Neil Parish Portrait

Neil Parish

Conservative - Tiverton and Honiton

1 APPG membership (as of 17 Nov 2021)
Wood Panel Industry
6 Former APPG memberships
Cider, Energy Studies, Rural Services, Swimming, Water, Zimbabwe
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee 2017-19
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee
20th Feb 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Sub-Committee
14th Oct 2015 - 22nd Mar 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 14th December 2021
10:00
Division Votes
Wednesday 8th December 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 292 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 300
Speeches
Tuesday 16th November 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

Apologies, Mr Speaker—some of us are very slow learners.

With global energy markets in a state of flux, Tiverton and …

Written Answers
Wednesday 10th November 2021
Waste: Carbon Emissions
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what are the projected emissions resulting from waste …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 11th February 2021
Support to tackle food waste
That this House recognises the valuable work of FareShare, the UK’s biggest charity fighting hunger and food waste, in providing …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: National Association of British and Irish Millers
Address of donor: 21 Arlington Street, London SW1A 1RN
Amount …
EDM signed
Thursday 2nd December 2021
Conduct of councillors towards town and parish council clerks
That this House notes with deep concern convincing evidence collected by the Association of Local Council Clerks showing that, far …
Supported Legislation
Clean Air (No. 3) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Neil Parish has voted in 350 divisions, and 4 times against the majority of their Party.

9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
20 Jul 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 323 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 326
13 May 2020 - Remote Division result: New Clause 2 - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 326 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 328
View All Neil Parish Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(25 debate interactions)
Victoria Prentis (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(19 debate interactions)
Deidre Brock (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(12 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Neil Parish's debates

Tiverton and Honiton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

As a country we see many water-related fatalities every year. We see many more call outs to water related incidents. Throughout lockdown year our coastguards were tasked to almost double the call outs than in the previous year. Our children NEED to learn about Cold water shock & rip currents.

Leading veterinary and welfare bodies are concerned by the alarming rise in ear-cropped dogs in the UK. Ear cropping is illegal in the UK and an unnecessary, painful mutilation with no welfare benefit. The practice involves cutting off part of the ear flap, often without anaesthesia or pain relief.

Plenty of dogs from UK breeders & rescues need homes. Transporting young pups long distances is often stressful, before being sold for ridiculous prices to unsuspecting dog-lovers. Government must adjust current laws, ban this unethical activity on welfare grounds & protect these poor animals ASAP.

Now that we have left the EU, the UK has the ability to finally stop the importation of Shark Fins. They had previously stated that 'Whilst in the EU, it is not possible to unilaterally ban the import of shark fins into the UK.'


Latest EDMs signed by Neil Parish

25th November 2021
Neil Parish signed this EDM on Thursday 2nd December 2021

Conduct of councillors towards town and parish council clerks

Tabled by: Julian Lewis (Conservative - New Forest East)
That this House notes with deep concern convincing evidence collected by the Association of Local Council Clerks showing that, far from being untypical, the toxic behaviour by Parish Councillors in Cheshire exposed online in December 2020, is endemic in a significant minority of Town and Parish Councils; deplores the departure …
8 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Dec 2021)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Labour: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
21st July 2021
Neil Parish signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 22nd July 2021

UN World Drowning Prevention Day

Tabled by: Catherine McKinnell (Labour - Newcastle upon Tyne North)
That this House welcomes the UN General Assembly’s adoption of its first ever resolution on global drowning prevention; recognises the first ever UN World Drowning Prevention Day on 25 July 2021 and deeply regrets that almost 4,000 people in the UK lost their lives in water accidents from 2009-20 according …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Scottish National Party: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Independent: 2
Conservative: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alba Party: 1
View All Neil Parish's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Neil Parish, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



34 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what progress he is making with international partners to (a) ensure that local and international supply chains for foodstuffs and key commodities are environmentally responsible, and (b) increase the alignment of financial flows with net-zero and the Paris Agreement objectives.

As part of the COP26 nature campaign, the UK Government has established the Forests, Agriculture and Commodity Trade (FACT) dialogues to bring together producer and consumer countries to agree collaborative actions which reduce the impact of commodity supply chains on forests and other critical ecosystems.

Increasing the alignment of finance with net zero targets and the Paris Climate Agreement is a core part of our COP26 strategy. I have been engaging with a wide range of international partners to seek increased climate finance commitments from donor countries to meet the critical $100bn goal. We have published our priorities for public finance. Mark Carney is implementing a framework for embedding climate into every financial decision and creating a more sustainable financial system to support the path to net zero. We have seen significant progress so far across financial institutions, central banks, regulators and Multilateral Development Banks.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of potential contribution of domestic tidal lagoon power to reaching the target of net zero by 2050.

The Government has been clear that tidal range technologies such as tidal lagoons and barrages may have a role to play in the UK’s long term energy mix but only if they can deliver value for money in the context of other renewable technologies.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has made to Cabinet colleagues on the interests of British farming in relation to the Government's (a) forthcoming heat policy roadmap and (b) plans to renew the Renewable Heat Incentive.

The Department engages regularly with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, at both ministerial and official level, on the interests of British Farming on a range of issues. This includes the biogas and biomethane technologies included under the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI).

The RHI has funding confirmed for new deployment of renewable heat technologies until 31 March 2021. The Budget on 11 March confirmed a new allocation of flexible tariff guarantees on the non-domestic RHI and announced a new support scheme for biomethane production to increase the proportion of green gas in the grid, funded by a Green Gas Levy.

We are planning to publish a Heat and Building Strategy later this year, which will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings and an ambitious programme of work required to enable key strategic decisions to set us on a path to Net Zero by 2050. We are currently developing policies to deliver low carbon heating in the 2020s and meet our climate targets which we will consult on with a wider range of stakeholders including British Farmers.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if the Government will reconsider including food and drink qualifications in the Lifetime Skills Guarantee.

Through the free courses for jobs offer, we are making courses available that address skills needs in the economy, offer good wage outcomes, and empower adults with the tools they need to secure a better job.

We have identified hundreds of courses that can give adults the skills they need in the labour market. These qualifications include those that can support employers regardless of their sector, including those in the food and drink industry, with courses in business, accountancy, engineering, marketing and a variety of digital qualifications. We are keeping the list of qualifications and the sector subject areas in scope under review and will consider requests for including courses that meet the published criteria. We have already added more qualifications to the original list. Those qualifications met all the criteria published on gov.uk.

Qualifications not included in this offer will still be eligible for Advanced Learner Loans (ALL). ALL are income contingent loans that provide extensive coverage of regulated qualifications from level 3 to level 6, helping to meet the up-front tuition fees. In the 2019/20 academic year there were applications to study at nearly 450 training providers, and over 3000 qualifications are currently in scope.

In addition to this, there a variety of high quality apprenticeship standards in food and drink manufacturing available for employers to use. They include, but are not limited to, food and drink advanced engineer, baker, and senior culinary chef.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has an emissions reduction plan.

On 19 October, the Government's Net Zero Strategy was published, setting the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out Government's vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors. The Natural Resources, Waste and Fluorinated-Gases (F-Gases) chapter covers Defra related sectors and their emission reductions including agriculture, peat and tree planting.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what are the projected emissions resulting from waste over the period of the 4th, 5th and 6th carbon budget periods.

The Government's Net Zero Strategy sets the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out Government's vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors.

Sectoral emissions for Waste and F-gases over forthcoming carbon budget periods are set out in Table 8 of the technical annex to the net zero strategy. These are: Carbon Budget (CB) 4 24-27 MtCO2e; Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) 17-20 MtCO2e and CB6 12-15 MtCO2e.

n.b. NDC is the midpoint of CB5

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what are the projected resulting emissions for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use over the period of the 4th, 5th and 6th carbon budget periods.

The Government’s Net Zero Strategy sets the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors.

Sectoral emissions for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) over forthcoming carbon budget periods are set out in Table 8 of the technical annex to the Net Zero Strategy. These are Carbon Budget (CB) 4; 51-57 MtCO2e; Nationally Determined Contribution 44-52 MtCo2e and CB6 38-48 MtCO2e.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he (a) has made and (b) plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of using powers under The Common Fisheries Policy and Aquaculture (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 to apply trade sanctions on relevant stocks against a nation State that is overfishing, for the purposes of securing the most advantageous deals for the UK fishing industry.

Powers set out under Retained Regulation (EU) No 1026/2012 on certain measures for the purpose of the conservation of fish stocks in relation to countries allowing non-sustainable fishing. The measures can include targeted trade sanctions on the species that has been caught. Sustainable fishing remains a priority for UK and we continue to consult a range of countries through bilateral and multilateral engagement to agree suitable harvest control rules to prevent overfishing.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to ban the non-commercial importation of pregnant cats as well as pregnant dogs.

The Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill was introduced in Parliament on 8 June. The Bill allows us to protect the welfare of pets by introducing restrictions to crack down on the low welfare movements of pets into Great Britain and includes powers to introduce new restrictions on pet travel and on the commercial import of pets on welfare grounds, via secondary legislation. These restrictions could relate to the movement of pets below a prescribed age and to the movement of heavily pregnant pets under the commercial and non-commercial rules. We will continue to work closely with stakeholders prior to the introduction of the legislation to ensure that our final measures are well considered and are guided by the latest evidence.

The Government is planning to launch a consultation later this year on the proposed restrictions to the commercial and non-commercial movement of pets into Great Britain. The consultation will allow us to refine the scope of the measures, including whether they apply to cats.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will introduce compulsory tick and tapeworm treatments for cats entering the UK non-commercially.

The Pet Travel and Illegal import clauses of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill focus on measures to improve welfare of pets entering Great Britain. We remain aware of the concerns around ticks and tick-borne disease and tapeworm in cats and our future policy will be guided by risk assessment. Defra also continues to monitor the disease situation through the Tick Surveillance Scheme.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will introduce a requirement for a (a) rabies blood test for cats before entry into the UK and (b) wait period post vaccination which is in line with the incubation period of rabies.

The Pet Travel and Illegal import clauses of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill focus on measures to improve welfare of pets entering GB. Recent quantitative risk assessments have concluded that the risk of a pet animal with rabies entering the UK under the pet travel rules is very low. Defra continues to monitor the disease situation.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) Government buying standards for food are in line with the UK’s targets for net zero emissions and (b) top-quality British farmers and producers can benefit from public sector contracts.

The Government will always champion greater consumption of our excellent British food and drink, including from British farmers and local producers. The Government Buying Standards for Food (GBSF) encourages the procurement of UK seasonal and locally produced food.

Defra is launching a public consultation this summer to review the GBSF. We want to enhance the GBSF in line with recent Government policy initiatives around promoting local produce, social value and environment and resource management.

The consultation will seek views as to how public sector food procurement can assist the Government in achieving net zero carbon emissions. This will include proposals for procuring from more sustainable farming systems, as well as ensuring caterers use energy efficient equipment and move away from food waste management to waste reduction.

We will also be seeking views on how the standards could be used to promote even greater uptake of locally produced food by public procurers and their suppliers.

In addition, Defra is working closely with the Crown Commercial Service to develop the Future Food Framework in the South West region. The trial will create significant new opportunities for our farmers and local producers to supply regional public sector bodies.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has plans to (a) commission and (b) fund further research to assess animal welfare in transport using modern broiler genotypes and transport systems.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare standards of all animal journeys. We are continuously assessing the available scientific evidence on improving animal welfare during transport and are committed to commissioning new research where it is needed in order to develop the evidence base further.

We launched a Call for Evidence, in 2018, on controlling live exports for slaughter and improving animal welfare during transport and, that same year, commissioned Scotland’s Rural University College and the University of Edinburgh to produce a systematic review of the evidence on welfare aspects of the transport of live animals.

The Government asked the then Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC, now Animal Welfare Committee) to provide an opinion on improving the welfare of animals during transport. FAWC considered the evidence obtained from the Call for Evidence; the report of the systematic review; as well as their engagement with stakeholders before submitting their opinion and recommendations.

We launched a consultation in England and Wales in 2020 on improvements to the domestic welfare in transport regime, informed by the recommendations from FAWC’s report. We will shortly be publishing our response to the consultation and outlining how we will take reforms forward.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that legislative changes on animal welfare in transport are informed by the most up-to-date science and technology.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare standards of all animal journeys. We are continuously assessing the available scientific evidence on improving animal welfare during transport and are committed to commissioning new research where it is needed in order to develop the evidence base further.

We launched a Call for Evidence, in 2018, on controlling live exports for slaughter and improving animal welfare during transport and, that same year, commissioned Scotland’s Rural University College and the University of Edinburgh to produce a systematic review of the evidence on welfare aspects of the transport of live animals.

The Government asked the then Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC, now Animal Welfare Committee) to provide an opinion on improving the welfare of animals during transport. FAWC considered the evidence obtained from the Call for Evidence; the report of the systematic review; as well as their engagement with stakeholders before submitting their opinion and recommendations.

We launched a consultation in England and Wales in 2020 on improvements to the domestic welfare in transport regime, informed by the recommendations from FAWC’s report. We will shortly be publishing our response to the consultation and outlining how we will take reforms forward.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to improve governance of organic certification.

Now that the UK has left the European Union we have the opportunity to chart our own course in organic regulation, setting rules around organic production and certification that suit the needs of our domestic organics industry.

We are working to streamline bureaucratic processes inherited from the EU regulatory system to allow for a more flexible and responsive way to handle our regulatory obligations while reducing costs for producers and the burden on the public purse.

The Agriculture Act 2020 gives us powers to amend the organics regime to support organic farmers further, benefit the environment, maintain consumer confidence, promote research and innovation in the sector, and reflect future trade agreements. In due course we will consult with organic producers and industry bodies on how to boost innovation, improve governance of organic certification, group certification and making entry into organic production appealing for new entrants.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with representatives from organic farms during the design of the Environmental Land Management scheme.

We are working closely with a range of environmental and agricultural stakeholders collaboratively to design the new schemes that reward environmental benefits.

The new schemes will fairly compensate farmers for environmental goods generated across all land types and farm management systems, including organic farms.

Several representatives of the organic sector are involved in codesigning the schemes in a variety of ways, including being part of our stakeholder and codesign groups, as well as separate one to one and small group meetings.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of cases of illegal dog ear cropping in the last six years; and what steps his Department is taking to help (a) halt that practice and (b) prevent the importation of dogs that have had their ears cropped.

The Government has not made a specific assessment on the numbers of dogs with illegally cropped ears but we continue to raise awareness regarding the improper selling of pets by deceitful sellers in the UK and abroad through our ‘Petfished’ campaign. This seeks to educate prospective pet buyers on common tricks and tactics used by deceitful sellers which may result in the purchase of a mistreated or unwell pet, including those that have been subject to cropping. The campaign urges buyers to mitigate risks, for example by buying from trusted sellers such as those under the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder scheme, viewing puppies with their mothers and siblings, asking questions of the seller and following the Animal Welfare Foundation and RSPCA Puppy Contract to ensure that puppies are in good health when purchased.

The practice of mutilating dogs’ ears is abhorrent and has rightly been banned in the UK for 15 years. The maximum penalty for causing unnecessary suffering to an animal or cropping a dog’s ears in England is six months’ imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. However, the Government is committed to increasing the maximum custodial penalty for both of these offences from six months to five years. The Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill, currently before Parliament, which will implement this increase, will continue to receive Government support as it completes its passage through Parliament.

We already have some of the world’s highest animal welfare standards. The end of the transition period has opened up new opportunities for managing our own pet travel and commercial importation rules. We are actively listening to the concerns of stakeholders and the Government is considering options regarding the importation and commercial movements of dogs with cropped ears into Great Britain in line with World Trade Organization rules.

Importers of animals must adhere to welfare standards as set out in Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport and in domestic legislation, The Welfare of Animals (Transport) (England) Order 2006 (WATEO). This legislation aims to protect the health and welfare of animals during transportation and applies to dogs that are suffering injury as a result of non-exempted mutilations including cropped ears.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on public health of the delays in (a) implementing local Clean Air Zones and (b) achieving compliance with legal limits on air pollution.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of (a) Clean Air Zones and (b) other restrictions on the use of vehicles compared with other means of tackling illegal levels of air pollution.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) the response to the covid-19 outbreak does not delay the urgent steps required to tackle illegal levels of air pollution and protect people’s health and (b) local authorities deliver their air quality plans as soon as possible.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if it remains the Government's policy to maintain the October 2022 deadline for (a) air quality, water, (b) biodiversity, (c) resource efficiency and (d) waste reduction targets.

The Government plans to bring forward at least one target in each of the four priority areas by the Environment Bill’s 31 October 2022 deadline. Targets will be developed based on robust, scientifically credible evidence, as well as economic analysis. We want them to be ambitious, credible and supported by society.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the UK fishing industry (a) during the covid-19 outbreak and (b) in preparation for the end of the transition period.

The Government remains committed to supporting the long-term profitability of our fishing industry in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. On 17 April 2020 it launched a £10 million financial assistance package for England's fishing and aquaculture businesses which included a £1 million grant scheme to support the sale of fish locally.

We have left the EU, and at the end of the Transition Period will leave the Common Fisheries Policy. We will take back control of our waters to secure a fairer share of fishing opportunities for the UK fishing industry and will develop a world-class fisheries management regime to the benefit of industry. The Fisheries Bill will give us the necessary powers to manage fisheries as an independent coastal State. New, domestic, long-term funding arrangements will support the UK's fishing industry from 2021. We are working closely with the industry and others to ensure that the trade of seafood with the EU can continue after the end of the Transition Period.

A number of schemes are available to support fisheries and aquaculture businesses and a summary can be found via the link below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/883851/Support_for_fishing_industry_one_stop_shop_v20.pdf

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Trade and Agriculture Commission will be involved in the final stages of negotiating the Australia-UK free trade agreement prior to signature.

The Commission will scrutinise the signed Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Australia to inform Parliamentary scrutiny. The role of the Trade and Agriculture Commission is not to advise on negotiations. Its role will be as debated and approved during the passage of the Trade Act 2021 and the Agriculture Act 2020.

The Department has increased engagement with key agricultural stakeholders during FTA negotiations through its dedicated agri-food Trade Advisory Group, which meets at least three times a year, or as required by developments in the free trade negotiation process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent assessment the Government has made of the effect on the rights of indigenous peoples in Brazil of British businesses importing resources or products from that country.

The United Kingdom has a strong history of promoting her values globally.

We continue to support work with indigenous communities across Brazil, including in the Amazon region. We are taking steps domestically to tackle illegal deforestation and, through our Partnership for Forests programme, we are supporting almost 2,000 indigenous people to strengthen their livelihoods through sustainable forest management.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the future of UK car mileage in the context of (a) the National Travel Survey finding that 25 per cent of car mileage is for commuting purposes and (b) ONS data from April 2020 showing that 47 per cent of people did some work at home.

There is significant uncertainty about the impact of COVID-19 on road travel demand. The Department continues to closely monitor the impact of the pandemic and to develop tools to understand and present this uncertainty alongside other drivers of future demand such as technological change and population change.

The Department has commissioned a programme of social and behavioural research to understand the impacts of the pandemic on people’s travel behavior. This includes changes in the behaviours that drive travel demand, such as working from home, and a longitudinal survey to track changes in behaviour during the pandemic as well as people’s intentions going forward.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Apr 2021
What plans he has for the future role of community hospitals.

Community hospitals are a hugely valuable and valued part of our health and care system. As we have seen during the pandemic, they have played a vital role in providing intermediate care for patients not yet well enough to return home and play a much broader role year-in year-out to the communities they serve. While it is for local communities to make decisions on specific local services, we are clear that our community hospitals should continue to play a central role in healthcare provision for many years to come.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many reports of mis-stunning before slaughter he has received for each category of animal in each year since 2008.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) can provide recorded data from 2010 onwards detailing the number of instances of inaccurate/ineffective stunning which have occurred in the main categories of animals, in FSA approved slaughter premises in England and Wales. Each instance relates to an event that has been categorised as a serious or critical non-compliance on the welfare reporting systems used at that time. These figures do not reflect the number of animals involved.

Number of inaccurate/ineffective stuns recorded as serious/critical in England and Wales 2010-19

Year

Period

Poultry

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep and Goats

Total

2010

April 2010 to March 2011

17

9

4

9

39

2011

April 2011 to March 2012

6

10

3

4

23

2012

April 2012 to March 2013

9

8

2

6

25

2013

April 2013 to March 2014

6

13

3

2

24

2014

April 2014 to March 2015

11

21

3

3

38

2015

April 2015 to March 2016

4

81

0

3

88

2016

April 2016 to March 2017

2

27

0

1

30

2017

April 2017 to March 2018

4

15

1

10

30

2018

April 2018 to March 2019

2

34

4

6

46

2019

April 2019 to December 2019

0

14

1

6

21

Grand Total

61

232

21

50

364

The figures in the table above for poultry only reflect the data associated with electrical stunning methods as the predominant method used in larger poultry premises is controlled atmosphere stunning (gas) method which is designed to kill rather than stun.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many reports of mis-cutting he received for each category of animal in each year since 2008.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) can provide the recorded data from 2010 onwards detailing the number of instances of mis-cutting which have occurred in the main categories of animals, in FSA approved slaughter premises in England and Wales. Each instance relates to an event that has been categorised as a serious or critical non-compliance on the welfare reporting systems used at that time. These figures do not reflect the number of animals involved.

Year

Period

Poultry

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep and Goats

Total

2010

April 2010 to March 2011

181

0

0

0

181

2011

April 2011 to March 2012

154

0

0

0

154

2012

April 2012 to March 2013

180

0

0

0

180

2013

April 2013 to March 2014

88

0

0

0

88

2014

April 2014 to March 2015

93

0

0

0

93

2015

April 2015 to March 2016

96

0

0

0

96

2016

April 2016 to March 2017

42

0

0

0

42

2017

April 2017 to March 2018

43

0

0

0

43

2018

April 2018 to March 2019

31

0

0

0

31

2019

April 2019 to December 2019

25

0

0

3

28

Grand Total

933

0

0

3

936

As is evident in the data contained in the table the issue is almost exclusively related to poultry processing with an improving trend in recent years. This is due to improvements in business operator practices, technology and enforcement action being taken against operators who do not comply with the legal requirements.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help protect the rights of indigenous peoples in Brazil.

The UK is committed to promoting and defending the human rights of all individuals, and we continues to support work with indigenous communities across Brazil, including in the Amazon region. UK programmes on building back better after the COVID-19 pandemic include a focus on vulnerable groups, including in the Amazon region, and work on issues such as solar energy, primary health, and skills development. The UK has also supported local and indigenous people in the Amazon through our International Climate Finance Programmes, with nearly £120 million invested since 2012.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of implications for his policies of the conclusions of the Federation of Wholesale Distributors survey that (a) 50 per cent of businesses surveyed that have a turnover of £45 million or lower, are in danger of going into liquidation in the next three months to a year, (b) 70 per cent of respondents supply to schools, care homes, hospitals and (c) £270 million worth of public sector contracts are at risk; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency including almost £300 billion of guarantees – equivalent to 15% of UK GDP. Local Authorities (LAs) can choose to make discretionary grants to businesses in supply chains, like wholesale distributors, if they feel there is a particular local economic need. The Government has allocated up to £617 million to LAs to enable them to give discretionary grants to businesses in this situation. LAs may choose to focus payments on those priority groups which are most relevant to their local areas or to businesses outside of these priority groups, so long as the business was trading on 11th March, and has not received any other cash grant funded by central Government.

Wholesale distributors can also benefit from other elements of the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and the four government-backed loan schemes for firms of all sizes. The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder.

On 11 May the Government published its COVID-19 recovery strategy which sets out our plan for moving to the next phase of our response. The strategy sets out a cautious roadmap for easing existing measures in a safe and measured way. Our aim is that all non-essential retail will be able to reopen by 15 June if the Government’s five tests are met and they follow the COVID-19 secure guidelines. The roadmap will be kept constantly under review, and we will continue to work hard to support business and workers as the situation evolves. The Department for Transport is engaging with the haulage industry to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the sector.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the application of business rates relief to food and drink wholesalers.

The Government has provided enhanced support through business rates relief to businesses occupying properties used for retail, hospitality and leisure given the direct and acute impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on those sectors.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has published guidance for local authorities on eligible properties. As set out in the guidance, support is targeted at premises that are wholly or mainly being used as shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues; for assembly and leisure; or as hotels, guest and boarding premises, and self-catering accommodation. It is for local authorities to determine eligibility for reliefs, having regard to guidance issued by the Government.

A range of further measures to support all businesses, including those not eligible for the business rates holiday, such as wholesalers, has also been made available.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Written Statement of 28 June 2021, HCWS128 on Supporting Tourism in England, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on (a) facilitating a quick licensing process and (b) expediting new applications for camping licences to provide certainty for applicants of temporary campsites.

As the Written Statement made clear, the Government wants local authorities to expedite new applications for licenses for temporary campsites, where they are needed, to provide certainty for applicants.

Under the campsite licensing legislation, if a local authority fails to meet this expectation for a fast decision and does not respond to a licensing application within a month, the operator can continue without a license.

My Department and DEFRA will continue to work together with local authorities to ensure licensing does not become a barrier to increased temporary campsite capacity over the Summer.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress has been made towards establishing a code of practice under the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019.

On 3 November 2019, we announced we were contracting with the British Standards Institution (BSI) to develop the Code of Practice as British Standard, to ensure the new regulation will be robust and of the highest quality.

The government’s choice of BSI delivers on our promise to listen to industry and consumers and involve them in the design of the new regulation.

Work with BSI commenced in December 2019, and they are now convening a group of key stakeholders to write the Code. The stakeholder group will comprise representatives from the parking industry, consumer groups, standards bodies and, recognising the key role that parking plays in supporting our high streets, the retail sector.

A full public consultation will take place within six months, to give the parking industry, the public, and other interested parties the opportunity to have a say.

We have committed to developing the final Code this year.