact.

We are currently working with a group of key stakeholders, including subcontractors of the Victim Care Contract, to update the standards and design a compliance regime. The standards will then be incorporated into future care contracts for adult victims of modern slavery. In the meantime, we will work with all subcontractors to ensure they are meeting the minimum standards.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have a dedicated modern slavery taskforce.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. Decisions about the size and composition of the police workforce are an operational matter for chief officers, in line with the local priorities set by their Police and Crime Commissioner.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders, who had been issued with removal directions, have (a) made asylum claims (b) lodged judicial review applications and (c) made further representations in each year since 2010?

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-detained foreign national offenders who have completed their custodial sentences have been removed in each year since 2010.

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of foreign national offenders that have missed a reporting event, and how many have subsequently (i) had contact re-established and (ii) not had contact re-established in each year since 2010?

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate he has made of the number of foreign national offenders broken down by offence and region.

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 2 December 2016 to Question 54519, what the timetable is for the publication of the Government's review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

The Government has conducted a review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 to assess whether it has met its intended objectives and whether it should be retained or repealed. A report of the findings of this review will be published later this year.

23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action have been removed since those organisations were proscribed.

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for how long websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action remained live after those organisations were proscribed.

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish its framework for the review of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 as set out in section 58 of that Act.

On 14 July the Home Office published The Psychoactive Substances Act Review Framework which set out the Government’s plans to measure as far as possible any change in activity before and after the implementation of the Psychoactive Substances Act.

18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the number of overseas applications for passports has been in each month since March 2014.

Her Majesty’s Passport Office received a total of 1,258,726 overseas passport applications from March 2014 to December 2016. A monthly breakdown of the total is provided in the table below.

Table

Overseas passport applications received March 2014 to December 2016.

Mar-14

40,874

Apr-14

37,836

May-14

43,092

Jun-14

34,926

Jul-14

32,064

Aug-14

29,327

Sep-14

33,670

Oct-14

32,998

Nov-14

28,110

Dec-14

25,919

Jan-15

39,276

Feb-15

41,273

Mar-15

47,400

Apr-15

42,913

May-15

40,364

Jun-15

40,769

Jul-15

36,041

Aug-15

31,636

Sep-15

38,995

Oct-15

37,174

Nov-15

32,893

Dec-15

25,929

Jan-16

43,902

Feb-16

47,771

Mar-16

49,548

Apr-16

45,894

May-16

42,248

Jun-16

40,485

Jul-16

36,333

Aug-16

33,651

Sep-16

34,559

Oct-16

32,620

Nov-16

34,034

Dec-16

24,202

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport examining officers HM Passport Office employed in each year since 2010.

The table below shows the number of Her Majesty's Passport Office full-time equivalents working within operational directorates for passport production, which includes passport examining officers and other front line roles, on the 31 March of each year.

Number (FTE)

2011

2,586

2012

2,216

2013

2,389

2014

2,593

2015

3,594

2016

3,412

2017

3,219

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Passport Agency's average process time was for (a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014.

The tables below show the average processing time in days for a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014 for UK and International applications. From April 2017 the median average times were used instead of the mean average previously reported, due to enhanced reporting available through a new system.

Table 1

UK average processing times for straightforward (SFPC) & non-straightforward passport applications (NSFPC)

Date

UK SFPC

UK NSFPC

Jan-14

4.2

8.1

Feb-14

6.8

10.3

Mar-14

7.7

11.9

Apr-14

9.3

13.9

May-14

10.9

15.6

Jun-14

14.0

18.5

Jul-14

16.2

21.3

Aug-14

12.0

19.3

Sep-14

3.8

12.5

Oct-14

2.4

9.7

Nov-14

2.1

9.1

Dec-14

2.0

9.4

Jan-15

2.4

7.2

Feb-15

3.1

7.6

Mar-15

3.4

8.3

Apr-15

2.7

8.0

May-15

2.5

7.7

Jun-15

2.5

8.0

Jul-15

2.0

8.2

Aug-15

1.8

8.0

Sep-15

2.2

8.1

Oct-15

2.8

8.7

Nov-15

2.6

8.4

Dec-15

1.7

8.4

Jan-16

2.0

6.2

Feb-16

2.4

6.6

Mar-16

2.3

7.0

Apr-16

3.0

7.5

May-16

3.3

7.8

Jun-16

4.4

8.7

Jul-16

5.4

9.4

Aug-16

5.6

9.5

Sep-16

3.6

8.3

Oct-16

1.8

6.9

Nov-16

1.8

6.2

Dec-16

1.8

6.5

Jan-17

1.8

6.2

Feb-17

2.1

6.4

Mar-17

2.6

7.2

Apr-17

3.1

7.9

May-17

3.7

8.1

Jun-17

3.8

8.3

Table 2

International average processing times for straightforward & non-straightforward passport applications

Date

Int SFPC

Int NSFPC

Jan-14

9.0

16.4

Feb-14

11.4

16.3

Mar-14

15.5

20.9

Apr-14

26.0

29.8

May-14

24.8

34.3

Jun-14

27.3

34.4

Jul-14

30.2

36.2

Aug-14

27.5

34.6

Sep-14

16.0

29.5

Oct-14

10.4

25.5

Nov-14

5.4

21.6

Dec-14

3.9

21.8

Jan-15

4.7

19.7

Feb-15

5.2

16.4

Mar-15

4.4

15.1

Apr-15

3.4

12.1

May-15

4.0

12.9

Jun-15

4.2

12.9

Jul-15

3.7

13.2

Aug-15

2.6

12.3

Sep-15

3.7

12.0

Oct-15

2.6

11.2

Nov-15

2.5

11.3

Dec-15

2.1

12.0

Jan-16

2.7

9.5

Feb-16

3.7

9.8

Mar-16

2.9

10.0

Apr-16

3.2

10.2

May-16

3.0

10.5

Jun-16

3.1

11.3

Jul-16

4.1

12.7

Aug-16

5.8

13.9

Sep-16

3.9

10.3

Oct-16

2.1

11.8

Nov-16

2.0

11.2

Dec-16

1.9

12.2

Jan-17

1.9

11.8

Feb-17

3.1

11.2

Mar-17

2.9

11.3

Apr-17

2.8

9.7

May-17

3.0

11.2

Jun-17

2.6

11.7

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) passport renewal and (b) a first passport were classified as in progress in each month since January 2017.

The table below contains information on applications that are classed as work in progress. These are applications where Her Majesty’s Passport office is not waiting for a response from the customer.

Applications in Progress

Renewals

First Times

Jan-17

29,695

26,884

Feb-17

41,920

31,695

Mar-17

49,873

38,773

Apr-17

53,389

37,051

May-17

36,495

36,609

Jun-17

65,399

44,561

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much compensation Her Majesty's Passport Office has paid out in each year since 2010.

Since 2014/15 compensation payments for HM Passport Office are included within overall HM Passport Office costs disclosed in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts.

Prior to 2014/15 HM Passport Office produced its own Annual Reports and Accounts which disclosed all HM Passport Office income and expenditure, including compensation payments to customers.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers in each year since 2010.

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers were subsequently recovered in each year since 2010.

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport applications processed by the Passport Office missed the three week target for processing in each month between 1 January and 30 June 2017.

Between 1 January 2017 and 30 June 2017, 1,352 UK passport applications not requiring further information took longer than three weeks to process.

This represents 0.06% of the 2.4 million UK applications issued in this period.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much HM Passport Office spent on overtime in each month of 2017.

Overtime costs for Her Majesty’s Passport Office are included within overall staffing costs published in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts. Staffing costs for January to March 2017 are included in the published 2016/17 financial year report. Staffing costs for April to June 2017 will be included in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts for financial year 2017/18.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many intelligence personnel were employed by Border Force in each year since 2010.

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff were operational at the Border Force (a) Intelligence South East and Europe (Folkestone), (b) Intelligence Hub (Dover), (c) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Sheffield), (d) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Croydon), (e) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Solihull) and (f) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Glasgow) in each year since 2010.

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost was of the Deloitte review of intelligence for the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement, commissioned in 2014.

The cost of the Deloitte Review of intelligence for Immigration Enforcement and Border Force was £340,704.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has undertaken an assessment of the effect of switching off the ATHENA border force software at the end of May 2016 on the Border Force.

Athena was replaced by the Single Intelligence Platform (SIP) at the beginning of May 2016. The single intelligence platform was designed specifically for intelligence across the Border Force, Immigration Enforcement and HM Passport Office. It is better suited to the operational needs of Home Office intelligence, is simpler to use, has greater functionality than Athena and has delivered significant efficiencies. SIP has enabled wider access including HM Passport Office.

It has been built and developed by Home Office Digital Data and Technology. Improvements and new functionality are added on a weekly basis. The user research conducted every week provides a wealth of empirical evidence confirming the positive effect on the user experience.

Information from the decommissioned Athena database remains available and accessible to intelligence staff in Immigration Enforcement and Border Force.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement have made on the implementation of the Deloitte review of intelligence commissioned in 2014.

Since publication of the Deloitte Review, Immigration Enforcement (IE) and Border Force (BF) have made a number of changes in direct response to its recommendations. This includes strengthening tasking and prioritisation processes, organisational restructures and developing a culture where the value of intelligence is understood across the organisation.

We consider that all of the Deloitte recommendations have now been addressed or are incorporated as part of our Transformation programme, and therefore the review is now closed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force category (a) A, (b) B and (c) C alerts were (i) issued and (ii) produced a successful outcome for maritime and air freight for each year since 2010.

This information is exempt from disclosure under sections 31(1) (a) & (e) of the Freedom of Information Act due to the potential to compromise National border security.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) airports, (b) ports and (c) train terminals had a dedicated Border Force customs team to deal with freight in each year since 2010.

This Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. All airports, ports and train terminals have Border Force Customs to deal with freight.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force staff have accessed the Professional Practice Manual on her Department's intranet since it was introduced.

Border Force does not have access to the level of information that is required in response to the PQ.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken in response to the findings in the report from the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration of 21 July 2016 on intelligence functions of Border Force and Immigration Enforcement regarding making best use of the Intelligence Management System.

Border Force and Immigration Enforcement are continually making improvements to the Intelligence Management System as part of the system’s development to meet business needs specific to each organisation.

For example, the link between the Intelligence Management System and the Single Intelligence Platform enables Intelligence Management System records and information to be automatically uploaded into Single Intelligence Platform. This has been completed and went live in autumn 2016. This was a significant improvement ensuring the system is used to its full potential.

Border Force is working on delivering a border specific user interface in IMS. This will enable Border Force to improve and increase the recording of information received within IMS.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the most recent (a) guidance and (b) training was issued for UK Visas and Immigration caseworkers on using the Intelligence Management System.

UKVI issued detailed training guidance to temporary migration caseworkers in June 2016. This included detailed instruction on how to complete the online referral form.

Immigration Enforcement deliver training on request to UKVI caseworkers as part of their intelligence cycle transformation work.

Intelligence requirements are regularly circulated to all staff as set out in the quarterly threat assessment. These provide clear indications of what information is needed to fulfil those intelligence gaps and complete the intelligence picture.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department has issued to Border Force teams on the use of the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets to log intelligence data.

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure Border Force regions use the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets.

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has a hard copy of the Professional Practice Manual to each Border Force operation site since it was introduced.

The Professional Practice Manual (PPM) is an Immigration Enforcement product. Border Force staff refer to their own guidance and, in addition, have access to PPM via the Home Office Intranet.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many detector dogs Border Force had in each (a) airport, (b) port and (c) train terminal in each year since 2010.

Border Force works at the Border with a range of law enforcement partners including the police and the Ministry of Defence, including the use of detector dogs.

Border Force detector dogs are a national resource and the current number available for deployment nationally to detect illegal goods and clandestines is 108.

65 of these dogs are wholly owned by Border Force and 43 are provided by a UK based contractor.

Since 2010, the numbers have been (Border Force owned dogs only):

2010: 75

2011: 73

2012: 70

2013: 69

2014: 70

2015: 64

2016: 67

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the UK has accessed Europol's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams in each year since their creation.

The UK has never accessed EUROPOL's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams since their creation.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information has been exchanged by the UK to other EU member states via Europol's Secure Information Exchange Network Application service in each year since 2010.

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information the UK has shared with Europol's information system on foreign terrorist fighters in each year since 2010.

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of Europol assistance in tackling missing trader intra-community fraud on the UK's ability to tackle value added tax fraud.

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Europol's information system on the UK's ability to tackle crime.

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Early Warning System on the UK's ability to tackle new psychoactive substances.

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol on the UK's ability to work across borders with the US.

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Terrorism Situation and Trend Report system on the UK's ability to tackle terrorism.

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) financial, (b) intelligence, (c) personnel and (d) other assistance Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre has given to the UK in each year since February 2016.

Cooperation between UK law enforcement and Europol’s European Migrant Smuggling Centre on organised immigration crime is well-established and routine. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK through enhanced intelligence exchange.

However, the specific data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant on the UK's ability to easily extradite those who have committed crimes.

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has on replacement for the SIRENE Bureaux if the UK leaves the European Arrest Warrant agreement.

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant requests made by (a) the UK to each other EU state and (b) each other EU member state to the UK have been rejected as not valid in each year since 2010.

Between 21 July 2014 and 31 March 2017 the National Crime Agency refused to certify 508 European Arrest Warrants on the grounds of disproportionality or dual criminality.

The NCA does not hold figures prior to the 2014 reforms made to the European Arrest Warrant, which came into effect on 21 July 2014.

The NCA does not hold equivalent figures for EU member states.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) websites have been shut down, (b) goods have been seized, (c) arrests have been made and (d) medicine units have been seized in the UK under Operational Pangea in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold this information. INTERPOL releases information annually detailing the total results of Operational Pangea from all participating countries.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) arrests and (b) prosecutions have taken place in the UK after Europol investigations into missing trader intra-community fraud in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many weapons have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many kilograms of (a) drugs, (b) new psychoactive substances and (c) endangered species goods have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to the Schengen Information System on tackling crime after the UK leaves the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation on measures such as SIS II once the UK has left the EU but it is too early to speculate at this stage what future arrangements may look like.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have (a) been issued by the UK, (b) resulted in an extradition back to the UK and (c) resulted in an extradition back to the country requesting the warrant in each year since 2010.

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have been requested by each police force since 2010.

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant (a) arrests, (b) requests and (c) surrenders have been made in each year since 2010.

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the Crown Prosecution Service of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with the Crown Prosecution Service on the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many files the UK has sent to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution in each of the last three years.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases have been shared through Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare programme by (a) the UK, (b) other EU member states, (c) states with operational agreements with Europol and (d) states with strategic agreements with Europol in each year since that programme's creation in March 2015.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what contributions Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare has made to UK border control operations at (a) Calais and (b) other locations in each year since March 2015.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed information from Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspects have been arrested in the UK after the use of Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre since February 2016.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed Europol's EU internet referral unit in each year since 1 July 2015.

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the total number of referrals to the EU Internet Referral Unit was; and how many of those referrals led to the deletion of internet content in each year since 2015.

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of losing access to the (a) European Cybercrime Centre and (b) Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment on tackling cybercrime after the UK leaves the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions her Department has used the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme since its creation.

The Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme (TFTP) allows UK law enforcement access, in specific circumstances, to information on international financial transactions on the SWIFT messaging network. The Joint Report from the EU Commission and US Treasury Department highlighted the valuable role data from TFTP had played in supporting counter-terrorism investigations. Due to reasons of national security it is not in the public interest to disclose the specific details of the UK’s use of the TFTP.

Joint Report from the European Union Commission and the U.S. Treasury Department regarding the value of TFTP Provided Data – 27 November 2013

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare on tackling illegal migration to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to protect citizens, businesses and the state from malware attacks of the potential loss of access to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution after the UK leaves the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to fight cybercrime of the UK's potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Cybercrime action taskforce after the UK leaves the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre on tackling human trafficking to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on tackling human trafficking.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment has she made of the potential effect of loss of access to the European Judicial Cybercrime Network after the UK has left the EU.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the Government has placed an urgent request for judicial cooperation with Eurojust on terrorism-related cases in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases that Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug VAT fraud cases that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many VAT fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many human trafficking cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in and (b) outside the UK in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on private and non-profit sectors who use that organisation's services.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle drug trafficking.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle VAT fraud.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases of human trafficking Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
14th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for the European Economic Area family permit have been (a) submitted, (b) rejected and (c) accepted in each year since 2010.

The information requested on the number of applications, grants and refusals for the European Economic Area family permit in each year since 2010 is published in the Home Office’s quarterly Immigration Statistics Visa tables volume 1, table vi_01_q, latest edition available from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-october-to-december-2016/list-of-tables#visas

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force operatives were deployed at (a) airports and (b) ports in each year since 2010.

I am sorry but this information is not held centrally and could only be acquired at disproportionate cost.

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average waiting time at the UK border was for (a) British, European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss passengers and (b) non-EEA passengers in (i) each year since 2010 and (ii) each month since 2010.

I am sorry but this information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to the public purse has been to date of updating the warning index and Semaphore systems.

Break down by years is available at the following link: https://www.nao.org.uk/report/home-office-e-borders-and-successor-programmes/

Spend prior to April 2006 is not available due to Departmental changes in the accounting system.

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of Advanced Passenger Information checks has been completed by Border Force at primary check points on (a) scheduled flights, (b) unscheduled flights, (c) sea transportation and (d) rail transportation in each year since 2010.

Every route to the United Kingdom whether by air, sea or rail carries an element of risk, and assessment of risk is undertaken across all routes and all modes. Analysis of passenger, crew and service information in advance of travel or upon departure to the UK forms part of the risk assessment process – which is complemented by full checks of all passengers arriving at primary control point on all modes.

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of (a) flights, (b) sea transportation and (c) rail transportation has been risk-assessed when notified to the Border Force in each year since 2010.

Every route to the United Kingdom whether by air, sea or rail carries an element of risk, and assessment of risk is undertaken across all routes and all modes. Analysis of passenger, crew and service information in advance of travel or upon departure to the UK forms part of the risk assessment process – which is complemented by full checks of all passengers arriving at primary control point on all modes.

28th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans that the warning index and Semaphore systems update will be completed.

The Digital Services at the Border (DSAB) Programme was launched in 2014 to deliver a new generation of Border Security Systems including replacing the Warnings Index (WI) and Semaphore. This has a scheduled end-date of 31 March 2019.

24th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which external groups her Department plans to consult on its review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 under section 18 of that Act.

The Home Office will consult with a wide range of external groups, including representatives of the scrap metal and metals recycling industry such as the British Metals Recycling Association, the energy and rail networks, the Church of England and other religious bodies, Historic England, representatives from Gypsy, Traveller and Roma organisations, local authorities and the police.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what funding has been allocated to each constabulary to tackle scrap metal theft and enforcement of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 in each year since 2010.

The Government is not providing funding specifically to police forces to tackle metal theft. We provide funding for individual police budgets and Police and Crime Commissioners determine according to local priorities how this funding is allocated to tackle crime. However, the Government did provide additional funding of £6 million in total to the National Metal Theft Taskforce between January 2012 and September 2014 to support the implementation of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013. The legislation is proving to be effective and in 2015-16 metal theft offences reduced by 38%, according to the Office for National Statistics in their statistical bulletin Focus on property crime: year ending March 2016 published on 24 November 2016.

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to section 18 of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013, when she plans to publish the Government's review of that Act

The Government intends to commence the review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 very shortly and will publish the outcomes of the review in 2017.

This is earlier than required by section 18 of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act which said that the review should be undertaken and its finding published no later than 30 September 2018. We consulted with key partners and it was considered that there was sufficient evidence available about the working of the Act to undertake the review now.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether police forces in Wales are required to contribute to the UK's Apprenticeship Levy.

The apprenticeship levy will be introduced on 6 April 2017. The levy will be paid by an employer, in any sector, with a pay bill more than £3 million each year. This includes police forces in England and Wales.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many scrap metal dealers have had their scrap metal licences revoked for not displaying a copy of their licence (a) at each site identified in the licence and (b) on any vehicle that was being used in the course of the dealer's business in each year since 2013.

Information about extant scrap metal dealer licences, both collector and site licences, is available in Wales on the Natural Resources Wales public register of scrap metal dealers and in England on the Environment Agency’s public register.

These licences are issued by local authorities and the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of licences issued, renewed, modified or revoked by local authorities.

Similarly, the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of warrants to enable the police or an officer of a local authority to enter premises for the purposes specified in section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many scrap metal (a) sites and (b) collectors licences have been modified because of a change of trading name in each year since 2013.

Information about extant scrap metal dealer licences, both collector and site licences, is available in Wales on the Natural Resources Wales public register of scrap metal dealers and in England on the Environment Agency’s public register.

These licences are issued by local authorities and the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of licences issued, renewed, modified or revoked by local authorities.

Similarly, the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of warrants to enable the police or an officer of a local authority to enter premises for the purposes specified in section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many scrap metal (a) site and (b) collectors licences have been issued in each year since 2013.

Information about extant scrap metal dealer licences, both collector and site licences, is available in Wales on the Natural Resources Wales public register of scrap metal dealers and in England on the Environment Agency’s public register.

These licences are issued by local authorities and the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of licences issued, renewed, modified or revoked by local authorities.

Similarly, the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of warrants to enable the police or an officer of a local authority to enter premises for the purposes specified in section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many scrap metal (a) site and (b) collectors licences have been (i) renewed and (ii) revoked in each year since 2013 in each local authority.

Information about extant scrap metal dealer licences, both collector and site licences, is available in Wales on the Natural Resources Wales public register of scrap metal dealers and in England on the Environment Agency’s public register.

These licences are issued by local authorities and the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of licences issued, renewed, modified or revoked by local authorities.

Similarly, the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of warrants to enable the police or an officer of a local authority to enter premises for the purposes specified in section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many warrants have been issued authorising entry in accordance with section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 in each year since that Act came into force.

Information about extant scrap metal dealer licences, both collector and site licences, is available in Wales on the Natural Resources Wales public register of scrap metal dealers and in England on the Environment Agency’s public register.

These licences are issued by local authorities and the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of licences issued, renewed, modified or revoked by local authorities.

Similarly, the Home Office does not collect or hold information on the number of warrants to enable the police or an officer of a local authority to enter premises for the purposes specified in section 16(5) of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many days of police time were lost in sick leave as a result of assaults on police officers in each constabulary in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold all of the data requested. Data that are held are provided in the accompanying tables. These statistics have been supplied to the Home Office from police forces’ live operational systems. As such, the numbers may change as information on those systems is updated.

Published data for 2014/15 and 2015/16, along with notes can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

None of the current data sources provide a complete measure of assaults, and the Home Office is currently working with police forces to improve this data.

Information on the number of working days lost by police officers as a result of sickness due to assault ceased to be collected from 2012/13 due to significant issues with the completeness and quality of the data.

The number of working days lost by police community support officers as a result of sickness due to assaults is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) police officers and (b) police community support officers have been assaulted in each constabulary in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold all of the data requested. Data that are held are provided in the accompanying tables. These statistics have been supplied to the Home Office from police forces’ live operational systems. As such, the numbers may change as information on those systems is updated.

Published data for 2014/15 and 2015/16, along with notes can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

None of the current data sources provide a complete measure of assaults, and the Home Office is currently working with police forces to improve this data.

Information on the number of working days lost by police officers as a result of sickness due to assault ceased to be collected from 2012/13 due to significant issues with the completeness and quality of the data.

The number of working days lost by police community support officers as a result of sickness due to assaults is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people received pre-charge bail conditions that (a) withheld their travel documents and (b) restricted their movement in each year since 2010; and how many people breached those pre-charge bail conditions.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
19th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 4 February 2016 to Question 22830, whether the Warnings Index Checks system has been affected by high-priority incidents in the last five years.

All Border Force systems and services, including the Warnings Index system, are constantly monitored and closely managed so any arising incidents can be quickly and effectively resolved. Whilst there have been a small number of high priority incidents during the period in question with the Warnings Index system, like other Home Office technology services, it has layers of resilience built into it along with supporting continuity arrangements. This resilience and operational arrangements has enabled controls at the border to be maintained with no suspension of checks at any port since November 2011. The migration in the autumn of 2014 of the core Warning Index services to modern data-centres has significantly improved its reliability and stability.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average hourly earnings of (a) female, (b) male, (c) full-time and (d) part-time employees of her Department were in each of the last five years.

The average hourly pay for Civil Servants in the Home Office by gender and part and full time workers, for each of the last five years is in Table 1.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many vessels which displayed the yellow Q flag (a) docked at UK ports and (b) were checked by Border Force officials in each of the last five years.

No information is held on the number of vessels which fly the ‘Q’ flag. Border Force utilise an intelligence led approach in deciding which vessels to intercept.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of general aviation flights that arrived in the UK (a) had correctly completed general aviation reports, (b) had incorrectly completed general aviation reports and (c) failed to complete a general aviation report in each of the last five years.

This information is not recorded in a reportable field on Home Office databases. Obtaining such information would therefore require a manual search of records and could only be achieved at a disproportionate cost.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many undeclared passengers were identified by the Border Force in each of the last five years.

For the purpose of this question Border Force have assumed that ‘undeclared passenger’ means any passenger travelling in any mode of transport whose movement has not been notified in the prescribed manner.

Border Force does not collate records of ‘undeclared passengers’. But it works closely with aircraft operators, pilots and others to maximise the provision of Advance Passenger Information in all modes.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many vessels (a) completed and (b) failed to complete the C1331 customs declaration form in each of the last five years.

The table below outlines the number of completed C1331 customs declaration forms received by Border Force in each of the last 5 years. This data has been drawn from basic IT systems used for management information which are not subject to internal quality checks and may be subject to change.

Year

Number of completed C1331 Forms received by Border Force

2011

408

2012

331

2013

399

2014

391

2015

319

There are no records held that could adequately answer the question of how many vessels failed to complete the C1331 form.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many flights were attended by the Border Force beyond the primary control points in each of the last five years.

Border Force does not have the requested data prior to 2012/13. Since then we have made improvements to our command and control of general aviation, including our national statistical reporting, and are able to provide full details from 2013 onwards.

During 2013/14 Border Force a) attended 27,299 flights and remotely cleared 18,885 flights

During 2014/15 Border Force a) attended 27,033 flights and remotely cleared 32,042

The figures quoted are management information, subject to internal quality checks and may be subject to change.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many general aviation flights were (a) attended and (b) cleared remotely by the Border Force in each of the last five years.

Border Force does not have the requested data prior to 2012/13. Since then we have made improvements to our command and control of general aviation, including our national statistical reporting, and are able to provide full details from 2013 onwards.

During 2013/14 Border Force a) attended 27,299 flights and remotely cleared 18,885 flights

During 2014/15 Border Force a) attended 27,033 flights and remotely cleared 32,042

The figures quoted are management information, subject to internal quality checks and may be subject to change.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she expects the Maritime Priority Assessment Tool to be fully implemented.

The Maritime Priority Assessment Tool was rolled out nationally on 29 December 2015.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many alerts were issued by the National Border Targeting Centre to the regional offices of Border Force relating to flights of potential interest in each of the last five years.

The National Border Targeting Centre issue alerts to both police and Border Force officials at the UK border. The figures provided record those alerts raised for Immigration or Customs reasons at the Border, and do not include any police alerts.

In 2013 Border Force implemented a quality assurance procedure of Border Force alerts which were being disseminated to the frontline. You will see that in 2012, alerts steadily dropped. Alert ratios reduced due to a more stringent alert framework being adopted by the agency. Alerts were of a higher quality and specifically directed to manage the threat to the Border depending on the priorities of the Border Control Strategy and threat assessment.

Year Alert count

2011 16,694

2012 15,864

2013 11,076

2014 10,516

2015 10,167

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2016 to Question 22835, in what months the biometric passport chip reading facilities were deactivated in (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015.

For the period for which figures are available, biometric chip reading facilities were deactivated 7 times in 2013 and these occurred during the months of February, March, May & June. In 2014 chip reading facilities were deactivated 3 times and these occurred during the months of September, October and December. In 2015, chip reading facilities were deactivated 3 times and occurred during the months of February, April, and June.

These figures should be considered against the background of the overall volume of transactions which are currently running at over 100 million per year and each of the instances has been thoroughly investigated and we are satisfied that there has been no risk to the border as a result.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2016 to Question 22835, in what months the biometric passport chip reading facilities were deactivated in (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015.

For the period for which figures are available, biometric chip reading facilities were deactivated 7 times in 2013 and these occurred during the months of February, March, May & June. In 2014 chip reading facilities were deactivated 3 times and these occurred during the months of September, October and December. In 2015, chip reading facilities were deactivated 3 times and occurred during the months of February, April, and June.

These figures should be considered against the background of the overall volume of transactions which are currently running at over 100 million per year and each of the instances has been thoroughly investigated and we are satisfied that there has been no risk to the border as a result.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times Warnings Index checks have been suspended (a) in the UK, (b) at each port, (c) at each airport and (d) nationally in each of the last five years.

In November 2011, the then Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration found that the then UKBA had carried out a number of suspensions of Warnings Index Checks without due ministerial authority. Since then, Border Force has operated to a Ministerially-approved mandate that requires it to undertake Warnings Index Checks against all passengers arriving into the UK on scheduled, commercial routes; and Secure ID Checks against passengers that require a visa to enter the UK. These checks have not been suspended at any port since November 2011.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the biometric passport chip reading facilities have been deactivated (a) in the UK, (b) at each port and (c) at each airport in each of the last five years.

For the period for which figures are available, biometric chip reading facilities were deactivated 7 times in 2013, 3 times in 2014 and 3 times in 2015.

These figures should be considered against the background of the overall volume of transactions which are currently running at over 100 million per year.

Deactivation of the chip reading function by Border Force staff is routinely monitored. The occasions reported above have been thoroughly investigated and none has given rise to concerns about officer integrity. We are also satisfied that there has been no risk to the border as a result. An investigation is ongoing with the system supplier to ascertain whether a technical issue may have caused these incidents.

A further breakdown of locations cannot be given for border and national security reasons.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspensions of the Secure ID checks took place (a) in the UK, (b) at each port and (c) at each airport in each of the last five years.

In November 2011, the then Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration found that the then UKBA had carried out a number of suspensions of Warnings Index Checks without due ministerial authority. Since then, Border Force has operated to a Ministerially-approved mandate that requires it to undertake Warnings Index Checks against all passengers arriving into the UK on scheduled, commercial routes; and Secure ID Checks against passengers that require a visa to enter the UK. These checks have not been suspended at any port since November 2011.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspensions of terrorist warning index checks took place without a reason for that suspension in each of the last five years.

In November 2011, the then Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration found that the then UKBA had carried out a number of suspensions of Warnings Index Checks without due ministerial authority. Since then, Border Force has operated to a Ministerially-approved mandate that requires it to undertake Warnings Index Checks against all passengers arriving into the UK on scheduled, commercial routes; and Secure ID Checks against passengers that require a visa to enter the UK. These checks have not been suspended at any port since November 2011.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on ensuring that policy and border staff share information on the illegal wildlife trade with Interpol, Europol and World Customs Organisation.

Border Force are in regular contact with all the Organisations listed and regularly use their systems to communicate and share Intelligence on IWT to the global community .They are also represented on the EU Enforcement Working group that covers the Illegal wildlife trade.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many seizures of illegal animal wildlife products have been made at UK ports of entry in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the number of seizures under CITES by Border Force (Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species).


Year

Number of seizures under CITES

2011

422

2012

665

2013*

569

2014*

512

2015 (Jan to June 2015)*

490


*These figures are published, and can be found on the GOV UK website.

The figures quoted above are management information, which are subject to internal quality checks and may be subject to change.


Link to website: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-force-transparency-data-august-2015

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many women and girls (a) under 17, (b) 18 to 20, (c) 21 and over, (d) of unknown age and (e) in total were arrested for notifiable offences in the North Wales police force area (i) in 2015-16 to date and (ii) in the most recent quarter.

The Home Office does not currently hold the information requested. The latest statistics covering arrests for notifiable offences by gender, age and police force area cover the period to the year ending 31 March 2014, and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2014/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2014#arrests.

Arrests data covering the period to the year ending 31 March 2015 are due to be published on Thursday 19th November 2015.

Data covering the period requested, and up to the year ending 31 March 2016 will be published in 2016.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people in each nation and region of the UK receive support under her Department's asylum support regulations in each Government-defined period in each of the last three years.

Support may be provided under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute until their asylum claim is determined. Section 95 support can be provided as both accommodation and subsistence, or accommodation or subsistence only.

The table below shows the number of asylum seekers in receipt of Section 95 support in each Local Authority and region of England and Wales as at the end of June in 2013, 2014 and 2015.

The numbers of asylum seekers in receipt of section 95 support, broken down by Local Authority, are published on a quarterly basis by the Home Office in Table as_16_q of the Immigration Statistics release .The latest publication (Immigration statistics, April to June 2015 ) is available on the GOV.UK website: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2015

Table A: Asylum seekers in receipt of Section 95 support, by local authority, as at end of June 2013 to June 2015
Local Authorityas at the end of June 2013as at the end of June 2014as at the end of June 2015
Total21,42326,72030,457
Aberdeen001
Aberdeenshire100
Adur023
Allerdale000
Alnwickzzz
Amber Valley110
Angus100
Antrim000
Ards000
Argyll and Bute000
Armagh000
Arun000
Ashfield001
Ashford221
Aylesbury Vale333
Babergh222
Ballymena000
Ballymoney000
Banbridge000
Barking and Dagenham132140126
Barnet1089084
Barnsley236391394
Barrow-in-Furness000
Basildon044
Basingstoke and Deane000
Bassetlaw340
Bath and North East Somerset001
Bedford51212
Belfast346465496
Berwick-upon-Tweedzzz
Bexley333323
Birmingham9741,2691,400
Blaby123
Blackburn with Darwen249280299
Blackpool045
Blaenau Gwent000
Blyth Valleyzzz
Bolsover000
Bolton677755931
Boston000
Bournemouth026
Bracknell Forest333
Bradford183264556
Braintree022
Breckland011
Brent106104107
Brentwood000
Bridgend064
Bridgnorthzzz
Brighton and Hove242022
Bristol224280278
Broadland755
Bromley212019
Bromsgrove221
Broxbourne1173
Broxtowe1533
Burnley036
Bury254306381
Caerphilly000
Calderdale143167166
Cambridge430
Camden161421
Cannock Chase044
Canterbury433
Caradonzzz
Cardiff9249761,041
Carlisle000
Carmarthenshire120
Carrickzzz
Carrickfergus000
Castle Morpethzzz
Castle Point444
Castlereagh000
Central Bedfordshire231
Ceredigion000
Charnwood030
Chelmsford233
Cheltenham200
Cherwell022
Cheshire East001
Cheshire West and Chester010
Chesterzzz
Chesterfield001
Chester-le-Streetzzz
Chichester000
Chiltern003
Chorley000
Christchurch000
City of London110
Clackmannanshire000
Colchester555
Coleraine000
Congletonzzz
Conwy000
Cookstown000
Copeland000
Corby510
Cornwall001
Cotswold000
County Durham220
Coventry400481506
Craigavon000
Craven000
Crawley4513
Crewe and Nantwichzzz
Croydon119153162
Dacorum114
Darlington002
Dartford605
Daventry000
Denbighshire000
Derby346479605
Derbyshire Dales000
Derry000
Derwentsidezzz
Doncaster156226220
Dover100
Down000
Dudley144186226
Dumfries and Galloway000
Dundee101114
Dungannon000
Durhamzzz
Ealing133128168
Easingtonzzz
East Ayrshire000
East Cambridgeshire000
East Devon000
East Dorset000
East Dunbartonshire000
East Hampshire000
East Hertfordshire100
East Lindsey000
East Lothian000
East Northamptonshire000
East Renfrewshire000
East Riding of Yorkshire440
East Staffordshire013
Eastbourne211
Eastleigh111
Eden000
Edinburgh81218
Eilean Siar000
Ellesmere Port and Nestonzzz
Elmbridge111
Enfield201183201
Epping Forest81311
Epsom and Ewell011
Erewash141
Exeter102
Falkirk121
Fareham000
Fenland017
Fermanagh000
Fife022
Flintshire000
Forest Heath000
Forest of Dean000
Fylde000
Gateshead141216261
Gedling100
Glasgow1,9652,4852,602
Gloucester7089110
Gosport110
Gravesham330
Great Yarmouth000
Greenwich857783
Guildford100
Gwynedd333
Hackney444338
Halton002
Hambleton000
Hammersmith and Fulham241425
Harborough000
Haringey162147139
Harlow613
Harrogate000
Harrow525069
Hart000
Hartlepool121122135
Hastings536870
Havant000
Havering62625
Herefordshire020
Hertsmere174
High Peak000
Highland000
Hillingdon135146154
Hinckley and Bosworth111
Horsham002
Hounslow755878
Huntingdonshire000
Hyndburn333
Inverclyde000
Ipswich577064
Isle of Anglesey000
Isle of Wight000
Isles of Scilly000
Islington212534
Kennetzzz
Kensington and Chelsea111416
Kerrierzzz
Kettering011
King's Lynn and West Norfolk000
Kingston upon Hull157257261
Kingston upon Thames253742
Kirklees225287326
Knowsley131
Lambeth515743
Lancaster100
Larne000
Leeds285472501
Leicester503776851
Lewes003
Lewisham12612393
Lichfield000
Limavady000
Lincoln301
Lisburn110
Liverpool1,1721,4661,417
Luton314373
Macclesfieldzzz
Magherafelt000
Maidstone221
Maldon000
Malvern Hills000
Manchester648779934
Mansfield002
Medway435
Melton000
Mendip000
Merthyr Tydfil010
Merton545036
Mid Bedfordshirezzz
Mid Devon000
Mid Suffolk001
Mid Sussex850
Middlesbrough706799746
Midlothian000
Milton Keynes161117
Mole Valley000
Monmouthshire000
Moray000
Moyle000
Neath Port Talbot312
New Forest000
Newark and Sherwood000
Newcastle upon Tyne327358546
Newcastle-under-Lyme000
Newham385382348
Newport263391459
Newry and Mourne000
Newtownabbey000
North Ayrshire000
North Cornwallzzz
North Devon000
North Dorset001
North Down001
North East Derbyshire000
North East Lincolnshire001
North Hertfordshire013
North Kesteven001
North Lanarkshire000
North Lincolnshire000
North Norfolk010
North Shropshirezzz
North Somerset000
North Tyneside52100107
North Warwickshire000
North West Leicestershire000
North Wiltshirezzz
Northampton91612
Northumberland010
Norwich107115113
Nottingham408598791
Nuneaton and Bedworth112
Oadby and Wigston034
Oldham421539637
Omagh010
Orkney Islands000
Oswestryzzz
Other and Unknown41153165
Oxford81112
Pembrokeshire000
Pendle065
Penwithzzz
Perth and Kinross122
Peterborough98131137
Plymouth147222235
Poole000
Portsmouth98131128
Powys001
Preston44131
Purbeck000
Reading10914
Redbridge190189180
Redcar and Cleveland437
Redditch015
Reigate and Banstead010
Renfrewshire012
Restormelzzz
Rhondda Cynon Taf014
Ribble Valley000
Richmond upon Thames9814
Richmondshire000
Rochdale403615984
Rochford002
Rossendale000
Rother001
Rotherham392342334
Rugby200
Runnymede100
Rushcliffe040
Rushmoor000
Rutland000
Ryedale000
Salford536533592
Salisburyzzz
Sandwell359593695
Scarborough000
Scottish Borders000
Sedgefieldzzz
Sedgemoor000
Sefton028
Selby000
Sevenoaks400
Sheffield370550654
Shepway102
Shetland Islands000
Shrewsbury and Atchamzzz
Shropshire000
Slough173347
Solihull385
South Ayrshire012
South Bedfordshirezzz
South Bucks000
South Cambridgeshire023
South Derbyshire000
South Gloucestershire373854
South Hams000
South Holland000
South Kesteven000
South Lakeland000
South Lanarkshire334
South Norfolk010
South Northamptonshire011
South Oxfordshire003
South Ribble000
South Shropshirezzz
South Somerset222
South Staffordshire000
South Tyneside373658
Southampton908867
Southend-on-Sea897
Southwark646389
Spelthorne045
St. Albans088
St. Edmundsbury000
St. Helens025
Stafford400
Staffordshire Moorlands000
Stevenage1093
Stirling001
Stockport83100115
Stockton-on-Tees490579697
Stoke-on-Trent452444625
Strabane000
Stratford-on-Avon000
Stroud000
Suffolk Coastal333
Sunderland145167119
Surrey Heath022
Sutton61712
Swale002
Swansea363523773
Swindon8390106
Tameside184200253
Tamworth010
Tandridge100
Taunton Deane001
Teesdalezzz
Teignbridge000
Telford and Wrekin043
Tendring000
Test Valley000
Tewkesbury016
Thanet020
The Vale of Glamorgan000
Three Rivers111
Thurrock163032
Tonbridge and Malling000
Torbay011
Torfaen000
Torridge222
Tower Hamlets242424
Trafford657991
Tunbridge Wells000
Tynedalezzz
Uttlesford000
Vale of White Horse77z
Vale Royal0z8
Wakefield326082
Walsall156215234
Waltham Forest168188184
Wandsworth595542
Wansbeckzzz
Warrington102
Warwick121
Watford01315
Waveney000
Waverley002
Wealden000
Wear Valleyzzz
Wellingborough057
Welwyn Hatfield354
West Berkshire000
West Devon000
West Dorset000
West Dunbartonshire000
West Lancashire004
West Lindsey111
West Lothian020
West Oxfordshire100
West Somerset000
West Wiltshirezzz
Westminster344943
Weymouth and Portland000
Wigan304448592
Wiltshire303
Winchester000
Windsor and Maidenhead015
Wirral326
Woking000
Wokingham501
Wolverhampton402571645
Worcester043
Worthing130
Wrexham405268
Wychavon000
Wycombe61835
Wyre002
Wyre Forest001
York000
z = Not applicable.
: = Not available.
1. The data include dependants in receipt of support.
2. The data excludes unaccompanied asylum seeking children supported by Local Authorities.
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been spent on additional security at Calais in each month since July 2014.

Border Force has funded additional security measures for Calais at £9.46 million since July 2014 as below:

2014

July 2014

August

September

October

November

December

£167,000

£109,000

£167,000

£114,000

£701,000

£351,000

2015

January

2015

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

£193,000

£98,000

£6.673 million

£168,000

£105,000

£102,000

£184,000

£328,000

Note - In March 2015 bills for work undertaken to that point were accounted for at the end of the financial year including a substantial amount for the juxtaposed ports’ grant to the value of £4.893 million. The figures for 2015 do not include all anticipated spend.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which Ministers in her Department have visited the port of Calais since June 2014.

Home Office Ministers have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of these meetings are passed to the Cabinet Office on a quarterly basis and are subsequently published on the Gov.uk website: http://data.gov.uk/dataset/ministerial-data-home-office

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many civil penalties levied by the Border Force for the carrying of illegal migrants have been (a) issued and (b) paid by (i) UK citizens and (ii) foreign nationals in each of the last three years.

The number of civil penalties levied by Border Force for the carrying of clandestine illegal entrants in each of the last three years has been :

Period

Penalty Notices issued

Penalties imposed on British drivers and hauliers

Penalties imposed on non- UK drivers and hauliers

01/04/12-31/03/2013

1690

122

1568

01/04/13-03/03/2014

1324

94

1230

01/04/14-31/03/2015

3321

233

3088

These figures do not relate to the number of penalty notices issued/ imposed for incidents/cases which occurred during these three years. This information is from internal management reports.

The civil penalties paid by UK citizens and foreign nationals in the same period as a whole is information that is not held in an immediately retrievable format and would have to be recovered manually, incurring disproportionate cost. The total amount of penalties without nationality specified is held. This information is from management information reports. Penalty payments made may not necessarily be for the same year that they were imposed. For example if a penalty was imposed in 2014 and then subject to appeal it might not be paid until much later.

Period

Penalties imposed

Penalties received

01/04/12 - 31/03/13

£890,544

£ 484,922

01/04/13 – 31/03/14

£4,070,471

£ 2,293,699

01/04/14 – 31/0315

£ 6,490,232

£ 4,050,139

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the cost of additional (a) security staff and (b) sniffer dogs deployed at Calais since 1 June 2015.

The costs of additional security staff and sniffer dogs in June, July and August 2015 were:

June

July

August

Total

Security staff

£57,000

£94,000

£121,000

£272,000

Sniffer dogs

£45,000

£90,000

£207,000

£342,000

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many illegal migrants have been apprehended by the Border Force (a) on the English side of the French border at Calais and (b) in Kent in each month of 2015.

To ensure the integrity and security of the UK border Her Majesty’s Government does not comment on port specific statistics.

At the regional juxtaposed ports in Northern France, around 40,000 attempts to cross the Channel illegally in 2014/15 have been prevented by Border Force and its contractors and the French authorities.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what criteria are used by her Department to select the post offices used for the issue of biometric residence permits.

The collection network was designed by Post Office Limited using anonymised, historical immigration data provided by the Home Office and the requirement that, on average, an applicant should not have to travel more than 30 miles to collect their BRP. In addition, the top 20 Post Office branches already used to enrol biometrics were excluded from the collection network to avoid adversely affecting the Post Office’s ability to collect biometrics and provide its other services during the early autumn.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with (a) the post office network and (b) educational establishments on the management of biometric residence permits at the start of the academic year 2015-16.

The Home Office has worked with Post Office Limited and the education sector to review the proposed branch collection network ahead of the 2015-16 academic year. Particular concerns have been to identify ‘hotspots’, and to identify universities which are relatively remote from their nearest collection branch.

The Home Office has offered the largest universities the option of having BRPs delivered to them, rather than requiring each student to attend a Post Office branch to collect in person. Universities operating this process must have appropriate security arrangements in place for bulk storage of BRPs and only use approved staff to perform the identity verification activity that would have been performed in branch by Post Office staff.

The Home Office has also reviewed with the Post Office and the school sector the best approach for child students, who require a responsible adult to supervise their collection at the Post Office. As a result, we have introduced a Third Party Standing Authority process which allows named school staff to collect BRP on behalf of their students, significantly reducing the administrative burden on the school and removing the need to transport pupils to and from the Post Office branch.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which UK post offices are approved to issue biometric residence permits.

There are 199 Post Office branches approved to offer the BRP collection service throughout the UK. These include Crown, Main, Company and Independent Franchise Post Offices. The top 20 Post Office branches used to enrol biometrics are excluded from the Collection Network to avoid adversely affecting the Post Office’s ability to collect biometrics and provide its other services during the ‘student surge’ period. The complete list is:

Aberdeen St Nicholas

Aberystwyth

Acton

Albany Road

Aldwych

Antrim

Armley

Ayr

Baker Street

Bangor

Barking

Barnes Green

Barnstaple

Barras Bridge

Beaumont Leys

Beckton

Bedminster Parade

Beeston

Belfast City

Berryden

Bolton

Brent Park

Brighton

Broad Street Mall

Broadway

Bulwell

Bury Park

Byker

Cambridge City

Canary Wharf

Canterbury

Canton

Carlisle

Castle Mall

Catford

Chatham

Chesser

Chiswick

Churchill Place

Churchill Way West

City of Bath

City Of Exeter

Clapham Common

Colchester

Cornwall Street

Corporation Street

Cotham Hill

Coventry

Cowley Centre

Crawley

Dartford

Derby City

Dingle

Dundee

Durham

Ealing

East Ham

Edgbaston

Edgware

Edgware Road

Edinburgh City

Enniskillen

Farnborough

Farringdon Road

Ferndale Road 250

Five Ways

Fiveways

Forest Gate

Fort William

Frederick Street

Fulham

Gloucester

Gorton

Grays Inn

Great Greenford

Great Portland Street

Guildford Town

Hackney

Hammersmith

Harborne

Harlow

Harrow

Hatfield

Haverfordwest

Hayes

Headingley

Headington

Heathway

High Road Hayes

High Wycombe

Hillsborough

Hockwell Ring

Horfield

Houndsditch

Hounslow

Hull

Hulme

Huntingdon

Ilford

Inverness

Kensington

Kilburn

Kings Cross

Kingston Upon Thames

Lancaster

Leamington Spa

Leece Street

Lewisham

Leytonstone

Liverpool

London Road

Londonderry

Loughborough

Lower Earley

Maida Hill

Manchester Mount Street

Maryhill

Marylebone

Merchant City

Middlesbrough

Milton Keynes

Nelson

New Street

Newcastle Under Lyme

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Newland Avenue

Newry

Newtown

Norfolk Street

North Finchley

Northampton

Northfield

Northumberland Avenue

Norwood

Nottingham

Oxford

Oxford Street

Paddington Quay

Partick

Perth

Peterborough City

Piccadilly Plaza

Plaistow

Pontypridd (temporarily closed)

Portsmouth

Portswood

Preston

Queensway

Richmond

Romford

Salford City

Sauchiehall Street

Scarborough

Shawlands

Sheffield City

Shipley

Shirley Precinct

Sincil Street

Sketty

Slough

Small Heath

Soho Road

Southampton

Southend-On-Sea

St Andrews

St Andrews Cross

St Peters

St Peters Street

St Stephens Parade

St Thomas

Stirling

Stratford

Streatham

Sunbridge Road

Sunderland City

Sutton

Swindon

Taunton

Terminus Road

The City of London

The City Of Swansea

The Markets

The Shires

Tooting Tower

Ramparts

Truro

Uxbridge

Walthamstow Central

Warstone Lane

Watford

Wembley

West Croydon

Whitechapel

Windsor

Winton

Wolverhampton

Woolwich

Wrexham Town Centre

York

9th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of students who have had their leave curtailed or extension of their leave refused where there was a cancelled ETS English language certificate who have left the UK under the normal Removals and Voluntary Departures scheme in each year since May 2010.

Data on the operational response to the abuse of Secure English Language Testing supplied by ETS is published quarterly in the Home Office Transparency data which can be accessed at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/temporary-and-permanent-migration-data-may-2015 .

The most recent figures are published to the end of Quarter 1 2015 and include the number of individuals who have had leave curtailed or an application refused, those who have been removed from the United Kingdom and those who had at some time been detained. In addition to these figures a significant number of individuals will have chosen to leave the UK of their own volition without Home Office assistance.

The Home Office has not been notified of cancelled English language test certificates issued by other providers since 2010 on anything approaching the scale of ETS. Moreover it is in theory possible that an individual student may have had leave to remain curtailed or extension of leave to remain refused for reasons unrelated to their English language proficiency but might subsequently also have had a test certificate issued by a provider other than ETS cancelled. For these reasons, aside from ETS, the Home Office does not hold aggregated figures for students who have had leave curtailed or been refused leave to remain since May 2010 and who have had at any time an English language test certificate issued by a provider other than ETS withdrawn

9th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many students who hold a cancelled English language test certificate have (a) had leave to remain curtailed or extension of leave to remain refused and (b) been removed from the UK in each year since May 2010.

Data on the operational response to the abuse of Secure English Language Testing supplied by ETS is published quarterly in the Home Office Transparency data which can be accessed at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/temporary-and-permanent-migration-data-may-2015 .

The most recent figures are published to the end of Quarter 1 2015 and include the number of individuals who have had leave curtailed or an application refused, those who have been removed from the United Kingdom and those who had at some time been detained. In addition to these figures a significant number of individuals will have chosen to leave the UK of their own volition without Home Office assistance.

The Home Office has not been notified of cancelled English language test certificates issued by other providers since 2010 on anything approaching the scale of ETS. Moreover it is in theory possible that an individual student may have had leave to remain curtailed or extension of leave to remain refused for reasons unrelated to their English language proficiency but might subsequently also have had a test certificate issued by a provider other than ETS cancelled. For these reasons, aside from ETS, the Home Office does not hold aggregated figures for students who have had leave curtailed or been refused leave to remain since May 2010 and who have had at any time an English language test certificate issu