Rebecca Long Bailey Written Questions

278 Questions to Government Departments tabled by Rebecca Long Bailey


Date Title Questioner
24 Sep 2020, 4:45 p.m. Non-surgical Cosmetic Procedures Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) protect the safety of consumers seeking (i) special treatments and (ii) other non-surgical cosmetic procedures and (b) ensure that all practitioners offering those treatments are appropriately qualified.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

The Government is committed to improving the safety of cosmetic procedures through better training for practitioners, and clear information so that people can make informed decisions about their care.

The Department is exploring the regulation of premises, practitioners, products and consumer safeguards. This includes an assessment of the regulation of practitioners in the aesthetics sector and working with stakeholders to ensure that practitioners are able to identify providers of accredited training.

The Government expects providers of cosmetic procedures to operate responsibly by conducting a pre-treatment consultation and ensuring they hold the requisite knowledge and skills to safely deliver the treatments they offer.

24 Sep 2020, 4:45 p.m. Non-surgical Cosmetic Procedures Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to introduce mandatory requirements for formal training and qualifications for all practitioners providing (a) special treatments and (b) other non-surgical cosmetic treatments.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

The Government is committed to improving the safety of cosmetic procedures through better training for practitioners, and clear information so that people can make informed decisions about their care.

The Department is exploring the regulation of premises, practitioners, products and consumer safeguards. This includes an assessment of the regulation of practitioners in the aesthetics sector and working with stakeholders to ensure that practitioners are able to identify providers of accredited training.

The Government expects providers of cosmetic procedures to operate responsibly by conducting a pre-treatment consultation and ensuring they hold the requisite knowledge and skills to safely deliver the treatments they offer.

24 Sep 2020, 4:45 p.m. Non-surgical Cosmetic Procedures Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that non-surgical cosmetic treatments available to consumers are carried out (a) by qualified practitioners and (b) in safe and hygienic premises.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

The Government is committed to improving the safety of cosmetic procedures through better training for practitioners, and clear information so that people can make informed decisions about their care.

The Department is exploring the regulation of premises, practitioners, products and consumer safeguards. This includes an assessment of the regulation of practitioners in the aesthetics sector and working with stakeholders to ensure that practitioners are able to identify providers of accredited training.

The Government expects providers of cosmetic procedures to operate responsibly by conducting a pre-treatment consultation and ensuring they hold the requisite knowledge and skills to safely deliver the treatments they offer.

21 Sep 2020, 3:24 p.m. Maternity Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has issued to NHS Trusts on allowing partners of pregnant women to attend (a) appointments with midwives, (b) routine scan appointments, (c) non-routine scan appointments and (d) during labour.

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

The National Health Service is making arrangements to ensure that women are supported and cared for safely through pregnancy, birth and the period afterwards during this pandemic.

Decisions on partners attending scans and appointments is subject to local discretion by trusts and other NHS bodies.

A new Framework to assist NHS trusts to reintroduce access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women in English maternity services was published on 8 September at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/09/par001599-framework-for-the-reintroduction-of-visitors-throughout-maternity-services-sep-2020.pdf

We expect trusts to use this Framework and consider as a priority how access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women can be reintroduced whilst maintaining the safety of all service users, staff and visitors.

15 Sep 2020, 3:10 p.m. Fuel Poverty Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department will publish the Government’s response to the consultation on the Fuel Poverty for England Strategy, which closed on 16 September 2019.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

We intend to publish the Government response to the consultation on updating the Fuel Poverty Strategy for England shortly.

21 Jul 2020, 12:26 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a landlord that receives funding from the Government's energy efficiency voucher scheme is prevented from raising the level of (a) energy bills, (b) rent and (c) service charges applied to tenants as a result of work financed by that voucher scheme.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Low income households will receive a higher rate of subsidy of up to 100% of the cost of measures.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch.

21 Jul 2020, 12:25 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) private and (b) social sector tenants will be able to require their landlord to access the Government's energy efficiency voucher scheme to upgrade their property.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Low income households will receive a higher rate of subsidy of up to 100% of the cost of measures.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch.

21 Jul 2020, 12:24 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme: Insulation Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether housing associations that manage properties subject to overarching PFI arrangements and were previously excluded from Government funding schemes to remove and replace flammable ACM cladding, will be entitled to access the Government's energy efficiency voucher scheme to upgrade those properties.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Low income households will receive a higher rate of subsidy of up to 100% of the cost of measures.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch.

21 Jul 2020, 12:23 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether (a) housing associations and (b) local authorities will be able to access the Government's efficiency voucher scheme to upgrade properties on behalf of their tenants.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Low income households will receive a higher rate of subsidy of up to 100% of the cost of measures.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch of the scheme.

21 Jul 2020, 12:21 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme: Salford Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has in place to enable social housing renters in Salford to access the energy efficiency voucher scheme; and at what income threshold those renters will qualify for the maximum grant.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery. Low income households will receive a higher rate of subsidy of up to 100% of the cost of measures.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch of the scheme.

21 Jul 2020, 12:19 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme: Salford Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has in place to enable (a) private renters, (b) leaseholders and (c) people engaged in part ownership schemes in Salford to access the energy efficiency voucher scheme; and what income threshold he plans to put in place for each category to qualify for the maximum grant.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes.

Further detail on eligibility will be announced in due course, before the full launch.

21 Jul 2020, 12:17 p.m. Green Homes Grant Scheme Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the energy efficiency voucher scheme directly assists people affected by fuel poverty.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Further detail on the scheme will be announced in due course, before the full launch of the scheme.

15 Jul 2020, 5:43 p.m. Personal Care Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to offer additional financial support to people working in tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapy, reflexology and other close contact services in the event that a date for reopening can not yet be confirmed.

Answer (Paul Scully)

Close contact services in England, except Leicester, have been able to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

The Government has introduced a comprehensive package of measures to support businesses through this difficult period, including Government-backed loan schemes providing facilities of between £2000 and £200 million, which will run for an initial period of six months.

The schemes offer generous terms to help firms manage debts: under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) and Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) Government covers any interest and lender-levied fees for the first 12 months.

Additionally, under BBLS no repayments are due for the first 12 months, and interest is capped at 2.5%. Businesses can also access support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, deferral of VAT and income tax payment, grant funding for small businesses, and more.

15 Jul 2020, 5:42 p.m. Personal Care Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations the Government has received from representatives of industry organisations on the date of reopening for tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists, reflexologists and other close contact services.

Answer (Paul Scully)

The Close Contact Services taskforce comprised stakeholders from a cross-section of the sector, including representative organisations. We consulted these stakeholders due to their expertise and real-life knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by the industry during the COVID-19 outbreak.

This taskforce was responsible for developing guidance to help businesses in this sector prepare to reopen safely; it was not focused on when a return to work might be brought about.

Representations have included:

  • All Party Parliamentary Group for Beauty, Aesthetics and Wellbeing
  • Associated Beauty Therapists
  • Coalition letter from 180 businesses in the beauty, aesthetics, spa and wellness industry; and
  • The National Hair and Beauty Federation.

We have now provided other close contact services like tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists and reflexologists in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

15 Jul 2020, 5:39 p.m. Personal Care Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what advice the Government has received from SAGE on the date of reopening for tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists, reflexologists and other close contact services.

Answer (Paul Scully)

Our approach to the types of businesses that can reopen is guided by the scientific and medical advice. SAGE provides world-leading scientific advice to the Government. However, making any changes depends on us continuing to meet the five tests.

We have now provided other close contact services like tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists and reflexologists in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

15 Jul 2020, 5:38 p.m. Personal Care Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what (a) criteria and (b) guidance he is following to determine (i) a date and (ii) the ancillary safety measures required for the reopening of tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists, reflexologists and other close contact services.

Answer (Paul Scully)

We have now provided close contact services in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines. Our approach is guided by the scientific and medical advice, making any changes depends on us continuing to meet the five tests, and the fifth test, which is being confident any adjustments to the current measures will not risk a second peak of infections that overwhelms the NHS, is informed by the Chief Scientific Adviser and Chief Medical Officer’s opinion.

This guidance was developed with stakeholders like Public Health England and the Health and Safety Executive, taking into account the latest scientific and medical advice, as our other guidance has.

We appreciate that this is a difficult time for some businesses. Every step is weighed against the evidence, remembering that the more we open up the more vigilant we will need to be.

15 Jul 2020, 5:36 p.m. Personal Care Services: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, on what date the reopening for tattoo parlours, nail and beauty salons, massage therapists, reflexologists and other close contact services will be confirmed.

Answer (Paul Scully)

We have now provided close contact services in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

We appreciate that this is difficult for some businesses. Our approach is guided by the scientific and medical advice, and every step is weighed against the evidence, remembering that the more we open up the more vigilant we will need to be.

8 Jul 2020, 4:09 p.m. Protective Clothing: Public Transport Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the level of risk of (a) older and (b) vulnerable people catching covid-19 as a result of passengers on public transport that refuse to cover their faces.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

Protecting the public, especially older and vulnerable citizens, from Covid-19 is the government’s primary focus. Since Monday 15 June, it has been mandatory for passengers to wear a face covering on public transport in England, unless they are exempt for health, disability or other reasons (full list of exemptions can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators#exemptions-from-mandatory-face-coverings). Operators are reporting high levels of compliance across the country.

Measures are in place to safeguard passengers from people who refuse to abide by this legislation. The regulations made under Public Health Act 1984 include powers for transport operators to deny access to a service, or direct someone to leave a service, who is not wearing a face covering. If a passenger still refuses to comply, there are new powers for the police or TfL authorised officers to issue fines.

8 Jul 2020, 4:01 p.m. Public Transport: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of (a) trends in the use and (b) the effectiveness of (i) Stagecoach and (ii) other operator Journey Assistance Cards in (A) helping people who are exempt from wearing face coverings during the covid-19 outbreak and (B) making it clear to the public that the non-wearing of face coverings should not take place without adequate reason.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

Our guidance sets out exemptions to mandatory face covering, including for health and disability reasons (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators). We are working with operators to include these in their communications, and have been clear that operators should continue to assist disabled passengers as they did before the pandemic.

There are a range of assistance cards provided to disabled people independently of Government. We do not have data to assess the trends and the effectiveness of these cards. Assistance cards can be used to help passengers identify themselves, but we are clear that passengers should not have to routinely 'prove' their exemption when challenged by transport operators.

The Department is working closely with transport operators, including Stagecoach, to understand their policies and procedures around mandatory face coverings and exemptions, and how these are working in practice.

8 Jul 2020, 3:58 p.m. Public Transport: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the (a) general publicity regarding the new covid-19 travel regulations and passenger compliance, (b) obligation on customers to wear a face covering on public transport, (c) requirement on operators to engage, encourage and explain the new regulations to their service users and (d) enforcement action against non-compliant passengers.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

When we introduced this policy, the Secretary of State was clear that the early stages would focus on communications rather than enforcement. We are working with transport operators to ensure they are disseminating key messages to their staff and passengers, including making the exemptions clear to disability groups (Safer Transport Guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators).

Our approach has achieved high levels of compliance. ONS data for the week following implementation showed 84% saying they are wearing face coverings on public transport. Our guidance clearly sets out the role of operators, the police and TfL authorised enforcement officers. While the government expects the vast majority of people to comply with the changes, operators will be able to refuse travel or issue penalty fines for those who fail to wear a face covering

21 Apr 2020, 9:59 a.m. Australia: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he held with his Australian counterpart on the extent to which closed borders may potentially prevent British citizens in Australia from returning to the UK; and what assessment he has made of the ability of those British citizens to purchase commercial flight tickets in order to return to the UK.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

Following the change to date for answer of this PQ, I submitted a response by email on 27 March, with the following response. The Table Office have agreed this approach.

We are proactively engaging commercial airlines and governments worldwide, including Australia, on keeping flight routes and transit hubs open to enable British nationals to return home. Our British High Commissioner in Canberra has written to the Australian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister on this issue. We are signposting British nationals to commercial flight options and continuing to explore new routes by which then can travel home. We have also set up an online registration tool for any British nationals in Australia who require our support. The Prime Minister last spoke to PM Morrison about the broader COVID-19 crisis on 14 March.

21 Apr 2020, 7:58 a.m. Indonesia: British Nationals Abroad Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he held with his Indonesian counterpart on the extent to which closed borders may potentially prevent British citizens in Bali, or wider Indonesia, from returning to the UK; and what assessment he has made of the ability of those British citizens to purchase commercial flight tickets in order to return to the UK.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

As Parliament rose earlier than planned and the first day for answer of this PQ was after the Easter recess, due to the pace of developments during the COVID-19 crisis, I submitted a response by email on 9 April, with the following response. The Table Office have agreed this approach.

FCO officials are working with airlines and with the authorities of Indonesia and potential transit countries to help British travellers get home. The Foreign Secretary spoke with Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi on 1 April; she reassured him that Indonesia would keep flight routes running and would support the UK's repatriation efforts. The Foreign Secretary expressed appreciation of Indonesia's support in getting 7000 British Nationals home from Bali, including the role of national airline Garuda Indonesia. I (Minister Adams) spoke to Indonesian Deputy Foreign Minister Mahendra Siregar on 23 March. More widely, we are working urgently to ensure that governments worldwide have plans in place to enable the return of British and other travellers and to keep borders open for a sufficient period of time to enable returns to take place on commercial flights wherever possible. We are also working with airlines to ensure as many people as possible can get commercial flights home.

21 Apr 2020, 7:31 a.m. Northern Cyprus: British Nationals Abroad Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs on organising repatriation flights for British nationals who wish to urgently return to the UK from Northern Cyprus.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

Following the change to date for answer of this PQ, I submitted a response by email on 30 March, with the following response. The Table Office have agreed this approach.

Our teams around the world are working urgently to ensure that governments have sensible plans to enable the return of British and other travellers, and, crucially, to keep borders open for a sufficient period of time to enable returns to take place on commercial flights, wherever possible.

The administration in the north of Cyprus has introduced a total ban on entry for all foreign nationals, including the UK. This includes those holding residency, work, or student permits. Following policy changes announced by the Republic of Cyprus Government and the administration in the north, all crossing points between the Republic and the north are effectively closed to travellers. British travellers should contact their tour operator or transport provider now if they want to leave. We are working closely with the Government of Cyprus to explore options.

27 Mar 2020, 2:44 p.m. Morocco: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Moroccan counterparts on ensuring the immediate safe return of British nationals from Moroccan airports unable to return to the UK as a result of most outbound flights from Morocco having been suspended due to the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (James Cleverly)

We are working intensively with the Governments of those countries that have closed their borders to people travelling to and from the UK, to enable airlines to bring back British people to the UK, if that is what they want. I spoke to the Moroccan Foreign Minister, Nasser Bourita, on 18 March to ask for additional flights to enter and leave Morocco. The British Embassy in Rabat has been working with tour operators and airlines to encourage them to offer additional flights, last week we facilitated 49 flights, taking 8,520 passengers to the UK. The welfare of British nationals remains our top priority, and we are focused on supporting those around the world who are being affected by the restrictions being put in place.

27 Mar 2020, 1:49 p.m. Electricity and Heating: Carbon Emissions Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to decarbonise the (a) electricity and (b) heating sectors.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In 2019, the Government set a legally binding-target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions from across the UK economy by 2050. The Government has introduced many initiatives to decarbonise and increase the supply of renewable energy production in the UK and have already made great strides forward. Over 50% of our power now comes from low carbon sources and coal is all but being eliminated from the mix.

Earlier this month, the Government announced that onshore wind, solar and other established technologies, will be eligible for the next Contracts for Difference (CfD) allocation round in 2021. In March 2019, the Government published the Offshore Wind Sector Deal, which will build on the United Kingdom’s global leadership in offshore wind by working with the Sector to increase productivity and develop new offshore wind technologies. The Sector Deal also commits to increasing diversity in the sector, with the ambition of increasing the percentage of women and people from BAME backgrounds employed in offshore wind.

The Government also announced an investment of £800 million to deploy the first carbon capture storage (CCS) cluster by the mid-2020s. We are supporting wider industrial decarbonisation by investing £500 million to support energy-intensive industries adopt low-carbon technologies, for which CCS will play a key part.

We also have an ambitious programme of work already underway to support heat decarbonisation. In the Budget we announced our intention to extend the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) for 12 months, ahead of the launch of a new Clean Heat Grant scheme. We also announced a third allocation of Tariff Guarantees for the Non-Domestic RHI to continue support for large-scale plants which require investment certainty to proceed. This will help ensure continuous support before launch of the new Green Gas support scheme

We are investing up to £320m, through grants and loans, to accelerate the growth of the UK heat networks market through the Heat Networks Investment Project and have launched the £16.5 million Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale transition to electrification of heat in Great Britain. We have announced spending of up to £121 million on hydrogen innovation and working with stakeholders to develop a comprehensive programme of work to demonstrate the technical and practical feasibility of using hydrogen in place of natural gas for heating.

26 Mar 2020, 3:08 p.m. Jordan: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Jordanian counterpart on arranging repatriation flights for British nationals that wish to return to the UK as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (James Cleverly)

We are working closely with local authorities, commercial airlines and other diplomatic missions to enable British people to get home. Our consular team is working around the clock to provide support, advice and information. British travellers should contact their tour operator or airline as soon as possible if they want to return to the UK. We are working intensively with the Governments of those countries, including Jordan, that have closed their borders to people travelling to and from the UK, to enable airlines to bring back British people to the UK, if that is what they want.

In light of the rapidly changing situation, we urge all travellers to sign up for our travel advice alert service. British nationals in Jordan should keep up to date with our travel advice for Jordan, which they can find on: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/jordan/coronavirus.

We have also published advice for British nationals who do not have immediate departure options available to them: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/travel-advice-novel-coronavirus#if-youre-abroad-and-you-want-to-return-to-the-uk

25 Mar 2020, 2:36 p.m. Peru: Coronavirus Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Peruvian counterpart on organising repatriation flights for British nationals in Peru that wish to return to the UK.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

The Foreign Secretary spoke with the Peruvian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Gustavo Meza-Cuadra, on 21 March about the impact of the ongoing State of National Emergency on UK nationals in Peru. He assured him that he would work together with the UK to make sure we could arrange flights home this week. Our Embassy is working closely with the Peruvian authorities to secure the appropriate permissions for those flights to land.

25 Mar 2020, 2:33 p.m. Embassies: Peru Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, for what reasons (a) the British Embassy in Lima, Peru is closed and (b) remote working has not been fully implemented to protect British nationals in need of assistance in that country; and what guidance his Department has provided to British nationals in that country on communicating with the British consulate.

Answer (Wendy Morton)

Due to a State of National Emergency announced on 16 March, and the subsequently strict travel restrictions, members of our Embassy in Lima are working remotely. The Embassy is not closed and we are working round the clock to make flights available this week for British nationals who wish to leave Peru, but who are currently unable to do so on commercial flights because of the travel restrictions that have been imposed. We are aware of approximately 1160 British Nationals in Peru who have expressed interest in flights back to the UK.

24 Mar 2020, 2:14 p.m. Housing: Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to encourage homeowners to invest in energy efficiency; and what incentives the Government is providing to improve energy efficiency in homes.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In the Clean Growth Strategy, Government set an aspiration for as many homes as possible to be Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035 and is developing a suite of mutually supporting policies and measures that will help deliver this:

Our current Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme and its successor will drive £6bn of additional investment to support energy improvements in low-income, vulnerable and fuel poor households between 2018 and 2028.

In order to improve rented properties, we introduced the Private Rented Sector Minimum standard regulations on 1 April 2018. The regulations require landlords to bring their properties to EPC Band E or above. We will consult on tightening the minimum energy standards in due course.

We have also committed to consult on requirements for mortgage lenders to help households improve the energy efficiency of the homes they lend to and last summer we launched the £5m Green Home Finance Innovation Fund to support the development of green finance products.

In addition, we have launched Simple Energy Advice, a digital platform offering impartial and tailored advice for consumers on how to make their homes more energy efficient.

23 Mar 2020, 2:37 p.m. Housing: Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to improve the energy efficiency of housing for fuel poor households.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Energy Company Obligation is worth £640m per year and since December 2018 has been focused on upgrading the homes of low income and vulnerable households.

In April 2018, we introduced for the first time a minimum energy efficiency standard of EPC Band E for private rented sector properties, with all private rented properties required to meet, or exceed, this standard by 1 April 2020.

In 2019, we launched Simple Energy Advice, a new digital and phoneline service to provide homeowners with impartial and tailored advice on how to cut their energy bills and make their homes greener, as well as information on any available financial support.

The latest fuel poverty statistics showed that there are 800,000 fewer fuel poor households living in the least efficient homes – Bands E, F and G – compared to 2010.

The Government will detail its future plans to tackle fuel poverty in due course.

23 Mar 2020, 2:35 p.m. Housing: Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost savings to the NHS of improving all housing to EPC Band C.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

Understanding the benefits of improving the energy efficiency of homes to both householder health, and to the NHS is of great value. The benefits to households’ health from improving their homes’ thermal performance are already included in our impact assessments where relevant, and we are currently undertaking a study to enable us to quantify the cost savings to the health service of improving the energy efficiency of homes.

20 Mar 2020, 12:48 p.m. Local Government: Carbon Emissions Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what additional resource the Government is providing to local authorities to help meet the Government’s air quality and carbon-neutral targets.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 14 February to question UIN 13580.

19 Mar 2020, 12:43 p.m. Housing: Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes the Government plans to upgrade to EPC Band C by 2030; and whether the Government has targets for such upgrades.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

In the Clean Growth Strategy, Government set an aspiration for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable, with an earlier target of 2030 for homes in fuel poverty. Good progress has already been made, with 34% of homes in England at Band C or above. This is an increase from 7% in 2007.

18 Mar 2020, 5:56 p.m. Marriage: Humanism Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the judgment in Smyth, Re Judicial Review [2017] NIQB 55, for what reasons the remit of the Law Commission's review of weddings law includes the legal recognition of humanist marriages.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

The Government announced in June 2019 that the Law Commission will conduct a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations about how marriage by humanist and other non-religious belief organisations could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent.

12 Mar 2020, 2:02 p.m. Marriage: Humanism Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of granting legal recognition to humanist marriages in advance of the report from the Law Commission.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

Government consulted in 2014 on marriages by non-religious belief organisations. Assessment of these matters can be found in the Government response at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/marriages-by-non-religious-belief-organisations.

12 Mar 2020, 2:02 p.m. Marriage: Humanism Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of public support for legal recognition of humanist marriages in England and Wales.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

Government consulted in 2014 on marriages by non-religious belief organisations. Assessment of these matters can be found in the Government response at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/marriages-by-non-religious-belief-organisations.

12 Mar 2020, 2:02 p.m. Marriage Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of choices available to non-religious couples to have a legally-recognised wedding conducted in line with their own beliefs.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

Government consulted in 2014 on marriages by non-religious belief organisations. Assessment of these matters can be found in the Government response at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/marriages-by-non-religious-belief-organisations.

9 Mar 2020, 3:05 p.m. Marriage: Humanism Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the Government plans to bring forward legislative proposals to legalise humanist marriages in England and Wales.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

The Government announced last June that the Law Commission will conduct a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations about how marriage by humanist and other non-religious belief organisations could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent.

4 Mar 2020, 2:51 p.m. Motability Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether an individual private buyer can purchase a second hand motability vehicle direct from Motability.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

The Department for Work and Pensions is responsible for the disability benefits that provide a passport to the Motability scheme. While the Department works closely with Motability, it is an independent charitable organisation that is wholly responsible for overseeing the terms and the administration of the scheme. With this in mind, any questions should be directed to Motability. You can contact them at the following address:

Chief Executive of Motability, Motability, Warwick House, Roydon Road, Harlow, Essex, CM19 5PX.

4 Mar 2020, 2:24 p.m. Motability Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Motability Scheme, what contracts the Government holds with (a) British Car Auctions and (b) other car auctioneer organisations on the disposal of motability vehicles once the lease has expired.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

The Government holds no contracts with British Car Auctions or other car auctioneer organisations. The Department for Work and Pensions is responsible for the disability benefits that provide a passport to the Motability scheme. Motability Operations is independent commercial FCA regulated company responsible for the operational delivery of the scheme. Motability Operations is accountable to the Motability charity. With this in mind, any questions relating to the operation of the scheme itself should be directed to Motability. You can contact them at the following address:

Chief Executive of Motability, Motability, Warwick House, Roydon Road, Harlow, Essex, CM19 5PX.

8 Oct 2019, 4:09 p.m. Cancer: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that medicines to treat cancer in children are available in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The Department is doing everything appropriate to prepare for leaving the European Union. We want to reassure patients that our plans should ensure the uninterrupted supply of medicines and medical products, including those to treat cancer in children, once we have left the EU.

The Department, as part of our EU exit preparations, is implementing a multi-layered approach to mitigate potential disruption to supply, which consists of stockpiling where possible, securing freight capacity, changing or clarifying regulatory requirements, procuring additional warehousing, working closely with industry to improve trader readiness and putting in place the National Supply Disruption Response to manage potential shortages. Further details can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/medicines-and-medical-products-supply-government-updates-no-deal-brexit-plans

8 Oct 2019, 3:08 p.m. European Reference Networks Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has for maintaining access to (a) the European Reference Network on paediatric haemato-oncology and (b) other European reference networks in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Government would prefer to leave the European Union with a deal and will work in an energetic and determined way to get a better deal. However, if we were to leave the EU without a deal, it is expected that the United Kingdom would lose membership of European Reference Networks. UK patients will continue to benefit from the world-leading clinical expertise available here in the UK and patients will have the same access to UK expertise as they do now.

8 Oct 2019, 10:08 a.m. Rare Cancers: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU (a) with and (b) without a deal on access to EU clinical trials for children with rare cancers.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The United Kingdom and the European Union have a long track record of jointly tackling global challenges with strong existing links already in place between our research and innovation communities. We look forward to continuing our relationship in research and innovation with the EU, regardless of EU exit.

As part of exit negotiations, we are working to ensure that we continue to have the best possible environment in which to support clinical trials. Our overall aim is to ensure that patients in the UK, including children with rare cancers, have access to the best and most innovative medicines.

The Department has and continues to examine the effect on clinical trials of the UK leaving the EU with and without a deal across a range of areas, including access to, and mobility of, the research leaders and the technical and research delivery workforce; access to EU research funding; the regulation of clinical trials, data and devices; rare diseases research; and clinical trials supplies.

With regards to children with rare cancers, we are fully aware that the scarcity of patients in any single country means that clinical research into rare diseases strongly benefits from international collaboration.

It is important to make clear that irrespective of whether we leave the EU with or without a deal, the UK’s ability to participate in multinational trials, in the EU or the rest of the world, will not change and UK clinical trial applications will continue to be authorised by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and ethical committees as they are now.

Beyond EU Exit, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) cancer research expenditure has risen from £101 million in 2010/11 to £136 million in 2017/18, which constitutes the largest investment in a disease area. The NIHR Clinical Research Network has over 800 cancer trials and studies recruiting or in set-up. Through the NIHR Clinical Research Network, the proportion of patients entering cancer clinical trials and studies is more than double that in any other country for which data exists, including the United States.

The NIHR works with Cancer Research UK to fund the Paediatric Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre Network which plays a leading role in speeding up the process of cancer drug development and the search for cancer biomarkers – molecules present in blood or tissue - that can be used to diagnose cancer, predict the aggressiveness of the disease, or show whether a drug will be effective in a specific patient and at what dose.


29 Jul 2019, 3:25 p.m. Terrorism: Manchester Arena Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether businesses that have been adversely affected by the Manchester bombing of 22 May 2017 are entitled to support through the victim's compensation scheme.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The purpose of the statutory Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme is to make compensatory awards to individual persons who have sustained a serious physical and/or mental injury as a direct result of a violent crime, and to family members of those killed. Businesses impacted by the Manchester Bombing of 22 May 2017 do not fall under the ambit of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 2012.

Crimes of violence for the purposes of the Scheme include physical and sexual assault, acts of a violent nature that cause physical injury, and threats against a person causing fear of immediate violence (in circumstances which would cause a person of reasonable firmness to be put in such fear).

The Scheme provides for awards based upon a tariff of serious physical and mental injuries. Only injuries which are listed on the tariff can be compensated.

26 Jul 2019, 12:17 p.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2019 to Question 273399 on HIV Infection: Salford, if he will take steps to ensure that gay and bisexual men in Salford have access to PrEP.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Impact Trial is managed by the Trial Sponsor. Recruitment to places in the Trial is managed locally by participating clinics. Following funding from NHS England to pay for extra PrEP drug and research costs and the my Rt. hon Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care’s announcement on 30 January that the number of places on the PrEP Impact Trial would be doubled to 26,000, expansion of the Trial is now underway across the country. Participation in the Trial is on a voluntary basis and it is for research clinics and local authorities to decide whether they wish to take part and the number of allocated places they can accept.

16 Jul 2019, 2:42 p.m. Insomnia: Circadin Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons Circadin is available in Scotland for the treatment of insomnia caused as a result of dementia but not in England.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The availability of treatments in Scotland is a matter for the devolved administration.

In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that develops authoritative, evidence-based guidance on best practice in health and social care. NICE’s guideline on the assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers, published in 2018, recommends that Circadin (melatonin) should not be offered to manage insomnia in people living with Alzheimer's disease, and that a personalised multicomponent sleep management approach that includes sleep hygiene education, exposure to daylight, exercise and personalised activities should be considered for people living with dementia who have sleep problems.

Further information about the evidence underpinning NICE’s guideline is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng97/evidence/full-guideline-pdf-4852695709

NICE does not make recommendations on the use of melatonin in the treatment of patients living with other types of dementia who have sleep problems.

16 Jul 2019, 2:42 p.m. Insomnia: Circadin Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to make Circadin available in England to people suffering from insomnia caused by dementia.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The availability of treatments in Scotland is a matter for the devolved administration.

In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that develops authoritative, evidence-based guidance on best practice in health and social care. NICE’s guideline on the assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers, published in 2018, recommends that Circadin (melatonin) should not be offered to manage insomnia in people living with Alzheimer's disease, and that a personalised multicomponent sleep management approach that includes sleep hygiene education, exposure to daylight, exercise and personalised activities should be considered for people living with dementia who have sleep problems.

Further information about the evidence underpinning NICE’s guideline is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng97/evidence/full-guideline-pdf-4852695709

NICE does not make recommendations on the use of melatonin in the treatment of patients living with other types of dementia who have sleep problems.

12 Jul 2019, 10:18 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons SHINE sexual health services at Salford are not open for gay and bisexual men on the PrEP impact trial.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Information on the reasons why SHINE sexual health services are not open for gay and bisexual men on the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) impact trial is not collected centrally.

PrEP is provided by the National Health Service through the three year PrEP Impact Trial. Participation in the trial is on a voluntary basis and it is for clinics and local authorities to decide whether they wish to take part.

12 Jul 2019, 10:18 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that gay and bisexual men accessing the SHINE clinic in Salford have access to PrEP.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Information on the reasons why SHINE sexual health services are not open for gay and bisexual men on the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) impact trial is not collected centrally.

PrEP is provided by the National Health Service through the three year PrEP Impact Trial. Participation in the trial is on a voluntary basis and it is for clinics and local authorities to decide whether they wish to take part.

9 Jul 2019, 2:18 p.m. Immigrants: EU Nationals Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has informed any EU nationals that they have no recourse to public funds since June 2018.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

Whether someone has recourse to public funds is a matter for the Home Office. However, where a person’s claim for benefit has been refused, DWP will inform the claimant of this decision and how they can request a reconsideration.

3 Jul 2019, 3:43 p.m. Sharing Economy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support contracting and the flexible economy.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Through our Good Work Plan reforms this Government is delivering the biggest upgrade to workers’ rights in a generation, and working to ensure that the UK labour market strikes the balance between flexibility and worker protections.

We have already taken significant steps to ensure that the UK's flexible economy works for all, We have passed legislation that means almost 300,000 workers, including people on casual or flexible hours contracts, will have a right to a payslip for the first time. This helps workers in the flexible economy to better understand their pay and identify if their employer is not meeting their minimum pay obligations.

We have quadrupled the penalty that Employment Tribunals can use where employers have shown malice, spite or gross oversight. This reform acts as an important deterrent against poor employment practices and is an important measure to protect the rights of those working in our flexible economy.

We have also helped agency workers by abolishing the Swedish Derogation, removing a legal loophole to secure equal pay for up to 120,000 agency workers.

27 Jun 2019, 3:40 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding his Department allocated from the apprenticeship budget to (a) apprenticeship levy paying employers, (b) top up payments to apprenticeship levy paying employers, (c) non-apprenticeship levy paying employers, (d) ongoing costs of apprenticeships already in training prior to 1 April 2017, (e) English and maths qualifications, (f) incentive payments for 16- to 18-year-old apprentices and (g) additional support for apprentices that are care leavers or have special needs in financial year (i) 2017-2018 and (ii) 2018-19.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The balance that levy payers see in their apprenticeship service accounts is distinct from the department’s ring-fenced apprenticeships budget. The balance in employers’ accounts is based on their total levy contributions and how many of their employees live in England. The department also tops up these funds by 10% after this English portion has been calculated.

Levy-paying employers can use the funds in their accounts to place orders for the training and assessment of their apprentices. The department then pays the relevant providers and end-point assessment organisations directly from its ring-fenced apprenticeships budget. An amount equal to the value of this provider payment is also deducted from the levy payer’s account balance.

The department’s ring-fenced apprenticeship budget is set in advance by Her Majesty’s Treasury to fund apprenticeships in England only. The expenditure on various parts of the apprenticeship programme is calculated based on the cash payments made from this ring-fenced budget.

It should be noted that aggregated information on spending by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and the department for 2017-18 is held by the ESFA and included here, but information for 2018-19 will be published in the audited annual reports and accounts later this year. Annual data on levy collected in 2018-19 will be published by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs.

In 2017-18, spending on apprentices employed with levy payers, and who started training after the levy was introduced, was £268 million.

In making employers’ levy contributions available as funds in their apprenticeship service accounts, the government applies a 10-per-cent top-up to these contributions. However, the balances in these accounts are distinct from the department’s ring-fenced budget for apprenticeships. Where employers are using some or all of this top-up to fund new apprenticeships, this spend is reflected in the answer to (A) above.

£189 million was spent on training for apprentices who started on or after 1 May 2017 with employers who do not pay the levy. In 2017/18, £1,065 million was spent on ongoing costs of training apprentices who started before the levy was introduced in May 2017.

Of the £457 million spent on new starts in 2017-18 (£268 million on levy payers and £189 million on non-levy payers), £38 million was spent on English and Maths teaching. £72 million was spent on additional provider payments and employer payments for apprentices aged 16 to 18 and apprentices aged up to 24 years old who have either an education, health and care plan or who have been in local authority care. £27 million was spent on other smaller elements of funding policy, such as learning support.

18 Jun 2019, 2:10 p.m. Innovation Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide a list of all publicly-owned testing centres for innovation.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

We want the UK to be the world’s most innovative economy and through the Industrial Strategy we have an ambition to raise total R&D investment to 2.4% of GDP by 2027, and 3% in the longer term.

There is no single definition or list of government supported testing centres for innovation. However, the government supports innovation through a number of mechanisms including:

  • Public Sector Research Establishments are research and development institutes. An example is the National Physical Laboratory, developing and maintaining national measurement standards.
  • The Catapult Network which helps to bridge the gap between business, academia, research and Government.
  • Advanced Propulsion Centre facilitates funding to UK-based R&D projects developing low-carbon emission powertrain technologies.
  • The Aerospace Technology Institute identifies global opportunities for UK organisations in research and technology.
  • The Knowledge Transfer Network provides innovation networking for businesses.
17 Jun 2019, 3:16 p.m. Health Services: Innovation Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the budget of the Small Business Research Initiative Healthcare was in each financial year since 2009-10.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) Healthcare has been the remit of NHS England since 2013 and the budget for SBRI Healthcare for the financial years since 2013/14 is shown in the following table. Records of the budgets prior to the programme being owned by NHS England are not held.

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

£10 million

£20 million

£20 million

£12.9 million

£12.9 million

£17.9 million

£5.2 million

Note:

The figures relate to SBRI Healthcare and not SBRI budgets for other programmes. The difference in funding between 2018/19 and 2019/20 is due to a change in suppliers for the programme’s Programme Management function. This means extra funding was provided in 2018/19 to prepare for transition between suppliers, and a reduction in 2019/20 until the new supplier is fully established.

23 May 2019, 2:03 p.m. York Energy (UK) Holdings Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a guarantor or bond has been offered by or sought from York Energy (UK) Holdings or Alpha Energy (UK) or its investors to underwrite the proposed transfer of petroleum assets to the newly incorporated limited company York Energy (UK) Holdings Ltd.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The potential sale of Third Energy to York Energy (UK) Holdings Ltd is a commercial agreement between the relevant parties. Therefore, it would not be appropriate for Government to comment.

23 May 2019, 2:02 p.m. York Energy (UK) Holdings Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether regulatory approval has been granted for the transfer of onshore licences held by Third Energy Onshore Limited to York Energy (UK) Holdings.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The potential sale of Third Energy to York Energy (UK) Holdings Ltd is a commercial agreement between the relevant parties. Therefore, it would not be appropriate for Government to comment.

Further information relating to the Oil and Gas Authority’s role with regard to licence change of control can be found here: https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/licensing-consents/licensing-system/change-of-control/.

8 May 2019, 3:02 p.m. Liquefied Petroleum Gas: Competition Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the regulation of the LPG market by the Competition and Markets Authority.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The monitoring of the liquefied petroleum gas supply market for domestic suppliers is a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) exercising its role as an independent competition authority.

Domestic bulk LPG suppliers remain subject to regulation under the CMA Statutory Orders and the CMA continues to monitor compliance with these Orders and the 2012 voluntary agreements. More information is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/liquefied-petroleum-gas-lpg-market-orders-and-calculator

In February 2018 the CMA published a factsheet and short animation explaining switching rights for new and existing Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) customers on metered estates: www.gov.uk/government/news/cma-advises-liquefied-petroleum-gas-customers-on-switching-rights. This was accompanied by updated guidance from the sector trade association UKLPG for its members about how best to communicate with residents of metered estates about their supply and switching options and a Q&A for residents on their website.

8 May 2019, 3:02 p.m. Liquefied Petroleum Gas and Natural Gas: Competition Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the number of customers who switched suppliers of (a) LPG and (b) mains gas in each of the last three years for which data is available.

Answer (Claire Perry)

According to data held by the Competition and Markets Authority, the annual switching rate for suppliers of Liquified Petroleum Gas in 2016, 2017 and 2018 is:

Year to 31 May

Metered estates (%)*

Single tanks (%)*

2016

1.14

3.72

2017

1.35

4.58

2018

1.67

5.27

* Calculated as the percentage of customers switching away compared to the size of the customer base at the start of the year.

The data regarding mains gas switching is publicly available information, and can be found at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/data-portal/number-domestic-customers-switching-supplier-fuel-type-gb

29 Apr 2019, 3:30 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 8 of the table on page 250 of his Department's publication, Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18, if he will publish a breakdown of the figures under the heading, Managing our energy legacy safely and responsibly (ALB) net, for (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17 and (d) 2017-18.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

The breakdown of expenditure for 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 under the heading Managing our energy legacy safely and responsibly (ALB) net is as shown in the following table:

£k

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Civil Nuclear Police Authority

Take up of provision

76

-317

115

-1

Unwinding of discount rate (provisions)

106

45

27

Utilisation of provisions

-693

-554

-284

-267

Total Civil Nuclear Police Authority

-511

-826

-142

-268

Coal Authority

Bad debts

-

-

9

-

Depreciation/amortisation

-

-

141

-

Impairment/revaluation

6,676

5,290

4,911

5,477

Take up of provision

-66,867

1,907,875

43,801

1,555,047

Unwinding of discount rate (provisions)

11,579

10,503

-23,799

-26,956

Utilisation of provisions

-16,712

-16,378

-23,002

-26,194

Total Coal Authority

-65,324

1,907,290

2,061

1,507,374

Oil and Gas Authority

Notional Costs

-

-14

-

-

Take up of provision

-

191

106

30

Unwinding of discount rate (provisions)

-

3

-

4

Utilisation of provisions

-

-14

-

-

Total Oil and Gas Authority

-

166

106

34

Total Managing our energy legacy safely and responsibly (ALB) net

-65,835

1,906,630

2,025

1,507,140

29 Apr 2019, 3:29 p.m. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority: Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 12 of the table on page 250 of his Department's publication, Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18, if he will publish a breakdown of the figures under the heading, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority for (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17 and (d) 2017-18.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

The breakdown of expenditure for 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 under the heading Nuclear Decommissioning Authority is as shown in the following table:

£k

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

Bad debts

-

-

7

-

Depreciation/amortisation

64,863

54,350

29,000

43,102

Impairment/revaluation

-3,081

-

-

262,713

Purchase of goods and services

-

-

-

92,900

Take up of provision

5,573,765

89,751,230

2,821,509

70,768,099

Take up of provision (Change in pensions liability)

8,806

-7,648

-

-

Unwinding of discount rate (pensions)

-

-

-

373

Unwinding of discount rate (provisions)

-

-

-

-1,255,331

Total Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

5,644,353

89,797,932

2,850,516

69,911,856

29 Apr 2019, 3:29 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 7 of the table on page 250 of his Department's publication, Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18, if he will publish a breakdown of the figures under the heading entitled, Taking action on climate change and decarbonisation (ALB) net for (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17, and (d) 2017-18.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

The breakdown of expenditure for 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 under the heading Taking action on climate change and decarbonisation (ALB) net is as shown in the following table:

£k

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

Bad debts

-

-

7

-

Depreciation/amortisation

64,863

54,350

29,000

43,102

Impairment/revaluation

-3,081

-

-

262,713

Purchase of goods and services

-

-

-

92,900

Take up of provision

5,573,765

89,751,230

2,821,509

70,768,099

Take up of provision (Change in pensions liability)

8,806

-7,648

-

-

Unwinding of discount rate (pensions)

-

-

-

373

Unwinding of discount rate (provisions)

-

-

-

-1,255,331

Total Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

5,644,353

89,797,932

2,850,516

69,911,856

8 Apr 2019, 10:15 a.m. Third Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Oil and Gas Authority's (OGA) December 2018 document entitled Retention Areas Agreed (Updated December 2018) 2014 Model Clauses, whether the OGA required a guarantor for Third Energy extensions of work commitments.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The OGA carries out financial assessments, as part of which a Parent Company Guarantee may be required, for all companies when there is a licence transaction to consider, specifically when considering licence award, licence assignment, changes of control, drilling consent, and field development consent. Applications for Retention Areas (such as those applied for by Third Energy) do not trigger a financial assessment.

When a Licensee applies for a Retention Area within an existing Licenced Area, this allows the Licensee to undertake exploration and appraisal activities within a set time period, as set out in the related Retention Area Plan. An application for a Retention Area therefore does not create any additional risk, since the operations will have either been appropriately assessed already, or operations proposed will be financially assessed at such a point it is appropriate, for example, when applying for consent to drill.

8 Apr 2019, 10:15 a.m. Third Energy Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Oil and Gas Authority's December 2018 document entitled Retention Areas Agreed (Updated December 2018) 2014 Model Clauses, whether the Oil and Gas Authority assessed whether the operator required a guarantor when granting Third Energy an extension to their work commitments for licences AL006, DL005, PL079, PL080, PL081, PEDL177, PL077.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The OGA carries out financial assessments, as part of which a Parent Company Guarantee may be required, for all companies when there is a licence transaction to consider, specifically when considering licence award, licence assignment, changes of control, drilling consent, and field development consent. Applications for Retention Areas (such as those applied for by Third Energy) do not trigger a financial assessment.

When a Licensee applies for a Retention Area within an existing Licenced Area, this allows the Licensee to undertake exploration and appraisal activities within a set time period, as set out in the related Retention Area Plan. An application for a Retention Area therefore does not create any additional risk, since the operations will have either been appropriately assessed already, or operations proposed will be financially assessed at such a point it is appropriate, for example, when applying for consent to drill.

2 Apr 2019, 4:41 p.m. Post Offices Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the postcode location is of every large post office in the UK.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK. This is why the Government committed to safeguard the post office network and protect existing rural services. The overall number of post offices across the UK remains at its most stable in decades with over 11,500 branches thanks to significant Government investment of over £2 billion since 2010.

While the Government sets the strategic direction for the Post Office, it allows the company the commercial freedom to deliver this strategy as an independent business. The postcode location of every large Post Office in the UK is an operational matter for Post Office Limited. I have therefore asked the Group Chief Executive of Post Office Limited, to write to the hon Member on this matter. A copy of the reply will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

2 Apr 2019, 2:28 p.m. UK Shared Prosperity Fund Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to his Written Statement of 24 July 2018, Official Report HCWS927, when the Government plans to publish its consultation on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

Answer (Jake Berry)

The Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government reaffirmed to the House, Column 719 on 4 March 2019, that the government will consult widely on the design and priorities of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund and we invite all interested parties to contribute their views.

2 Apr 2019, 12:22 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 12 of the table on page 40 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Science and Society.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure included in Science and Society Capital DEL is as shown in the below table

The total of £91.5m is provided to the Royal Society and UKRI to fund post-doctoral, professorship, early career fellowships, Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Inspiration and Inspiring Science programmes.

£m

Royal Society

64.0

Science & Society: Science and Learning

15.6

Royal Society - Global Challenges Research Fund

9.7

Science & Society: Science and Careers

2.3

Total (Science and Society)

91.5*

*Table does not add up due to rounding

2 Apr 2019, 12:22 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 11 of the table on page 35 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Market Frameworks.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure included under Market Frameworks Resource DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Citizens Advice

35.3

Chartered Trading Standards Institute

13.4

National Minimum Wage (NMW) Enforcement

12.2

NMW & NLW (National Living Wage) enforcement and awareness raising campaigns

9.8

NMW Enforcement complex cases

4.3

New Labour Market Enforcement Agency

1.4

Small Business Commissioner

1.4

Convention of Scottish Local Authorities

1.2

Office for Product Safety and Standards: Product Regulations

1.1

EU Expertise: General Costs

0.9

Labour Market Emerging Priorities

0.6

Departmental Programme Translation Work

0.5

Paternity Adoption and Shared Parental Pay

0.5

European Consumer Centre

0.4

National Minimum Wage

0.4

ADR (alternative dispute resolution) Directive

0.3

Shared Parental Leave Comms

0.3

College For Europe

0.2

Consumer Advocacy for Energy, Post and cross-sector

0.2

eIDAS Implementation

0.1

Total (Market Frameworks)

84.3*

*Table does not add up due to rounding

2 Apr 2019, 12:21 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: British Shipbuilders Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row five of the table on page 35 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, what the spending under British Shipbuilders relates to.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Department has responsibility for liabilities arising from the former publicly-owned company British Shipbuilders. The liabilities largely relate to damages due to former workers who were exposed to asbestos over a period until the late 1980s.

2 Apr 2019, 12:21 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row three of the table on page 35 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a detailed breakdown under the heading Business and Enterprise.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure included in Business and Enterprise Resource DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Carbon Price Floor Compensation

60.0

EU ETS compensation

28.0

Productivity Council

5.0

Defence Solution Centre

3.0

Sponsorship

1.7

Cornwall Grant

1.2

Economic Intelligence And Analysis

1.1

Building Information Management

1.0

Advanced Manufacturing: Research

0.4

Regional Support Programme

0.3

Office for Life Sciences: Database and Web Portal

0.1

Total (Business and Enterprise)

101.6*

*Table does not add up due to rounding

2 Apr 2019, 12:21 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row four of the table on page 35 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish the other programmes with their respective budgets referred to in that table.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure included in Other Programmes under Deliver an ambitious industrial strategy Resource DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Ordnance Survey - Public Sector Mapping Agreement

6.0

Office for Product Safety & Standards

3.8

Design council

2.5

Portfolio Management

2.1

Launch Investments

0.5

International Science and Innovation Policy

0.2

Homes England: Innovation

0.1

Centrally held

15.1

Intellectual Property Office dividend

-1.0

Total (Other programmes)

29.4*

Table does not add up due to rounding

2 Apr 2019, 12:21 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 15 of the table on page 37 of his Department's 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Competition Service Programme.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure of spending under the heading Competition Service Programme is as shown in the following table:

£m

Staff Costs

1.5

Purchase of Goods and Services

1.0

Accommodation

1.3

Depreciation/Amortisation

0.2

Total (Competition Service Programme)

4.0

2 Apr 2019, 12:20 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 16 of the table on page 37 of his Department's 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Financial Reporting Council Admin.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

There was no admin spend required against Part II, sub-head K for the Financial Reporting Council in the BEIS 2018/19 Main Estimate. As it was identified the budget was not actually required it was removed at the Supplementary Estimate.

2 Apr 2019, 12:20 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 8 of the table on page 37 of his Department's 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Government as a Shareholder: Other Programmes.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of spending under the heading Government as a Shareholder: Other Programmes is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Companies House: Administration of the Late Filing Penalties Regime

4.9

Business Environment: Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)

0.1

British Business Bank: Enable Funding Interest Income (Loans to SME’s)

(2.2)

Companies House: Annual Dividend Receivable

(4.0)

Total Other Programmes

(1.2)

2 Apr 2019, 12:20 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to rows 25,26 and 27 of the table on page 36 of the his Department's 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Capability: Core and Agency Admin, Centrally held/unallocated and Other Programmes.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure included in Capability Resource DEL is as shown in the following table:

£m

Wages and salaries

186.9

Purchase of goods and services

106.7

Rentals

23.7

Depreciation and Amortisation

18.1

Business Rates

15.0

Transfers into Committee on Climate Change

(1.3)

Sales of goods & services/fees & charges income

(32.4)

Total Core and Agency Admin

316.7

Centrally held/unallocated Programme budget including Invest to Save

151.4

Total Centrally held/unallocated

151.4

Energy Resilience

10.3

Estates

4.3

Legal

2.4

Finance

2.2

Compensations Payments Programme

1.5

Energy Statistics Research & Analysis

0.9

Communications

0.9

Staff Exit Provision

0.8

Departmental Security

0.5

Assurance Reviews and PPM Capability

0.4

Construction: Statistics and Other Sponsorship Activities

0.2

Income from Other Government Departments

(19.2)

Total Other Programmes

5.2

2 Apr 2019, 12:20 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 12 of the table on page 35 of his Department's 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Low Pay Commission.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The breakdown of expenditure of spending under the heading Low Pay Commission is as shown in the following table:

£m

Staff Costs

0.5

Purchase of Goods and Services

0.3

Total (Low Pay Commission)

0.8

2 Apr 2019, 12:19 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 13 of the table on page 36 of his Department's publication, 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a description of spending under the heading British Energy Liabilities.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

As a result of the restructuring of British Energy (BE) in January 2005, the Government assists BE (now EDF Energy Nuclear Generation Limited) in meeting its contractual historic fuel liabilities. It is forecast that payments relating to this liability will be made up until 2029, as set out in the waste processing contracts agreed between BE, British Nuclear Fuels Limited and the Department.

2 Apr 2019, 12:19 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 12 of the table on page 39 of his Department's publication 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a description of spending under the heading International Climate Finance.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

BEIS annual accounts https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/beis-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018 , include a section on the department’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) expenditure including International Climate Finance spend.

In addition, BEIS International Climate Finance spend forms part of the Government’s annual ODA statistics at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-final-uk-aid-spend-2017 . and is elaborated in reporting to both the EU and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change: http://cdr.eionet.europa.eu/gb/eu/mmr/art16_finance/envw6tyfq/Final_2018_UK_MMR_climate_finance_report.xlsx/manage_document . BEIS individual programme documents such as business cases are published on the Development Tracker website at https://devtracker.dfid.gov.uk/department/BEIS .

2 Apr 2019, 12:19 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 25 of the table on page 39 of his Department's publication, 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a description of spending under the heading Heat.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The spending under the heading of ‘Heat’ relates to the FY 2018-19 capital budget (£137.5 million) for the Heat Network Investment Project (HNIP). This scheme will provide £320 million of capital funding (across the life of the programme) to gap fund heat network projects in England and Wales. The scheme is open to the public, private and third sectors. Following confirmation by HMT in October 2018, the FY 2018-19 budget was reprofiled.

Details of the scheme are available on gov.uk, the HNIP page is at hnip-scheme-overview.

25 Mar 2019, 5:09 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 14 of the table on page 40 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Research Base and Science Contingency.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The breakdown of expenditure included under Research Base and Science Contingency Capital DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Global Challenges Research Fund

31.4

Newton fund

23.2

Rutherford Fund

6.8

Academy of Medical Sciences

3.8

Foresight

2.6

Global Science Innovation and Education

1.7

Research Base initiatives

0.5

Global Partnership Fund

0.2

Reserved for new National Productivity Investment Fund (NPIF) funds

306.8

Total (Research Base and Science Contingency)

377.2*

*Table does not add up due to rounding

25 Mar 2019, 5:08 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 9 of the table on page 40 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, what the Research Capital Investment Fund is.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Allocation of Science and Research Funding 2016/17-2019/20* confirmed that a specific allocation of Science Capital would be made each year through the period to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland administrations for distribution to Higher Education Institutions across the UK, to be matched by each of the Devolved Administrations. This is in addition to science capital funding allocated for distribution to HE providers in England.

The purpose of this funding is for capital investment in the physical infrastructure for research which helps to maintain excellent departments in HE providers across the UK with the critical mass to compete globally and the expertise to work closely with business, charities and public services. It is allocated and distributed by reference to the research income earned from Research Councils.

*https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/505308/bis-16-160-allocation-science-research-funding-2016-17-2019-20.pdf

25 Mar 2019, 5:08 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row nine of the table on page 39 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending on Launch Investments.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The £157.3m credit shown under Launch Investments Capital DEL is the estimated income due to be paid to BEIS in the 2018-19 financial year from its various Repayable Launch Investment contracts. These investments were to enable the design and development of new civil aerospace products. These are long-term investments where income is received, in some cases, over several decades.

Since 2000, we have invested over £1 billion and have received £2.1 billion in levies or royalties due from products sold. We cannot provide a breakdown of the individual investments, as the details are commercially confidential between the parties. The current portfolio has a future income valued at £1.047 billion as of 31 March 2018 (HC 1214 - BEIS Annual report and accounts 2017/18 page 174).

25 Mar 2019, 5:08 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row three of the table on page 39 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a breakdown of spending under the heading Business and Enterprise.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The breakdown of expenditure included under Business and Enterprise Capital DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Advanced Propulsion Centre

8.7

Aerospace Technology Institute

2.5

Stoke City Deal

1.4

European Transonic Windtunnel

0.5

Total (Business and Enterprise)

13.1

25 Mar 2019, 5:07 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 24 of the table on page 36 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a list of all programmes funded under the heading Capability including those under Other Programmes.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The programmes included under Capability Resource DEL are as follows: -

  • Assurance Reviews and PPM Capability
  • Centrally held/unallocated Programme budget including Invest to Save
  • Communications
  • Compensations Payments Programme
  • Construction: Statistics and Other Sponsorship Activities
  • Core BEIS Administration costs
  • Departmental Security
  • Staff Exit Provision
  • Estates
  • Energy Resilience
  • Energy Statistics Research & Analysis
  • Finance
  • Income from Other Government Departments and Devolved Administrations for the Committee on Climate Change
  • Legal
25 Mar 2019, 5:07 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to row 10 of the table on page 35 of the BEIS 2018-19 Main Estimate Memorandum, if he will publish a description of spending under the heading Better Regulation.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The breakdown of expenditure included under Better Regulation Resource DEL is as shown in the following table: -

£m

Office for Product Safety and Standards

5.0

Better Regulation Executive

3.4

Total (Better Regulation)

8.4

11 Mar 2019, 5:40 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether any civil servants of his Department have been redeployed from work on national minimum wage enforcement to work on preparations for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are responsible for enforcing the National Minimum Wage Regulations on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

We have almost doubled the enforcement budget for the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage to a record high of £26.3 million for 2018/19, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16. There are over 420 HMRC staff involved in the enforcement of the National Minimum Wage Act 1998.

BEIS has robust plans in place to manage delivery of EU exit. No BEIS officials have been redeployed from work on National Minimum Wage enforcement to work on preparations for the UK leaving the EU.

11 Mar 2019, 5:40 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff in his Department are working on minimum wage enforcement.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are responsible for enforcing the National Minimum Wage Regulations on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

We have almost doubled the enforcement budget for the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage to a record high of £26.3 million for 2018/19, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16. There are over 420 HMRC staff involved in the enforcement of the National Minimum Wage Act 1998.

BEIS has robust plans in place to manage delivery of EU exit. No BEIS officials have been redeployed from work on National Minimum Wage enforcement to work on preparations for the UK leaving the EU.

4 Mar 2019, 1:51 p.m. Minimum Wage: Non-payment Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons his Department has not published the names of the companies who have underpaid the national minimum wage since July 2018.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage should receive it and we will act where employers have been found to be in breach of the law. This Government continues to invest heavily in minimum wage enforcement, almost doubling the budget to £26.3 million for 2018/19, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16.

Last year, the Director of Labour Market Enforcement recommended making changes to the scheme “to increase its compliance and deterrent effect.” Work has now begun on this to ensure the scheme continues to best fulfil this purpose.

4 Mar 2019, 1:51 p.m. Minimum Wage: Non-payment Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the names of employers who have underpaid the national minimum wage since July 2018.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage should receive it and we will act where employers have been found to be in breach of the law. This Government continues to invest heavily in minimum wage enforcement, almost doubling the budget to £26.3 million for 2018/19, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16.

Last year, the Director of Labour Market Enforcement recommended making changes to the scheme “to increase its compliance and deterrent effect.” Work has now begun on this to ensure the scheme continues to best fulfil this purpose.

28 Feb 2019, 11:54 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to double the number of places on the PrEP Trial across all trial sites as soon as possible.

Answer (Steve Brine)

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care announced on 30 January 2019 that the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Impact trial would be expanded to 26,000 people. Work is currently underway with partners to take this forward. The PrEP Oversight Board has requested information on local capacity to make the additional places available, and will review this shortly. Further details on the timescale for implementation will be confirmed in due course.

The Department has made no assessment of the effect of the closure of Shine in Salford. This is a matter for local commissioners.

28 Feb 2019, 11:54 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timescale is for the implementation of doubling the number of places on the PrEP Trial across all trial sites.

Answer (Steve Brine)

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care announced on 30 January 2019 that the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Impact trial would be expanded to 26,000 people. Work is currently underway with partners to take this forward. The PrEP Oversight Board has requested information on local capacity to make the additional places available, and will review this shortly. Further details on the timescale for implementation will be confirmed in due course.

The Department has made no assessment of the effect of the closure of Shine in Salford. This is a matter for local commissioners.

28 Feb 2019, 11:54 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason there has been a delay in doubling the number of places on the PrEP Trial across all trial sites.

Answer (Steve Brine)

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care announced on 30 January 2019 that the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Impact trial would be expanded to 26,000 people. Work is currently underway with partners to take this forward. The PrEP Oversight Board has requested information on local capacity to make the additional places available, and will review this shortly. Further details on the timescale for implementation will be confirmed in due course.

The Department has made no assessment of the effect of the closure of Shine in Salford. This is a matter for local commissioners.

28 Feb 2019, 11:54 a.m. HIV Infection: Drugs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment has his Department made of the effecgt of the closure of Shine in Salford on the ability of Salford residents to access the HIV prevention drug PrEP under the PrEP Impact Trial.

Answer (Steve Brine)

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care announced on 30 January 2019 that the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Impact trial would be expanded to 26,000 people. Work is currently underway with partners to take this forward. The PrEP Oversight Board has requested information on local capacity to make the additional places available, and will review this shortly. Further details on the timescale for implementation will be confirmed in due course.

The Department has made no assessment of the effect of the closure of Shine in Salford. This is a matter for local commissioners.

27 Feb 2019, 1:28 p.m. Liquefied Petroleum Gas: Competition Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many abuses of a dominant market position by the three multinational firms that comprise 90 per cent of the UK domestic off grid LPG market have been investigated; and what the outcome was of those investigations.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Investigations of a potential abuse of a dominant market position are a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA). These are undertaken independently of Ministers. The CMA does not comment on potential investigations. According to the CMA’s public records, it has not opened an abuse of dominance case in this sector.

15 Feb 2019, 9:39 a.m. Children: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the increase in the number of looked after children, child protection plans and children in need throughout (a) Salford and (b) Greater Manchester in the last five years.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The department publishes information on looked after children, child protection plans and children in need in local authorities, including those within the Greater Manchester area, in the Local Authority Interactive Tool. This can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-interactive-tool-lait.

There are a range of factors that contribute to trends in demand for children’s social care including deprivation in different local authorities. The most deprived local authorities have more looked after children (per 10,000 0-17 year olds), and these rates have grown faster, than the least deprived local authorities. The most common factors that present themselves in children’s social care assessments are domestic abuse and mental health. Data on this is available in Table C3 of statistical release ‘Characteristics of children in need 2017-18’ at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/characteristics-of-children-in-need-2017-to-2018.

In preparation for the Spending Review, to help ensure decisions are based on the best available evidence, the government is working with the sector to develop a sharper and more granular picture of demand for children’s services.

14 Feb 2019, 5:56 p.m. Registration of Overseas Entities Bill (Draft) Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timetable is for the publication of the Government's response to the consultation on the draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Government published the draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill on 23 July 2018. Alongside this, an Overview Document was published which, while providing an overview of the policy and how the register will work, sought views on how the clauses will be implemented in practice.

The draft Bill is expected to undergo pre-legislative scrutiny by a joint ad hoc Committee. The Committee will report to Parliament, following which the Government intends to respond to the Committee’s report. The response will reflect the responses to the Overview Document.

14 Feb 2019, 9:52 a.m. Fossil Fuels: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timeframe is for a decision to made by the Oil and Gas Authority in relation to Petroleum Oil and Gas Licence (PEDL) 193 to move this PEDL into the Production Term on 1st July 2019.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) are responsible for granting and monitoring all onshore Petroleum Exploration and Development Licences (PEDLs). For PEDL193, the OGA last year agreed to a Retention Area Work Plan under which the licensee(s) are obliged to acquire new seismic data by 30 June 2020, submit a planning application to drill a well by 30 June 2022, and drill, hydraulically fracture and flow test a well by 30 June 2024. Details of this licence variation can be found on the OGA website via the following link: https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/media/5260/retention-areas-agreed-december-2018-updated.pdf.

13 Feb 2019, 5:32 p.m. Fossil Fuels: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a decision has been made by the Oil and Gas Authority in relation to Petroleum Oil and Gas Licence (PEDL) 193 to move that PEDL into the Production Term on 1 July 2019.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) are responsible for granting and monitoring all onshore Petroleum Exploration and Development Licences (PEDLs). For PEDL193, the OGA last year agreed to a Retention Area Work Plan under which the licensee(s) are obliged to acquire new seismic data by 30 June 2020, submit a planning application to drill a well by 30 June 2022, and drill, hydraulically fracture and flow test a well by 30 June 2024. Details of this licence variation can be found on the OGA website via the following link: https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/media/5260/retention-areas-agreed-december-2018-updated.pdf.

12 Feb 2019, 4:32 p.m. Fossil Fuels: Licensing Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the present stage is of all the Petroleum Oil and Gas Licence areas within his Department's regulatory roadmap for onshore oil and gas exploration.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) are responsible for granting and monitoring all onshore Petroleum Exploration and Development Licences (PEDLs). Information regarding PEDL data is publicly available and can be found on the OGA’s site via https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/data-centre/data-downloads-and-publications/licence-data/.

In addition to this information, the OGA agreed last year to a number of Retention Area Work Plans - these licence variations can be found on the OGA website via the following link: https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/media/5260/retention-areas-agreed-december-2018-updated.pdf.

12 Feb 2019, 4:32 p.m. Fossil Fuels: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the present stage is of Petroleum Oil and Gas Licence 193 within his Department's regulatory roadmap for onshore oil and gas exploration.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) are responsible for granting and monitoring all onshore Petroleum Exploration and Development Licences (PEDLs). For PEDL193, the OGA last year agreed to a Retention Area Work Plan under which the licensee(s) are obliged to acquire new seismic data by 30 June 2020, submit a planning application to drill a well by 30 June 2022, and drill, hydraulically fracture and flow test a well by 30 June 2024. Details of this licence variation can be found on the OGA website via the following link: https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/media/5260/retention-areas-agreed-december-2018-updated.pdf

12 Feb 2019, 4:31 p.m. Nissan: Government Assistance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Oral Statement of 31 October 2016 Nissan: Sunderland, whether the award of £61 million to Nissan in June 2018 detailed in his letter to the BEIS Select Committee of 4 February 2019 was scrutinised by the Industrial Development Advisory Board and reported to Parliament.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

I can confirm that the application by Nissan for £61m of support was scrutinised by the Industrial Development Advisory Board.

The role of the board under the Industrial Development Act 1982 is to advise my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State and make independent recommendations. Only if the Secretary of State wished to act contrary to the board’s recommendation (which was not the case with the Nissan award), he shall (if the Board requests) lay a statement before Parliament. There is no obligation to do so when he acts in accordance with their recommendation.

5 Feb 2019, 1:21 p.m. Motorcycles: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many reports of anti-social behaviour were made in relation to mopeds in (a) Salford and Eccles constituency and (b) Greater Manchester in each of the last three years.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office collects data on the number of anti-social behaviour incidents recorded by the police forces in England and Wales. From this information it is not possible to identify how many of such incidents related to mopeds.

Anti-social behaviour incidents recorded by the police are published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesotherrelatedtables/yearendingjune2018/otherrelateddatatables.yearendingjune2018v2.xlsx

1 Feb 2019, 1:54 p.m. Asylum: Mental Health Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applications are pending where the claimant has a recorded mental health condition; and how many of these are claims have been awaiting decision for (a) three years (b) two years and (c) 12 months.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Department does not hold data on the number of asylum seekers who have mental health issues and have been waiting a decision for two years, three years and 12 months in a reportable format.


The basis of a person’s asylum claim and any personal information is recorded on their individual Home Office file, but not in a way that can be easi-ly aggregated, so this information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost, because it would require a manual search through individual records. Even then, the data may not be sufficiently reliable, as it is worth noting that the claimants do not always disclose their mental health issues to case-workers despite having opportunity to do so.


The Home Office publishes data, in its quarterly Immigration Statistics release, on the number of asylum applications lodged in each year, broken down by outcome, including cases with a decision, or appeal outcome, or not known, as at May 2018 (time of publication), in table as_06 (Asylum, volume 2).

Latest edition available at:


https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/758195/asylum2-sep-2018-tables.ods

30 Jan 2019, 5:53 p.m. Social Services: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with Directors of Children’s Services in Greater Manchester on their ability to deliver their statutory duties to children and families.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Along with my right hon. Friend the Secretary for Education, I regularly meet key stakeholders, including Directors of Children’s Services (DCSs) to discuss policy issues relating to the department’s agenda.

I recently met with DCSs and local authority chief executives at the National Children and Adult Services Conference, have held recent roundtables in the department with groups of both DCSs and chief executives, and attended induction events for new DCSs. In addition, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education spoke at the Association of Directors of Children’s Services Conference in Manchester and we have both very recently met with a number of children in care to hear their views and experiences.

The department recognises how important it is to speak directly with those who are on the front-line delivering services for children and families.

30 Jan 2019, 4:59 p.m. Social Services: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions he has had with Greater Manchester council leaders on future funding of children’s services.

Answer (Rishi Sunak)

As the Minister for Local Government, I regularly hear from councils across the country to discuss the delivery of services, including children’s social care.

The Department leads on the national Troubled Families Programme, which has been rolled-out across Greater Manchester. It aims to find better ways of working with complex families with multiple high-cost problems. I regularly visit participating authorities and hear from the families and children who are supported by the Programme, in which we have committed £920 million from 2015-2020.

30 Jan 2019, 3:31 p.m. Social Services: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the correlation between deprivation and demand for children’s services.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Demand for children’s services is associated with a number of factors including deprivation. The most deprived local authorities have more looked-after children (per 10,000 0-17 year olds) and these rates have grown faster than the least deprived local authorities. In preparation for the Spending Review, to help ensure decisions are based on the best available evidence, the government is working with the sector to develop a sharper and more granular picture of demand for children’s services.

We are also working with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government as part of the government’s review of relative needs and resources, where new, up-to-date formulae are being developed to ensure funding distribution to councils is based on the best available evidence.

We welcome the contributions from the sector in this area including Newton Europe’s ‘Making sense’ (2018) report and the Association of Directors of Children’s Services continuing research reports, ‘Safeguarding pressures’ (2018).

30 Jan 2019, 1:25 p.m. Social Services: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the amount local authorities in (a) Greater Manchester and (b) the North West overspent on children’s services in 2017-18; and whether he plans to provide additional funding for local authority run children's services.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Local authorities are required under Section 251 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act (2009) to submit education and children’s social care budget and expenditure statements. This data is published in statistical releases annually:

This data is published for all local authorities in statistical releases annually.

At Autumn Budget, my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an extra £410 million next year for social care, including children’s services, along with £84 million over 5 years to support up to 20 local authorities to improve their social work practice. This builds on the £200 billion government has already made available to councils up to 2020 to provide services in the best interests of local residents, including those for children and young people.

The government will continue to work closely with the sector to consider long-term children’s services funding as part of the 2019 Spending Review, when the government will set out its long-term spending approach.

29 Jan 2019, 4:57 p.m. Children: Day Care Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what additional financial provision local authorities have received to help implement the Government’s commitment for 30 hours free childcare for working parents.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The department is committed to supporting local authorities (LAs) in the delivery of the childcare entitlements, including the new 30 hours free childcare entitlement, and has made significant investment into the offer. We will be spending around £6 billion on childcare support in 2019-20 – a record amount. That will include funding for our free early years education entitlements, on which we plan to spend £3.5 billion this year alone.

Since 30 hours free childcare was announced, the department has also invested heavily in specific projects to support delivery of the offer at a local level.

In 2016, the department made available £100 million in capital funding for which LAs, in partnership with providers, were invited to submit bids. Over 350 projects across 123 LAs were successful in this bid round.

Following this, in 2017 the department allocated £2.15 million as part of the Digital Accelerate grant, supporting LAs in the development of their IT systems.

And in 2018, £7.7 million in grant funding was allocated to LAs through our Delivery Support Fund. This funding was intending to support LAs during the first year of delivery of 30 hours and allowed LAs to undertake projects that directly benefit 30 hours’ delivery and created (directly or indirectly) 30 hours places.

In addition to specific funding, LAs continue to receive support directly from departmental officials and through our delivery partners, Childcare Works, who provide a package of universal and targeted support to ensure LAs are best placed to deliver the government’s childcare offers.

29 Jan 2019, 4:36 p.m. Social Services: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the proportion of public expenditure that is spent on children’s services delivered by local government.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

I refer the hon member to the answer I gave on 17 December 2018 to PQ UIN 202165.

29 Jan 2019, 4:18 p.m. Prisoners Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what comparative assessment he has made of the number of prisoners serving life sentences in (a) the UK (b) EU countries; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

I have not made any such assessment. Life sentences are reserved for only the most serious offending.

29 Jan 2019, 3:45 p.m. Zimbabwe: Commonwealth Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the Government's policy is on Zimbabwe’s application to re-join the Commonwealth.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

It is not for the UK to decide if Zimbabwe is to re-join the Commonwealth as the final decision is for all Commonwealth members. However, in light of the Commonwealth's high standards on human rights, the UK would not currently support an application from Zimbabwe.

29 Jan 2019, 3:27 p.m. Home Office: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time support staff in his Department work on (i) visa applications and (ii) asylum applications (A) in 2019 and (B) in 2009.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

UK Visas and Immigration regularly reviews its capacity plans and resources and redeploys staff where necessary to help meet and maintain service standards for individual services or routes.

However, to provide the number of decision-making staff and support staff who were employed to process visa and asylum applications in 2019 and 2009 it would require a manual check through resourcing databases and would encounter disproportionate costs.

Data on staffing within UK Visas & Immigration is published online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#staffing-data

29 Jan 2019, 3:27 p.m. Home Office: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time decision-making staff deal with (i) visa applications and (ii) asylum applications (A) currently and (B) in 2009.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

UK Visas and Immigration regularly reviews its capacity plans and resources and redeploys staff where necessary to help meet and maintain service standards for individual services or routes.

However, to provide the number of decision-making staff and support staff who were employed to process visa and asylum applications in 2019 and 2009 it would require a manual check through resourcing databases and would encounter disproportionate costs.

Data on staffing within UK Visas & Immigration is published online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#staffing-data

29 Jan 2019, 3:13 p.m. Cammell Laird: Strikes Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will release all documents relating to the 1984 strike at Cammell Lairds Shipyard and the subsequent arrest and imprisonment of 37 striking workers.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office does not hold any files relating to the 1984 strike at Cammell Lairds Shipyard and the subsequent arrest and imprisonment of 37 striking workers.

29 Jan 2019, 2:35 p.m. Asylum: Applications Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for asylum applications that were submitted (a) three years ago, (b) two years ago and (c) within the last 12 months are awaiting a decision.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office publishes data, in its quarterly Immigration Statistics release, on the number of asylum applications lodged in each year, broken down by outcome, including cases with a decision, or appeal outcome, not known as at May 2018 (time of publication), in table as_06 (Asylum, volume 2)

Latest edition available at:


https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/758195/asylum2-sep-2018-tables.ods


The next update of this table is due in August 2019.

29 Jan 2019, 2:13 p.m. Social Services: Children Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding local authorities receive to deliver children’s services.

Answer (Rishi Sunak)

Funding for local government services, including children’s services, is set at the Spending Review. The Chancellor has announced that the next Spending Review will be this year, and decisions about the future funding of local government will be taken in the round.

We are working with the Department for Education (DfE) and the sector to develop an understanding of children’s services costs and pressures, and to help local authorities innovate and reform services to achieve better quality and efficiency.

In preparation for the Spending Review, and as part of the Government’s review of relative needs and resources, new, up-to-date formulas are being developed to ensure funding distribution to councils is based on the best available evidence. DfE and MHCLG have commissioned an ambitious data research project from independent contractors to inform this work.

29 Jan 2019, 1:15 p.m. Air Pollution Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what support his Department is providing to (a) areas of Salford and (b) the UK who experience poor air quality.

Answer (Dr Thérèse Coffey)

(a) Government support has included £250 million, since 2017 alone, to Greater Manchester for cleaner better transport to help improve air quality. Manchester authorities, including Salford, are working together to develop a Clean Air Plan for Manchester. The Government is committed to providing the required financial and technical support to local authorities to enable delivery of their air quality plans. We are working closely with Greater Manchester to reduce air pollution and have committed £495 million for local authorities to implement and mitigate their plans. We will be able to consider Greater Manchester’s funding requirement once their final plan is received; it was due in December 2018, but will not be provided until March 2019.

(b) The UK continues to meet all current international air quality limits, except for Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations (NO2). In July 2017, we published the NO2 Plan, backed by £3.5 billion of funding, which sets out the steps we are taking to reduce NO2 concentrations in the shortest possible time, thus complying with NO2 limits as soon as possible. We are working intensively with local authorities, to identify measures to swiftly bring forward compliance, and support them with guidance and funding. This includes major cities outside the Capital which are exceeding NO2 limits, including Greater Manchester Authorities, such as Salford. Additionally, we published our new world leading Clean Air Strategy on 14 January 2019, which has been welcomed by the World Health Organisation as “an example for the rest of the world to follow”.

28 Jan 2019, 5:44 p.m. Pakistan: Overseas Aid Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what (a) Official Development Assistance and (b) other resources her Department has allocated to the rule of law initiative in Pakistan; and if she will publish her Department's human rights assessment of that initiative for 2018-2019.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

DFID has spent £7.69m to-date since financial year 2015/16 on rule of law initiatives in Pakistan which are funded through the Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF). This has supported work to improve the justice system in Pakistan for citizens.

HMG makes robust use of the oversees security and justice assessment (OSJAs) process to manage any human rights risks arising from security and justice assistance delivered overseas. A risk assessment has therefore been carried out on the DFID led work in Pakistan. OSJAs include a UK assessment of the human rights situation in a country at a given time and are regularly updated to inform exposure to risk and adjust programme delivery to reduce that risk if necessary. OSJAs therefore need to be candid about the situation in order to work. Placing them in the public domain could prejudice relations between the UK and another state, the interests of the UK abroad or the promotion or protection by the UK of its interests abroad.

28 Jan 2019, 4:12 p.m. Prison Sentences Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have received an Imprisonment for Public Protection sentence in each of the last three years.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Courts have handed down one Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence in the last three years. The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act abolished the IPP sentence for offences committed on or after 3 December 2012. However, the offender in this one case committed the offences prior to abolition of the IPP sentence.

Prisoners serving an IPP sentence have no fixed date of release. At the time of sentencing, the Court set a tariff – that is, the minimum custodial period to be served before the prisoner would be eligible for release. At the end of September 2018, 2,319 IPP prisoners had served more than their minimum tariff period. The number of tariff-expired prisoners serving an IPP sentence, and the time they have served over tariff, is published in table 1.9b of the OMSQ Prison Population publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2018

Figures for Quarter 4 of 2018 will be published at the end of January 2019.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Public protection is our priority. Prisoners serving IPP sentences will only be released if the independent Parole Board is satisfied that it is safe to do so based on a thorough assessment of risk. Those who have served their minimum tariff have the opportunity to apply to the Parole Board and demonstrate that they are no longer a risk to society.

28 Jan 2019, 4:12 p.m. Prison Sentences Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners serving Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences have served time in excess of the original sentence.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Courts have handed down one Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence in the last three years. The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act abolished the IPP sentence for offences committed on or after 3 December 2012. However, the offender in this one case committed the offences prior to abolition of the IPP sentence.

Prisoners serving an IPP sentence have no fixed date of release. At the time of sentencing, the Court set a tariff – that is, the minimum custodial period to be served before the prisoner would be eligible for release. At the end of September 2018, 2,319 IPP prisoners had served more than their minimum tariff period. The number of tariff-expired prisoners serving an IPP sentence, and the time they have served over tariff, is published in table 1.9b of the OMSQ Prison Population publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2018

Figures for Quarter 4 of 2018 will be published at the end of January 2019.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Public protection is our priority. Prisoners serving IPP sentences will only be released if the independent Parole Board is satisfied that it is safe to do so based on a thorough assessment of risk. Those who have served their minimum tariff have the opportunity to apply to the Parole Board and demonstrate that they are no longer a risk to society.

28 Jan 2019, 12:05 p.m. Home Office: Vacancies Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of his staff leave their respective posts on an annual basis; how many vacant posts there are in his Department; and what proportion of posts in his Department are currently vacant.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Department records actual staffing levels but does not centrally record the number of posts or vacancies. It is therefore not possible to provide details of vacant posts.
The level of turnover within the Department is currently 5.35% per annum.

Turnover represents the number of staff that leave the Home Office, voluntarily or otherwise,
i.e. through resignation or dismissal.

28 Jan 2019, 11:57 a.m. Asylum and Visas: Applications Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) visa applications and (b) asylum applications were awaiting a decision on 22 January 2019.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

All asylum claims lodged in the UK are carefully considered on a case by case basis, based on their individual merits, against a background of relevant case law and up to date country information.
The available information for the number of visa applications awaiting a decision up until the end of September 2018, can be found at table Visa_03 of the International Operations Transparency Data at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-operations-transparency-data-november-2018

The available information for the number of Asylum Applications awaiting a decision up until the end of September 2018 can be found at table Asy_11 of Asylum Transparency Data at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/asylum-transparency-data-november-2018

24 Jan 2019, 9:06 a.m. Natural Gas: Imports Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, from which countries the UK imports gas; and what proportion of the UK gas supply each of those countries exports to the UK.

Answer (Claire Perry)

This is publicly available information which can be found online here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/natural-gas-chapter-4-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes.

24 Jan 2019, 9:05 a.m. Natural Gas: Russia Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 12 September 2016 to Question HL1673, what proportion of the UK's gas supply comes from Russia.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The UK has high levels of gas security from a diverse supply mix including storage facilities; pipelines from Norway, Netherlands and Belgium; and Liquified Natural Gas terminals. This is in addition to domestic production which accounted for 47 per cent of gas supply in 2017 (the most recent year for which full data is available). Russian gas accounted for less than 1 per cent of total UK gas supply in 2017.

Full data for 2018 will be published in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES) in July 2019.

21 Jan 2019, 10:28 a.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 18 December 2018 on Public Spending, HCWS 1205, if he will publish the budget headlines under which he plans to allocate the £190 million funding in relation to preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

On the 18 December, my rt. hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury confirmed Departmental allocations for EU Exit funding for 2019/20 including £190 million for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The Department is undertaking an internal allocation process as part of 2019/20 planning.

A full breakdown of 2019/20 allocations can be found in the Chief Secretary’s Written Ministerial Statement, HCWS1205, made on 18 December 2018.

Source: https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-12-18/HCWS1205/

18 Jan 2019, 11:44 a.m. Egypt: Ethnic Groups Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has made a recent assessment of the effect on the human rights of (a) the Nubian people and (b) other political dissenters of the Egyptian Government's alleged persecution of those people; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

​We continue to monitor issues and cases involving Nubians and other minorities within Egypt. Egypt is a human rights priority country for the UK and the UK wants to see more political progress and better protection of human rights for all Egyptians, as set out in Egypt's constitution. The UK regularly raise concerns about human rights with the Egyptian Government both in public and in private. I raised our human rights concerns with the Egyptian Foreign Minister during my visit to Cairo on 14 October 2018.

17 Jan 2019, 2:23 p.m. Sudan: Ethnic Groups Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Sudanese counterpart on the welfare of Nubian people residing in Sudan.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The British Government has no separate engagement with the Government of Sudan related to the Nubian people. However, we engage frequently with the Government of Sudan to improve the lives and human rights of all people in Sudan. The UK is one of largest humanitarian donors to Sudan, committed to providing lifesaving aid to millions of the most vulnerable.

17 Jan 2019, 2:17 p.m. Energy Supply Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of Toshiba’s withdrawal from development of a nuclear power plant in Cumbria on the future delivery of a sustainable, secure and diverse energy sector.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

This Government was the first to give the go ahead to a nuclear power station in a generation. The percentage of electricity generated by nuclear in 2010 was 16.4%, in 2017 it was 20.8% (DUKES, 2011 & 2018). We want to see a diverse range of sources for Britain’s energy production. Toshiba’s decision to withdraw from the Moorside project does not change this, and due to the long lead up time to the project it will not affect security of supply. Moorside still remains a potential site for new nuclear, and I am willing to meet with any viable proponents wishing to develop the site.

17 Jan 2019, 2:14 p.m. Egypt: Ethnic Groups Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his Egyptian counterpart on the welfare of Nubian people residing in Egypt.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

​We continue to monitor issues and cases involving Nubians and other minorities within Egypt. Egypt is a human rights priority country for the UK and the UK wants to see more political progress and better protection of human rights for all Egyptians. We call on the Egyptian Government to ensure full implementation of the rights set out in Egypt's constitution.

17 Jan 2019, 2:14 p.m. Egypt: Ethnic Groups Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what further discussions he plans to have with his Egyptian counterpart on human rights abuses in relation to the Nubian minority in that country.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

​We continue to monitor issues and cases involving Nubians and other minorities within Egypt. Egypt is a human rights priority country for the UK and the UK wants to see more political progress and better protection of human rights for all Egyptians. We call on the Egyptian Government to ensure full implementation of the rights set out in Egypt's constitution.

16 Jan 2019, 11:42 a.m. Nurseries: Local Government Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many local authority run nurseries there were in (a) 2010 and (b) the latest period for which figures are available.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The department collects data on all providers offering funded early education via the schools and early years census data collections. Local authority run nurseries would be most likely to be listed in the ‘local authority day nurseries’ category. In January 2010 there were 463 local authority day nurseries with children in receipt of funded early education, and 428 local authority day nurseries with children in receipt of funded early education in January 2018. Local authority day nurseries with no funded children will be omitted from these numbers.

The provision for children under 5 years of age national statistics release shows the number of local authority day nurseries separately for 2 year-olds (table 12) and 3 and 4 year-olds (table 13): https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2018. Where children received funded early education at more than one private, voluntary or independent (PVI) provider they have been counted only once. The PVI provider where the child took the majority of their funded hours is the provider reported in the statistical release figures therefore, if the local authority day nursery was not providing the majority of a child’s hours, they will not have been counted in tables 12 and 13.

15 Jan 2019, 12:47 p.m. Pre-school Education: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what meetings (a) he and (b) Ministers of his Department have held with (a) local authority leaders, (b) staff and (c) parents on the future funding of maintained nursery schools in (i) Salford and (ii) England; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Since my appointment, I have held the following meetings and visits involving local authority leaders, staff and parents regarding maintained nursery schools (MNS) and local authority maintained nurseries.

  • The City Mayor of Salford, nursery representatives and parents.

  • The Mayor of Greater Manchester.

  • Headteacher of Castle Vale Nursery School & Children’s Centre, Birmingham.

  • Headteacher and staff at Lanterns Nursery school, Winchester.

  • Headteacher and staff at Hindley Nursery School, Wigan.

  • Headteacher and staff at Rothesay Nursery School, Luton.

  • The All Party Parliamentary Group for Nursery Schools and Nursery Classes.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State has visited and met with staff at Rothesay Nursery School in Luton and Martenscroft Nursery school in Manchester. My right hon. Friend, the Minister for School Standards held a roundtable with a group of headteachers to discuss school funding, which was attended by the headteacher of Castle Vale Nursery School.

We recognise that MNS are an important part of the early years sector and make a valuable contribution to improving the lives of some of our most disadvantaged children. We are providing around £60 million a year to local authorities to enable them to maintain funding levels until at least 2020 and have commissioned new research that will help us establish an evidence-base to inform long-term policy for maintained nursery schools.

7 Jan 2019, 12:06 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 18 December 2018, Public Spending, HCWS 1205, if he will publish the budget headlines under which he plans to allocate the £190 million funding in relation to preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

On 18 December, my rt. hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury confirmed Departmental allocations for EU Exit funding for 2019/20 including £190 million for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The Department is undertaking an internal allocation process as part of 2019/20 planning.

21 Dec 2018, 5:26 p.m. Yemen: Asylum Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps is he taking to enable Yemeni Nationals seek asylum in the UK after the closure of the British Embassy in Yemen.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We have a proud history of providing protection for those who need it, in accordance with our obligations under the Refugee Convention. All asylum claims lodged in the UK are carefully considered so that we do not return anyone who faces persecution or serious harm in their country.

However, in line with the approach taken by other signatories to the Refugee Convention, we do not consider asylum claims lodged outside the UK and there is no provision in our Immigration Rules for people to be allowed to travel to the UK to seek asylum. Those who need international protection should claim in the first safe country they reach that is the fastest route to safety.

11 Dec 2018, 5:59 p.m. Crime: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions his Department has had with Greater Manchester Police on the effect of (a) funding and (b) the number of police officers on tackling (i) serious and organised and (ii) gun crime in Greater Manchester.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Home Office Ministers have regular discussions with law enforcement partners as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) coordinates the operational response of police forces across the UK (including GMP), however, the size and composition of the police workforce is an operational decision for chief officers. The Home Office is working with the NPCC Serious and Or-ganised Crime (SOC) leads to implement the SOC Strategy.

The Government is committed to tackling gun crime and is taking steps to address the issue. This includes measures taken forward in the Offensive Weapons Bill to ban certain rapid firing rifles, and bump stocks, introducing greater regulation of antique firearms, consulting on statutory guidance on firearms licensing to improve standards and the consistency of police licensing decisions, and tightening controls on firearms dealers.

We will ensure the police have the resources they need and police resources will be a priority for the Home Office at the next Spending Review. Overall, public investment in policing is growing by over £1bn from £11.9 billion in 2015/16 to £13 billion in 2018/19, including counter-terrorism policing, local policing and funding of national programmes

11 Dec 2018, 12:10 p.m. Social Security Benefits: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of appeals to the tribunals service in (a) Salford and Eccles constituency, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) the North West relating to (i) personal independence payment, (ii) employment and support allowance, (iii) income support, (iv) jobseeker's allowance, (v) tax credits and (vi) universal credit were successful in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Information about the volumes and outcomes of appeals - including (i) Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and (ii) Employment Support Allowance (ESA) - to the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) (SSCS) is published at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics.

Latest figures (to June 2018) indicate that since PIP was introduced, 3.5 million decisions have been made, and of these 9% have been appealed and 4% have been overturned at tribunals. For ESA, 3.5m ESA (post Work Capability Assessment) decisions have been made between April 2014 and March 2018 and of these 8% have been appealed and 4% have been overturned at tribunals.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service does not record data based on constituencies. SSCS appeals are listed into the hearing venue nearest to the appellant’s home address. The published data (which can be viewed at the link above) provide information about the outcomes of PIP and ESA appeals for hearing venues covering (a) Salford and Eccles, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) the North West for the period April to June 2018, the latest period for which data are available.

The table below contains the requested information for (iii) Income Support (IS), (iv) Job Seekers Allowance (JSA), (v) Tax Credits and (vi) Universal Credit (UC):

Proportion1 of appeals decided in favour of the appellant for the period April to June 2018 (the latest period for which data are available)

IS

JSA

Tax Credits2

UC

Manchester3

83%

~

~

~

Greater Manchester4

58%

~

24%

46%

North West

44%

44%

30%

53%

  1. Proportion based on the number of cases found in favour of the appellant at a tribunal hearing, as a percentage of the cases heard at a tribunal hearing.
  2. Includes Working Family Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, and Working Tax Credit.
  3. Appeals for those living in the Salford and Eccles constituency are heard in Manchester venues.
  4. Greater Manchester includes the venues: Manchester, Stockport, Rochdale and Wigan.

~ Equates to a value fewer than five.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-

scale case management system and are the best data that are available.

These data may differ slightly from those in the published statistics as these data were run on a different date.

11 Dec 2018, 11:07 a.m. Personal Independence Payment: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people undergoing a work capability assessment for personal independence payment in Salford and Eccles constituency were found to be fit for work in each year since 2015.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is available to claimants with a long-term health condition or disability and can be paid regardless of whether a claimant is in or out of work. The work capability assessment is a feature of assessing entitlement to Employment Support Allowance and Universal Credit and is not part of the PIP assessment process

11 Dec 2018, 11:07 a.m. Personal Independence Payment: Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people undergoing a work capability assessment for personal independence payment were found to be fit for work in each constituency in each year since 2015.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is available to claimants with a long-term health condition or disability and can be paid regardless of whether a claimant is in or out of work. The work capability assessment is a feature of assessing entitlement to Employment Support Allowance and Universal Credit and is not part of the PIP assessment process

11 Dec 2018, 10:56 a.m. Employment and Support Allowance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people undergoing a work capability assessment for employment and support allowance were found to be fit for work in each constituency in each year since 2015.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

The information on the number of Employment and Support Allowance claimants who have a Work Capability Assessment and the related outcomes by parliamentary constituency is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/jsf/login.xhtml

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

11 Dec 2018, 10:56 a.m. Employment and Support Allowance: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people undergoing a work capability assessment for employment and support allowance in Salford and Eccles constituency were found to be fit for work in each year since 2015.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

The information on the number of Employment and Support Allowance claimants who have a Work Capability Assessment and the related outcomes by parliamentary constituency is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/jsf/login.xhtml

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

6 Dec 2018, 5:06 p.m. Right to Buy Scheme: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many social housing properties have been sold in each constituency in Greater Manchester under right to buy in each year between 2010 and 2018; and how many of those properties have been replaced by (a) local authorities and (b) housing associations.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

Information on the sale and supply of social and affordable housing is not disaggregated to constituency level.

Information on the sale of social homes under the Right to Buy by lower-tier or unitary local authority can be found in Table 691 of the Live Tables on Social Housing Sales, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-social-housing-sales.

Information on the sale of preserved right to buy by housing associations can be found in Homes England Statistical Data Return Stock Balance sheet https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistical-data-return-statistical-releases but this information is presented by housing association not by local authority.

Information on the total supply of new affordable housing by lower-tier or unitary authority since 2015-16 can be found in Table 1008C of the Live Tables on Affordable Housing Supply, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply.

Figures new supply delivered by housing associations and local authorities for the last three years are included in Live Table 1011. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply.

6 Dec 2018, 3:39 p.m. Burundi: Crimes of Violence Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 10 May 2016 to Question 36968, what steps the Government has taken to ensure that the perpetrators of the Gatumba genocide are prosecuted.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The UK continues to play a role in efforts to resolve the political crisis in Burundi and supports the refugee reintegration in Burundi, working closely with EU and likeminded international partners.

The only way to stop attacks like that on Gatumba in 2004 is to break the cycle of instability in the Great Lakes region. We regularly raise human rights and security issues with the Government of Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo Government, including at the UN Security Council on 21 November and the UN General Assembly in September.

5 Dec 2018, 5:52 p.m. Undocumented Migrants: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data his Department holds on the number of people resident in Salford and Eccles constituency that (a) did not have a legal right to stay and (b) were removed or forced to depart the UK in (i) 2011 (ii) 2012 (iii) 2013 (iv) 2014 (v) 2015 (vi) 2016 (vii) 2017 (viii) 2018.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Any estimate of the exact size of the illegal population in Salford and Eccles constituency is extremely difficult and there would be considerable uncertainty around it.


Exit checks were introduced in April 2015 and are, over time, providing more detailed insights into the behaviour of migrants and how they comply with the restrictions placed upon their length of stay in the UK. The Government is focused on making it harder for people to live in the UK illegally.

For those removed or forced to depart the UK across the periods specified, providing the information requested would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

5 Dec 2018, 3:21 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what data she holds in relation to the number of claimants of disability living allowance in (a) Salford and Eccles constituency and (b) Greater Manchester, that were not awarded personal independence payments as a result of work capability assessments conducted by Atos between 2010 and 2018.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

DWP case managers make decisions on all Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims based on the PIP2 questionnaire completed by the claimant, any additional evidence they have submitted, the report from the assessment provider and any additional information the assessment provider has requested, for example information from the claimant’s GP.

The work capability assessment is a feature of assessing entitlement to Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and is not part of the PIP assessment process.

The Department publishes a range of detailed statistics for PIP on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

These statistics include monthly clearances (decisions) since PIP was introduced in April 2013. Clearance figures can be broken down by clearance type (e.g. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed pre-referral to an assessment provider, disallowed at assessment or withdrawn) and by reassessment type (i.e. whether the claimant was making a new claim or was undergoing Daily Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment). All clearance data can be broken down by parliamentary constituency and by local authority. Local authorities can be combined to generate other geographies such as Greater Manchester.

All PIP claimants in the Greater Manchester area were assessed by Independent Assessment Services (previously known as ATOS).

5 Dec 2018, 10:30 a.m. Pay: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an estimate of the number of people in each parliamentary constituency in Greater Manchester that are paid the (a) national minimum wage and (b) national living wage.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. Once I receive their response, I will place a copy in the Library.

4 Dec 2018, 5:52 p.m. Merchant Shipping: Minimum Wage Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to improve the enforcement of the national minimum wage for seafarers working on merchant ships operating between UK ports and offshore energy installations on the UK continental shelf.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Workers who ordinarily work in the UK are entitled to minimum wage for all of their work, including, for example, for work on ships located outside the UK servicing offshore installations. Furthermore, workers on UK registered ships are entitled to minimum wage for all their work on the ship wherever it is located, unless they work entirely outside the UK or are not ordinarily resident in the UK.

This Government takes minimum wage enforcement seriously and is committed to ensuring all employers pay their workers correctly. We continue to invest heavily in minimum wage enforcement, increasing the budget to over £25 million for 2018/19, up from £13 million in 2015/16. In addition to following up on every worker complaint received, HMRC undertake proactive investigations and conduct awareness raising activities amongst both employers and workers.

Last year, HMRC identified record arrears of £15.6 million, for over 200,000 workers.

4 Dec 2018, 5:52 p.m. Shipping: Minimum Wage Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps HMRC has taken to ensure compliance with the national minimum wage for seafarers working on vessels working in the construction and maintenance phase of the offshore wind industry.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

Workers who ordinarily work in the UK are entitled to minimum wage for all of their work, including, for example, for work on ships located outside the UK servicing offshore installations. Furthermore, workers on UK registered ships are entitled to minimum wage for all their work on the ship wherever it is located, unless they work entirely outside the UK or are not ordinarily resident in the UK.

This Government takes minimum wage enforcement seriously and is committed to ensuring all employers pay their workers correctly. We continue to invest heavily in minimum wage enforcement, increasing the budget to over £25 million for 2018/19, up from £13 million in 2015/16. In addition to following up on every worker complaint received, HMRC undertake proactive investigations and conduct awareness raising activities amongst both employers and workers.

Last year, HMRC identified record arrears of £15.6 million, for over 200,000 workers.

4 Dec 2018, 5:12 p.m. Teachers: North West Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers in (a) Salford, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) the North West Region are on the (a) upper, (b) leading practitioner and (c) leadership pay ranges.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The attached table provides the number and proportion of full and part-time regular teachers in service in state funded schools who are paid on the upper, leading practitioner and leadership pay ranges for Salford, Greater Manchester and the North West Region and in England in November 2017.

Figures for teachers on the main pay scale have been provided for context.

4 Dec 2018, 3:43 p.m. Universal Credit: Disqualification Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many adverse sanction decisions have been made against universal credit claimants since August 2015 in (a) Salford and Eccles constituency, (b) Salford local authority area, (c) Greater Manchester and (d) the North West.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The available information on the number of individuals sanctioned by benefit, by parliamentary constituency, local authority and region is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

4 Dec 2018, 10:40 a.m. Children: Maintenance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of self-employed parents who are evading payment of child maintenance by diverting their income to their partner or spouse.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

The Department has not made an estimate of the number of self-employed parents who avoid child maintenance by diverting their income through their partner or spouse. Income information for paying parents is obtained directly from HMRC. This figure will include earnings from self-employment. Where there is reason to suspect a declared income or that a parent is using self–employment as a means to avoid or reduce their maintenance liability, the case will be referred to the Financial Investigations Unit. The volume of cases which are subject to a complex earners investigation are published in Table 12 of Child Maintenance Service Statistics available on line at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-june-2018-experimental. Investigations into self-employed paying parents are a subgroup of the complex earners investigations.

3 Dec 2018, 10:35 a.m. Wind Power: Skilled Workers Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that skilled workers in the offshore oil and gas sector can train to work in the offshore wind sector without incurring unreasonable extra cost or duplicate qualifications.

Answer (Claire Perry)

Within the offshore oil and gas industry several initiatives are taking place to help diversify the workforce into other sectors of the economy such as offshore wind. For example, OPITO the offshore industry skills body is working with Government and representatives from offshore oil and gas, onshore oil and gas, renewables and nuclear sectors to identify common transferable qualifications for a range of technical job roles to enable workers to move more freely between energy sectors.

28 Nov 2018, 3:20 p.m. Registration of Overseas Entities Bill (Draft) Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timetable is for the Government response to the consultation on the draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Government published the draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill on 23 July. Alongside this, an Overview Document was published which, while providing an overview of the policy and how the register will work, sought views on how the clauses will be implemented in practice.

The draft Bill is expected to undergo pre-legislative scrutiny by a joint ad hoc Committee. The Committee will report to Parliament, following which the Government intends to respond to the Committee’s report. The response will reflect the responses to the Overview Document.

5 Nov 2018, 2:52 p.m. Tree Planting: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to line 40, urban tree planting, of Table 2.1 and paragraph 4.71 of the Budget 2018, how the Government will fund the additional £50 million of carbon credits for qualifying tree planting under the Woodland Carbon Guarantee scheme.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The government’s Woodland Carbon Guarantee will deliver tree planting to help offset carbon emissions and support wildlife. The government is providing up to £50 million of guaranteed future payments over the next thirty years to those who plant qualifying woodland, to purchase carbon credits as trees grow and sequester carbon. Those carbon credits could then be sold, reducing the overall cost to taxpayers. The government will meet this guarantee at future spending reviews. Line 40 (urban tree planting) is a different measure, providing government funding to plant valued trees in and around our towns and cities.

1 Nov 2018, 2:32 p.m. Tree Planting Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to line 40 of table 2.1 of Budget 2028, how he plans to fund the additional £50 million of carbon credits for qualifying tree planting under the Woodland Carbon Guarantee Scheme announced in paragraph 4.71 of that Budget.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The government’s Woodland Carbon Guarantee will deliver tree planting to help offset carbon emissions and support wildlife. The government is providing up to £50 million of guaranteed future payments over the next thirty years to those who plant qualifying woodland, to purchase carbon credits as trees grow and sequester carbon. Those carbon credits could then be sold, reducing the overall cost to taxpayers. The government will meet this guarantee at future spending reviews. Line 40 (urban tree planting) is a different measure, providing government funding to plant valued trees in and around our towns and cities.

1 Nov 2018, 1:41 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 4.4 of Budget 2018, whether the £1.6 billion research and development funding is in addition to the research and development funding announced in table 4.1 of Autumn Budget 2017.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

Since 2016, the government has committed an additional £7 billion from the National Productivity Investment Fund for research and development by 2021/22 – the largest increase for 40 years. Autumn Budget 2018 also provided £60m (see scorecard table 2.1) in support of nuclear fusion, quantum technologies and University Enterprise Zones. This additional funding, together with existing record increases to public R&D spending, meant that government was able to detail plans for allocating over £1.6 billion of investments in innovation and support for key technologies which will drive economic growth across the UK.

Spending breakdowns are available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/731507/research-innovation-funding-allocation-2017-2021.pdf

1 Nov 2018, 1:41 p.m. Research: Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the line entitled research and development funding in table 4.1 of Budget 2018, if he will publish a table detailing the allocation of research and development spending in each year included in that forecast.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

Since 2016, the government has committed an additional £7 billion from the National Productivity Investment Fund for research and development by 2021/22 – the largest increase for 40 years. Autumn Budget 2018 also provided £60m (see scorecard table 2.1) in support of nuclear fusion, quantum technologies and University Enterprise Zones. This additional funding, together with existing record increases to public R&D spending, meant that government was able to detail plans for allocating over £1.6 billion of investments in innovation and support for key technologies which will drive economic growth across the UK.

Spending breakdowns are available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/731507/research-innovation-funding-allocation-2017-2021.pdf

30 Oct 2018, 3:05 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Contracts Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the average hourly pay is of staff employed by companies subcontracted by his Department.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold records on the staff employed by companies subcontracted for the provision of services.

26 Oct 2018, 1:51 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Contracts Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of staff of companies subcontracted by Department are BAME.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold records on the number of staff employed by companies subcontracted for the provision of services.

26 Oct 2018, 1:51 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Contracts Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of staff of companies subcontracted by his Department are BAME.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold records on the number of staff employed by companies subcontracted for the provision of services.

22 Oct 2018, 3:29 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Public Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the change has been to his Department's budget in real terms in each year since 2010; and what the projected real terms changes are for each year to 2022.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) was created in July 2016, so its first full year budget was for the financial year 2017/18.

BEIS budgets decreased in real terms by 3.8% between 2017/18 and 2018/19.

BEIS budgets are projected to increase in real terms by 4.9% between 2018/19 and 2019/20. (2019/20 budgets are yet to be approved by Parliament so may be subject to change.)

My right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer has confirmed that there will be a Spending Review in 2019 which will set planned departmental budgets beyond 2019/20.

Note: “BEIS budgets” refers to total Departmental Expenditure Limits, excluding depreciation, taken from the Autumn Budget 2017 publication.

11 Sep 2018, 2:23 p.m. Financial Reporting Council Independent Review Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timeframe is for the publication of the independent review of the Financial Reporting Council.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has invited Sir John Kingman to report and publish his findings in due course.

5 Sep 2018, 4:14 p.m. Innovation and Research Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 89 of the Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has launched the new international research and innovation strategy.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Further to my response on 14 June 2018 to Question UIN 151204, we intend to publish the International Research and Innovation Strategy in autumn this year.

4 Sep 2018, 12:58 p.m. Technology and Innovation Centres: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 82 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to agree long-term funding for the Catapult Network.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

We announced long-term funding on 10 August, an additional £780 million to expand catapult centres which are fueling innovation across the country as part of the UK’s ambitious Industrial Strategy. This new funding backs Britain’s brightest talent – supporting work in high-tech labs, cutting edge factories and advanced training centres.

This build on £180 million announced by my rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister for centres in the North East last month, taking the total of funding to almost £1 billion.

4 Sep 2018, 12:18 p.m. Telecommunications: Reviews Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to page 154 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the review of the telecoms market.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government published its Future Telecoms Infrastructure Strategy on 23 July 2018. It can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/future-telecoms-infrastructure-review

17 Jul 2018, 4:59 p.m. Financial Reporting Council Independent Review Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the terms of reference of the Independent Review of the Financial Reporting Council 2018, if he will publish summary meeting notes for all meetings of that review.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

I have asked Sir John Kingman to carry out the review independently. Summaries of the discussions of the Review’s Advisory Group will be available at the gov.uk website.

The final report will also include details of all the organisations consulted in the course of the review.

5 Jul 2018, 10:07 a.m. Supermarkets: Small Businesses Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support SME suppliers to supermarkets.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

Small and medium-sized businesses that supply directly to supermarkets covered by the Groceries Supply Code of Practice are supported by the work of the Groceries Code Adjudicator, who ensures they are treated lawfully and fairly. The Government is also acting to tackle the late payment culture across all sectors. At Spring Statement 2018, my rt. hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a call for evidence on how to eliminate unfair payment practices to small businesses, which will seek views on how the Government can go further to deliver a fair payment culture.

More widely, small and medium-sized businesses in England can access support through GOV.UK and the Business Support Helpline and, through our Industrial Strategy, we will continue to back them to grow and create jobs by providing an environment in which they can thrive.

5 Jul 2018, 10:05 a.m. Asda: Sainsbury's Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take to support suppliers and consumer choice after the merger of Sainsbury’s and Asda.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

Direct suppliers to Sainsbury’s and Asda are already covered by the Groceries Supply Code of Practice and benefit from the work of the Groceries Code Adjudicator to ensure they are treated lawfully and fairly. They will continue to be protected by the Code and the Adjudicator should the proposed merger go ahead.

Under the Enterprise Act 2002 the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) have the powers to investigate, independently of Government, whether mergers raise competition issues that could have an impact on consumer choice. The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has written to the Chief Executive of the CMA to express his view that, when assessing the proposed merger of Sainsbury’s and ASDA, the CMA should consider the possible impact on the supply chain.

The Government will continue to monitor closely this proposed merger.

3 Jul 2018, 2:12 p.m. Financial Reporting Council Independent Review: Trade Unions Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether trade unions will be consulted as part of the independent review of the Financial Reporting Council.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

Sir John Kingman is conducting the review independently of my Department. I am therefore unable to speak for the review directly. However, I understand Sir John Kingman met the Financial Reporting Council (FRC) Stakeholder Advisory Panel on 26 June 2018, which included representatives from the Trades Union Congress (TUC).

On 6 June 2018, the independent Review of the FRC published a public call for evidence, inviting views and information from those affected by the FRC’s functions and effectiveness. Sir John Kingman would welcome responses to the call for evidence from a wide range of stakeholders, including interested trade unions, before 6 August. The Review Secretariat can be contacted at FRCReview@BEIS.gov.uk.

3 Jul 2018, 2:12 p.m. Financial Reporting Council Independent Review Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the first meeting of the advisory group of the independent review of the Financial Reporting Council will take place; and how often it will meet thereafter.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Advisory Group that supports the independent Review of the Financial Reporting Council met for the first time on 25 May 2018. I understand the Group will meet approximately monthly until the end of the year.

3 Jul 2018, 2:11 p.m. Financial Reporting Council Independent Review: Costs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the independent review of the Financial Reporting Council.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

Sir John Kingman asked not to receive a fee for his role undertaking the independent Review of the Financial Reporting Council. Members of the Review’s Advisory Group are also not remunerated for their involvement.

The Review’s Secretariat is currently made up of 5.2 full time equivalent civil servants (receiving public sector pay) with the view that this will increase to 6.2 once a vacancy has been filled. The Secretariat also includes one secondee whose salary is met by Legal & General. It is estimated that the costs of the Review will amount to approximately £210,000. This includes forecasted staff costs for the Secretariat, printing and travel and subsistence.

20 Jun 2018, 4:33 p.m. Salford Academy Trust Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the (a) reasons for and (b) evidential basis for his Department's decision on winding up Salford Academy Trust.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Following consultation with the department, Salford Academy Trust (SAT) has decided that the best option for its academies is to merge with another trust. The department’s priority is to ensure that all pupils in SAT receive the best possible education and in this case, we have agreed to identify a trust to provide increased capacity to improve outcomes for pupils. The department is working closely with SAT to manage a smooth transition for its pupils. The decision on whether or not SAT winds up is a matter for the trust.

15 Jun 2018, 1:37 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to answer of 13 December 2017 to Question 117659 on Electric Vehicles: Finance, what the timetable is for the Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund to be in operation.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

Following the announcement of this fund at Autumn Budget, the Government has been engaging extensively with the private sector to ensure that it is set up in the most effective way. This includes holding meetings with over 80 stakeholders.

We expect to launch the procurement for the private sector fund manager shortly. Once a preferred fund manager is nominated and the legal documents agreed, the fund will be formally launched and start investing. Further details on the fund will be included in the forthcoming zero emission road transport strategy.

15 Jun 2018, 12:12 p.m. ICT: Education Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to answer of 13 December 2017 to Question 117656 on ICT: Education, what the timetable is for the National Centre for Computing Education to be in operation.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department expects the first National Centre to be appointed by autumn 2018, with the first training taking place in the 2018-2019 academic year.

In May 2018, the Department released the tender inviting bids for the programme. The closing date for the submission of bids is 15 June 2018. Ensuring that our children have the digital and computing skills needed for the future is a key priority of this Government. The National Centre of Computing Education is part of a new £84 million programme to improve the teaching of computing and to increase participation in computer science. The National Centre will support a national network of computing hubs to raise academic standards by providing comprehensive training and resources to schools.

15 Jun 2018, 11:53 a.m. Official Cars: Exhaust Emissions Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to page 50 of the Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made on making 25 per cent of all cars in the central government department fleet ultra-low emission by 2022.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

It is for individual Government departments to determine how they work towards this target. In December last year the Government updated the Government Buying Standards for transport to include this new commitment. The Office for Low Emission Vehicles is also providing guidance to public sector fleet managers. We expect these steps to encourage public fleets across the country to adopt ambitious targets and deliver on them in the coming years.

14 Jun 2018, 4:09 p.m. Artificial Intelligence: Research Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 39 of the Industrial Strategy, what progress his Department has made on supporting additional PhDs in AI and related disciplines.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Artificial intelligence is a vital technology for the future of our economy; it will also help us tackle big societal challenges, from delivering clean growth to helping people live longer, healthier lives. As part of our AI sector deal, we will create 200 additional PhDs in AI and related disciplines per year by 2020-21, with at least 1,000 Government-backed PhD places at any one time by 2025. The first 200 additional PhDs have already been funded.

14 Jun 2018, 3:52 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to Answer of 11 December 2017 to Question 117396 on Research: Finance, what the timetable is for the new Strategic Priorities Fund to be operational.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

UK Research and Innovation have set out the objectives of the Strategic Priorities Fund in its Strategic Prospectus, published in May 2018. The Strategic Priorities Fund will: drive an increase in high-quality multi- and interdisciplinary research and innovation; ensure that UKRI’s investment links up effectively with Government departments’ research priorities and opportunities; and ensure the system is able to respond to strategic priorities and opportunities. Further details on the operational timetable will be set out in due course.

14 Jun 2018, 3:41 p.m. Innovation and Research Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 89 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish an International Research and Innovation Strategy.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The Industrial Strategy White Paper announced the development and publication of a new International Research and Innovation Strategy in 2018. The Strategy will further set out our desire to build on the UK’s long tradition of international collaborations in research and innovation across all fields and our openness to international talent.

We are currently working in partnership with UK Research and Innovation to develop this strategy.

12 Jun 2018, 4:13 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Consultants Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 35 of the Industrial Strategy, how many (a) Business Champions and (b) external advisers have been appointed.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

My rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s recent speech on science and innovation set out an ambitious approach to tackle the Grand Challenges and put the UK at the forefront of the industries of the future.

There has been extensive engagement on the Grand Challenges which has resulted in business and academic advocates shaping the work and contributing their support as seen as recent events with the national academies and the Resolution Foundation.

We will continue to work with the best from across academia and the private sector as we develop our approach to the Grand Challenges and will be appointing Business Champions shortly.

12 Jun 2018, 3:24 p.m. Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made on agreeing local industrial strategies; and what resources he has allocated to (a) civil servants and (b) local areas to develop those strategies.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

I am encouraged by the enthusiasm shown across the country for developing Local Industrial Strategies. Policy officials are working intensively with Local Enterprise Partnerships and Mayoral Combined Authorities to develop innovative proposals which address the challenges laid out in our national Industrial Strategy. We are making good progress with trailblazers Greater Manchester, West Midlands and partners across the Cambridge – Milton Keynes – Oxford corridor

12 Jun 2018, 1:53 p.m. Independent Industrial Strategy Council Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 December 2017 to question HL3767 on Independent Industrial Strategy Council, what progress has been made on appointing the Industrial Strategy Council.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

We are finalising the terms of reference and membership of the council, and further details will be set out in more detail shortly.

12 Jun 2018, 1:53 p.m. Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many proposals for sector deals he has received; what progress has been made on assessing those proposals; and to how many of those proposals he has formally responded.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Sector Deals have proven to be a popular concept since suggested in the Industrial Strategy Green Paper in January 2017.

Four deals (with the Life Sciences, Automotive, Creative Industries and Artificial Intelligence sectors) have already been published and deals with Construction and Nuclear are expected in the coming weeks.

A number of other sectors have expressed interest in a Sector Deal and, as set out in the White Paper, we expect to progress with further Deals that best meet the expectations set out in the White Paper, in due course.

12 Jun 2018, 1:52 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to answer of 12 December 2017 to Question 117393 on Research: Investment, when he plans to publish a roadmap for meeting his target of increasing investment in R&D to 2.4 per cent of GDP by 2027.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

Since the publication of the Industrial Strategy, we have been speaking to businesses, academics and other stakeholders to develop the roadmap. Through this engagement we are exploring the barriers to increased R&D investment by business, the greatest opportunities for R&D growth over the next decade, and the key policies Government should prioritise to reach the 2.4% goal and deliver economic and societal impact.

8 Jun 2018, 9:38 a.m. Social Security Benefits Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the merits of offline access to benefit claims; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Department offers a number of ways for people to claim benefits and contact us, including face to face, in writing or by telephone, and we are increasingly offering the convenience of online services, for example to check and claim the State Pension.

Universal Credit is designed to be accessed online but, for those that require assistance, we offer a freephone telephone helpline and face to face support.

8 Jun 2018, 9:17 a.m. Housing Benefit: Expenditure Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions,what assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding to (a) Salford City Council and (b) all local authorities to meet their statutory requirements on benefits.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) provides core funding for local authorities (LAs) to deliver Housing Benefit through the Housing Benefit Administration Subsidy (HBAS). This provides a contribution to the total cost of the service.

In addition, DWP provides additional funding in line with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government New Burdens Doctrine. This ensures that, where central government requires or exhorts that LAs do something new or additional, there is no additional pressure on Council Tax payments.

DWP is proactive in assessing and monitoring the level of funding and costs to LAs and continues to work with LAs to determine the total cost of delivering Housing Benefit.

DWP has established a new consultation forum called the LA Funding Group in conjunction with the Local Authority Associations. The aim of the group is to provide adequate time to discuss funding related issues and includes LA Chief Finance Officers on the group to gain stronger LA financial input and to explore funding methodologies

6 Jun 2018, 1:30 p.m. Offshore Industry: Divers Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the basic training qualifications for industrial divers in the offshore oil and gas and wind sectors in enabling those employees to transfer their skills between the two sectors.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

The Health and Safety Executive has responsibility for enforcing the Diving at Work Regulations 1997, which apply to all diving carried out in Great Britain where at least one person who is taking part is at work. These regulations specify the requirement for divers to hold an approved qualification for the type of diving that is being conducted.

The regulations are supported by 5 Approved Codes of Practice (ACOPs) which cover different dive industry sectors. The ACOPs were reviewed and revised in 2014 in consultation with the diving industry. The Commercial Diving Projects Offshore ACOP applies to all work associated with the oil and gas industry and some parts of the wind industry. The Commercial Diving Projects Inland/Inshore ACOP applies to all work in the wind sector that doesn’t fall under the Commercial Diving Projects Offshore ACOP.

Diving qualifications are transferable between sectors if the type of diving being undertaken in the particular sector is covered by the diving qualification held. A diver with a qualification appropriate for working in the offshore oil and gas industry would be able to work in the offshore wind industry. However, a diver holding a qualification for certain work in the wind industry may find that they need extra training before they can work in the offshore oil and gas industry. This is due to the different types of diving techniques used.

For further information on diving, please see HSE’s website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/diving/index.htm.

4 Jun 2018, 2:42 p.m. Wind Power: Seas and Oceans Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the Offshore Wind Industry Council’s proposals for a sector deal between Government and that industry up to 2030.

Answer (Claire Perry)

I recently met members of the Offshore Wind Industry Council to discuss their proposal for a sector deal. BEIS officials have been in discussions with the sector over recent months and have had engagement with relevant departments across Government as well as the Devolved Administrations on the sector’s proposals.

15 May 2018, 12:23 p.m. Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the consultation on proposals for replacement of the feed-in tariff policy framework.

Answer (Claire Perry)

We are considering options for small-scale low-carbon generation beyond 2019, and a consultation on the Feed-in Tariffs scheme will be published in due course.

27 Apr 2018, 1:52 p.m. Gas Appliances (Enforcement) and Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations 2018 Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on the maintenance of the Gas Appliances (Enforcement) and Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations 2018 after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Government takes the issue of consumer product safety extremely seriously and is committed to ensuring that only safe products, including gas appliances, are placed on the UK market now and in the future.

The safety requirements that gas appliances must meet that are based on EU law will be retained through the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill. This means that, on day 1 after exit, gas appliances will only be able to be sold on the UK market if they meet the same safety requirements as they do now.

27 Apr 2018, 1:51 p.m. Personal Protective Equipment (Enforcement) Regulations 2018 Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's policy is on the maintenance of the provisions of the Personal Protective Equipment (Enforcement) Regulations 2018 after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Government takes the issue of consumer product safety extremely seriously and is committed to ensuring that only safe products, including personal protective equipment, is placed on the UK market now and in the future.

The safety requirements that personal protective equipment must meet that are based on EU law will be retained through the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill. This means that, on day 1 after exit, personal protective equipment will only be able to be sold on the UK market if it meets the same safety requirements as it does now.

16 Apr 2018, 1:05 p.m. Average Earnings Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will make an estimate of the average (a) hourly and (b) weekly wages of (i) agency workers and (ii) directly employed staff working in comparable (A) jobs and (B) sectors.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Government does not believe that making such an estimate is practicable as there is insufficient data available to do so.

Following the Government’s response to the Taylor Review, the Government is currently consulting on potential changes to the enforcement of the Agency Worker Regulations and specifically on the use of the “Swedish Derogation”.

16 Apr 2018, 1:03 p.m. Agency Workers: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of agency workers have been employed on pay between assignment contracts under regulation 10 of the Agency Worker Regulations 2010 in the last 12 months.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Department does not hold robust statistical information on the number or proportion of agency workers that have been employed on pay between assignment contracts.

The Government recently published qualitative research entitled Qualitative analysis of the use of Pay Between Assignment contracts for agency workers including the role of umbrella companies[1]. However, the focus of this research was qualitative and we do not believe that this research enables robust quantitative analysis of agency workers on pay between assignment contracts.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-use-of-pay-between-assignment-contracts-for-agency-workers-including-the-role-of-umbrella-organisations

16 Apr 2018, 1:02 p.m. Agency Workers: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of Part 5 of the Agency Workers Regulations 2010 on pay rates for agency workers.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

No assessment has been made of the effect of Regulation 10 or Part 5 of the Agency Workers Regulations on the pay of agency workers.

Following the Government response to the Taylor Review, the Government is currently consulting on the rules governing the use of agency workers and the use of pay between assignment contracts. Alongside the consultation, the Government also published a report by HOST Policy Research entitled Qualitative analysis of the use of Pay Between Assignment contracts for agency workers including the role of umbrella companies[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679564/HOST_Final_Report_final_version-.pdf

16 Apr 2018, 1:02 p.m. Agency Workers: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of Regulation 10 of the Agency Worker Regulations 2010 on the pay of agency workers.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

No assessment has been made of the effect of Regulation 10 or Part 5 of the Agency Workers Regulations on the pay of agency workers.

Following the Government response to the Taylor Review, the Government is currently consulting on the rules governing the use of agency workers and the use of pay between assignment contracts. Alongside the consultation, the Government also published a report by HOST Policy Research entitled Qualitative analysis of the use of Pay Between Assignment contracts for agency workers including the role of umbrella companies[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679564/HOST_Final_Report_final_version-.pdf

16 Mar 2018, 2:59 p.m. Conditions of Employment Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is (a) conducting a review and (b) undertaking other work on the deregulation of employment rights.

Answer (Andrew Griffiths)

The Government’s position on employment rights was set out recently in the Government Response to the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices, in which we committed to firm action and future legislation to enhance employment rights. We are currently consulting on how best to achieve this change.

21 Feb 2018, 12:39 p.m. Carillion: Insolvency Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for the Cabinet Office of 15 January 2018, on Carillion, if she will place the annual reports of the 14 pension schemes forming part of the Carillion Group in the Library.

Answer (Guy Opperman)

Government Ministers do not have access to the annual reports of the pension schemes forming part of the Carillion Group. This would be a matter for the pension schemes’ trustees.

The trustees of defined benefit schemes are required to let members know that the scheme’s annual report and accounts are available on request within seven months of the end of each scheme year. The report must include a copy of the audited accounts and auditor's statement, details of the trustees and how they are appointed and removed, an investment report, including how the investments have performed and the actuary's certification of the adequacy of the schedule of contributions.

22 Jan 2018, 2:05 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the carbon footprint of the North Sea decommissioning market in each year to 2025.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Offshore oil and gas operators must decommission installations and pipelines at the end of a field’s economic life. This is done in accordance with international obligations using a process that sees operators assess the carbon footprint of their decommissioning proposals where appropriate. The data is reviewed as part of the regulatory process but no annual assessment of the overall carbon footprint is calculated.

22 Jan 2018, 2:04 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance the Oil and Gas Authority provides to drilling companies on the decommissioning of semi-submersible drilling rigs.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Mobile drilling rigs are legally classified as ships and subject to shipping regulations. The waste arising from the decommissioning or dismantling of a drilling rig in the UK must be managed in accordance with the environmental permit requirements at the location where decommissioning takes place. Guidance is available from the relevant environmental agency. The Oil and Gas Authority does not provide guidance on the decommissioning of semi-submersible drilling rigs.

18 Jan 2018, 5:29 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of semi-submersible drilling rigs on the UK Continental Shelf which will be decommissioned in each year to 2025.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Mobile drilling rigs are legally classified as ships and are subject to shipping regulations. The Department has not estimated the number that have the potential to be decommissioned in the UK however we are aware that a number of UK ports and associated recycling/dismantling facilities across the UK have expressed an interest in decommissioning opportunities when they arise.

18 Jan 2018, 5:29 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of jobs that will be created by the North Sea decommissioning market by 2025.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department does not have details of the specific job numbers associated with decommissioning. However it is clear that decommissioning is already supporting a significant number of UK jobs, and we expect that numbers will rise in accordance with increases in decommissioning activity.

18 Jan 2018, 5:29 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that retired semi-submersible drilling rigs from the UK continental shelf are decommissioned in the UK.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Mobile drilling rigs are legally classified as ships and are covered by shipping regulations. The location of decommissioning or dismantling of drilling rigs is a commercial decision taken by the owners who will need to comply with prevailing environmental law. Currently a vessel leaving a UK port for decommissioning falls under the definition of waste in the EU Waste Shipment Regulation and would need to be recycled in an appropriately equipped facility. EU Ship Recycling Regulations are due to enter into force later this year that will replace the current system with a list of approved facilities for the recycling of vessels including drilling rigs.

18 Jan 2018, 4:53 p.m. Offshore Structures: Decommissioning Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which facilities on the east coast of (a) Scotland and (b) England have the capacity to recycle steel and other material from decommissioned infrastructure from the offshore oil and gas industry.

Answer (Claire Perry)

There is an established supply chain for recycling disused machinery and structures of all types in the UK, from removal and dismantling of the equipment, via the scrap merchants that separate the materials, through to final recycling of the materials into new products.

The supply chain is complex and there are many suppliers and facilities across the UK. All the primary steel producers in the UK use steel scrap as a feedstock, along with numerous metals foundries which can melt scrap steel and other metals.

18 Jan 2018, 4:50 p.m. Offshore Structures Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the UK has the capacity to (a) decommission, (b) recycle and (c) scrap the retired semi-submersible drilling rigs (i) Ocean Guardian, (ii) Ocean Princess and (iii) Ocean Nomad; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Ocean Guardian, Ocean Princess and Ocean Nomad are in Scottish waters and the Scottish Environment and Protection Agency is engaging with their owners on the waste implications arising from their decommissioning. There have been a number of reports released over the last few years which have identified many different ports in the UK have the potential to carry out this work and a number of ports and associated recycling/dismantling facilities across the UK have expressed an interest in decommissioning opportunities when they arise.

15 Jan 2018, 2:39 p.m. Patents Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the Patents and Patents (Fees) (Amendment) Rules 2017 on the number of patent applications from small businesses.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

The fee changes being made are the first patent fee increases since 2010. They have been made after a full public consultation and Impact Assessment, both of which considered the impact on small businesses. UK patent fees will remain amongst the lowest globally, ensuring access to the system for businesses of all sizes.

8 Jan 2018, 3:45 p.m. Tidal Power Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to answer of 13 December to Question 118103, whether Tidal Range is classified as a less established technology that is eligible to participate in auctions for additional contracts for difference under the Control for Low Carbon Levies announced in Autumn Budget 2017.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Tidal range has not been eligible to participate in Contract for Difference auctions due to its particular characteristics, including: lack of cost data available and the site specific nature of these technologies. The list of technologies that were eligible to participate in the most recent auction for less established technologies was set out in the answer I gave to Question 118103; tidal range did not fall within that list.

8 Jan 2018, 3:45 p.m. Offshore Industry: North Sea Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) shore-based maritime, (b) seafarer and (c) supply chain jobs that will be created in the UK as a result of decommissioning activity in the North Sea in each year until 2025.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

With increasing numbers of offshore oil and gas fields reaching the end of their economic life, forecasts from industry estimate that the annual expenditure for decommissioning over the next 5 years will be in the region of £1.7 to £2 billion. With recent estimates from industry suggesting that decommissioning will represent around 11 per cent of total expenditure on oil and gas for 2017, and the industry will have provided over 300,000 jobs in total in the UK, decommissioning is already supporting a significant number of UK jobs.

8 Jan 2018, 3:45 p.m. Offshore Industry: North Sea Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that National Minimum Wage rates are (a) applied and (b) enforced for seafarers employed to work on oil and gas decommissioning projects on the UK continental shelf.

Answer (Margot James)

The National Minimum Wage (Offshore Employment) Order 1999 applies the 1998 National Minimum Wage Act to offshore employment in the territorial waters of the UK and the UK sector of the continental shelf.

The Government is clear that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) or National Living Wage (NLW) should receive it. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) investigates every complaint it receives and workers can call the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas) Helpline (on 0300 123 1100) for information and guidance about the NMW, or visit their website (www.acas.org.uk).

Furthermore, the Government has established the Legal Working Group on Seafarers to improve the guidance on these matters, and to ensure seafarers are aware of their rights.

8 Jan 2018, 2:35 p.m. Tidal Lagoons Independent Review Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the Hendry review.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Department’s revised estimate of the costs incurred by the Hendry Review, excluding the salaries of seconded civil servants, is approximately £156,000.

13 Dec 2017, 5:38 p.m. Vocational Education Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 103 of the Industrial Strategy, when she plans to undertake a review into higher level technical education at levels 4 and 5.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The government announced a review of higher technical education on 31 October. We want to allow T level students in 2020 to have a clear sight of progression pathways into higher education. During the review we will engage with employers, education providers, students, and others with expertise in this area and I will keep the House updated on progress.

13 Dec 2017, 5:28 p.m. ICT: Education Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 110 of the Industrial Strategy, when she expects the National Centre for Computing Education to be in operation.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The new National Centre for Computing Education will form part of the government’s new £84 million package over the next five years to improve the teaching of computing and drive up participation in computer science. The centre will support a national network for schools to provide training and resources to primary and secondary schools. We are currently developing plans for the delivery of the package and will be announcing more details about the National Centre in due course.

13 Dec 2017, 4:38 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to page 145 of the Industrial Strategy, when he expects the Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund to be in operation.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

Following the announcement of the Fund at Autumn Budget, the Government is already engaging with the private sector to ensure that it is set up in the most effective way. Further details will be announced in due course.

13 Dec 2017, 2:16 p.m. Industry: Environment Protection Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 148 of Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Bioeconomy Strategy.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Bioeconomy Strategy has been developed in partnership with industry, and sets out a framework for growth in the sector to develop new low carbon bio-based products and processes. This contributes to the Clean Growth agenda and I am aiming to publish the strategy early in 2018.

12 Dec 2017, 4:35 p.m. Vocational Education Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 11 of the Industrial Strategy, what assessment she has made of the effect of funding cuts to the Adult Skills Budget since 2010 on the ability to establish a technical education system that rivals the best in the world.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Adult Education Budget (AEB), introduced in 2016-17, replaced three separate funding lines: funding for adult vocational education outside of apprenticeships (previously held within the Adult Skills Budget), Community Learning and Discretionary Learner Support. We have maintained funding for the AEB in cash terms at £1.5 billion for this year to support adult skills participation. In the 2017-18 financial year, the overall funding for adult Further Education and skills (excluding capital) is £3.4 billion. This £3 billion will be available to directly support learning (this includes funding for offender learning which is now the responsibility of Ministry of Justice). This is set out in the Skills Funding Letter 2017-18 which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/skills-funding-letter-april-2017-to-march-2018.

Furthermore, in the Spring 2017 Budget, the government announced the investment of an additional £500 million per year in England’s technical education system once T levels have been fully rolled out. We announced £20 million to help providers prepare for the delivery of T levels and to help teachers prepare for these changes.

In the first wave of reforms to technical education, we are focussing on developing T levels as high quality level 3 technical study programmes for 16 to 19 year olds. We will consider how we adapt T levels so they are appropriate for adult learners and will review technical provision at levels 4 and 5. On 30 November we published a consultation setting out proposals for T levels and the wider reformed technical education system. It seeks views on how best to implement the reforms to make sure they are a success and meet the aims of the Sainsbury Report and the Post-16 Skills Plan.

12 Dec 2017, 4:12 p.m. Science: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 85 of the Industrial Strategy, when he expects the Strength in Places Fund to be in operation.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Government announced the new Strength in Places Fund in the Industrial Strategy White Paper. This new competitive funding stream will be delivered by UK Research and Innovation and will support areas to build on their science and innovation strengths and develop stronger local collaborative networks.

Exact details will be announced in due course, subject to the approval of a full business case; however the Government expects to launch a call for expressions of interest from local consortia in financial year 2018/19.

12 Dec 2017, 3:27 p.m. Industry: Environment Protection Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 148 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the new strategy for resources and waste.

Answer (Dr Thérèse Coffey)

The Resources and Waste Strategy will be published in 2018.

12 Dec 2017, 3:17 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 67 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish a roadmap for meeting his target of increasing investment in R&D to 2.4 per cent of GDP by 2027.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

We will publish a roadmap in 2018 that sets out how Government and industry will work together to reach the 2.4% target.

12 Dec 2017, 2:41 p.m. Research and Development Expenditure Credit Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to page 69 of Industrial Strategy: Building a Britain fit for the future, when the Government plans to launch the campaign to raise awareness of R&D tax credits.

Answer (Mel Stride)

As announced at Autumn Budget and in the Industrial Strategy the government will work with small and medium sized businesses, and those developing new and emerging technologies, to ensure that they can access the maximum amount of support from R&D tax credits, and will launch a campaign to raise awareness in these sectors. We will work with stakeholders and across government to develop and deliver this campaign by April 2018.

12 Dec 2017, 2:40 p.m. Research and Development Expenditure Credit Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to page 69 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to introduce an advanced clearance service for R&D expenditure credit claims.

Answer (Mel Stride)

As announced at Autumn Budget and in the Industrial Strategy, the government will introduce an Advanced Clearance Service for R&D Expenditure Credit claims. The Advanced Clearance Service will be introduced following a pilot program with selected businesses. The pilot will start shortly.

11 Dec 2017, 3:11 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 68 of Industrial Strategy: Building a Britain fit for the future, when he expects the new Strategic Priorities Fund to be operational.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

UK Research and Innovation will work with the Government to develop a new competitive Strategic Priorities Fund. We are designing the operating model for the fund to ensure that we invest strategically whilst also giving certainty for the long term. Further details will be set out in due course.

11 Dec 2017, 3:09 p.m. Universities: Research Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 79 of the Industrial Strategy, what the timetable is for the establishment of the knowledge exchange framework.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

I wrote to the Executive Chair (designate) of Research England on 24th November commissioning The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) (and Research England from April 2018) to initiate work and consult with the sector on the development of a new Knowledge Exchange Framework (KEF), which will bring together a comparable range of measures of effective collaboration and knowledge exchange. This requests that a consultation on the Framework should be issued by Research England in Spring 2018, with the implementation of the KEF to take place in Autumn 2018. On 1 December, HEFCE published details of the Technical Group which will advise HEFCE/RE on the design and delivery of the new KEF metrics system, along with a call for evidence. Details are available at http://www.hefce.ac.uk/ke/kef/metrics/.

11 Dec 2017, 3:04 p.m. Science: China Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 85 of the Industrial Strategy, when he plans to agree the joint Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy with China.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

A Memorandum of Understanding formalising the agreed Joint UK-China Science, Technology & Innovation Strategy was signed by myself and my counterpart Vice Minister Wang Zhigang of the Chinese Ministry of Science & Technology at a ceremony at the Royal Society on 6th December.

5 Dec 2017, 4:58 p.m. National Productivity Investment Fund Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to line 21 of table 2.1 of Autumn Budget 2017, from which allocation of capital spend the £7 billion in year 2022-23 has been re-allocated

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

At the recent Budget we extended the National Productivity Investment Fund for an extra year and increased it from £23bn to £31bn

The extension into 2022/2023 by £7 billion reflects Government’s sustained commitment to addressing our productivity challenges, by providing additional investment into areas that are critical for boosting productivity: transport, digital communications, R&D and housing.

Funding in 2022/23 is not reallocated from an existing allocation of capital spend.

5 Dec 2017, 4:58 p.m. National Productivity Investment Fund Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to line 21 of table 2.1 of Autumn Budget 2017, from which allocation of capital spend the £7 billion in year 2022-23 has been re-allocated.

Answer (Elizabeth Truss)

At the recent Budget we extended the National Productivity Investment Fund for an extra year and increased it from £23bn to £31bn

The extension into 2022/2023 by £7 billion reflects Government’s sustained commitment to addressing our productivity challenges, by providing additional investment into areas that are critical for boosting productivity: transport, digital communications, R&D and housing.

Funding in 2022/23 is not reallocated from an existing allocation of capital spend.

30 Oct 2017, 4:46 p.m. Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Industrial Strategy White Paper.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Industrial Strategy White Paper is due to be published later this year.

25 Oct 2017, 4:53 p.m. West Bank: Water Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to support improved access to portable, affordable and clean water for the domestic and livestock needs of the Bedouin communities in the Palestinian West Bank.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The UK regularly raises the issue of water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPTs) with the Israeli authorities to ensure fair distribution of water across the OPTs. The UK is a shareholder in a number of major international financial institutions, such as the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the European Investment Bank, which support infrastructure projects across the OPTs.

The Government also supports Bedouin communities facing demolition or eviction in Area C of the West Bank through our funding to the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) legal aid programme. This helps residents challenge decisions in the Israeli legal system. 97 per cent of cases provided with legal representation through NRC have resulted in suspension of demolitions and evictions, allowing Palestinians to remain in their homes.

25 Oct 2017, 4:49 p.m. Israel: Palestinians Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to promote Israeli-Palestinian cooperation relating to the water sector.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

​We welcome the progress made towards the 'Red to Dead' water supply agreement between Israel and the Palestinians announced in July 2017. The fair and effective distribution of shared water resources across the Middle East is of great concern to us. These resources are limited and therefore require effective co-operation from all parties to manage them in such a manner that ensures there will be enough for all. Although this issue transcends the Arab-Israeli conflict, it is essential that Israel and the Palestinians discuss this issue and ensure that there is a just solution on shared water resources.

25 Oct 2017, 4:48 p.m. West Bank: Sanitation Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has made recent representations to the Government of Israel on the adequacy of the water supply and sanitation infrastructure in the West Bank.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The UK regularly raises concerns over access to water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories with the Israeli authorities, including stressing the urgent need for Israel to take immediate and practical measures to improve the current situation and ensure fair distribution of water in the West Bank. Officials from our Embassy in Tel Aviv and the Department for International Development discussed this issue with the Israeli authorities on 12 September. The Department for International Development discussed the issue of water at the Ad Hoc Liaison Comittee in New York on 17-18 September.

25 Oct 2017, 1:58 p.m. West Bank: Water Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with Israel and Palestinian officials on water permits in the (a) Jordan Valley area and (b) wider Palestinian West Bank.

Answer (Alistair Burt)

The UK regularly raises concerns over access to water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories with the Israeli authorities, including stressing the urgent need for Israel to take immediate and practical measures to improve the current situation and ensure fair distribution of water in the West Bank. We have not raised this issue with the Palestinian Authority.

24 Oct 2017, 2:12 p.m. Homelessness: Foreign Nationals Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what provisions her Department has in place to help support sponsored foreign nationals at risk of homelessness if their sponsor is no longer available.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Foreign nationals in the UK who are sponsored, are generally expected to leave the UK if their sponsor is no longer available. Those who qualify for residence in their own right, may be able to apply for housing benefits or homelessness assistance if the conditions of their stay allow recourse to public funds.

24 Oct 2017, 2:09 p.m. Asylum: Ethiopia Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people from Ethiopia submitted applications for asylum in each financial year from 2010-11 to 2016-17.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office publishes annual breakdowns of the number of applications for asylum and the number of applications that were refused at initial decision, broken down by nationality, in the quarterly Immigration Statistics release. The latest figures are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017

Table as_01 contains the total number of applications, the number of initial decisions (broken down by decision type), and the number of cases where a decision is pending, in each year. Table as_01_q provides quarterly breakdowns of these data.

Table as_06 provides additional information on the outcomes of asylum applications raised in a given year.

24 Oct 2017, 2:09 p.m. Asylum: Iran and Ethiopia Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for asylum submitted by (a) Iranian and (b) Ethiopian nationals between 2010 and the latest date for which figures are available (i) are pending and (ii) have been (A) approved and (B) refused.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office publishes annual breakdowns of the number of applications for asylum and the number of applications that were refused at initial decision, broken down by nationality, in the quarterly Immigration Statistics release. The latest figures are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017

Table as_01 contains the total number of applications, the number of initial decisions (broken down by decision type), and the number of cases where a decision is pending, in each year. Table as_01_q provides quarterly breakdowns of these data.

Table as_06 provides additional information on the outcomes of asylum applications raised in a given year.

24 Oct 2017, 2:09 p.m. Asylum: Iran Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people from Iran have submitted applications for asylum in each financial year from 2010-11 to 2016-17.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office publishes annual breakdowns of the number of applications for asylum and the number of applications that were refused at initial decision, broken down by nationality, in the quarterly Immigration Statistics release. The latest figures are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017

Table as_01 contains the total number of applications, the number of initial decisions (broken down by decision type), and the number of cases where a decision is pending, in each year. Table as_01_q provides quarterly breakdowns of these data.

Table as_06 provides additional information on the outcomes of asylum applications raised in a given year.

20 Oct 2017, 11:33 a.m. Fracking Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that his decision on hydraulic fracturing consent applications, and the assessments made to support it, are published.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The majority of information contained in a hydraulic fracturing consent application will already be in the public domain. The Department plans to publish its response, as appropriate, and in line with its obligations under the Environmental Information Regulations.

19 Oct 2017, 2:47 p.m. Fracking: Ryedale Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment that (a) the relevant criteria for hydraulic fracturing consent have been met for the KM8 wellsite in Ryedale, North Yorkshire and (b) it is appropriate to grant hydraulic fracturing consent; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The Government is assessing and will respond appropriately in due course.

12 Oct 2017, 3:10 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people had personal independence payment awards reduced or removed as a result of reassessment in (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2017 to date in each parliamentary constituency in Greater Manchester.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The attached table shows the numbers of DLA to PIP Reassessments cleared in 2016/17 (April 6th to October 31st 2016 - the last date for which data is available). Data is published annually with the next update due in December 2017 and this will include data to October 31st 2017.

For each individual who has a PIP reassessment outcome their PIP entitlement has been compared to their DLA entitlement at the time of their PIP reassessment registration.

'Award Increased' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is higher than the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Award Unchanged' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is the same as the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Award Decreased' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is less than the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Disallowed post-referral to the assessment providers (AP)' includes claims that have been disallowed following the assessment due to the claimant not scoring enough points at the assessment to be awarded the benefit, or the claimant failing to attend the assessment without good reason.

'Disallowed pre-referral to the assessment providers (AP)' includes claims that have been disallowed due to failure of basic eligibility criteria or non-return of the Part 2 form within the time limit and have not been marked as requiring additional support.

'Withdrawn' includes all claims that have been withdrawn by the claimant prior to a decision being made. This can take place at any point in the claimant journey following registration of a claim.

12 Oct 2017, 3:10 p.m. Personal Independence Payment Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people had personal independence payment awards reduced or removed as a result of reassessment in (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2017 to date in each parliamentary constituency in the UK.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The attached table shows the numbers of DLA to PIP Reassessments cleared in 2016/17 (April 6th to October 31st 2016 - the last date for which data is available). Data is published annually with the next update due in December 2017 and this will include data to October 31st 2017.

For each individual who has a PIP reassessment outcome their PIP entitlement has been compared to their DLA entitlement at the time of their PIP reassessment registration.

'Award Increased' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is higher than the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Award Unchanged' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is the same as the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Award Decreased' means the Department have made a decision to award PIP and the total monetary value of the PIP award (Daily Living plus Mobility component) is less than the total monetary value of the DLA award (Care component plus Mobility component).

'Disallowed post-referral to the assessment providers (AP)' includes claims that have been disallowed following the assessment due to the claimant not scoring enough points at the assessment to be awarded the benefit, or the claimant failing to attend the assessment without good reason.

'Disallowed pre-referral to the assessment providers (AP)' includes claims that have been disallowed due to failure of basic eligibility criteria or non-return of the Part 2 form within the time limit and have not been marked as requiring additional support.

'Withdrawn' includes all claims that have been withdrawn by the claimant prior to a decision being made. This can take place at any point in the claimant journey following registration of a claim.

9 Oct 2017, 4:37 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Females Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2017 to Question 9015, how many women work in the Industrial Strategy Team.

Answer (Claire Perry)

As of 17th September 2017, the core Industrial Strategy Team within BEIS is led by Alexandra Jones, and employs 20 men and 18 women.

9 Oct 2017, 4:35 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Females Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2017 to Question 9015, how many and what proportion of (a) civil servants and (b) advisors working directly on the industrial strategy are women.

Answer (Claire Perry)

I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave her on 13 September 2017, to Question 9015:

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2017-09-06/9015/.

We are unable to provide an answer as this information is not centrally held and could only be obtained at disproportionate costs.

9 Oct 2017, 3:27 p.m. Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK has the capacity to manufacture (a) parts for and (b) whole manned and unmanned fighter aircraft.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The Defence Aerospace and the Combat Air sector make a strategically important contribution to securing our military operational advantage and freedom of action, developing high-end technologies and a skilled workforce, and generates revenues and international influence through exports. UK industry leads the world in a number of technology, design and manufacturing capability areas, and maintaining those capabilities is in our national interest.

In the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 we launched the Future Combat Air System Technology Initiative (FCAS TI) which is sustaining our design engineering capacity and skills, ensuring that the UK continues to be at the cutting edge of combat air technology. This includes our cooperation with France to design and build an Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Demonstrator.

Our investment in the F-35 programme has secured 15% workshare (by value) of every F-35 to be built in the global programme of 3,000 aircraft, sustaining high-end manufacturing capabilities, skills and capacity as well as providing enduring economic benefit. In addition, from early 2018 North Wales will be home to a global hub, providing maintenance, repair, overhaul and upgrade services for F-35 avionic and aircraft components. Over the lifetime of the programme, the components for hundreds of European-based F-35 aircraft will be serviced and maintained at the site. Similarly our acquisition of, and success in exporting, Typhoon aircraft has provided a considerable manufacturing workload, particularly in the North West of England.

The Ministry of Defence is considering our future combat air capability requirements and the best approach to delivering the UK's operational needs as well as maintaining our leading role in the combat air sector. This will involve detailed consideration of the industrial, prosperity, international and financial implications as well as a clear military requirement.

9 Oct 2017, 3:23 p.m. Defence: Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he plans to publish a defence industrial review.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The Ministry of Defence is actively involved in the cross-Government work on an industrial strategy. Many of the themes in this apply to defence, and we do not plan a separate defence industrial strategy or review. However, as part of the recently announced National Security and Capability Review, we are refreshing defence industrial policy and taking further action to help the UK's defence industry grow and compete successfully.

9 Oct 2017, 3:17 p.m. Boeing Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the value is of current Government procurement contracts with the Boeing Company.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

The value of current contracts between the Ministry of Defence and Boeing is around £4.5 billion.

The largest contract held is the Chinook through life customer support contract which is valued at over £2 billion and runs until 2040.

25 Sep 2017, 11:26 a.m. Letting Agents: Fees and Charges Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the planned timetable is for bringing forward proposals to ban letting agency fees paid by tenants.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

We will bring them forward shortly.

25 Sep 2017, 11:25 a.m. Letting Agents: Fees and Charges Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish the responses to the Government's consultation exercise on the implementation of a ban on letting agency fees paid by tenants.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

We plan to publish the responses to the Government's consultation exercise on the implementation of a ban on letting agency fees paid by tenants shortly.

20 Sep 2017, 1:13 p.m. Police Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the types of incidents police have provided an immediate response to in (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18; and whether there has been any change in the ability of the police to respond to crimes such as burglary, shoplifting and anti-social behaviour.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

It is a matter for Chief Constables, working with their Police and Crime Commissioners, to manage their available resources according to local priorities.

Ministers have recently written to police leaders setting out a programme of engagement to better understand the impact of changing demands on the sector and what more can be done to improve productivity and efficiency.

18 Sep 2017, 2:17 p.m. Veterans: Great Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has made an assessment of the adequacy of support available to service personnel from Greater Manchester who have left the armed forces.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

The Ministry of Defence has made no assessment of the adequacy of support available to Service personnel from Greater Manchester who have left the Armed Forces. Support to former Service personnel residing in the UK, including Greater Manchester, is available from Statutory Authorities and the voluntary and charitable sector.

18 Sep 2017, 9:47 a.m. Aerospace Industry: Procurement Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of his Department's procurement policy in supporting UK aerospace companies and the UK aerospace sector.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Although the Department does not procure from the aerospace sector, we provide strong support for the UK aerospace industry through the Aerospace Growth Partnership (AGP). We believe this has been successful in supporting industry. Since 2010, the UK aerospace industry has seen turnover grow from £23.7billion to £32billion; exports have increased from £18billion to £30billion; direct jobs have grown from 110,000 to 120,000, with indirect jobs up from 148,000 to 161,000; and, between 2010 and 2016, productivity growth in the sector was over five times more than in the economy as a whole. In addition we have created a more certain environment to drive increased investment in R&D, through a £1.95billion Government commitment over 13 years to 2026, matched by industry, to fund new R&D projects.

But we are not complacent and will continue to work with industry through the AGP to retain the UK's position as a leading aerospace nation.

13 Sep 2017, 1:01 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Females Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of the civil servants and advisors working on the industrial strategy are women.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Industrial Strategy has been developed across Government, with many civil servants working directly or indirectly on it. Therefore we are unable to provide the figures requested without incurring disproportionate cost.

An inclusive economic policy is of the highest importance to the success of the Industrial Strategy, my hon. Friend the Minister of State for Small Firms and I have engaged with a broad range of stakeholders, including women’s organisations, to ensure that we could understand and consider key issues.

12 Sep 2017, 3:35 p.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 20 of the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to require quoted companies to report the ratio of CEO pay to the average pay of their UK workforce.

Answer (Margot James)

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to Questions UIN 8198 and 8199.

12 Sep 2017, 3:29 p.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, for what reason the Financial Conduct Authority will not maintain a register of listed companies that experienced shareholder opposition to pay awards.

Answer (Margot James)

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 8196.

12 Sep 2017, 3:28 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Trade Unions Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, how many meetings he or ministers of his Department had with representative of trade unions during the preparation of that paper.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government is committed to strengthening the worker voice in the boardroom. My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State had one meeting specifically on the subject of corporate governance with trade union representatives at a roundtable event held in the Department on 6 February 2017. In addition, the Secretary of State and his Ministerial team met regularly with representatives of the trade unions during the preparation of the paper. This included a Trade Unions Congress chaired roundtable on the Industrial Strategy, attended by the heads of the six main unions, on 18 April 2017 where Corporate Governance was discussed.

12 Sep 2017, 2:13 p.m. Crime: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has made an assessment of the effect of the level for funding Greater Manchester Police in 2016-17 and 2017-18 on its ability to respond to all reported crimes in Salford and Eccles constituency.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Government protected overall police spending in the 2015 Spending Review, and the 2017/18 police funding settlement maintains that commitment. The Greater Manchester Mayor’s direct resource funding for his Police & Crime Commissioner functions (including council tax precept) is £545.4 million in 2017/18, an increase of £4.2 million on funding levels for 2015/16.

It is a matter for Chief Constables, working with their Police and Crime Commissioners, to manage their available resources according to local priorities. However, Ministers have recently written to police leaders setting out a programme of engagement to better understand the impact of changing demands on the sector and what more can be done to improve productivity and efficiency.

12 Sep 2017, 2:13 p.m. Crime: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has made an assessment of any correlation between levels of crime and the number of police in Salford and Eccles constituency.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Government protected overall police spending in the 2015 Spending Review, and the 2017/18 police funding settlement maintains that commitment. The Greater Manchester Mayor’s direct resource funding for his Police & Crime Commissioner functions (including council tax precept) is £545.4 million in 2017/18, an increase of £4.2 million on funding levels for 2015/16.

It is a matter for Chief Constables, working with their Police and Crime Commissioners, to manage their available resources according to local priorities. However, Ministers have recently written to police leaders setting out a programme of engagement to better understand the impact of changing demands on the sector and what more can be done to improve productivity and efficiency.

12 Sep 2017, 12:55 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Medical Examinations Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment assessment appeals were taken to the tribunal stage in (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2017-18 to date.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The latest available data on volumes of appeals, volumes overturned and volumes upheld can be found in quarterly published statistics from the Ministry of Justice in tables SSCS.1 and SSCS.3 of: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics#history

12 Sep 2017, 12:55 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Medical Examinations Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment assessment decisions were (a) overturned as a result of an appeal tribunal and (b) maintained in (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 to date.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The latest available data on volumes of appeals, volumes overturned and volumes upheld can be found in quarterly published statistics from the Ministry of Justice in tables SSCS.1 and SSCS.3 of: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics#history

12 Sep 2017, 11:57 a.m. Personal Independence Payment: Salford and Eccles Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Salford and Eccles constituency had personal independence payment awards reduced or removed in (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2017-18 to date as a result of reassessment.

Answer (Penny Mordaunt)

The table below shows the number of individuals in Salford and Eccles constituency who were previously in receipt of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and who underwent a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Reassessment between 6th April 2016 and 31st October 2016 resulting in either a reduced reward or removal of award.

Re-assessment Outcome

2016/17 Apr 6th to Oct 31st 2016

Award Decreased

190

Disallowed post referral to the AP

160

Disallowed pre referral to the AP

20

Withdrawn

#

Total

380

October 2016 is the latest published data available. Later data is available on DWP systems but has been withheld as it will be published as part of official statistics in December 2017.

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. ‘#’ indicates a total of less than 5. Columns may not sum due to rounding.

12 Sep 2017, 7:47 a.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper, Corporate Governance Reform, published on 29 August 2017, whether the publication of pay multiples will apply solely to the CEO of a company.

Answer (Margot James)

Work is underway to bring forward legislative proposals for pay ratio reporting as soon as possible.

The pay ratio reporting requirement is intended to apply to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the company and to be determined by reference to the single figure for total remuneration receivable by the CEO that quoted companies are required to disclose annually (along with the pay of other directors).

12 Sep 2017, 7:47 a.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper, Corporate Governance Reform, published on 29 August 2017, whether annual pay ratio reporting will require the reporting of exact pay and remuneration.

Answer (Margot James)

Work is underway to bring forward legislative proposals for pay ratio reporting as soon as possible.

The pay ratio reporting requirement is intended to apply to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the company and to be determined by reference to the single figure for total remuneration receivable by the CEO that quoted companies are required to disclose annually (along with the pay of other directors).

11 Sep 2017, 4:41 p.m. Prisoners' Release: Greater Manchester Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has made an assessment of the adequacy of rehabilitation and support services available to people leaving prison in Greater Manchester for the last two years.

Answer (Mr Sam Gyimah)

It is vital that offenders leaving prison are supported to lead successful and law-abiding lives in the community. That is why weIn 2014/15 the government reformed the probation system to strengthen its focus on reducing reoffending and protecting communities, and much progress has been made in implementing these reforms. For the first time around 40,000 offenders a year released from custodial sentences of less than 12 months are entitled to statutory support from probation on release, and new through-the-gate services have been introduced to improve the resettlement of released prisoners in the community. reformed the probation system to extend post-release supervision to all prisoners released from custody and introduce new through-the-gate resettlement services.

The Cheshire and Greater Manchester CRC provides support to offenders released from prisons in Greater Manchester. We understand that the current delivery of through-the-gate service across England and Wales must improve and recognise the issues raised by Her Majesty’s Chief Inspectors of Prisons and Probation in their report published in June. We are working with providers to explore improvements that could be made to the delivery of rehabilitative services, and we continue to hold providers rigorously to account for their performance to ensure they deliver services which reduce re-offending, protect the public and help offenders contribute to society.

11 Sep 2017, 4:40 p.m. Energy: Billing Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if it is the Government's policy to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce an energy price cap.

Answer (Margot James)

The detriment to retail energy customers on poor value standard variable tariffs, which was identified by the Competition and Markets Authority as averaging £1.4bn a year, must be addressed.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State has written to the Chief Executive of Ofgem asking him to advise on what action the regulator intends to take to safeguard consumers on the poorest value tariffs and to consider the future of standard variable tariffs. The Secretary of State will consider further action in the light of Ofgem’s proposals and remains prepared to legislate if necessary.

11 Sep 2017, 3:04 p.m. Non-domestic Rates Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of businesses eligible for business rates transitional relief have received that relief in the last 12 months for which figures are available.

Answer (Mr Marcus Jones)

The Department does not hold information about the number of properties in receipt of transitional relief.

A £3.6 billion transitional relief scheme is providing support for the minority of businesses who face increases at the 2017 revaluation. Transitional relief is applied automatically to bills by local authorities.

11 Sep 2017, 1:32 p.m. Offshore Industry: North Sea Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's press release of 30 August 2017, UK Government committed to maximising economic opportunity in North Sea, what plans he has to maximise the economic opportunity in the North Sea.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The oil and gas industry is important to the UK’s energy security, economy and jobs. Government remains committed to maximising economic recovery of the UK Continental Shelf and we are continuing to create the right environment though a stable and supportive package to allow business, enterprise and jobs to flourish.

In recent years we have provided £2.3bn package of fiscal supports, have implemented all of the Wood Review recommendations and established the Oil and Gas Authority as a strong, independent regulator focused on maximising economic recovery of the UK Continental Shelf.

We will continue to work with the sector to build on the UK Government support through our modern Industrial Strategy.

11 Sep 2017, 1:11 p.m. Company Law Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 42 of the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to require companies to disclose their corporate governance arrangements.

Answer (Margot James)

Work is underway to bring forward legislative proposals as soon as possible to require companies to disclose their corporate governance arrangements.

11 Sep 2017, 1:09 p.m. Business: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, what plans he has to require companies to accept recommendations from an employee advisory council.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government’s green paper on corporate governance reform sought views on the option of designating a non-executive director to ensure that voices of employees and other interested groups are heard at board level. Responses to the consultation suggested that this could be an effective option if appropriately resourced and supported, and care taken to ensure that the responsibilities associated with the role are clearly identified.

It will be for individual boardrooms to determine how they can engage most effectively with employees and meet their duty to have regard to employee interests.

The Government intends to introduce secondary legislation to require all companies of significant size (private as well as public) to explain how their directors comply with the requirements of section 172 to have regard to employee and other interests.

11 Sep 2017, 1:09 p.m. Directors: Staff Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 4 of the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, whether he has assessed the potential effect of a designated non-executive director on strengthening the voice of employee influence.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government’s green paper on corporate governance reform sought views on the option of designating a non-executive director to ensure that voices of employees and other interested groups are heard at board level. Responses to the consultation suggested that this could be an effective option if appropriately resourced and supported, and care taken to ensure that the responsibilities associated with the role are clearly identified.

It will be for individual boardrooms to determine how they can engage most effectively with employees and meet their duty to have regard to employee interests.

The Government intends to introduce secondary legislation to require all companies of significant size (private as well as public) to explain how their directors comply with the requirements of section 172 to have regard to employee and other interests.

11 Sep 2017, 1:06 p.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 1.6 of the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, how many and what proportion of the respondents that supported an annual binding vote on remuneration were trade unions.

Answer (Margot James)

Of the 375 respondents to the Corporate Governance Reform green paper consultation, 25 supported option (iii) which would require or encourage quoted company pay policies to set an upper threshold for total annual pay and ensure a binding vote where annual remuneration exceeds that threshold. None of the trade unions responding to the consultation supported this option.

Of the 375 respondents to the consultation, 26 supported option (iv) which would require the existing binding vote on executive pay policies to be held more frequently than every three years (or give shareholders the option of bringing forward an earlier binding vote). One trade union and one trade union representative council supported option (iv) representing 8% of the respondents who supported this option.

Of the 375 respondents to the consultation, 76 supported an annual binding shareholder vote on some or all elements of executive remuneration. This included two trade unions and one trade union representative council, comprising 4% of the respondents who supported this option.

11 Sep 2017, 1:06 p.m. Company Law Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 1.7 of the Government's paper Corporate Governance Reform published on 29 August 2017, how many and what proportion of the respondents that supported options (iii) and (iv) were trade unions.

Answer (Margot James)

Of the 375 respondents to the Corporate Governance Reform green paper consultation, 25 supported option (iii) which would require or encourage quoted company pay policies to set an upper threshold for total annual pay and ensure a binding vote where annual remuneration exceeds that threshold. None of the trade unions responding to the consultation supported this option.

Of the 375 respondents to the consultation, 26 supported option (iv) which would require the existing binding vote on executive pay policies to be held more frequently than every three years (or give shareholders the option of bringing forward an earlier binding vote). One trade union and one trade union representative council supported option (iv) representing 8% of the respondents who supported this option.

Of the 375 respondents to the consultation, 76 supported an annual binding shareholder vote on some or all elements of executive remuneration. This included two trade unions and one trade union representative council, comprising 4% of the respondents who supported this option.

7 Sep 2017, 2:03 p.m. Directors: Incentives Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper, Corporate Governance Reform, published on 29 August 2017, whether companies will be required to make a full disclosure of executive bonus payments and how they are paid.

Answer (Margot James)

The Large and Medium-sized Companies and Groups (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008, as amended in 2013, already require quoted companies to disclose remuneration received by directors as a result of the achievement of annual performance measures.

7 Sep 2017, 2 p.m. Business: Pay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's paper, Corporate Governance Reform, published on 29 August 2017, what representations he has received on the proposal for the Investment Association to maintain a public register of listed companies that experience shareholder opposition to pay awards.

Answer (Margot James)

The register will bring together publicly available data on quoted companies’ shareholder voting records and any actions taken by companies to address significant shareholder dissent on individual resolutions. As the representative body for a large proportion of the UK’s investment community which votes on such resolutions, the Investment Association is well placed to establish and maintain the register.

In its response to the Government’s green paper consultation on Corporate Governance Reform the Investment Association set out its intention to maintain a public register of quoted companies that experience significant shareholder dissent on executive remuneration resolutions.

7 Sep 2017, 1:55 p.m. Energy: Prices Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether legislation is required to implement the Government's proposed cap on household energy prices.

Answer (Margot James)

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State has written to the Chief Executive of Ofgem asking him to advise on what action the regulator intends to take to safeguard consumers on the poorest value tariffs and to consider the future of standard variable tariffs. The Secretary of State will assess whether further action is necessary once he receives Ofgem’s proposals.

Ofgem already have extensive powers which would allow them to establish a price cap on household energy prices, but new legislation would be required in order to oblige Ofgem to put such a cap in place. The Secretary of State remains prepared to legislate if necessary.

5 Sep 2017, 3:21 p.m. Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of a sectoral approach to industrial strategy on regional inequality.

Answer (Claire Perry)

It is right that Government supports sectors across the country to grow, invest and reach their potential. This is why we have invited British business to come forward with proposals for sector deals to advance the productivity of their particular sectors.

Sector led proposals should be consistent with our Industrial Strategy and should demonstrate how they have been developed in partnership with local partners in key areas of competitive advantage for the specific sector across the country.

5 Sep 2017, 2:35 p.m. Research Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of the distribution of research and development establishments on regional inequality.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

Research and development is an important driver of productivity and growth both nationally and locally. The Government’s Industrial Strategy identified a range of other factors that also contribute to growth including skills, trade and inward investment, infrastructure, business support and sectors. The Government recognises that different places have different needs. Science and Innovation Audits are helping to develop the evidence base of where local research strength, innovation capability and potential markets are aligned. These audits are an important contribution to understanding of the strengths and opportunities of different regions as the Government develops an Industrial Strategy that works for all parts of the country.

5 Sep 2017, 2:35 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will review ways of allocating Government investment in research and development to ensure regional equality.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

Research and development is an important driver of productivity and growth both nationally and locally. The Government’s Industrial Strategy identified a range of other factors that also contribute to growth including skills, trade and inward investment, infrastructure, business support and sectors. The Government recognises that different places have different needs. Science and Innovation Audits are helping to develop the evidence base of where local research strength, innovation capability and potential markets are aligned. These audits are an important contribution to understanding of the strengths and opportunities of different regions as the Government develops an Industrial Strategy that works for all parts of the country.

5 Sep 2017, 2:27 p.m. Companies Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to publish its response to the Corporate Governance Reform consultation.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government published its response to the Green Paper consultation on Corporate Governance Reform on 29 August 2017.

A copy of the response can be found:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/640631/corporate-governance-reform-government-response.pdf

26 Jul 2017, 9:13 a.m. Wind Power: Seas and Oceans Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of the UK's offshore wind sector is owned by UK investors and companies.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

We do not hold specific information on UK ownership given the breadth of the sector and related supply chain. There has been significant overseas investment into offshore wind in the UK. Bloomberg New Energy Finance reported that in 2016 the UK led Europe for the third successive year, with investment of $25.9bn, up 2% year on year percentage increase in investment in the UK in clean energy.

17 Jul 2017, 4:15 p.m. Housing Market Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph A.143 of Fixing Our Broken Housing Market, published on 7 February 2017, when his Department will issue guidance to clarify the meaning of backing of affected local communities.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

We are currently considering the responses to the consultation, which closed on 2 May, and will respond in due course.

14 Jul 2017, 8:28 a.m. Industry Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to publish its response to the Building our Industrial Strategy consultation.

Answer (Claire Perry)

We are currently analysing the responses to the consultation and intend to publish an Industrial Strategy white paper in late 2017.

12 Jul 2017, 10:02 a.m. Tidal Power: Swansea Bay Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which members of the Cabinet will be responsible for making a decision on the pathfinder tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Within the Cabinet, my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has responsibility for matters of energy policy.

11 Jul 2017, 2:30 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, in what year the Government expects to reach a total spend of three per cent of gross domestic product on research and development.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

Science, Research and Innovation will be at the heart of our Industrial Strategy and this Government has bold ambitions to significantly increase research and development and back industries of the future. The Government’s vision is to achieve R&D spending of 2.4% of GDP within ten years and 3% in the longer-term.

11 Jul 2017, 2:25 p.m. Research: Finance Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on encouraging total public and private sector spending of three per cent of gross domestic product on research and development.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

This Government has set out its vision to meet R&D investment of 2.4% of GDP within ten years and 3% in the longer-term. Going forward, this ambition will be an important part of our Industrial Strategy and will require a concerted cross-government approach.

We have already increased research and development investment by £4.7 billion over the period 2017-18 to 2020-21. This equates to an extra £2 billion per year by 2020-21 and is an increase of around 20% to total government R&D spending, more than any increase in any parliament since 1979.

The new Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF), announced in November 2016, will back priority technologies where the UK has the potential to turn research strengths into a global industrial and commercial lead. The first wave of ISCF investment will be spent across six key challenges over the next 4 years and a variety of underpinning investments, driving progress in areas in which will support the industrial strategy. The ISCF is a UK wide fund for researchers and businesses across the UK.

11 Jul 2017, 2:07 p.m. Productivity Rebecca Long Bailey

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government has made any recent revisions to the UK's Productivity Plan.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

The government continues to believe that raising productivity is the best route to driving growth and raising long run living standards, as set out in “Fixing the foundations: Creating a more prosperous nation” - a plan for productivity growth in the UK. The government has since taken further steps, including the establishment of a National Productivity Investment Fund targeted at the productivity-critical areas of transport, R&D, housing and digital communications. It is also making sure that young people have the skills that British businesses need through the reform of the technical education system and the introduction of T-levels.