Sadiq Khan

Labour - Former Member for Tooting

Sadiq Khan is not a member of any APPGs
1 Former APPG membership
Governance and Inclusive Leadership
Shadow Minister (London)
16th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice
8th Oct 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government)
5th Oct 2008 - 9th Jun 2009
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2007 - 5th Oct 2008
Public Accounts Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 4th Jun 2007


Division Voting information

Sadiq Khan has voted in 1724 divisions, and 17 times against the majority of their Party.

4 Mar 2010 - Chair (Terminology) - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Labour Aye votes vs 124 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 106 Noes - 221
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 93 Labour No votes vs 155 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 176
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 156 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 153
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Labour Aye votes vs 230 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 299
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 49 Labour Aye votes vs 227 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 298
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 194 Noes - 306
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 45 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 183 Noes - 308
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Labour Aye votes vs 215 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 336
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 62 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 286
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 314
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 233 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 149 Noes - 318
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 225 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 342
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 293
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 126 Labour Aye votes vs 184 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 418
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 132 Labour Aye votes vs 177 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 156 Labour Aye votes vs 157 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
17 Oct 2006 - Gambling Act 2005 (Amendment) - View Vote Context
Sadiq Khan voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 49 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 240
View All Sadiq Khan Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Chris Grayling (Conservative)
(83 debate interactions)
Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)
(50 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(341 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(188 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(81 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(23 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Sadiq Khan has not made any spoken contributions to legislative debate
View all Sadiq Khan's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Sadiq Khan

Sadiq Khan has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Sadiq Khan, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Sadiq Khan

Monday 16th June 2014

Sadiq Khan has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Sadiq Khan has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Sadiq Khan has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


744 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
34 Other Department Questions
24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the Answer of 1 March 2016 to Question 21634, when he plans to deposit in the Library information on the end of year budget surplus or deficit for each further education college in London in each financial year since 2010-11.

I apologise to the Rt Hon Member for the delay. The information will be deposited shortly with the most recent figures available included.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when he plans to answer Question 21634, tabled by the Right hon. Member for Tooting on 8 January 2016.

We will collate this information and deposit it in the Libraries of the House shortly.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many properties that have been bought and sold in (a) London and (b) each London borough in the last 10 years record no sale price on the Land Registry.

The relevant data requested is attached.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many properties in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each London Borough are registered with the Land Registry (i) in total and (ii) to off-shore companies.

The relevant data is attached.

8th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how much funding from the (a) European Regional Development Fund and (b) European Social Fund was spent in (i) London and (ii) each London borough in each year from 2010 to 2015.

The European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and European Social Fund (ESF) are administered in London by the Greater London Authority. Annual allocations are set out in the London ERDF Operational Programme 2007-2013 and London ESF Regional Framework 2011-2013 which can be found on the Greater London Authority’s website. The allocations could be spent up to the end of 2015. Allocations were not broken down for each London borough but a full list of projects funded by ERDF can be found also on the Greater London Authority’s website. A list of projects funded by ESF can be found under ESF funding for London on the Department for Work and Pensions website on gov.uk.

8th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that will be created as a result of funding from the European Structural and Investment Funds spent in London between 2016 and 2020.

Information on the number of jobs that will be created from the European Structural and Investment (ESI) Funds spent in London in the 2014-2020 programming period is set out in the ESI Funds strategy prepared by the London Enterprise Panel and other local partners which can be found on the London Enterprise Panel website.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many smart (a) electric and (b) gas meters have been installed in (i) London and (ii) each London borough since the smart meter programme started.

Data on the number of smart electricity and gas meters installed is set out in the Government’s ‘Smart Meters, Great Britain, Quarterly report to end September 2015’, published on 22 December 2015:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistical-release-and-data-smart-meters-great-britain-quarter-3-2015.

The roll-out is making good progress with more than 2 million meters now operating under the Programme.

Data is not collected from energy suppliers in a format that allows details of the number of smart meters installed in London or each London borough to be produced.

8th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the end of year budget surplus or deficit was for each further education college in London in each financial year since 2010-11.

We will collate this information and deposit it in the Libraries of the House shortly.

2nd Nov 2015
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many people on the electoral register on 7 May 2015 were (a) registered under individual electoral registration, (b) data matched and (c) carried over from the old register in each London borough.

The Electoral Commission holds data on how many register entries on 7 May 2015 related to electors who had either been confirmed, through data matching, or were individually registered, and the number that were being retained on the registers under the IER transitional arrangements. This data is set out below by local authority area in London.


Local authority

Confirmed or IER Registered

Retained

Local Government (incl. Attainers)

Barking and Dagenham

116,080

11,107

127,187

Barnet

232,443

16,587

249,030

Bexley

170,789

8,432

179,221

Brent

195,769

22,004

217,773

Bromley

235,233

6,889

242,122

Camden

147,719

10,070

157,789

City of London

6,514

428

6,942

Croydon

250,652

13,231

263,883

Ealing

239,332

6,929

246,261

Enfield

207,295

10,242

217,537

Greenwich

175,963

8,952

184,915

Hackney

147,700

43,774

191,474

Hammersmith and Fulham

124,392

6,660

131,052

Haringey

153,161

18,537

171,698

Harrow

167,110

13,490

180,600

Havering

182,833

5,378

188,211

Hillingdon

202,116

7,123

209,239

Hounslow

181,404

8,079

189,483

Islington

148,265

9,524

157,789

Kensington and Chelsea

86,285

17,660

103,945

Kingston upon Thames

116,425

1,689

118,114

Lambeth

214,529

25,297

239,826

Lewisham

181,801

16,187

197,988

Merton

146,741

6,233

152,974

Newham

186,965

18,896

205,861

Redbridge

192,949

25,486

218,435

Richmond upon Thames

138,025

1,336

139,361

Southwark

197,577

15,230

212,807

Sutton

139,529

8,141

147,670

Tower Hamlets

170,626

15,215

185,841

Waltham Forest

172,094

14,616

186,710

Wandsworth

228,354

13,347

241,701

Westminster

129,062

8,244

137,306


2nd Nov 2015
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many (a) EU and (b) Commonwealth citizens from which countries were registered in each London borough to vote by October 2015.

The Electoral Commission holds data on the the number of European Union (EU) citizens (including attainers) on the electoral registers in December 2014. These figures are collected annually by the Office of National Statistics for England and Wales. Data is not available on the number of registered Commonwealth citizens as the registers do not distinguish Commonwealth citizens as they are entitled to vote in all elections.

London borough

Number of registered EU citizens

Barking and Dagenham

11,552

Barnet

23,174

Bexley

5,148

Brent

30,107

Bromley

8,742

Camden

17,654

City of London

748

Croydon

15,731

Ealing

31,339

Enfield

16,803

Greenwich

15,217

Hackney

18,145

Hammersmith and Fulham

18,965

Haringey

21,020

Harrow

14,641

Havering

5,282

Hillingdon

12,935

Hounslow

21,089

Islington

16,334

Kensington and Chelsea

20,670

Kingston upon Thames

8,971

Lambeth

28,035

Lewisham

16,651

Merton

16,725

Newham

25,562

Redbridge

13,999

Richmond upon Thames

9,580

Southwark

20,368

Sutton

7,848

Tower Hamlets

19,910

Waltham Forest

22,269

Wandsworth

24,764

Westminster

19,565


23rd Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what the cost to the public purse was of the solar industry feed-in tariff in (a) the UK and (b) London in each year from 2010-11 to 2014-15.

The Feed-in-Tariff is not financed through the public purse. The cost of the Feed-in Tariff (FIT) scheme is paid for through a levy on consumer electricity bills and managed within the Levy Control Framework (LCF).


The table below shows total payments for all technologies under the FITs scheme as reported by Ofgem. Payments made under the FIT scheme are not available by technology, but the majority of deployment is solar photovoltaic. We do not hold this data by region.


2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

FIT Total Expenditure

£14,526,123

£151,147,686

£511,137,737

£690,991,283



Below you can find a link to Ofgem’s webpage of Annual Reports:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/feed-tariff-fit-scheme/feed-tariff-reports-and-statistics/annual-reports


Ofgem’s Annual Report reporting generation payments for 2014/15 will be released in the next few months.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many full time equivalent Electoral Commission employees are working on monitoring and enforcement of Part 2 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014.

The aim of the Commission is to regulate in a way that is effective, proportionate and fair, in line with the principles of good regulation. Wherever possible, the Commission will use advice and guidance to assist people to help them to comply with legislation but will monitor and take enforcement action where necessary.

In 2014-15, two full time equivalent Commission employees (based on average full time equivalent employees over the year) worked on enforcement and monitoring of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014 and the average full time equivalent budget for 2015-16 is 3.92 staff.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how much the Electoral Commission plans to spend in 2015-16 on enforcement and monitoring of Part 2 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014.

The aim of the Commission is to regulate in a way that is effective, proportionate and fair, in line with the principles of good regulation. Wherever possible, the Commission will use advice and guidance to assist people to help them to comply with legislation but will monitor and take enforcement action where necessary.

The Commission plans to spend £182,000 in 2015-16 on enforcement and monitoring of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how much the Electoral Commission spent in 2014-15 on enforcement and monitoring of Part 2 of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014.

The aim of the Commission is to regulate in a way that is effective, proportionate and fair, in line with the principles of good regulation. Wherever possible, the Commission will use advice and guidance to assist people to help them to comply with legislation but will monitor and take enforcement action where necessary.

The Commission spent £66,000 on enforcement and monitoring of the Transparency of Lobbying, Third Party Campaigning and Trade Union Act 2014 in the eleven months to the end of February 2015 and estimates that expenditure for the whole of 2014-15 will be £80,000.

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what information his Department holds on how many complaints were made against estate agents to the Property Ombudsman in London, and in each London borough, in each year since 2010; and how many such complaints were upheld in each year.

This Department does not hold information on the number of complaints made against estate agents to the Property Ombudsman. However, the Property Ombudsman Annual Report 2013 (http://www.tpos.co.uk/downloads/reports/TPO_Annual_Report_2013.pdf ) and the 2014 Interim Report (http://www.tpos.co.uk/downloads/reports/TPO-Interim-Report-2014.pdf ) set out the number of complaints received and resolved for Letting Agents and Estate Agents.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many Electoral Registration Officers failed to meet (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five or (f) more than five of the Electoral Commission's performance standards in each year since 2008.

The number of Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) who did not meet one, two, three, four, five or more than five of the Electoral Commission's performance standards in each year since 2008 is as follows:

One

Two

Three

Four

Five

More than five

Total

2008

88

66

66

36

23

18

297

2009

93

54

19

12

5

2

185

2010

39

13

4

2

2

0

60

2011

58

8

1

0

0

0

67

2012

32

0

0

0

0

0

32

2013

22

1

0

0

0

0

23

In 2013 the Commission introduced a new performance standards framework for EROs to support them in preparing for and delivering the transition to Individual Electoral Registration. In March 2014 we reported that no EROs failed to meet the first of these standards.

Pursuant to the answer given to the Hon. Member on 9 December 2014, UIN 216888. The total given for the number of Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) who did not meet one or more of the Commission’s performance standards was mistakenly given as 299. This figure incorrectly included two local authorities who, due to local government re-structuring, did not exist in their current form in 2008 so should not have been included in the figures. The table above provides the correct figures for this year.

2nd Dec 2014
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, on how many occasions Electoral Registration Officers did not meet the Electoral Commission performance standards; how many directions were issued by the Commission in response to such occasions; and on how many such directions Ministers have acted.

The number of Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) who did not meet one or more of the Commission’s performance standards in each year since their introduction in 2008 is as follows:

2008

299

2009

185

2010

60

2011

67

2012

32

2013

23

In 2013 the Commission introduced a new performance standards framework for EROs to support them in preparing for and delivering the transition to Individual Electoral Registration. In March 2014 we reported that no EROs failed to meet the first of these standards.

More detailed information on the performance of EROs in each year is available on the Commission’s website.

The Commission has not to date made any recommendations to the Secretary of State to issue a direction to individual EROs.

Where an ERO does not carry out their duties in full, the Commission’s priority is to take action to ensure that the ERO makes improvements to their performance in the discharge of their functions. In doing this, the Commission considers the full range of available options, taking into account the facts in each particular case. This could include making a recommendation to the Secretary of State to issue a direction to the ERO to require them to make improvements.

2nd Dec 2014
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when she plans to Answer Question 205841, tabled on 15 July 2014.

Due to a technical error, the answer to question 205841 was not processed, as had been believed. I apologise and can confirm to the Rt. Hon. Member that the question has now been answered.

16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many and what proportion of properties in each London borough sold in each year since 2010 were sold to foreign buyers.

The information requested has been placed in the Libraries of the House.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Ministers for Women and Equalities, how much the Government Equalities Office paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The table sets out the amounts paid to the companies in question by DCMS, which in the relevant years, included the Government Equalities Office (GEO). For prior years the Department does not hold this information. This will be recorded in the accounts of the Home Office, as the GEO used the expertise of the Home Office and Government Procurement Service.

2012-13

2013-14

Supplier

G4S

320.40

0.00

Capita Health Solutions

0.00

0.00

Capita Resourcing Ltd

2,859,479.69

4,312,004.26

Capita Learning & Development

16,816.15

40,584.36

Capita Bisiness Travel

94,356.64

0.00

Capita Symonds

66,375.60

0.00

Capita Business Services (interim)

0.00

74,679.50

Atos

5,958,713.10

4,707,570.47

Mitie Managed Services

0.00

0.00

Carillion Business Services Ltd

2,301,879.07

656,254.50

Carillion Business Services Ltd

892,106.50

0.00

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The Table below details expenditure incurred by the Department of Energy and Climate Change for each of the financial years 2010 to 2014 with the firms listed. We do not have any record of expenditure with the firms of (d) GEOAmey; (g) Mitie; (h) Working Links (i) A4E; (j) MTC Amey; (k) GEO Group.

2010-11 £(k)

2011-12 £(k)

2012-13 £(k)

2013-14 £(k)

(a) G4S

-

-

-

1

(b) Serco

24

2

18

5

(c) Sodexo

2

-

-

-

(e) Capita

128

18

7,348

7,626

(f) Atos

-

16

-

-

(l) Carillion

334,756

123,695

35,450

16,964

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Ministers for Women and Equalities, how much and what proportion of the Government Equalities Office's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of the Government Equalities Office's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

I refer the honourable Member for Tooting to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Minister for Sport and Tourism on given on 2nd September 2014 Official Report, col 201W . The figures for 2013-14 and 2014-15 for DCMS included figures for the Government Equalities Office (GEO). Within those totals, the figures for the GEO are:

Financial Year

Contracted-out expenditure
£000
Actuals

Proportion of contracted-out expenditure to Budget
Actuals*

2013/14

2,252

26%

Forecast

Forecast

2014/15

2,782

42%

* the percentage value is calculated against a proportion of the GEO budget which excludes grant payments and internal payment transfers between departments

For prior years the Department does not hold this information, as the GEO used the expertise of the Home Office and Government Procurement Service.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross representing the House of Commons Commission, how much and what proportion of the House of Commons Commission's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of the House of Commons Commission's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

There are around 800 third party suppliers of services to the House of Commons and given system changes in recent years it would involve disproportionate cost to derive precise figures of contract expenditure by financial year. It is estimated that expenditure has broadly been equivalent to:

Year

Amount (£m)

Proportion of spend (%)

2009/10

92.7

32.6

2010/11

87.4

47.4

2011/12

90.7

43.1

2012/13

89.0

40.9

2013/14

83.7

37.0

For 2014/15 the planned amount is around £100 million which represents 40.8% of the combined capital and resource budget.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change entered into a contract for the provision of transactional HR and finance services in November 2013 and incurred expenditure of £0.5m during 2013-14. This is equivalent to 0.01% of total departmental expenditure for the year. In previous years the equivalent services were provided to DECC by other government departments. Expenditure on these services in 2014-15 is forecast to be approximately £1.2m and to account for a similar proportion of total expenditure.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Chairman of the Public Accounts Commission, how much and what proportion of the National Audit Office's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of the National Audit Office's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The majority of the NAO's contracted work planned in 2014–15 is in financial audit, where additional audit resources are provided by some half-a-dozen private audit firms. The NAO's partners are chosen through a rigorous process, in line with EU rules on public sector procurement, to ensure value for money. Financial audit work comprises some 55% of the NAO's total activity and around 20% of the NAO's financial audit work is outsourced.

The use of private firms to carry out some audits is included in the NAO's Strategy, approved by the Public Accounts Commission. The current mix ensures that the NAO maintains the breadth of insight into departments which the C&AG derives on behalf of Parliament from having NAO staff undertake financial audits directly, but also has sufficient exposure to the framework partners so as to benchmark the NAO against the private sector and import best practice. The NAO also uses outsourcing arrangements in its value-for-money or investigations work where specialist skills are required.

% of NAO Activities contracted out

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

Estimate

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

Professional Services brought in (£ million)

17,553

13,678

13,238

11,940

10,409

10,100

Total Voted Gross Expenditure
(Audit and Assurance) (£ million)

94,600

92,600

87,700

89,000

84,600

83,000

% of activities contracted out

19%

15%

15%

13%

12%

12%


Total Voted Gross Expenditure (Audit and Assurance) excludes the following exceptional expenditure:

  • Restructuring of the NAO (£4.2m in 2013–14)
  • Refurbishment of the NAO building (£16.2 million in 2009–10)
  • Temporary accommodation costs (£5.9 million in 2009–10)
10th Jul 2014
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, how much and what proportion of the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority's (IPSA) budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of IPSA's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority. I have asked IPSA to reply.

Letter from Marcial Boo, July 2014:

As Chief Executive of the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking about contracted out services.

Contracted out expenditure has been interpreted as all third party expenditure and the data are set out in the below table.

Costs (£'000)

Actual

Forecast

Financial year

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

Costs

1650

3332

946

1406

1646

1709.535

IPSA's administrative budget

4448

10394

8364

7908

10152

10332

% of budget related to contracted out services

37%

32%

11%

18%

16%

17%

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

A comprehensive answer cannot be provided without incurring disproportionate cost as the Department does not maintain a single register of all contracted out services. However, the Department does routinely publish details of the ‘Outsourced Programme Managed Services' in its annual resource accounts. These are contracts the Department has placed to manage the delivery of programmes and work to support the Department's objectives.

The figures over the financial years in question along with the total programme expenditure for the core Department are as follows:

F/Yr OutsourcedService Costs Total Programme Expenditure

2013/14 £23.0m £23,566m

2012/13 £34.9m £21,077m

2011/12 £10.2m £22,373m

2010/11 £29.9m £25,734m

2009/10 £69.2m £24,610m

Note: the total programme expenditure reflects non-administration costs, including payment of grant-in-aid, grants and other disbursements in support of policy initiatives.

9th Jul 2014
To ask the right hon. Member for Banbury, representing the Church Commissioners, how much and what proportion of the Commissioners' budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The Church Commissioners, as one of the National Church Institutions (NCIs) alongside:

(a) The Archbishops' Council,

(b) The Church of England Pensions Board,

(c) The Archbishop of Canterbury (in his Corporate Capacity),

(d) The Archbishop of York (in his Corporate Capacity),

(e) Lambeth Palace Library,

(f) The National Society (Church of England) for Promoting Religious Education

jointly employ staff carrying out service functions that are often contracted out to external organisations – including Finance, Legal, HR, Communications, Records, IT & Office Services.

The figures shown below represent the cost (and associated proportion of the Church Commissioners' administration budget) of those wholly outsourced/contracted out activities that were not provided by the NCIs themselves.

£ million% of total
Actual20091.010%
Actual20100.55%
Actual20110.87%
Actual20121.210%
Actual20131.08%
Budget20141.07%

Also to note note:

(i) The Church Commissioners operate with a January-December financial year.

(ii) The figures do not include Investment Management fees – such costs of investing are treated as a direct deduction from investment income.

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what the electoral registration figures were in each ward in the recent confirmation dry run conducted in the London Borough of Wandsworth.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match.

Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls

The ward results for Wandsworth were as follows:

Ward

Green matches

Amber matches

Red matches

Balham

57.8%

9.2%

33.1%

Bedford

53.0%

13.1%

33.9%

Earlsfield

59.3%

6.6%

34.1%

East Putney

57.9%

6.2%

35.9%

Fairfield

54.2%

9.6%

36.2%

Furzedown

68.2%

6.7%

25.1%

Graveney

60.9%

7.2%

31.9%

Latchmere

65.6%

4.2%

30.1%

Nightingale

57.7%

10.0%

32.3%

Northcote

54.1%

13.3%

32.7%

Queenstown

58.0%

6.2%

35.8%

Roehampton & Putney Heath

63.5%

3.2%

33.3%

Shaftesbury

54.1%

12.3%

33.7%

Southfields

64.4%

5.7%

29.8%

St Mary's Park

58.5%

5.7%

35.8%

Thamesfield

58.8%

9.2%

31.9%

Tooting

59.0%

8.8%

32.2%

Wandsworth Common

64.3%

7.6%

28.1%

West Hill

67.7%

3.1%

29.3%

West Putney

69.4%

3.1%

27.5%

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many voters in (a) London, (b) each London borough and (c) each parliamentary constituency in London could not be matched as part of the recent confirmation dry run carried out by the Electoral Commission.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match. This work was carried out by the Cabinet Office and not directly by the Electoral Commission.

The red and amber results for London, each London borough and each parliamentary constituency in London were as follows:

LONDON

Red

Amber

London

1,523,114

280,337

LONDON BOROUGH

Red

Amber

Barking & Dagenham

26,127

2,430

Barnet

58,211

8,529

Bexley

30,494

2,168

Brent

58,460

12,198

Bromley

39,726

4,737

Camden

52,346

20,136

City of London

2,779

258

Croydon

57,129

8,005

Ealing

58,701

12,776

Enfield

40,801

6,474

Greenwich

40,056

4,769

Hackney

57,498

10,065

Hammersmith & Fulham

39,378

16,210

Haringey

53,621

15,010

Harrow

37,983

4,588

Havering

28,332

2,606

Hillingdon

45,437

4,366

Hounslow

45,995

6,085

Islington

51,188

12,795

Kensington and Chelsea

43,133

13,482

Kingston upon Thames

26,100

3,118

Lambeth

81,417

14,165

Lewisham

52,211

8,834

Merton

34,821

4,981

Newham

64,311

8,981

Redbridge

48,608

5,702

Richmond upon Thames

28,672

4,654

Southwark

67,234

9,160

Sutton

23,790

3,148

Tower Hamlets

53,028

8,225

Waltham Forest

46,129

7,389

Wandsworth

73,033

17,032

Westminster

56,365

17,261

LONDON PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCIES

Red

Amber

Barking

17,910

1,651

Battersea

26,831

6,751

Beckenham

10,868

1,041

Bermondsey and Old Southwark

33,169

3,549

Bethnal Green and Bow

27,095

4,655

Bexleyheath and Crayford

10,728

750

Brent Central

25,187

6,123

Brent North

23,399

3,410

Brentford and Isleworth

26,105

3,809

Bromley and Chislehurst

12,019

1,345

Camberwell and Peckham

27,167

4,040

Carshalton and Wallington

11,186

1,491

Chelsea and Fulham

26,701

8,467

Chingford and Woodford Green

12,736

1,379

Chipping Barnet

16,855

2,190

Cities of London and Westminster

33,759

7,674

Croydon Central

17,235

2,057

Croydon North

24,436

4,033

Croydon South

15,458

1,915

Dagenham and Rainham

12,564

1,195

Dulwich and West Norwood

23,880

4,861

Ealing Central and Acton

23,996

6,646

Ealing North

17,761

2,709

Ealing Southall

16,944

3,421

East Ham

32,053

4,476

Edmonton

13,762

2,233

Eltham

11,835

1,226

Enfield North

12,557

1,533

Enfield Southgate

14,482

2,708

Erith and Thamesmead

16,321

1,184

Feltham and Heston

19,890

2,276

Finchley and Golders Green

20,416

3,855

Greenwich and Woolwich

20,864

2,975

Hackney North and Stoke Newington

28,427

6,110

Hackney South and Shoreditch

29,071

3,955

Hammersmith

25,041

10,874

Hampstead and Kilburn

29,704

13,337

Harrow East

15,483

1,852

Harrow West

18,134

2,206

Hayes and Harlington

17,540

2,110

Hendon

20,940

2,484

Holborn and St Pancras

32,516

9,464

Hornchurch and Upminster

11,456

1,073

Hornsey and Wood Green

26,706

8,550

Ilford North

15,605

1,554

Ilford South

25,007

3,242

Islington North

25,295

7,491

Islington South and Finsbury

25,893

5,304

Kensington

30,769

10,351

Kingston and Surbiton

19,493

2,381

Lewisham Deptford

24,795

4,336

Lewisham East

16,939

2,741

Lewisham West and Penge

18,129

3,239

Leyton and Wanstead

20,763

3,727

Mitcham and Morden

16,823

2,280

Old Bexley and Sidcup

10,802

802

Orpington

9,187

869

Poplar and Limehouse

25,933

3,570

Putney

21,693

3,538

Richmond Park

18,456

3,023

Romford

12,529

1,117

Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner

13,858

1,443

Streatham

30,298

5,420

Sutton and Cheam

12,604

1,657

Tooting

24,509

6,743

Tottenham

26,915

6,460

Twickenham

16,823

2,368

Uxbridge and South Ruislip

18,405

1,343

Vauxhall

34,137

5,455

Walthamstow

20,626

3,189

West Ham

32,258

4,505

Westminster North

25,385

9,845

Wimbledon

17,998

2,701

Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what the electoral registration figures were in the recent confirmation dry run conducted in (a) each London borough and (b) each parliamentary constituency in London.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match.

Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls

The results for each London borough and each parliamentary constituency in London were as follows:

LONDON BOROUGH

Green matches

Amber matches

Red matches

Barking & Dagenham

77.5%

1.9%

20.6%

Barnet

72.8%

3.5%

23.7%

Bexley

81.7%

1.2%

17.1%

Brent

67.6%

5.6%

26.8%

Bromley

81.3%

2.0%

16.7%

Camden

52.2%

13.3%

34.5%

City of London

53.9%

3.9%

42.2%

Croydon

75.1%

3.1%

21.8%

Ealing

70.2%

5.3%

24.5%

Enfield

78.0%

3.0%

19.0%

Greenwich

74.3%

2.7%

23.0%

Hackney

60.8%

5.8%

33.3%

Hammersmith & Fulham

55.4%

13.0%

31.6%

Haringey

60.5%

8.6%

30.8%

Harrow

76.3%

2.6%

21.1%

Havering

83.4%

1.4%

15.2%

Hillingdon

75.9%

2.1%

22.0%

Hounslow

72.0%

3.3%

24.7%

Islington

58.9%

8.2%

32.9%

Kensington and Chelsea

46.9%

12.6%

40.4%

Kingston upon Thames

74.9%

2.7%

22.4%

Lambeth

57.0%

6.4%

36.6%

Lewisham

68.3%

4.6%

27.2%

Merton

73.2%

3.4%

23.5%

Newham

64.8%

4.3%

30.9%

Redbridge

73.8%

2.7%

23.4%

Richmond upon Thames

75.7%

3.4%

20.9%

Southwark

62.6%

4.5%

32.9%

Sutton

81.2%

2.2%

16.6%

Tower Hamlets

63.6%

4.9%

31.5%

Waltham Forest

71.0%

4.0%

25.0%

Wandsworth

60.3%

7.5%

32.2%

Westminster

48.2%

12.1%

39.7%

LONDON PARLIAMENTARY CONSTITUENCIES

Green matches

Amber matches

Red matches

Barking

76.4%

2.0%

21.6%

Battersea

57.5%

8.5%

34.0%

Beckenham

82.6%

1.5%

15.8%

Bermondsey and Old Southwark

59.6%

3.9%

36.5%

Bethnal Green and Bow

62.1%

5.6%

32.4%

Bexleyheath and Crayford

82.9%

1.1%

15.9%

Brent Central

65.7%

6.7%

27.6%

Brent North

71.9%

3.6%

24.6%

Brentford and Isleworth

68.4%

4.0%

27.5%

Bromley and Chislehurst

80.1%

2.0%

17.9%

Camberwell and Peckham

64.1%

4.7%

31.3%

Carshalton and Wallington

82.3%

2.1%

15.6%

Chelsea and Fulham

52.3%

11.5%

36.2%

Chingford and Woodford Green

79.5%

2.0%

18.5%

Chipping Barnet

76.8%

2.7%

20.6%

Cities of London and Westminster

44.3%

10.3%

45.4%

Croydon Central

76.5%

2.5%

21.0%

Croydon North

70.0%

4.3%

25.8%

Croydon South

79.5%

2.3%

18.2%

Dagenham and Rainham

81.5%

1.6%

16.9%

Dulwich and West Norwood

63.7%

6.1%

30.2%

Ealing Central and Acton

62.9%

8.0%

29.0%

Ealing North

76.0%

3.2%

20.8%

Ealing Southall

71.7%

4.8%

23.6%

East Ham

64.6%

4.3%

31.1%

Edmonton

77.7%

3.1%

19.2%

Eltham

80.2%

1.9%

18.0%

Enfield North

80.4%

2.1%

17.4%

Enfield Southgate

75.9%

3.8%

20.3%

Erith and Thamesmead

76.9%

1.6%

21.6%

Feltham and Heston

75.7%

2.5%

21.8%

Finchley and Golders Green

69.3%

4.9%

25.8%

Greenwich and Woolwich

68.5%

3.9%

27.5%

Hackney North and Stoke Newington

60.5%

7.0%

32.5%

Hackney South and Shoreditch

61.1%

4.7%

34.2%

Hammersmith

55.1%

13.6%

31.3%

Hampstead and Kilburn

51.9%

14.9%

33.2%

Harrow East

78.0%

2.4%

19.7%

Harrow West

73.4%

2.9%

23.8%

Hayes and Harlington

75.3%

2.7%

22.1%

Hendon

72.1%

3.0%

24.9%

Holborn and St Pancras

55.2%

10.1%

34.7%

Hornchurch and Upminster

84.7%

1.3%

14.0%

Hornsey and Wood Green

60.6%

9.6%

29.8%

Ilford North

77.9%

2.0%

20.1%

Ilford South

70.0%

3.4%

26.6%

Islington North

58.3%

9.5%

32.2%

Islington South and Finsbury

59.5%

6.9%

33.6%

Kensington

47.0%

13.3%

39.7%

Kingston and Surbiton

74.7%

2.7%

22.5%

Lewisham Deptford

62.9%

5.5%

31.6%

Lewisham East

72.3%

3.9%

23.8%

Lewisham West and Penge

71.7%

4.3%

24.0%

Leyton and Wanstead

67.0%

5.0%

28.0%

Mitcham and Morden

75.0%

3.0%

22.0%

Old Bexley and Sidcup

83.0%

1.2%

15.8%

Orpington

85.4%

1.3%

13.3%

Poplar and Limehouse

65.1%

4.2%

30.6%

Putney

63.6%

5.1%

31.3%

Richmond Park

74.1%

3.6%

22.3%

Romford

81.8%

1.5%

16.7%

Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner

79.9%

1.9%

18.2%

Streatham

57.6%

6.4%

36.0%

Sutton and Cheam

80.2%

2.3%

17.5%

Tooting

60.3%

8.6%

31.2%

Tottenham

60.4%

7.7%

31.9%

Twickenham

77.1%

2.8%

20.1%

Uxbridge and South Ruislip

74.1%

1.8%

24.2%

Vauxhall

53.8%

6.4%

39.8%

Walthamstow

69.1%

4.1%

26.8%

West Ham

65.0%

4.3%

30.7%

Westminster North

52.6%

13.3%

34.2%

Wimbledon

71.2%

3.8%

25.0%

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many prisoners reached (a) Key Stage 1, (b) Key Stage 2 and (c) Key Stage 3 qualifications in (i) English and (ii) mathematics whilst in prison in each of the last five years.

We do not centrally hold information on prior attainment.

Work is under way to introduce, this summer, mandatory education assessment by the Offenders' Learning and Skills Service (OLASS) provider for all newly-received prisoners. This will ensure that all offenders, not just those that go on to learning, receive a learning assessment (focused around English and maths, but also covering learning difficulties and disabilities).

Table 1 shows Offender Learner English and Maths Achievements for the 2012/13 academic year. The data are broken down by Level rather than Key Stage as this is the appropriate measure for further education qualifications.

Table 1: Offender Learners - English and Maths Achievements by level, 2012/13

Level

English

Maths

Entry level

5,100

5,250

Level 1

3,550

4,020

Level 2

1,280

1,930

Total

9,300

10,100

Notes

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record.

2) Volumes are rounded to the nearest ten except for the Grand Totals which are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3) Learners undertaking courses at more than one level will be counted once for each applicable level, but once only in the Total.

4) Offender learners are defined as offenders aged 18 or over that participated in Skills Funding Agency funded learning while in the prison system. These offenders were funded via the Offenders' Learning and Skills Service (OLASS) budget.

Information on Offender Learner English and maths achievements by level for 2010/11 and 2011/12 is published as a Supplementary Table to a Statistical First Release. Data for earlier years are not available on a comparable basis.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/284253/January2013_OLASS_Participation_Achievement.xls

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-further-education-and-skills

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many prisoners did not have (a) Key Stage 1, (b) Key Stage 2 and (c) Key Stage 3 qualifications in (i) English and (ii) mathematics when they entered prison in each of the last five years.

We do not centrally hold information on prior attainment.

Work is under way to introduce, this summer, mandatory education assessment by the Offenders' Learning and Skills Service (OLASS) provider for all newly-received prisoners. This will ensure that all offenders, not just those that go on to learning, receive a learning assessment (focused around English and maths, but also covering learning difficulties and disabilities).

Table 1 shows Offender Learner English and Maths Achievements for the 2012/13 academic year. The data are broken down by Level rather than Key Stage as this is the appropriate measure for further education qualifications.

Table 1: Offender Learners - English and Maths Achievements by level, 2012/13

Level

English

Maths

Entry level

5,100

5,250

Level 1

3,550

4,020

Level 2

1,280

1,930

Total

9,300

10,100

Notes

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record.

2) Volumes are rounded to the nearest ten except for the Grand Totals which are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3) Learners undertaking courses at more than one level will be counted once for each applicable level, but once only in the Total.

4) Offender learners are defined as offenders aged 18 or over that participated in Skills Funding Agency funded learning while in the prison system. These offenders were funded via the Offenders' Learning and Skills Service (OLASS) budget.

Information on Offender Learner English and maths achievements by level for 2010/11 and 2011/12 is published as a Supplementary Table to a Statistical First Release. Data for earlier years are not available on a comparable basis.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/284253/January2013_OLASS_Participation_Achievement.xls

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-further-education-and-skills

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Attorney General, how much and what proportion of the Law Officers' Departments' budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of the Law Officers' Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

Tables showing the information requested for the Crown Prosecution Service and the Serious Fraud Office have been placed in the Library of the House.

The remaining Law Officers’ Departments are unable to provide any reliable estimates of the amount spent annually on contracted out services since 2009-10 without incurring a disproportionate cost.

6th Jun 2014
To ask the Attorney General, for how many acts of violence in prisons the Crown Prosecution Service decided to (a) bring or (b) not bring a prosecution for each type of offence in each of the last four years.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of cases where the CPS has been asked to make a charging decision and the decision made, either to charge or to take no further action. No record is held as to where an alleged offence was said to have taken place. To obtain details of alleged acts of violence in prisons referred to the CPS for a charging decision would require a manual exercise of reviewing individual case files to be undertaken at a disproportionate cost.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) men and (b) women took their own life in each London borough in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many recorded suicides there were by (a) men under 18, (b) men aged 18 to 30, (c) men aged over 30, (d) women under 18, (e) women aged 18 to 30 and (f) women aged over 30 in each London borough in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many recorded suicides there were by (a) men of black and minority ethnic background and (b) women of black and minority ethnic background in each London borough in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the five most common causes of death of children were in (a) England and Wales and (b) each London borough in (i) 2014, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2005 and (iv) 2000.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many children in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each London borough died from asthma in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

5th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average life expectancy was for (a) the total population, (b) women, (c) men in (i) the UK and (ii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much No. 10 Downing Street paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The Prime Minister's Office and the Deputy Prime Minister's Office are an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

As part of my department's transparency programme, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department's website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Deputy Prime Minister's Office paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The Prime Minister's Office and the Deputy Prime Minister's Office are an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

As part of my department's transparency programme, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department's website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much and what proportion of No. 10 Downing Street's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of No. 10 Downing Street's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

My Department outsources with Bouygues, Fujitsu (contracts signed under the previous administration), with the mutual joint venture MyCSP (signed in 2012) and Shared Services Connected Limited (signed in 2013).

As breakdown by year is

9/10 £10,370,213

10/11 £12,567,173

11/12 £18,417,184

12/13 £54,189

13/14 £832,189

Departmental resource and capital budgets are published online.

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much and what proportion of (a) his Department's budget and (b) the budget of the Office of the Deputy Prime Minster was spent for activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

My Department outsources with Bouygues, Fujitsu (contracts signed under the previous administration), with the mutual joint venture MyCSP (signed in 2012) and Shared Services Connected Limited (signed in 2013).

As breakdown by year is

9/10 £10,370,213

10/11 £12,567,173

11/12 £18,417,184

12/13 £54,189

13/14 £832,189

Departmental resource and capital budgets are published online.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

Supplier

G4S

0.00

0.00

320.40

0.00

Capita Health Solutions

253.51

80.78

0.00

0.00

Capita Resourcing Ltd

0.00

116,214.73

2,859,479.69

4,312,004.26

Capita Learning & Development

0.00

0.00

16,816.15

40,584.36

Capita Bisiness Travel

40,650.77

80,513.95

94,356.64

0.00

Capita Symonds

0.00

0.00

66,375.60

0.00

Capita Business Services (interim)

0.00

0.00

0.00

74,679.50

Atos

4,154,276.48

4,487,340.49

5,958,713.10

4,707,570.47

Mitie Managed Services

242,840.51

0.00

0.00

0.00

Carillion Business Services Ltd

121,567.48

1,100,852.66

2,301,879.07

656,254.50

Carillion Business Services Ltd

848,636.47

282,432.48

892,106.50

0.00

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The proportion of the Department’s budget spent on contracted-out activities is as follows – Financial Year Contracted-out expenditure £000 Actuals Proportion of contracted-out expenditure to Budget Actuals 2009/10 26,218 48% 2010/11 24,165 46% 2011/12 24,774 40% 2012/13 20,493 28% 2013/14 22,428 40% Forecast Forecast 2014/15 23,000 50% Figures for 2013-14 and 2014-15 include the Government Equalities Office.
26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school-aged children in each London borough attended a maintained school outside their borough of residency on 1 January of each year from 2010 to 2016.

The number of pupils in each London borough attending a school outside their borough of residency can be found in the cross border movement tables which can be found as part of the ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics’ statistics[1]. Data for 2016 has not been collected yet but is expected to be available in June 2016.

[1] 2015 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2015 - click on ‘Cross-border movement Local Authority Tables’

2014 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2014 - click on ‘Cross-border movement Local Authority Tables’

2013 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2013 - click on ‘Cross-border movement Local Authority Tables’

2012 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2012 - click on ‘Additional Tables 1’

2011 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2011 - click on ‘Additional Tables 1’

2010 data can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2010 - click on ‘Additional Tables 3’

26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average distance between home and school was for school-aged children in (a) London and (b) each London borough on 1 January in each year from 2010 to 2016.

Information in the form requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many childcare places there were in each London borough on 1 January of each year from 2010 to 2016.

Local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and make this report available and accessible to parents. The Department does not hold borough level estimates centrally.

The Department for Education’s Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey[1] collects data on all registered childcare places, including those in maintained schools and nurseries. However, data is only available at a national and regional level.


[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-providers-survey-2013

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the (a) surplus and (b) shortfall in childcare places in each London borough on 1 January of each year from 2010 to 2016.

Local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and make this report available and accessible to parents. The Department does not hold borough level estimates centrally.

The Department for Education’s Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey[1] collects data on all registered childcare places, including those in maintained schools and nurseries. However, data is only available at a national and regional level.


[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-providers-survey-2013

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average (a) monthly and (b) annual cost of childcare per household was in (i) England and Wales, (ii) London and (iii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

The Government uses a range of information from a number of difference sources to consider the affordability of childcare including:

We are committed to supporting hard-working parents with the costs of childcare and to make it more affordable. That is why we will be investing an extra £1billion per annum by 2019-20 to help hardworking families with the cost of childcare.

We are already funding 15 hours a week of free early education for all three- and four-year-olds and for disadvantaged two-year-olds – this saves families around £2,500 per child per year. Through our Childcare Bill we are making plans to fund and deliver an additional 15 hours of free childcare for the working parents of three- and four-year olds from September 2017 (with early implementation in some areas from September 2016) – worth around another £2,500 per child per year. We also continue to invest in the Early Years Pupil Premium.

We are also introducing Tax-Free Childcare from early 2017, under which around 2 million families could benefit by up to £2,000 per child per year or £4,000 per child per year if a child is disabled.

For working parents on low and middle incomes, working tax credit pays up to 70% of their childcare costs and this will increase to 85% under Universal Credit from April 2016. This support will be available, for the first time, to those working fewer than 16 hours per week.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school pupils were eligible for free school meals in each London borough in December 2015.

The department does not hold data for the number of pupils eligible for free school meals specifically in December 2015. The latest published figures, drawn from the January 2015 school census and broken down by local authority, are available in tables 8a, 8b and 8c of the ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics: January 2015’ statistics.[1]

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2015 - refer to the local authority tables.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on how many occasions (a) knives, (b) guns and (c) other offensive weapons were found in schools and colleges in each London borough in (i) 2010 and (ii) the most recent year for which figures are available.

The Department does not hold information on the number of occasions knives, guns or other offensive weapons have been found in schools and colleges.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school pupils were eligible for free school meals in each London borough in June (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013 and (e) 2014; and in the most recent months in 2015 for which figures are available.

Information on the number of pupils eligible for and claiming free schools meals in each local authority in London for January 2010 to 2015 is published in the “Statistics: schools and pupil numbers” series[1]. This is based on the January School census.

A collated version of this information has been provided in the attached Excel spreadsheet.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-and-pupil-numbers

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The table below lists the amounts paid to the suppliers as recorded in the Department for Education’s finance systems:

Organisation

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

Totals

£

£

£

£

£

G4S

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

G4S FIRE & SECURITY SYSTEMS

0.00

0.00

0.00

12,458.31

12,458.31

SERCO

22,708,767.65

1,866,032.89

3,947,420.89

2,215,156.65

30,737,378.08

SODEXO

6,787.41

217.50

2,147,460.65

2,240,588.92

4,395,054.48

GEOAmey

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

AMEY

70.38

0.00

0.00

151,126.73

151,197.11

CAPITA

741,581,058.23

376,783,648.98

116,807,524.23

82,368,692.26

1,317,540,923.70

ATOS CONSULTING LTD

194,862.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

194,862.00

MITIE

4,563,022.84

3,574,876.83

704,330.19

5,329.44

8,847,559.30

WORKING LINKS

0.00

16,280.00

0.00

0.00

16,280.00

A4E LTD

2,269,275.08

1,509,218.60

1,657,892.66

1,436,479.29

6,872,865.63

MTC Amey

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

GEO Group

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

CARILLION

124,275.35

56,359.00

- 43,612.00

156,484.00

293,506.35

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The Department for Education does not hold this information centrally.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, at which locations in London air pollution levels in 2014 exceeded the EU limit on (a) NO2, (b) Ozone, (c) PM10 particles and (d) PM2.5 particles.

9 of the 17 Defra Air Quality monitoring sites in London measured an exceedance of EU limits for NO2 in London during 2014: Camden Kerbside, Haringey Roadside, London Bloomsbury, London Hillingdon, London Marylebone Road, London Westminster, Southwark A2 Old Kent Road and Tower Hamlets Roadside. In addition to the measured exceedances, there were also a number of modelled exceedances of the EU limit for NO2 in London in 2014.


None of the 17 Defra Air Quality monitoring sites in London exceeded the EU Target Value for Ozone (O3), but 5 of the 17 measured an exceedance of the EU long term objective during 2014: London Haringey, Priory Park South, London Hillingdon, London North Kensington, London Teddington. In addition to the measured exceedances, there were also modelled exceedances of the EU long term objective for O3 in London in 2014.


The exact locations of the monitoring sites may be found here: http://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/networks/find-sites


There were no exceedances of EU limits for PM10 particles or PM2.5 particles in London in 2014.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much has been budgeted for compensation payments to residential and business properties affected by the construction of the Thames Tideway Tunnel.

Compensation payments for owners of residential or business properties which are acquired pursuant to the development consent order for the Thames Tideway Tunnel (TTT) are a matter for either Thames Water Utilities Limited or Bazalgette Tunnel Limited (trading as Tideway and being the licensed infrastructure provider that will finance, own, build and operate the tunnel). Provision for such compensation payments is included in the overall budget for the construction of the TTT. In the case of Thames Water Utilities Limited, these costs are included within their price control for the period 2015-2020 as determined by Ofwat. In the case of Bazalgette Tunnel Limited, the cost is within the overall budget included within the project licence granted to Tideway by Ofwat. The amount set aside for these compensation payments are commercially sensitive so cannot be disclosed.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what projection her Department has made of use of the Thames Barrier in each of the next five years.

The Thames Barrier will be required to close more frequently due to sea level rise but it is projected to protect London from tidal flooding to its designed standard until 2070.


The Environment Agency monitors a number of indicators to ensure that this projection remains valid but does not develop projections of the number of closures on a year on year basis.

14th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on how many occasions the Thames Barrier has been used in each of the last 30 years.

The following table shows the number of Thames Barrier closures in each flood season since its opening in 1982. A “flood season” is defined as the time period from September to April.




Year

Combined Tidal/Fluvial

Tidal

Grand Total

1982 - 1983

0

1

1

1983 - 1984

0

0

0

1984 - 1985

0

0

0

1985 - 1986

1

0

1

1986 - 1987

0

1

1

1987 - 1988

0

0

0

1988 - 1989

0

1

1

1989 - 1990

3

1

4

1990 - 1991

0

2

2

1991 - 1992

0

0

0

1992 - 1993

0

4

4

1993 - 1994

4

3

7

1994 - 1995

2

2

4

1995 - 1996

0

4

4

1996 - 1997

0

1

1

1997 - 1998

0

1

1

1998 - 1999

0

2

2

1999 - 2000

3

3

6

2000 - 2001

8

16

24

2001 - 2002

1

3

4

2002 - 2003

12

8

20

2003 - 2004

0

1

1

2004 - 2005

0

4

4

2005 - 2006

0

3

3

2006 - 2007

0

8

8

2007 - 2008

0

6

6

2008 - 2009

4

1

5

2009 - 2010

3

2

5

2010 - 2011

0

0

0

2011 - 2012

0

0

0

2012 - 2013

5

0

5

2013 - 2014

41

9

50

2014 - 2015

0

1

1

Grand Total

87

88

175

26th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which places in London have air pollution levels that exceeded the EU limit on (a) NO2, (b) Ozone, (c) PM10 particles and (d) PM 2.5 particles in each year since 2010.

Data for 2014 will be submitted to the European Commission in September 2015, as part of the annual reporting cycle. The information below covers 2010-2013.

(a) NO2

In 2010 and 2011 the NO2 annual mean limit value was exceeded in all London boroughs.

In 2012 the NO2 annual mean limit value was met in the London Borough of Sutton and exceeded in all other boroughs.

In 2013 the NO2 annual mean limit value was met in the two London boroughs of Sutton and Bromley Council and exceeded in all other boroughs.

(b) Ozone

The ozone target value was met across London from 2010 to 2013 inclusive, while the long term ozone objective has not been met.

(c) PM10

In 2010, the PM10 24-hour mean limit value was met in 30 London boroughs and exceeded in 3 boroughs: Westminster, Tower Hamlets and Camden.

In 2011, the PM10 24-hour mean limit value was met in 14 London boroughs and exceeded in 19 boroughs: Lambeth, Hounslow, Southwark, Greenwich, Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Ealing, Tower Hamlets, Newham, City of London, Camden, Hackney, Brent, Barking & Dagenham, Redbridge, Barnet, Waltham Forest, and Enfield.

In 2012 and 2013, the PM10 24-hour mean limit value was met in all London boroughs.

(d) PM2.5

In 2010, the PM2.5 limit value was met in 21 London boroughs and exceeded in 12 boroughs: Southwark, Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Ealing, Tower Hamlets, Newham, City of London, Camden, Hackney, Brent, and Waltham Forest.

In 2011, the PM2.5 limit value was met in eight London boroughs and exceeded in 25 boroughs: the 12 above plus Lambeth, Bexley, Hounslow, Wandsworth, Greenwich, Hillingdon, Havering, Islington, Barking & Dagenham, Redbridge, Barnet, Haringey, and Enfield.

In 2012, the PM2.5 limit value was met in 20 London boroughs and exceeded in 13 boroughs: Lambeth, Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Ealing, Tower Hamlets, Newham, City of London, Camden, Hackney, Brent, Barking & Dagenham, and Redbridge.

In 2013, the PM2.5 limit value was met in 26 London boroughs and exceeded in 7 boroughs: Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Ealing, Tower Hamlets, Camden and Brent.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what reviews are being conducted into the Thames Barrier or Thames flood defences.

In response to increasing pressures, such as climate change, the Environment Agency produced the Thames Estuary 2100 Plan. This identifies options and recommendations for managing flood risk across the estuary up to the end of the century, and includes possible monitoring, maintenance, modifications and improvements to the Thames Barrier and associated flood defences. This could also include the construction of a new Thames Barrier at Long Reach, Dartford, by 2070.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many times the Thames Barrier has been closed in each year since 2010.

The table below lists the number of times the Thames Barrier has been closed in each year since 2010.

Year

Number of closures

2010

5

2011

0

2012

3

2013

4

2014

48

2015

0

The figure for 2015 is for the period 01/01/15 to 23/02/15.

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The table below sets out details of payments made by the core Department.

Organisation

2010-11

(£)

2011-12

(£)

2012-13

(£)

2013-14

(£)

(b) Serco

785,314

586,352

607,033

567,478

(e) Capita

414,721

25,327

333,250

819,394

(f) Atos

1,503,292

10,255

-

-

No payments were made to the other organisations listed.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

This information is not held by the Department and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much her Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

The table below details the amounts paid by DFID to the suppliers listed above, over the periods specified.

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

£

£

£

£

G4S

509,960

711,440

595,279

755,681

Serco

1,765

Nil

Nil

Nil

Capita

4,208,938

3,397,155

2,305,454

1,415,700

Atos

6,315,202

11,141,720

16,399,297

19,381,683

Mitie

1,026,152

2,448,793

2,838,096

4,256,290

GEO Group

963

Nil

Nil

Nil

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much and what proportion of her Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of her Department's budget she expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

Under this Government's transparency programme, contracts and future contract pipeline information is published on Contracts Finder which is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder

In regards to the proportion of my Departments contracted spends to overall budget, full copies of the annual accounts are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?keywords=annual+accounts&publication_filter_option=corporate-reports&topics%5B%5D=all&departments%5B%5D=department-for-international-development&official_document_status=all&world_locations%5B%5D=all&from_date=&to_date=&commit=Refresh+results



6th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much aid funding the UK has disbursed to support the construction of prisons in each country and in each year since 2008.

The information necessary to provide a detailed response to your request is not held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost. The information is spread across DFID and other government departments, and the data is not sufficiently disaggregated to report purely on the amount spent on construction of prisons.

30th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many assaults there were on staff working for (a) London Underground, (b) London Overground, (c) London buses, (d) Docklands Light Railway and (e) Tramlink in each hour of the day in 2014.

The Department for Transport does not collect this information.


However, I am able to say that the British Transport Police will shortly be launching Project Servator, which aims to detect and deter crime on the railways. It deploys highly visible and unpredictable police patrols to prevent a range of criminal activity, from pickpocketing and theft to more serious crimes including terrorism.

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many assaults there have been on staff working for (a) London Underground, (b) London Overground, (c) London buses, (d) Docklands Light Railway and (e) Tramlink in each year between 2010 and 2014.

The Department for Transport does not collect this information.


However, I am able to say that the British Transport Police will shortly be launching Project Servator, which aims to detect and deter crime on the railways. It deploys highly visible and unpredictable police patrols to prevent a range of criminal activity, from pickpocketing and theft to more serious crimes including terrorism.

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many assaults there have been on staff working for (a) London Underground, (b) London Overground, (c) London buses, (d) Docklands Light Railway and (e) Tramlink in October of each year between 2010 and 2015.

The Department for Transport does not collect this information.


However, I am able to say that the British Transport Police will shortly be launching Project Servator, which aims to detect and deter crime on the railways. It deploys highly visible and unpredictable police patrols to prevent a range of criminal activity, from pickpocketing and theft to more serious crimes including terrorism.

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many British Transport Police officers were working night shifts in London on each day of September 2015.

The table below sets out the number of British Transport Police (BTP) officers working in Greater London (all London boroughs) on 1 October in each year between 2010 and 2015:


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

1,715

1,638

1,643

1,608

1,592

1,732


The table below sets out the number of officers in Greater London (all London boroughs) which were contracted to work night shifts as at 1 October in each year between 2010 and 2015:


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

46

49

53

55

52

57


All BTP officers could potentially be rostered on to night shifts if necessary.


The table below sets out the number of BTP officers that were working night shifts in Greater London (all London Boroughs) on each day of September 2015:



01 September 2015

49

02 September 2015

62

03 September 2015

64

04 September 2015

61

05 September 2015

62

06 September 2015

59

07 September 2015

62

08 September 2015

61

09 September 2015

59

10 September 2015

57

11 September 2015

60

12 September 2015

61

13 September 2015

61

14 September 2015

57

15 September 2015

50

16 September 2015

60

17 September 2015

59

18 September 2015

59

19 September 2015

58

20 September 2015

57

21 September 2015

58

22 September 2015

57

23 September 2015

61

24 September 2015

62

25 September 2015

63

26 September 2015

60

27 September 2015

61

28 September 2015

58

29 September 2015

61

30 September 2015

55


It is important to note that the number of officers contracted and due to work night shifts would have increased if the night tube had not been deferred.

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many British Transport Police officers in London were contracted to work night shifts as at 1 October (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013, (e) 2014 and (f) 2015.

The table below sets out the number of British Transport Police (BTP) officers working in Greater London (all London boroughs) on 1 October in each year between 2010 and 2015:


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

1,715

1,638

1,643

1,608

1,592

1,732


The table below sets out the number of officers in Greater London (all London boroughs) which were contracted to work night shifts as at 1 October in each year between 2010 and 2015:


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

46

49

53

55

52

57


All BTP officers could potentially be rostered on to night shifts if necessary.


The table below sets out the number of BTP officers that were working night shifts in Greater London (all London Boroughs) on each day of September 2015:



01 September 2015

49

02 September 2015

62

03 September 2015

64

04 September 2015

61

05 September 2015

62

06 September 2015

59

07 September 2015

62

08 September 2015

61

09 September 2015

59

10 September 2015

57

11 September 2015

60

12 September 2015

61

13 September 2015

61

14 September 2015

57

15 September 2015

50

16 September 2015

60

17 September 2015

59

18 September 2015

59

19 September 2015

58

20 September 2015

57

21 September 2015

58

22 September 2015

57

23 September 2015

61

24 September 2015

62

25 September 2015

63

26 September 2015

60

27 September 2015

61

28 September 2015

58

29 September 2015

61

30 September 2015

55


It is important to note that the number of officers contracted and due to work night shifts would have increased if the night tube had not been deferred.

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many incidents of (a) burglary, (b) criminal damage, (c) drugs, (d) fraud or forgery, (e) robbery, (f) sexual offences, (g) theft and handling, (h) violence against the person and (i) serious public disorder there were on (i) London Underground, (ii) London Overground, (iii) London buses, (iv) London tramlink and (v) the Docklands Light Railway in each year between 2008 and 2014.

Transport for London (TfL) publish information of recorded crimes on the TfL network in annual bulletins on a financial year basis. This information can be found on their website: https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/publications-and-reports/crime-and-incident-bulletins

The number of incidents of the various crimes are in the attached table. TfL do not separate incidents that occur on London Underground and the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) so these are combined.

20th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which organisation holds the franchise for each London bus route.

Transport in London is devolved to the Mayor of London. London’s bus network is regulated by Transport for London (TfL) which plans, procures and manages the network of services in a consistent and coordinated manner. Bus operating companies compete for contracts to provide specified levels of service for up to seven years, with companies penalised or rewarded depending if they meet, exceed or fall short of quality targets. TfL pays the bus operating companies to run the routes they are awarded, with all fares collected being retained by TfL. There are currently 22 companies which run one or more routes in London. A list of these companies is below;

1. Abellio London Limited

2. Abellio West London Limited

3. Arriva (Kent Thameside) Limited

4. Arriva (The Shires) Limited

5. Arriva London North Limited

6. Arriva London South Limited

7. Blue Triangle Buses Limited

8. Ct Plus Community Interest Company

9. Docklands Buses Limited

10. East London Bus & Coach Company Limited

11. Hr Richmond Limited

12. London Central Bus Company Limited

13. London General Transport Services Ltd

14. London Sovereign Limited

15. London United Busways Limited

16. Metrobus Limited

17. Metroline Travel Limited

18. Metroline West Limited

19. South East London & Kent Bus Company Ltd

20. Sullivan Bus & Coach Limited

21. Tgm Group Limited

22. Tower Transit Operations Ltd

20th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times national rail stations were closed because of overcrowding in each year since 2010.

The Department does not hold this information, as this is an operational matter for Network Rail and/or the relevant station operators.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of the department’s transparency programme, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department’s website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The amount and proportion of the Department's budget spent on contracted out activities is given in the table below.

Year

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

Amount

£20m

£17m

£11m

£15m

£24m

£22m

Proportion of total DEL budget

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.2%

0.2%

25th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with identified mental health needs have been (a) on the Work Programme and (b) helped into employment by that programme in each year since it began in (i) the UK and (ii) London.

The information requested is not available.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential for the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived to assist efforts to help homeless EEA nationals in the UK.

The UK allocation from the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD) is €3.96m for the 2014-20 period and will be used to expand breakfast club provision in deprived areas in England. The Department for Education received interim funding of €541,216 in advance of the scheme commencing. Officials are currently exploring options for the best way for the scheme to be administered.

Since FEAD was created from within structural funds allocations and has some similarities to ESF, DWP Ministers took the initial decisions on our negotiation position on the size of the UK allocation and on the use of the funds. Responsibility for implementing the Fund now sits with DfE, and we have agreed this response with them. We will discuss with officials there whether all correspondence, PQs and so on, should now be their responsibility, or whether we retain a policy lead.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much the Government has received from the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived in each of the last two years.

The UK allocation from the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD) is €3.96m for the 2014-20 period and will be used to expand breakfast club provision in deprived areas in England. The Department for Education received interim funding of €541,216 in advance of the scheme commencing. Officials are currently exploring options for the best way for the scheme to be administered.

Since FEAD was created from within structural funds allocations and has some similarities to ESF, DWP Ministers took the initial decisions on our negotiation position on the size of the UK allocation and on the use of the funds. Responsibility for implementing the Fund now sits with DfE, and we have agreed this response with them. We will discuss with officials there whether all correspondence, PQs and so on, should now be their responsibility, or whether we retain a policy lead.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of children living in households in Tooting constituency likely to be affected by a reduction in the benefit cap to £23,000.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20th July. A link to the impact assessment on the www.parliament.uk website is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people living in Tooting constituency who are likely to move home because of a reduction in the benefit cap to £23,000.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20th July. A link to the impact assessment on the www.parliament.uk website is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of children living in households in London likely to be affected by a reduction in the benefit cap to £23,000.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20th July. A link to the impact assessment on the www.parliament.uk website is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of how many people in Tooting constituency have moved home as a result of the implementation of the benefit cap.

The information is not available.

17th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been affected by the benefit cap in the London Borough of Wandsworth since April 2013.

Data on the number of households capped since April 2013 by geographical breakdown can be found in Stat-Xplore, the Department’s online interactive tabulation tool, which can be accessed here:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

17th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have been affected by the benefit cap in Greater London since April 2013.

Data on the number of households capped since April 2013 by geographical breakdown can be found in Stat-Xplore, the Department’s online interactive tabulation tool, which can be accessed here:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

17th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Tooting constituency have been affected by the benefit cap.

Data on the number of households capped since April 2013 by geographical breakdown can be found in Stat-Xplore, the Department’s online interactive tabulation tool, which can be accessed here:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people in London, and in each London borough, who do not have a bank account.

The information is not available in the format requested. Benefit and Pension recipients who do not have a bank account are paid by Simple Payment.

As of 15th January 2015, there were 44,528 benefit recipients and pensioners in Great Britain being paid by Simple Payment.

16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much in housing benefit has been paid to private sector landlords in London in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the table below.

Housing Benefit expenditure in the private rented sector in Greater London

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

£ million, nominal

2,496

2,686

2,631

£ million, 2014/15 prices

2,686

2,826

2,738

Source: Local Authority statistical data and subsidy returns

Notes:

1. Benefit expenditure is available for financial years only.

2. The last period for which a full year of expenditure is available is 2012/13. Figures for 2013/14 will be published later in the year.

3. Figures at 2014/15 prices are deflated using GDP deflators published following the 2014 Budget, and published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/299805/GDP_Deflators_Qtrly_National_Accounts_March_2014_update.xls

4. Expenditure data shown here for 2012/13 may differ slightly from published expenditure information due to more up to date local authority data received after the data had been published.

5. Prior to April 2011, a tenant in the private sector claiming Housing Benefit subject to Local Housing Allowance (LHA) restrictions could receive up to £15 excess if their rent was below the applicable LHA rate for the given area and property size entitlement. This entitlement was removed from April 2011 for new claims to Housing Benefit. Existing HB claimants in receipt of the excess had this entitlement removed on the anniversary of their claim after April 2011. The expenditure figures shown above include payments relating to the £15 excess which would have been paid to claimants rather than landlords. We are unable to reliably isolate these amounts in the data.

16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the total expenditure on housing benefit in London was in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the table below.

Total Housing Benefit expenditure in Greater London

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

£ million, nominal

5,539

5,890

6,081

£ million, 2014/15 prices

5,961

6,198

6,327

Source: Local Authority subsidy returns

Notes:

1. Benefit expenditure is available for financial years only.

2. The last period for which a full year of expenditure is available is 2012/13. Figures for 2013/14 will be published later in the year.

3. Figures at 2014/15 prices are deflated using GDP deflators published following the 2014 Budget, and published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/299805/GDP_Deflators_Qtrly_National_Accounts_March_2014_update.xls

4. Expenditure data shown here for 2012/13 may differ slightly from published expenditure information due to more up to date local authority data received after the data had been published.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

Please see table below:

Supplier

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

G4S Group

£81,433

£17,951,654

£32,123,087

£46,377,724

Serco Group PLC

£73,458,641

£29,569,238

£45,457,786

£58,823,106

Sodexo Ltd

NIL

£685

£2,895

£558

GEO Amey

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

Capita Group PLC

£57,821,217

£40,754,470

£42,255,394

£50,702,838

Atos Origin UK Ltd

£150,589,213

£143,524,261

£146,857,967

£102,646,905

Mitie Managed Services

£4,889

£859

£648

£20,277

Working Links

£85,337,045

£54,253,693

£78,302,405

Action for Employment

£175,360,690

£89,243,572

£75,616,533

£104,396,574

MTC Amey

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

GEO Group

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

Carillion

£923

NlL

NIL

£11,339

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

Contracted out expenditure has been interpreted as all third party expenditure. Figures are net of income and recoverable VAT. Figures cover the central Department and its Non Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs).

The relevant figures for the periods 2012-13; 2013-14; and, 2014-15 taken from our General Ledger are set out below.

£m

2012-13 Outturn

2013-14 Outturn

2014-15 Plans

Commercial Expenditure

3,211

3,102

3,187

Proportion of total DEL Expenditure

41%

39%

40%

Departmental Expenditure Limit (DEL) expenditure has been used to calculate the proportion of total expenditure. These figures have been taken from the Department's Annual Reports and Accounts 2013-14, Annex 7 – Expenditure Tables.

Data is not available for prior years on a comparable basis. The Department has changed the way it reports commercial expenditure in the last couple of years, which makes later years incomparable with earlier years.

25th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people have been referred to mental health services in (a) London and (b) each London NHS trust for gambling addiction in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not held centrally.

25th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people who were admitted for treatment by mental health trusts in London since 2010 had no previous contact with mental health services.

The attached table shows the number of people admitted to mental health services providers not previously known to mental health services between 2011-2012 and 2014-2015.

Figures prior to 2011-2012 are not available because of a change to the dataset which is the source for these figures.

25th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many acute beds there were in each mental health trust in London since 2010.

The information is shown in the following table.

General and acute beds open overnight in mental health trusts in London

Quarter

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

East London NHS Foundation Trust

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

2011-12 Q1

0

0

135

0

2011-12 Q2

51

0

82

0

2011-12 Q3

51

0

83

0

2011-12 Q4

73

0

84

0

2012-13 Q1

73

61

126

0

2012-13 Q2

73

61

124

0

2012-13 Q3

73

61

115

0

2012-13 Q4

75

61

134

0

2013-14 Q1

75

61

112

0

2013-14 Q2

75

61

178

0

2013-14 Q3

75

61

214

0

2013-14 Q4

75

61

225

0

2014-15 Q1

73

61

203

0

2014-15 Q2

75

61

180

0

2014-15 Q3

74

51

174

0

2014-15 Q4

80

51

188

0

2015-16 Q1

73

51

192

0

2015-16 Q2

73

51

180

0

2015-16 Q3

72

51

176

20

Source: Bed availability and occupancy, NHS England

Notes:

  1. Mental health trusts in London did not report general and acute beds in any quarter in 2010-11.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions mental health trusts in London have paid for private beds since 2010; and on each such occasion (a) from which organisation the bed was purchased and (b) what the cost of that purchase was to the public purse.

The information requested is not held centrally.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions a Mental Health Act 1983 assessment requested on someone in custody in London took longer than 24 hours in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The Policing and Crime Bill, currently before Parliament, will seek to reduce the maximum length of time a person can be detained under section 135 or 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 from 72 to 24 hours, to make clear that people should be assessed as quickly as possible.

23rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people arrested in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each London borough were diverted to mental health services after an assessment by liaison and diversion workers in each year since 2010.

We do not collect the data in the format requested.

NHS England rolled out Liaison and Diversion services commissioned to a national service specification from April 2014. From April 2015 services were provided in police stations, youth offending teams and courts serving 53% of the population of England. These included two services in London: North East London from April 2014; West, North West and Central London from April 2015.


The table shows the information available on mental health referrals.

Liaison and Diversion - Adults referred for treatment for identified mental health needs from 1st April 2014 to 31 December 2015:

England

London services

Referred for mental health treatment

9,093

2,541

Including:

Detained under Mental Health Act 1983

1,200

657

Admitted to mental health hospital

228

36

Source: NHS England.

Notes:

  1. Data refers to cases rather than individuals, the same individual may be counted more than once.
  2. Data for England is for all areas operating to the national service specification.
  3. Data for London is for two schemes operating to the national service specification, and does not cover the whole of London.

8th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulances waited more than 30 minutes to offload their patients in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each health trust area in London in each year from 2010 to 2015.

This information is not available in the format requested. NHS England collect winter daily situation reports which, up until the end of winter 2014/15, included data on ambulance handover delayed over 30 minutes. This is published at the following address:

http://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/winter-daily-sitreps/winter-sitrep/

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many complaints were received about (a) adult and (b) children and adolescent mental health services in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) each London borough and (iv) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

The information is not held in the format requested, however, figures for complaints received about mental health services in England, London and each London health trust in each year since 2010 are in the attached table.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many young people in children and adolescent mental health services waited longer than (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five and (f) six months between referral and treatment in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) each London borough and (vi) each London health trust in (A) 2010, (B) 2011, (C) 2012, (D) 2013, (E) 2014 and (F) 2015.

This information is not held centrally.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average number of days were from referral to treatment in children and adolescent mental health services in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children and young people detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 were held in police cells in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

The Department does not collect this information.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children under the age of 16 were treated in adult psychiatric wards in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

Whilst we do not have figures for how many young people were treated in adult mental health wards, the data below shows the number under the age of 16 who were admitted to adult mental health wards. These figures may therefore include children who have been admitted when their parents are treated, e.g. a mother for a perinatal mental health condition.

Provider code

Description

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

England

97

47

23

43

75

London

5

10

*

*

*

RRP

Barnet Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

*

10

*

*

*

TAF

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RV3

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RWK

East London NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RAT

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RPG

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RV5

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RQY

South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RNK

Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

RKL

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

*

*

*

*

*

At subnational level, data is always rounded to the nearest five out of respect for the privacy of the individuals concerned. For the same reason, we do not release exact figures where these are less than five.

This means that since 2012/13 there have never been five or more young people under 16 admitted to adult mental health wards in London in any given year. This reflects the fact that following increased government investment there are now more inpatient beds (‘Tier 4’) in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services than ever before.

These figures are published in the annual Mental Health Bulletin, which can be found at:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/mhldsreports

3rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent in (a) cash and (b) real terms on child and adolescent mental health services per young person in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) each London borough and (iv) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning health care services in England. However, it does not currently monitor mental health spend on individual programmes such as for children and adolescents’ mental health. This level of details is being collected in financial plans for 2016-17 and NHS England has processes in place to monitor spend at this level going forward.

3rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many young people were registered with Child and Mental Health services in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each London health trust on 1 January of each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally.

3rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the five disorders most commonly identified by Child and Mental Health services were in (a) England, (b) London, (c) London boroughs and (d) London health trusts in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally.

3rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many referrals there were to Child and Mental Health services in (a) England, (b) each London borough and (c) each health trust in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally.

3rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on child and adolescent mental health services in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each London boroughs and (d) each London health trust in each year since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested. The following table presents the available information which is taken from reference costs - the average unit cost to National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts of providing defined services to NHS patients.

Estimated costs to NHS trusts and foundation trusts1 of providing child and adolescent mental health services2, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Name

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

England

371.0

450.2

486.7

539.4

611.6

London

104.9

118.3

112.2

133.5

135.3

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

4.1

14.2

11.0

12.7

11.4

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

14.9

13.2

14.0

18.1

16.6

East London NHS Foundation Trust

11.7

14.7

12.9

17.5

17.2

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

-

-

-

0.6

0.6

Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust

-

0.3

-

-

-

Islington Primary Care Trust

4.1

-

-

-

-

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

14.5

16.3

13.1

17.1

15.7

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

0.2

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

9.3

7.6

6.9

7.0

7.6

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust

0.2

-

-

-

-

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

1.0

1.6

1.9

2.3

0.6

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

22.4

27.2

26.8

30.7

29.4

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

9.8

8.5

8.6

10.7

11.9

Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

6.2

5.9

5.0

4.9

10.4

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

-

5.9

2.7

5.2

3.6

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

6.6

2.6

9.0

6.3

10.1

Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

Notes:

  1. Reference costs were also collected from primary care trusts before 2011-12, after which they transferred their provider functions. Primary care trusts were abolished on 31 March 2013.
  2. The costs of providing child and adolescent mental health services in admitted, day care, outpatient and community settings for children and young people who have difficulties with their emotional or behavioural wellbeing are included. The costs of providing other specialist services to children and young people, such as drug and alcohol, or eating disorder services, are excluded.
  3. It is not possible to provide the information by London borough.

1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP surgeries (a) closed, (b) opened and (c) merged in (i) London, (ii) each London borough and (iii) each Trust area in London in each year since 2010.

The information is not held in the format requested.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GPs were aged (a) 50 or younger, (b) between 50 and 60 and (c) over 60 in (i) London, (ii) each London borough and (iii) each trust in London in January 2016.

The information is not available in the format requested. The tables attached show the information for the ages of general practitioners (GPs) broken down by clinical commissioning group prior to 2013 and primary care trust for the years 2010 to 2013 for Question 24853 and also the ages of GPs at 30 September 2014 which is the most recent data available for Question 24852.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average age of GPs was in (a) London, (b) each London borough and (c) each trust in London in January in each of the last five years.

The information is not available in the format requested. The tables attached show the information for the ages of general practitioners (GPs) broken down by clinical commissioning group prior to 2013 and primary care trust for the years 2010 to 2013 for Question 24853 and also the ages of GPs at 30 September 2014 which is the most recent data available for Question 24852.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GPs retired in (a) London, (b) each London borough and (c) each trust in London in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not centrally held.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children aged (a) four to five and (b) 10 to 11 years were recorded as obese in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) each primary care trust in London and (iv) each London borough in 2014-15.

Data are produced for each local authority and not by primary care trust.

Data on obese adults at a sub-national level are available through the Active People Survey and are published as pooled data for the period 2012-2014. The data for adults are from a sample survey (Active People Survey) therefore the numbers of obese adults in the population are not provided. The Active People Survey only began collecting data on adult height and weight in 2012, therefore local authority level data is not available before this date. The proportion of adults classified as obese for England is 24.0% and for London is 20.2%. Data for each local authority are available to download from:

http://www.noo.org.uk/visualisation.

Data on obese children are collected through the National Child Measurement Programme. The proportion of children measured as obese aged 4-5 years (Reception) in 2014/15 for England is 9.1% and for London 10.1%. The proportion of children measured as obese aged 10-11 (Year 6) in 2014/15 for England is 19.1% and for London 22.6%. Data for each local authority are available to download from:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB19109

and

http://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/national-child-measurement-programme.

95% confidence intervals should be taken into account when making direct comparisons of two different prevalence figures. Where confidence intervals overlap, it is not possible to determine the statistical significance (or otherwise) of the difference.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many sales of land of what value and to whom there have been in each health trust area in London (a) on the open market or (b) below market value in each year since 2010.

The Department has only collected data on surplus land sales since 2011. Since then the National Health Service has sold 26 London sites. The names of the sites sold are given in the following table. The Department does not hold information about whether or not sites were sold on the open market, or the final sale price. The Department does not hold information centrally about the number of housing units or affordable homes that have been built.

NHS trust

Site

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

69 Oakley Square

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Gunnersbury Day Hospital

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Henderson Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Manor Gate Mental Health Resource Centre

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

Wolfson Medical Rehab Centre

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

St Lukes Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Broadmoor Hospital Plot 1

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Newland House, Twickenham

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Roselands Resource Centre, New Malden

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Upney Lane Health Centre,

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

16a Cleveland Street

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

78 London Road, Croydon

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Ashley Road

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Hedgecock Centre 1

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Hubert Grove

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Lennard Lodge

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mascalls Park

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Southall/ Norwood Mental Health Resource Centre

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 2

Central and Northwest London NHS Foundation Trust

17 Paddington Green London

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Stonelea (Langthorne Hospital)

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Barnet General Hospital

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Coppett's Wood

South West London and St Georges Mental Health NHS Trust

Part Springfield Hospital

Barts Health NHS Trust

The London Chest Hospital

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many units of (a) housing and (b) affordable housing have been built on each parcel of NHS land sold in London since 2010.

The Department has only collected data on surplus land sales since 2011. Since then the National Health Service has sold 26 London sites. The names of the sites sold are given in the following table. The Department does not hold information about whether or not sites were sold on the open market, or the final sale price. The Department does not hold information centrally about the number of housing units or affordable homes that have been built.

NHS trust

Site

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

69 Oakley Square

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Gunnersbury Day Hospital

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Henderson Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Manor Gate Mental Health Resource Centre

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

Wolfson Medical Rehab Centre

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

St Lukes Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Broadmoor Hospital Plot 1

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Newland House, Twickenham

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Roselands Resource Centre, New Malden

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Upney Lane Health Centre,

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

16a Cleveland Street

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

78 London Road, Croydon

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Ashley Road

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Hedgecock Centre 1

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Hubert Grove

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Lennard Lodge

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mascalls Park

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Southall/ Norwood Mental Health Resource Centre

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 2

Central and Northwest London NHS Foundation Trust

17 Paddington Green London

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Stonelea (Langthorne Hospital)

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Barnet General Hospital

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Coppett's Wood

South West London and St Georges Mental Health NHS Trust

Part Springfield Hospital

Barts Health NHS Trust

The London Chest Hospital

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many parcels of NHS land were for sale in each health trust area in London on 1 January 2010.

The Department has only collected data on surplus land sales since 2011. Since then the National Health Service has sold 26 London sites. The names of the sites sold are given in the following table. The Department does not hold information about whether or not sites were sold on the open market, or the final sale price. The Department does not hold information centrally about the number of housing units or affordable homes that have been built.

NHS trust

Site

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

69 Oakley Square

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Gunnersbury Day Hospital

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Henderson Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Manor Gate Mental Health Resource Centre

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

Wolfson Medical Rehab Centre

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

St Lukes Hospital

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Broadmoor Hospital Plot 1

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Newland House, Twickenham

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Roselands Resource Centre, New Malden

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Upney Lane Health Centre,

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

16a Cleveland Street

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

78 London Road, Croydon

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Ashley Road

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Hedgecock Centre 1

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Hubert Grove

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Lennard Lodge

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mascalls Park

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Southall/ Norwood Mental Health Resource Centre

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

St Bernards Wing 2

Central and Northwest London NHS Foundation Trust

17 Paddington Green London

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Stonelea (Langthorne Hospital)

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Barnet General Hospital

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Coppett's Wood

South West London and St Georges Mental Health NHS Trust

Part Springfield Hospital

Barts Health NHS Trust

The London Chest Hospital

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many adults were recorded as obese in (a) England, (b) London, (c) each primary care trust in London and (d) each London borough in each year since 2010.

Data are produced for each local authority and not by primary care trust.

Data on obese adults at a sub-national level are available through the Active People Survey and are published as pooled data for the period 2012-2014. The data for adults are from a sample survey (Active People Survey) therefore the numbers of obese adults in the population are not provided. The Active People Survey only began collecting data on adult height and weight in 2012, therefore local authority level data is not available before this date. The proportion of adults classified as obese for England is 24.0% and for London is 20.2%. Data for each local authority are available to download from:

http://www.noo.org.uk/visualisation.

Data on obese children are collected through the National Child Measurement Programme. The proportion of children measured as obese aged 4-5 years (Reception) in 2014/15 for England is 9.1% and for London 10.1%. The proportion of children measured as obese aged 10-11 (Year 6) in 2014/15 for England is 19.1% and for London 22.6%. Data for each local authority are available to download from:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB19109

and

http://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/national-child-measurement-programme.

95% confidence intervals should be taken into account when making direct comparisons of two different prevalence figures. Where confidence intervals overlap, it is not possible to determine the statistical significance (or otherwise) of the difference.

26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prescriptions were issued for medication in each London borough in each year since 2010.

Information is provided on the number of prescription items dispensed and is available by health organisations but not by local authorities.


Table 1: Five most commonly dispensed medicines, by chemical name, in England and London, based on the number of prescription items written, in the community, within England and London, and dispensed within the United Kingdom, from 2011 to November 2015 1

Year

England

Number (000’s)

London 2

Number (000’s)

2011

Simvastatin

41,133.9

Simvastatin

4,878.2


Aspirin

32,338.1

Aspirin

3,504.9


Levothyroxine Sodium

24,958.6

Amlodipine

3,057.7


Omeprazole

23,199.6

Ramipril

2,554.2


Ramipril

22,435.0

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,543.6

2012

Simvastatin

42,616.8

Simvastatin

5,032.6


Aspirin

31,696.8

Aspirin

3,456.4


Levothyroxine Sodium

26,651.4

Amlodipine

3,283.2


Omeprazole

25,695.9

Omeprazole

2,724.6


Ramipril

23,819.7

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,720.7

2013

Simvastatin

39,827.5

Simvastatin

4,578.7


Aspirin

30,818.0

Amlodipine

3,481.7


Levothyroxine Sodium

27,693.5

Aspirin

3,403.7


Omeprazole

27,218.9

Omeprazole

2,870.7


Ramipril

24,921.9

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,864.2

2014

Simvastatin

37,743.5

Simvastatin

4,266.2


Aspirin

29,762.6

Amlodipine

3,675.1


Omeprazole

28,743.0

Aspirin

3,359.6


Levothyroxine Sodium

28,731.0

Omeprazole

3,042.8


Ramipril

25,933.6

Colecalciferol

3,030.8

2015 (January–November) 1

Simvastatin

31,417.4

Simvastatin

3,528.2


Omeprazole

27,309.2

Amlodipine

3,481.8


Levothyroxine Sodium

26,992.5

Atorvastatin

3,286.4


Aspirin

25,549.4

Colecalciferol

2,945.8


Atorvastatin

24,507.8

Aspirin

2,939.5

Source: Prescribing Analysis and Cost tool (PACT) system, maintained by NHS Prescription Services

Notes:

1 Information is provided by calendar year from 2011; data for 60 months is held at any one time and figures for the whole of 2010 are unavailable. Information for 2015 contains data from January to November 2015, inclusive; information is not yet available for December 2015.

2 part (b) of the question is interpreted as a single combined figure for all London primary care trusts/clinical commissioning groups.



Table 2: Number of prescription items written, in the community, in London and dispensed within the UK, from 2011 to November 2015 1

Year

Number (000)’s

2011

111,797.2

2012

115,913.5

2013

119,035.0

2014

123,556.6

2015 (January–November) 1

114,425.4

Source: Prescribing Analysis and Cost tool (PACT) system, maintained by NHS Prescription Services

Notes:

1 Information is provided by calendar year from 2011; data for 60 months is held at any one time and figures for the whole of 2010 are unavailable. Information for 2015 contains data from January to November 2015, inclusive; information is not yet available for December 2015.


26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the five most common types of medication prescription were which were issued in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each London borough in each year since 2010.

Information is provided on the number of prescription items dispensed and is available by health organisations but not by local authorities.


Table 1: Five most commonly dispensed medicines, by chemical name, in England and London, based on the number of prescription items written, in the community, within England and London, and dispensed within the United Kingdom, from 2011 to November 2015 1

Year

England

Number (000’s)

London 2

Number (000’s)

2011

Simvastatin

41,133.9

Simvastatin

4,878.2


Aspirin

32,338.1

Aspirin

3,504.9


Levothyroxine Sodium

24,958.6

Amlodipine

3,057.7


Omeprazole

23,199.6

Ramipril

2,554.2


Ramipril

22,435.0

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,543.6

2012

Simvastatin

42,616.8

Simvastatin

5,032.6


Aspirin

31,696.8

Aspirin

3,456.4


Levothyroxine Sodium

26,651.4

Amlodipine

3,283.2


Omeprazole

25,695.9

Omeprazole

2,724.6


Ramipril

23,819.7

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,720.7

2013

Simvastatin

39,827.5

Simvastatin

4,578.7


Aspirin

30,818.0

Amlodipine

3,481.7


Levothyroxine Sodium

27,693.5

Aspirin

3,403.7


Omeprazole

27,218.9

Omeprazole

2,870.7


Ramipril

24,921.9

Levothyroxine Sodium

2,864.2

2014

Simvastatin

37,743.5

Simvastatin

4,266.2


Aspirin

29,762.6

Amlodipine

3,675.1


Omeprazole

28,743.0

Aspirin

3,359.6


Levothyroxine Sodium

28,731.0

Omeprazole

3,042.8


Ramipril

25,933.6

Colecalciferol

3,030.8

2015 (January–November) 1

Simvastatin

31,417.4

Simvastatin

3,528.2


Omeprazole

27,309.2

Amlodipine

3,481.8


Levothyroxine Sodium

26,992.5

Atorvastatin

3,286.4


Aspirin

25,549.4

Colecalciferol

2,945.8


Atorvastatin

24,507.8

Aspirin

2,939.5

Source: Prescribing Analysis and Cost tool (PACT) system, maintained by NHS Prescription Services

Notes:

1 Information is provided by calendar year from 2011; data for 60 months is held at any one time and figures for the whole of 2010 are unavailable. Information for 2015 contains data from January to November 2015, inclusive; information is not yet available for December 2015.

2 part (b) of the question is interpreted as a single combined figure for all London primary care trusts/clinical commissioning groups.



Table 2: Number of prescription items written, in the community, in London and dispensed within the UK, from 2011 to November 2015 1

Year

Number (000)’s

2011

111,797.2

2012

115,913.5

2013

119,035.0

2014

123,556.6

2015 (January–November) 1

114,425.4

Source: Prescribing Analysis and Cost tool (PACT) system, maintained by NHS Prescription Services

Notes:

1 Information is provided by calendar year from 2011; data for 60 months is held at any one time and figures for the whole of 2010 are unavailable. Information for 2015 contains data from January to November 2015, inclusive; information is not yet available for December 2015.


26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many deaths were recorded of (a) patients awaiting the arrival of an ambulance and (b) patients in an ambulance from the London Ambulance Service area in each year since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the nurse vacancy rate was on 1 December (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013, (e) 2014 and (f) 2015 in (i) London and (ii) each health trust in London.

The information requested is not centrally collected.

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of total health spending in (a) London and (b) each London borough was allocated to general practice in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not available for the period prior to the establishment of NHS England.


We are advised that general practices in London held budgets as a percentage of total clinical commissioning group and direct commissioning budgets (excluding specialised commissioning held on a provider basis), according to the following proportions: 8.2% in 2013/14 and 2014/15, and 8.3% in 2015/16.



11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on (a) sexual health, (b) drug and alcohol and (c) smoking public health initiatives in (i) England and Wales, (ii) London and (iii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

Spending in Wales on these initiatives is a matter for the Welsh government.


Local authorities in England took over public health responsibility from April 2013 and are responsible for assessing local need and commissioning services and interventions to meet that need, using the Public Health Grant. They are free to determine their actual spend on services based on this assessment of need, but are required to report their spending on an annual basis. The Department for Communities and Local Government publishes statistics on local authority expenditure and total expenditure for sexual health services, drugs and alcohol services and smoking in England, London and London boroughs for the years 2013/14 and 2014/15. The links to the data are below:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2013-to-2014-individual-local-authority-data-outturn

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2014-to-2015-individual-local-authority-data-outturn


It is important to note that the expenditure on drug and alcohol services may not reflect all the resources that a local authority may have used on drug and alcohol misuse. For example community care budgets can be used to help people as part of their recovery from drug and/or alcohol dependency.

Prior to April 2013 primary care trusts commissioned public health services and public health expenditure was not published separately. Alcohol misuse services and smoking cessation services were funded from general National Health Service allocations and figures on this spend prior to 2013/14 are not available centrally.

Drug misuse services were funded from the Pooled Treatment Budget and figures for 2010/11 to 2012/13 are available at the links below:


2010-11: http://www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/adultptballocation2010-11final.pdf

2011-12: http://www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/drugfunding11-12annexc[0].pdf

2012-13: http://www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/drugfunding12-13v.xls

11th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on agency nurses by each NHS trust in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not collected centrally.


The Rt. Hon. Member may wish to contact each National Health Service trust directly for further information.


Following the Francis report many trusts increased their spend on temporary staffing to meet safe staffing levels. The Department expects trusts to have a strong grip on their finances, and manage their contract and agency staffing spend (including use of locums) responsibly through effective and efficient workforce planning and management and to minimise temporary staffing costs in future years.

8th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many (a) acute and (b) non-acute beds there were in each London hospital in each year since 2010.

Information on bed availability and occupancy is published every quarter.


The attached table shows the average daily number of available (a) general and acute and (b) maternity, mental health and learning disability beds that were open overnight and open day only and under the care of a consultant in London trusts in each quarter since 2010.

8th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the projected end of financial year budget surplus or deficit is for each health trust in London in (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17.

The information is not available in the format requested.


Projected figures for 2016-17 are unavailable. The attached table shows the projected end of financial year budget surplus or deficit for each health trust in London in 2015-16 only.

8th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much was spent on public health in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each London borough in each year since 2010.

Public health grant allocations to local authorities for 2016/17 will be announced shortly.


Total reported local authority public health expenditure for England, London and London boroughs for years 2013/14 and 2014/15 is set out in the following link:


https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing


Prior to April 2013 primary care trusts commissioned local public health services, and information on their public health spending was not collected nationally.

8th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the budget for public health in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each London borough is for 2016-17.

Public health grant allocations to local authorities for 2016/17 will be announced shortly.


Total reported local authority public health expenditure for England, London and London boroughs for years 2013/14 and 2014/15 is set out in the following link:


https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing


Prior to April 2013 primary care trusts commissioned local public health services, and information on their public health spending was not collected nationally.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the end of financial year budget surpluses or deficits was for each health trust in London in each year since 2010.

The information requested is in the attached tables.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many and what proportion of elective operations were cancelled in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each health trust in England in each year since 2010.

Information on cancelled elective operations is published quarterly. The attached table shows how many elective operations were cancelled in England, London and each health trust in England in each quarter since 2010. Information on the number of cancelled elective operations as a percentage of elective admissions is only published for England.


The number and proportion of cancelled operations remains low in the context of the millions of operations performed in the National Health Service each year. Compared to 2009/10, in 2014/15 there were 1.6 million more operations. The proportion of cancelled elective operations in the first two quarters of 2015/16 was 0.8% which is the same as the first two quarters of 2009/10.


Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of patients were seen within four hours of arriving at each A&E department in London in December (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013, (e) 2014 and (f) 2015.

The information is not available in the format requested. Information is available on the percentage of patients that were admitted, transferred or discharged within four hours of arriving at each accident and emergency department in London in December by year. December 2015 data has not been collected yet. This can be found at the following website:


https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/


7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many delays of over 12 hours there were in each A&E department in London in each year since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested. Information is available on the number of patients spending more than 12 hours from decision to admit to admission in each accident and emergency department in London by year. This can be found at the following website:


https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/

6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many incidents of A&E departments diverting admissions to other hospitals there were in London in each year since 2010.


The information is not available in the format requested.


The following data includes incidences of accident and emergency departments diverting admissions to other hospitals in London during the period April 2012 to December 2015.


Total Hospital Redirects: April 2012- December 2015


2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

April

19

32

18

9

May

10

6

6

12

June

9

16

10

6

July

6

17

8

9

August

7

4

10

7

September

10

19

13

21

October

6

25

17

21

November

24

5

8

39

December

21

13

42

29

January

36

16

17


February

22

22

16


March

31

13

14


Source: NHS England

Note:


NHS England was formed in 2012. Therefore data are not available prior to this period.


6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many days of (a) acute and (b) non-acute delayed transfers of care there were in each health trust in London in each month since January 2010.

Official statistics for the number of days of acute and non-acute delayed transfers of care there were each month in each health trust in London since August 2010, are published monthly by NHS England on its website at the following address. This data was not collected prior to August 2010.


https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/delayed-transfers-of-care/


6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the longest a patient waited for discharge from hospital after being declared fit to leave was in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in (i) the last month for which figures are available and (ii) that month in each year from 2010 to 2014.

This information is not available in the format requested.

Official statistics for National Health Service trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month.

It is not possible to calculate the longest wait from these data.

Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of patients spent more than four hours in A&E departments from decision to admit to admission in each A&E department in London in each month since May 2010.

This information is not available in the format requested. The attached table includes data showing the percentage of patients who attended accident and emergency (A&E) and subsequently waited four hours or more to be admitted once a decision to admit them had been taken. These data are given for the following periods:

- quarter 1 and Quarter 2 2010/11;

- each week between 07 November 2010 and 05 July 2015; and

- each month between July 2015 and October 2015.

5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of the population were recorded as having HIV in (a) England and Wales and (b) each London borough in each year since 2010.

The proportion of the 15-59 year old population (standard reported population) recorded as having human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in England and Wales and across each of the London boroughs is shown in tables 1 and 2.


The number of males and females newly diagnosed with HIV in the United Kingdom and across each of the London boroughs is shown in tables 3 and 4.


The data to reflect this information can be found in the attachment.


5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many (a) men and (b) women were diagnosed as having HIV in (i) the UK and (ii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

The proportion of the 15-59 year old population (standard reported population) recorded as having human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in England and Wales and across each of the London boroughs is shown in tables 1 and 2.


The number of males and females newly diagnosed with HIV in the United Kingdom and across each of the London boroughs is shown in tables 3 and 4.


The data to reflect this information can be found in the attachment.


4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the longest a patient waited for discharge from hospital after being declared fit to leave was in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not available in the format requested.


Official statistics for NHS trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month. The latest publication of this data was for delays occurring in October 2015 and was published on 10 December 2015.


It is not possible to calculate a montly average or the longest waits from these data. Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average time was between a patient being declared fit to leave hospital and being discharged in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not available in the format requested.


Official statistics for NHS trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month. The latest publication of this data was for delays occurring in October 2015 and was published on 10 December 2015.


It is not possible to calculate a montly average or the longest waits from these data. Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients waited four weeks or longer for discharge from hospital after being declared fit to leave in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not available in the format requested.


Official statistics for NHS trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month. The latest publication of this data was for delays occurring in October 2015 and was published on 10 December 2015.


It is not possible to calculate a montly average or the longest waits from these data. Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average time was from a patient being declared fit to leave hospital to their discharge in (a) England, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in (i) the last calendar month for which figures are available and (ii) that month in each year from 2010 to 2014.

This information is not available in the format requested.


Official statistics for NHS trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month. The latest publication of this data was for delays occurring in October 2015 and was published on 10 December 2015.


It is not possible to calculate a montly average or the longest waits from these data. Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients waited four weeks or longer for discharge from hospital after being declared fit to leave in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each health trust in London in (i) the last month for which figures are available and (ii) that month in each year from 2010 to 2015.

This information is not available in the format requested.


Official statistics for NHS trusts in England are published by NHS England on the number of patients delayed on the last Thursday of each month and the total delayed days during the month for all patients delayed throughout the month. The latest publication of this data was for delays occurring in October 2015 and was published on 10 December 2015.


It is not possible to calculate a montly average or the longest waits from these data. Health is a devolved matter in Wales.

2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of how many additional GPs will be needed to supply the Battersea-Nine Elms development; and how many such GPs are planned to be provided.

We are advised by NHS England that it is working with its co-commissioning clinical commissioning groups to assess the requirements of the new development utilising the existing infrastructure and the requirements for an estimated population of in excess of 30,000 over a 10 year plus timeframe.


We understand that new models of delivery of primary care services are being investigated with an estimate of around 15 additional general practitioners required to serve the final population numbers.

2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the weekend bed occupancy rates were in each mental health hospital in London in each weekend since 1 January 2015, taking account of patients on weekend leave.

Official statistics for average daily occupancy rates for beds open overnight, including mental health beds, are published every quarter by NHS England on its website at the following address:


https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/bed-availability-and-occupancy/


30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients were admitted to mental health hospitals outside of their home local authority area in (a) England and (b) London in each of the last five years.

Information on the number of patients who were admitted to mental health hospitals outside their home local authority area in England and London in each of the last five years is not available. However, information on the number of people in non-specialist mental health beds treated out of area between September 2014 and July 2015 is set out in the attached table: the number of people in non-specialist mental health beds, placed out of area at the end of the month, for England and London Providers, September 2014-July 2015.

30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average bed occupancy rate was in each mental health hospital in London in each month since 1 January 2015.

The information is not available in the format requested. Official statistics for average daily occupancy rates for beds open overnight are published every quarter.


Average daily bed occupancy rates for each hospital trust, including each mental health trust, in London for the quarters ending 31 March 2015 and 30 June 2015 are shown in the following table.


Table 1: Average daily bed occupancy rates in London hospital trusts, 2014-15 quarter 4 and 2015-16 quarter 2

Trust

Type

2014-15 quarter 4

2015-16 quarter 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

94.7%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

99.2%

98.0%

Barts Health NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

93.4%

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

98.6%

96.7%

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

94.7%

92.3%

Central London Community Healthcare NHS Trust

Community

86.0%

83.1%

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

89.4%

91.7%

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

Acute

87.6%

82.1%

East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

84.0%

82.7%

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

84.7%

82.2%

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

86.7%

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

84.2%

81.6%

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.7%

81.5%

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

85.4%

82.0%

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

92.2%

91.0%

Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

98.4%

89.7%

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust

Acute

95.2%

92.8%

London North West Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

90.4%

87.7%

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

72.6%

54.6%

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

91.2%

88.5%

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

96.7%

88.6%

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

95.6%

95.7%

Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

94.9%

86.4%

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

85.5%

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

64.9%

68.6%

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

90.8%

Did not return

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

80.6%

81.0%

St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

90.8%

93.3%

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

88.3%

84.5%

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

86.2%

83.1%

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

84.3%

87.7%

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

78.4%

73.4%

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

93.0%

93.2%

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

90.6%

87.9%

Source: Bed availability and occupancy, NHS England


Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London hospital trusts that provided data during the period.

The number of quarters in the last five years in which each mental health hospital trust in London had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90, 95 and 100 per cent is shown in the following table.


Table 2: Number of quarters in which London hospital trusts had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90 and 95 and 100 per cent in the 20 quarters from 2010-11 quarter 2 to 2015-16 quarter 1


Average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than:

Trust

85%

90%

95%

100%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

18

18

16

0

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

20

17

13

0

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

19

19

7

0

East London NHS Foundation Trust

9

0

0

0

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

8

1

0

0

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

20

19

5

0

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

16

5

0

0

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

10

1

0

0

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

20

18

1

0

Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London mental hospital trusts that provided data during the period.
30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many admissions there were to psychiatric inpatient wards for psychosis in each year from 2010 to 2015.


Data for admissions to psychiatric inpatient wards for psychosis in England is provided in the following table:


Count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) with a primary diagnosis of psychosis in England, 2010-11 to 2014-15


Year

FAEs

2010-11

12,852

2011-12

13,150

2012-13

14,221

2013-14

14,658

2014-15

14,856


Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre


Notes: Data for 2014/15 is provisional.


Activity is in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average bed occupancy rate was in each hospital trust in London in each month since 1 January 2015.

The information is not available in the format requested. Official statistics for average daily occupancy rates for beds open overnight are published every quarter.


Average daily bed occupancy rates for each hospital trust, including each mental health trust, in London for the quarters ending 31 March 2015 and 30 June 2015 are shown in the following table.


Table 1: Average daily bed occupancy rates in London hospital trusts, 2014-15 quarter 4 and 2015-16 quarter 2

Trust

Type

2014-15 quarter 4

2015-16 quarter 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

94.7%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

99.2%

98.0%

Barts Health NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

93.4%

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

98.6%

96.7%

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

94.7%

92.3%

Central London Community Healthcare NHS Trust

Community

86.0%

83.1%

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

89.4%

91.7%

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

Acute

87.6%

82.1%

East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

84.0%

82.7%

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

84.7%

82.2%

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

86.7%

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

84.2%

81.6%

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.7%

81.5%

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

85.4%

82.0%

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

92.2%

91.0%

Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

98.4%

89.7%

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust

Acute

95.2%

92.8%

London North West Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

90.4%

87.7%

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

72.6%

54.6%

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

91.2%

88.5%

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

96.7%

88.6%

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

95.6%

95.7%

Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

94.9%

86.4%

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

85.5%

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

64.9%

68.6%

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

90.8%

Did not return

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

80.6%

81.0%

St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

90.8%

93.3%

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

88.3%

84.5%

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

86.2%

83.1%

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

84.3%

87.7%

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

78.4%

73.4%

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

93.0%

93.2%

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

90.6%

87.9%

Source: Bed availability and occupancy, NHS England


Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London hospital trusts that provided data during the period.

The number of quarters in the last five years in which each mental health hospital trust in London had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90, 95 and 100 per cent is shown in the following table.


Table 2: Number of quarters in which London hospital trusts had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90 and 95 and 100 per cent in the 20 quarters from 2010-11 quarter 2 to 2015-16 quarter 1


Average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than:

Trust

85%

90%

95%

100%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

18

18

16

0

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

20

17

13

0

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

19

19

7

0

East London NHS Foundation Trust

9

0

0

0

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

8

1

0

0

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

20

19

5

0

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

16

5

0

0

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

10

1

0

0

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

20

18

1

0

Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London mental hospital trusts that provided data during the period.
30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions bed occupancy rates reached (a) 85, (b) 90, (c) 95 and (d) 100 per cent in each mental health hospital in London in each of the last five years.

The information is not available in the format requested. Official statistics for average daily occupancy rates for beds open overnight are published every quarter.


Average daily bed occupancy rates for each hospital trust, including each mental health trust, in London for the quarters ending 31 March 2015 and 30 June 2015 are shown in the following table.


Table 1: Average daily bed occupancy rates in London hospital trusts, 2014-15 quarter 4 and 2015-16 quarter 2

Trust

Type

2014-15 quarter 4

2015-16 quarter 1

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

94.7%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

99.2%

98.0%

Barts Health NHS Trust

Acute

96.0%

93.4%

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

98.6%

96.7%

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

94.7%

92.3%

Central London Community Healthcare NHS Trust

Community

86.0%

83.1%

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

89.4%

91.7%

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

Acute

87.6%

82.1%

East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

84.0%

82.7%

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

Acute

84.7%

82.2%

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

86.7%

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

84.2%

81.6%

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.7%

81.5%

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

85.4%

82.0%

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

92.2%

91.0%

Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

98.4%

89.7%

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust

Acute

95.2%

92.8%

London North West Healthcare NHS Trust

Acute

90.4%

87.7%

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

72.6%

54.6%

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

91.2%

88.5%

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

96.7%

88.6%

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

95.6%

95.7%

Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

94.9%

86.4%

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

85.5%

85.5%

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

64.9%

68.6%

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Mental health

90.8%

Did not return

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

80.6%

81.0%

St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

90.8%

93.3%

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

88.3%

84.5%

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

86.2%

83.1%

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

84.3%

87.7%

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Acute

78.4%

73.4%

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

Mental health

93.0%

93.2%

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Acute

90.6%

87.9%

Source: Bed availability and occupancy, NHS England


Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London hospital trusts that provided data during the period.

The number of quarters in the last five years in which each mental health hospital trust in London had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90, 95 and 100 per cent is shown in the following table.


Table 2: Number of quarters in which London hospital trusts had an average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than 85, 90 and 95 and 100 per cent in the 20 quarters from 2010-11 quarter 2 to 2015-16 quarter 1


Average daily bed occupancy rate equal to or greater than:

Trust

85%

90%

95%

100%

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

18

18

16

0

Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust

20

17

13

0

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

19

19

7

0

East London NHS Foundation Trust

9

0

0

0

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

8

1

0

0

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

20

19

5

0

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

16

5

0

0

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

10

1

0

0

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

20

18

1

0

Notes:

  1. The table shows average daily occupancy rates for all general and acute, maternity, mental health and learning disability beds open overnight.
  2. The table includes all London mental hospital trusts that provided data during the period.
30th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions patients were granted weekend leave in each mental health hospital in London in each month since 1 January 2015.

The information is not available in the format requested. The information in the attached table shows episodes of leave starting on a Friday, Saturday and Sunday for each London mental health trust, between 1 January 2015 to July 2015.


The attached table is provided by the Health and Social Care Information Centre.





29th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many new cases of psychosis were diagnosed in (a) the UK, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each health trust in London in each year between 2010 and 2015.


Sadiq Khan (Tooting):



To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many new cases of psychosis were diagnosed in (a) the UK, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each health trust in London in each year between 2010 and 2015. [14122]



ALISTAIR BURT



Data on new cases of psychosis is not collected at United Kingdom level.


Data for England is provided in the table below:


England Level Data


Financial Year

The number of new cases of psychosis served by early intervention teams

2014-15

10,186

2013-14

10,475

2012-13

10,375

2011-12

10,099

2010-11

10,312


Data for new cases of psychosis in London is provided in the table below:

Financial Year

The number of new cases of psychosis served by early intervention teams

2014-15

1,993

2013-14

2,177

2012-13

2,198

2011-12

1,952

2010-11

2,051


Data on a London borough level is not available centrally.

Data for new cases of psychosis diagnosed in each London Trust are provided in the attached table.

29th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, on how many occasions in each of the last five years bed occupancy rates reached (a) 85, (b) 90, (c) 95 and (d) 100 per cent in each hospital trust in London.

Official statistics for average daily occupancy rates for beds open overnight are published every quarter by NHS England on their website at the following address:


https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/bed-availability-and-occupancy/



29th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many (a) lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender and (b) black and minority ethic people were diagnosed with mental health problems in (i) the UK, (ii) London, (iii) each London borough and (iv) each health trust in London on 1 October (A) 2010, (B) 2011, (C) 2012, (D) 2013, (E) 2014 and (F) 2015.


The data is not collected in the format requested.Data is not available for the lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender community.


The attachment ‘black and minority ethnic mental health contact’ contains the latest data available on the number of people from black and minority ethnic groups who have been in contact with mental health services in London-based providers between 2011/12 and 2014/15 and clinical commissioning groups between 2013/14 and 2014/15.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average waiting time was for patients assigned to cognitive behavioural therapy on 1 October in each year since 2010 in (a) the UK, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each health trust in London.


This information is not held centrally.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GPs in London were aged 60 or over on 1 October 2010.

NHS workforce data are not available as at 1 October 2010. Figures shown in the following tables are for the total number of general practitioners (GPs) working in London and the number of GPs in London aged 60 or over as at 30 September 2010.


All GPs (including retainers and registrars)


London total

Number aged 60+

Headcount

5,930

968

Full time equivalent

5,357

890



GPs (excluding retainers and registrars)


London total

Number aged 60+

Headcount

5,340

964

Full time equivalent

4,820

887


Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre (General and Personal Medical Services Statistics).

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many vacancies there were for GPs in (a) London and (b) each London borough on 1 October in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not centrally held.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many prescriptions for anti-depressants were issued in each year since 2010 in (a) the UK, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each health trust in London.

Information is not held centrally on the number of prescription items issued. The attached tables provide numbers of anti-depressant prescription items written in England and London, and dispensed in the United Kingdom, for the available financial years 2011/12 to 2014/15. Information relating to prescriptions written in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, are a matter for the Devolved Administrations.


28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients were (a) receiving and (b) on the waiting list to receive cognitive behavioural therapy on 1 October in each year since 2010 in (a) the UK, (b) London, (c) each London borough and (d) each health trust in London.


This information is not held centrally.

27th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average age was of general practitioners in London in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the following tables:


Average age of all general practitioners (GPs) (including retainers and registrars) in London 2010-14

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

46

45.9

45.7

45.3

45.2


Average age of GPs (excluding retainers and registrars) in London 2010-14

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

47.6

47.5

47.4

47.3

47.1


Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre General and Personal Medical Services Statistics.


Note: all figures shown are as at 30 September for each year.



13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many medical students completed their studies in London medical schools in each year since 2010.

Data available from the Medical and Dental Students (MDS) Survey from 2009 to 2012 shows the output of those obtaining their first registrable medical qualification from London universities as:

Year

Output from London universities

2009

1,668

2010

1,650

2011

1,790

2012

1,713

Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England MDS Survey

From 2013, the MDS did not collect information on the output from medical schools.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many medical students completed their studies in London medical schools in each year from 2006 to 2009.

Data available from the Medical and Dental Students (MDS) Survey from 2009 to 2012 shows the output of those obtaining their first registrable medical qualification from London universities as:

Year

Output from London universities

2009

1,668

2010

1,650

2011

1,790

2012

1,713

Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England MDS Survey

From 2013, the MDS did not collect information on the output from medical schools.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many medical students studying in London medical schools are in their final year of study.

The Medical and Dental Students Survey records the total intake for medical schools for the 2014/15 academic year for London as1,616.Data is not held centrally on numbers of medical students studying in London for their final year of study or current totals of medical students in medical schools in London.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many medical students studying in London medical schools are in their first year of study.

The Medical and Dental Students Survey records the total intake for medical schools for the 2014/15 academic year for London as1,616.Data is not held centrally on numbers of medical students studying in London for their final year of study or current totals of medical students in medical schools in London.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many junior doctors worked in the NHS in London in each year since 2006.

The number of full time equivalent NHS Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) doctors in training and equivalents1 in London, as at 30 September each year between 2006 and 2014 and at 30 June 20152 is shown in the following table.

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

10,360

10,443

10,916

11,645

11,971

12,083

12,187

12,455

12,584

12,288

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre Medical and Dental Workforce Census.

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre, Provisional NHS HCHS Monthly Workforce Statistics.

Notes:

1 Doctors in training and equivalents refers to the Registrar group, Senior House Officer, Foundation Year 2, House Officer & Foundation Programme Year 1, other doctors in training and other staff at these grades that do not hold an educationally approved training post.

2 June 2015 data is the latest data available. This is sourced from the NHS HCHS Monthly Workforce Statistics.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many medical students are currently studying in medical schools in London.

The Medical and Dental Students Survey records the total intake for medical schools for the 2014/15 academic year for London as1,616.Data is not held centrally on numbers of medical students studying in London for their final year of study or current totals of medical students in medical schools in London.

6th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the staff turnover rate was in the London Ambulance Service in each of the last five years.

The following table shows numbers of staff joining and leaving London Ambulance Service NHS Trust during each of the last five twelve-month periods for which figures are available. The table also shows the joining and leaving rate during each twelve-month period.

Period

Staff Leaving

Leaving rate

Staff Joining

Joining rate

April 2014-

March 2015

580

12.6%

520

11.3%

April 2013-

March 2014

489

10.6%

521

11.3%

April 2012-

March 2013

447

9.6%

307

6.6%

April 2012-

March 2013

368

7.6%

170

3.5%

April 2011-

March 2012

349

7.0%

306

6.2%

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre, Provisional NHS Hospital and Community Health Service monthly workforce statistics.

Notes:

  1. Figures show all staff who have joined from outside or left to outside the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust.
  2. Turnover data is based on headcount.
  3. These statistics relate to the contracted positions within English National Health Service organisations and may include those where the person assigned to the position is temporarily absent, for example on maternity leave.
  4. The leaver/joiner rate is calculated by dividing the number of leavers/joiners by the average of the headcount of staff at the beginning of the period and headcount of staff at the end of the period.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many incidents of TB were recorded in (a) England, (b) London, (c) primary care trusts in London and (d) London boroughs in each of the last five years.

The number of tuberculosis (TB) cases between 2009 and 2013 in England and London are shown below in Table 1. The confidence interval refers to the probable range that the value will fall within.

Table 1

The confidence interval refers to the probable range that the value will fall within.

Source: Enhanced Tuberculosis Surveillance System (ETS), Office for National Statistics. Data as at May 2014. Prepared by: TB Section, Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, Public Health England

Year

England

London

Number of cases

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Number of cases

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

2009

8,119

15.7 (15.3-16.0)

3,404

42.9 (41.4-44.3)

2010

7,677

14.7 (14.4-15.0)

3,241

40.2 (38.8-41.6)

2011

8,284

15.6 (15.3-16.0)

3,489

42.5 (41.1-44)

2012

8,099

15.1 (14.8-15.5)

3,403

41 (39.6-42.4)

2013

7,290

13.5 (13.2-13.8)

2,985

35.5 (34.2-36.8)

The three-year average of TB case reports and rates by local authority in London between 2011 and 2013 are shown below in Table 2 (three-year averages are provided, as single year numbers are too small to be stable for a number of locations).

Table 2

The confidence interval refers to the probable range that the value will fall within.

Local Authority

Average number of cases (2011-2013)

Average rate per 100,000 (95%CI)

Barking and Dagenham

67.0

35.2 (27.2 -44.7)

Barnet

94.3

25.8 (20.9 -31.6)

Bexley

31.0

13.2 (9.0 -18.8)

Brent

298.7

94.7 (84.3 -106.1)

Bromley

33.7

10.5 (7.2 -14.8)

Camden

59.0

26.2 (20.0 -33.8)

City of London

1.3

13.2 (0.3 -73.3)

Croydon

120.3

32.5 (27.0 -38.9)

Ealing

233.7

68.4 (59.9 -77.8)

Enfield

74.3

23.3 (18.3 -29.3)

Greenwich

115.7

44.2 (36.5 -53.1)

Hackney

88.0

34.9 (28.0 -43.0)

Hammersmith and Fulham

54.0

30.0 (22.6 -39.2)

Haringey

106.7

40.9 (33.5 -49.5)

Harrow

161.0

66.4 (56.6 -77.5)

Havering

24.7

10 (6.4 -14.9)

Hillingdon

123.3

43.7 (36.3 -52.1)

Hounslow

178.7

68.7 (59.0 -79.6)

Islington

71.7

33.6 (26.3 -42.4)

Kensington and Chelsea

38.3

24.4 (17.2 -33.4)

Kingston upon Thames

27.7

16.5 (10.9 -24.0)

Lambeth

91.0

29.3 (23.6 -36.0)

Lewisham

86.7

30.5 (24.4 -37.7)

Merton

65.3

32.1 (24.8 -41.0)

Newham

357.3

113.7 (102.2 -126.1)

Redbridge

155.3

54.5 (46.2 -63.7)

Richmond upon Thames

13.7

6.9 (3.7 -11.8)

Southwark

109.3

37.1 (30.5 -44.8)

Sutton

28.7

14.5 (9.6 -20.9)

Tower Hamlets

119.7

45.2 (37.5 -54.1)

Waltham Forest

121.7

46.1 (38.2 -55.1)

Wandsworth

80.7

25.9 (20.6 -32.3)

Westminster

60.0

26.8 (20.5 -34.5)

Source: ETS, Office for National Statistics. Data as at May 2014. Prepared by: TB Section, Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, Public Health England

Primary care trusts have now been replaced by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). The three-year average TB case reports and rates by CCGs in London between 2011-2013 are shown below in Table 3.

Table 3

The confidence interval refers to the probable range that the value will fall within.

CCG

Average number of cases (2011-2013)

Average rate per 100,000 (95%CI)

NHS Barking & Dagenham

67.0

35.2 (27.2 -44.7)

NHS Barnet

94.3

25.8 (20.9 -31.6)

NHS Bexley

31.0

13.2 (9 -18.8)

NHS Brent

298.7

94.7 (84.3 -106.1)

NHS Bromley

33.7

10.5 (7.2 -14.8)

NHS Camden

59.0

26.2 (20 -33.8)

NHS Central London (Westminster)

38.0

23.6 (16.7 -32.4)

NHS City and Hackney

89.3

34.3 (27.5 -42.2)

NHS Croydon

120.3

32.5 (27 -38.9)

NHS Ealing

233.7

68.4 (59.9 -77.8)

NHS Enfield

74.3

23.3 (18.3 -29.3)

NHS Greenwich

115.7

44.2 (36.5 -53.1)

NHS Hammersmith and Fulham

54.0

30 (22.6 -39.2)

NHS Haringey

106.7

40.9 (33.5 -49.5)

NHS Harrow

161.0

66.4 (56.6 -77.5)

NHS Havering

24.7

10 (6.4 -14.9)

NHS Hillingdon

123.3

44.8 (26.9 – 62.7)

NHS Hounslow

178.7

68.7 (59 -79.6)

NHS Islington

71.7

33.6 (26.3 -42.4)

NHS Kingston

27.7

16.5 (10.9 -24)

NHS Lambeth

91.0

29.3 (23.6 -36)

NHS Lewisham

86.7

30.5 (24.4 -37.7)

NHS Merton

65.3

32.1 (24.8 -41)

NHS Newham

357.3

113.7 (102.2 -126.1)

NHS Redbridge

155.3

54.5 (46.2 -63.7)

NHS Richmond

13.7

6.9 (3.7 -11.8)

NHS Southwark

109.3

37.1 (30.5 -44.8)

NHS Sutton

28.7

14.5 (9.6 -20.9)

NHS Tower Hamlets

119.7

45.2 (37.5 -54.1)

NHS Waltham Forest

121.7

46.1 (38.2 -55.1)

NHS Wandsworth

80.7

25.9 (20.6 -32.3)

NHS West London (Kensington and Chelsea, Queen's Park and Paddington)

60.3

27.4 (20.9 -35.3)

CI: confidence interval. Only cases with complete postcodes were mapped to CCGs

Sources: ETS, Office for National Statistics mid-year population estimates. Data as at May 2014. Prepared by: TB Section, Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, Public Health England

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of eligible people were immunised against TB in (a) England, (b) London, (c) primary care trusts in London and (d) London boroughs in each of the last five years.

The Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunisation programme is not a universal programme but a risk-based programme. In line with the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation recommendations, and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance, BCG vaccination is offered to certain population sub-groups in England through either a universal or targeted infant vaccination programme dependent on residence in a high-incidence area (one in which tuberculosis (TB) incidence exceeds 40 cases per 100,000 population) or an assessment of individual risk factors.

There are no published data on proportion of eligible people immunised against TB because of the problem of defining the denominator (i.e. the total number of vaccine eligible persons in the population).

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many incidents of (a) mumps, (b) measles, (c) rubella, (d) diphtheria, (e) tetanus, (f) pertussis, (g) hib disease there were in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) primary care trusts in London and (iv) London boroughs in each of the last five years.

National and regional data on the number of cases of measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) in England are published by Public Health England based on the number of laboratory confirmed cases. For tetanus, cases are based on clinical diagnosis only, although laboratory tests can support the diagnosis.

There are no published figures for laboratory confirmed cases by primary care trusts or London boroughs, because of the risk of deductive disclosure and because laboratories do not always report the area of residence of the case.

Number of laboratory confirmed cases of selected vaccine preventable diseases1, London and England: 2010 to 2014

Year

Measles (London region/

England)

Mumps

(London region/ England)

Rubella

(London region/ England)

Pertussis

(London region/ England)

Diphtheria2

(London region/ England)

Tetanus (London region/ England

Hib

London region/ England

2010

89/372

689/3880

7/12

55/409

2/2

1/10

4/28

2011

418/1068

318/2299

3/4

93/1053

1/2

1/3

2/20

2012

139/1912

213/2476

5/65

785/9367

0/1

1/6

2/14

2013

192/1413

461/3540

8/12

516/4621

1/3

0/6

3/19

2014

59/111

452/2224

1/33

537/3388

0/1

2/7

4/12

1All except cases of tetanus which are based on clinical diagnosis only.

2 None of the cases presented with ‘classical’ respiratory diphtheria. In England there were six cases of cutaneous diphtheria and three cases of mild respiratory diphtheria; in London there were three cases of cutaneous diphtheria and one case of mild respiratory diphtheria.

3 one of the three cases was not confirmed by laboratory testing.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of two year olds were immunised against (a) MMR and (b) diptheria, tetanus, pertussis and hib in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) primary care trusts in London and (iv) London boroughs in each of the last five years.

The information requested is set out in the tables below. The latest annual vaccine uptake data relate to 2013/14. The areas covered by London Boroughs and London primary care trusts (PCT) (which were abolished from April 2013) are generally coterminous. The tables below show vaccine uptake by PCT areas.

(a) Percentage uptake of one dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine by two years of age (%)

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

England

88.2

89.1

91.2

92.3

92.7

London

81.9

83.8

86.1

87.1

87.5

PCTs

Barking and Dagenham

83.2

81.4

85.7

88.5

88.1

Barnet

87.7

89.6

92.7

87.8

80.7

Bexley

75.3

81.3

85.4

88.5

90.7

Brent Teaching

81.5

88.2

91.6

91.8

89.4

Bromley

81.3

83.6

91.5

90.6

91.2

Camden

73.0

77.3

85.0

85.0

87.3

City & Hackney Teaching

79.0

75.4

81.0

85.7

89.0

Croydon

83.7

82.1

83.5

86.5

88.9

Ealing

85.3

86.5

89.1

89.3

89.3

Enfield

80.6

77.1

80.0

82.8

78.3

Greenwich Teaching

74.3

82.6

83.3

85.2

86.1

Hammersmith and Fulham

76.3

80.5

82.6

83.7

82.7

Haringey Teaching

85.3

85.3

88.1

92.0

89.8

Harrow

84.4

88.1

91.6

92.5

92.1

Havering

78.5

85.6

89.9

91.3

88.7

Hillingdon

87.3

89.0

91.3

90.8

90.8

Hounslow

80.4

81.8

86.1

87.7

87.8

Islington

82.0

85.4

90.7

91.6

88.0

Kensington and Chelsea

84.3

86.1

82.9

81.3

80.4

Kingston upon Thames

85.1

83.7

89.3

88.6

89.5

Lambeth

81.0

82.3

83.4

89.1

90.4

Lewisham

78.3

81.2

85.7

86.3

89.1

Newham

79.3

80.8

79.2

82.2

85.1

Redbridge

82.2

85.2

86.5

89.7

88.0

Richmond &Twickenham

80.0

85.3

86.5

88.0

89.0

Southwark

80.0

80.4

82.3

85.7

88.9

Sutton & Merton

82.9

81.6

78.7

80.7

85.0

Tower Hamlets

84.0

94.4

93.9

93.8

93.8

Waltham Forest

84.0

87.0

88.4

87.2

84.8

Wandsworth

85.7

82.4

86.0

82.8

88.6

Westminster

91.3

89.3

82.1

77.4

79.5

(b) Percentage uptake of three doses of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine by two years of age (%)

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

England

95.3

96.0

96.1

96.3

96.1

London

90.8

92.9

93.3

93.6

93.1

PCTs

Barking and Dagenham

87.6

88.7

91.5

94.2

92.5

Barnet

94.0

95.0

96.9

94.3

93.4

Bexley

89.1

93.6

95.7

96.4

96.2

Brent Teaching

90.3

93.7

95.4

95.8

95.1

Bromley

91.1

93.4

96.4

96.0

96.1

Camden

88.0

90.3

94.0

93.7

95.0

City & Hackney Teaching

85.3

89.6

89.9

91.4

91.6

Croydon

94.4

94.0

93.4

94.1

94.5

Ealing

95.3

95.7

96.8

96.8

96.9

Enfield

88.9

87.3

87.9

90.5

89.1

Greenwich Teaching

85.8

92.4

93.2

93.4

93.5

Hammersmith and Fulham

90.5

92.5

92.8

91.7

86.4

Haringey Teaching

90.4

92.2

91.6

94.6

93.6

Harrow

95.2

96.5

95.5

96.6

95.9

Havering

86.4

94.4

94.4

95.8

93.1

Hillingdon

96.3

96.2

96.5

96.3

95.6

Hounslow

91.3

93.1

94.7

93.7

93.3

Islington

92.0

93.5

96.4

97.8

92.0

Kensington and Chelsea

95.0

94.3

89.3

88.5

85.0

Kingston upon Thames

94.5

95.0

96.1

96.0

96.2

Lambeth

92.6

93.3

92.9

95.5

95.3

Lewisham

88.7

91.8

92.8

89.9

91.8

Newham

88.0

88.5

90.8

91.0

91.9

Redbridge

90.6

92.6

93.4

94.8

94.1

Richmond &Twickenham

92.3

94.7

94.6

95.1

94.9

Southwark

91.5

91.4

90.2

93.1

94.4

Sutton & Merton

85.7

91.8

90.0

89.2

86.5

Tower Hamlets

94.3

97.7

97.3

97.3

97.3

Waltham Forest

93.6

94.8

94.7

94.6

92.0

Wandsworth

86.9

91.6

92.5

91.2

94.1

Westminster

92.4

93.2

85.7

81.9

81.6

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many emergency admissions there were for asthma in London in each of the last five years.

The attached table shows the number of emergency finished admission episodes where there was a primary diagnosis of asthma for London Strategic Health Authority of treatment in 2009-10 and NHS England’s London area team of treatment in 2010-11 to 2013-14.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the rate of (a) asthma and (b) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was in (i) England, (ii) London and (iii) each London borough in each of the last five years.

The number of people recorded on the disease register and the prevalence for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, at England level from 2009-10 to 2013-14 is provided in the attached table. Data is provided at Area Team and Clinical Commissioning Group level for 2012/13 and 2013/14 and at Strategic Health Authority and Primary Care Trust level for 2009/10 to 2011/12.

Data for the London boroughs can also be found in the accompanying spreadsheet.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children aged (a) four to five years and (b) 10 to 11 years were recorded as obese in (i) England, (ii) London, (iii) each primary care trust in London and (iv) each London borough in each of the last five years.

Data on the National Child Measurement Programme are not available by primary care trust. Table 1 presents the number of children aged four to five years who were recorded as obese for each London Borough, the London region and England for the period 2009/10 to 2013/14. Figures for the London Borough of Hackney also include City of London (to prevent potential disclosure of individuals). Table 2 presents the data for children aged 10 to 11 years. These tables are attached.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many working days (a) in total and (b) on average per staff member were lost due to sickness in the London Ambulance Service in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014.

The information is not available in the format requested.

The attached table shows the number of working days lost due to sickness absence for the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust from February 2010 - February 2014.

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many full-time equivalent unfilled vacancies there were in the London Ambulance Service on 1 June (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013, (e) 2014 and (f) 2015.

The full-time equivalent unfilled vacancies as of 1 June 2015 Service wide (front-line and corporate services) was as follows:

439.52 in 2012

575.43 in 2013

688.86 in 2014

403.94 in 2015

No data is available before 2012.

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many Surge Ambers, Surge Reds and Surge Purples were recorded by the London Ambulance Service in each year since 2010; and what the reasons were for each such surge.

The borough level information requested is not held centrally.

Information for London as a whole is routinely published on the NHS England website at the following address:

http://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many complaints of each type were received against the London Ambulance Service in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not held centrally.

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of Category A ambulance calls were responded to within eight minutes in May (a) 2015, (b) 2014, (c) 2013, (d) 2012, (e) 2011 and (f) 2010 in (i) each London borough and (ii) London.

The borough level information requested is not held centrally.

Information for London as a whole is routinely published on the NHS England website at the following address:

http://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of Category B ambulance calls were responded to within 19 minutes in May (a) 2015, (b) 2014, (c) 2013, (d) 2012, (e) 2011 and (f) 2010 in (i) each London borough and (ii) London.

The borough level information requested is not held centrally.

Information for London as a whole is routinely published on the NHS England website at the following address:

http://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people in London have died as a result of air pollution in each year since 2010; and if he will estimate the number of such deaths in the next 10 years.

Estimates of the fraction of mortality in English local authority areas and regions attributable to long-term exposure to particulate air pollution arising from human activities are published by Public Health England as one of the indicators in the Department’s Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF). For London, this figure was approximately 7.2% in 2010 and 2011 and 6.6% in 2012; the figures for later years are not currently available. These estimates for later years will be published on an annual basis under the PHOF.

16th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of cancer patients started treatment within 62 days in (a) London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the attached table.

16th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many cancelled operations there were in (a) London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the attached table detailing cancelled operations in London by hospital trust since 2010.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the median time was from arrival to treatment in accident and emergency units in (a) all of London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the attached tables.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the median time was from arrival to assessment in accident and emergency units in (a) all of London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the attached tables.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the median time between arrival and departure from accident and emergency was in (a) London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is shown in the attached tables.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the median waiting time for GP appointments was in (a) London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

The information requested is not available centrally.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the median ambulance response time was for each category of call in (a) London and (b) each London trust in each year since 2010.

This information is not available in the format requested.

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of the Department’s transparency programme, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department’s website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder.

www.contractsfinder.co.uk/

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

The Department contracts for a wide variety of services to support delivery of its objectives and is committed to providing services in the most efficient way possible to provide the best value for taxpayers.

The Department's central procurement system does not have a separate category nor any central means of consistently identifying spend on activities where they are contracted out for each year. To provide comprehensive spend would mean going back to each business area and Directorate in the Department and consulting on which of the contracts they commissioned are activities considered to be contracted out. This would incur disproportionate costs.

The Department publishes information on newly awarded contracts on Contracts Finder, the government on-line facility for the publication of tendering opportunities and contract information. Contracts Finder may be found at:

http://contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/

6th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many cases of HIV were reported in prisons in England and Wales in each of the last four years.

The following table provides information on the number of adults (aged 15 and above) identified as being resident in prison at the time they received human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment from specialist services. The source of the data provided is the Survey of Prevalent HIV Infection.

Number of prisoners

2009

184

2010

176

2011

190

2012

181

Notes:

  1. Prisoners were identified if an adult's residential postcode was a prison postcode. However, the completeness and accuracy depends on clinicians' reports. Although completeness of full postcode is high (>90%) in each of these four years, it is still possible that partial postcode, missing postcode or clinic postcode instead of residential postcode was provided. This may lead to an underestimate of numbers in the table.

  1. Data on patients (including prisoners) seen for care at non-National Health Service funded services are not included.

  1. Prisoners with a short sentence might be seen for care after release and therefore not captured in this table.

Recording of prison status is not routine and numbers are likely to be under-reported. This data does not imply that transmission of infection happened while the person was in prison or that the diagnosis was made during the period of incarceration.

Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset data shows that the number of new HIV infections diagnosed in serving prisoners in England in 2011 was nine and in 2012 was 17.

6th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many incidences of sexually transmitted diseases were reported in prisons in England and Wales in each of the last four years.

Data on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are now sourced from the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset, Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) services return. Data from GUM clinics on prisoners are unavailable prior to 2011.

For the most recent two years for which data is available, the following table shows all new STI diagnoses among prisoners in England. Data from Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset relate only to GUM services which are located in England.

2011*

2012**

Chlamydia (GUM clinic diagnoses only, all ages)

97

155

Gonorrhoea

11

19

Herpes: anogenital herpes (1st episode)

11

8

Syphilis: primary, secondary and early latent

<5

6

Warts: anogenital warts (1st episode)

226

380

All new STIs***

495

773

HIV diagnoses

9

17

*Data on prisoners are significantly underreported in 2011

** 2012 data for chlamydia and all new STIs are not comparable to data from previous years

*** All new STIs include new HIV infections diagnosed when a person was a prisoner, explained further at point 4 of the explanatory notes for table one.

Notes:

1. Data follow calendar years (January to December), not financial years (April to March).

2. Data represent the number of diagnoses reported and not the number of people diagnosed.

3. 2012 data for chlamydia and “All new STIs” are not comparable to data from previous years. Chlamydia diagnoses made among prisoners in GUM clinics that were reported as “previously diagnosed at another service” have been excluded from 2012 data only.

4. Data for “All New STIs” include: chancroid; lymphogranuloma venerum (LGV); donovanosis; chlamydia; gonorrhoea; herpes: anogenital herpes (1st episode); HIV: new diagnosis; molluscum contagiosum; non-specific genital infection; pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and epididymitis: non-specific; scabies; pediculus pubis; syphilis: primary, secondary and early latent; trichomoniasis and warts: anogenital warts (1st episode).

5. Data on prisoners are significantly underreported in 2011 due to the phased introduction of Sexual Health and HIV Activity Property Types (SHHAPT) STI surveillance codes.

6. Number of diagnoses between 1 and 4 with a population <10,000 are presented as ‘<5' to prevent deductive disclosure. Please see link for further details on data sharing and confidentiality:

www.hpa.org.uk/webc/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1247816526850

The following table also contains the number of chlamydia diagnoses among prisoners aged 15-24 years in England for 2009-2011. Data are sourced from the National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP). Data from NCSP relate only to NCSP services which are located in England.

2009

2010

2011

2012

Chlamydia (NCSP diagnoses outside GUM clinics, 15-24 years only)

1,179

1,292

1,209

N/A

Notes:

1. Chlamydia data from community services are sourced from the National Chlamydia Screening Programme for 2009-2011 only. Since 2012, this data source has been replaced by a new laboratory reporting system (CTAD) that does not indicate diagnoses made among prisoners.

2. Data follow calendar years (January to December), not financial years (April to March).

3. Data represent the number of diagnoses reported and not the number of people diagnosed.

4. Data include chlamydia diagnoses from people aged 15-24 only.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many hospital attendances there were from each prison in each of the last four years.

This information is not collected centrally by the Department or NHS England.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many hospital attendances there were from the (a) adult male, (b) adult female, (c) youth male, (d) youth female and (e) total prison estate in each of the last four years.

This information is not collected centrally by the Department or NHS England.

9th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, when he plans to answer Question 205687, tabled on 14 July 2014.

I responded to the right hon. Member's Question (PQ 205687) on 21 July 2014.

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of this Government's commitment to increasing transparency, all contracts over £10,000 are published at http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

Procurement responsibilities are devolved to directorates in the UK and our network of posts. Information regarding outsourced activities is not held centrally in the UK and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which estate agents in London have been penalised for failing to comply with the Money Laundering Regulations 2007 in each year since the introduction of those regulations; and what the level of the fine was in each such case.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is unable to provide any information which would identify its customers. The Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005 gives HMRC a duty of confidentiality which applies to all information it holds in connection with its functions.

In 2014-15 HMRC issued 677 penalties to the total value of £768,000. This is for all HMRC supervised businesses in the UK. The total includes estate agency businesses which HMRC supervised from 1 April 2014. This is three times the total value of penalties issued in 2013-14.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many estate agents in (a) England and Wales and (b) London have been penalised for failing to comply with the Money Laundering Regulations 2007.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is unable to provide any information which would identify its customers. The Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005 gives HMRC a duty of confidentiality which applies to all information it holds in connection with its functions.

In 2014-15 HMRC issued 677 penalties to the total value of £768,000. This is for all HMRC supervised businesses in the UK. The total includes estate agency businesses which HMRC supervised from 1 April 2014. This is three times the total value of penalties issued in 2013-14.

11th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much the climate change levy raised from non-domestic users in London in each year since 2010.

The climate change levy is collected on a national basis from energy suppliers and it is not possible to break down receipts by region. Detail on Climate Change Levy receipts on a national basis can be found at https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutyBulletins.aspx.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
24th Nov 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much his Department has spent on external legal fees relating to the case at the European Court of Justice on the cap on bankers' bonuses.

The total cost of external legal fees relating to the legal challenge and connected advice is £42, 857.

14th Jul 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of the government’s transparency agenda, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department’s website at GOV.UK. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police stations in London (a) had and (b) did not have custody nurses working in them in each year since 2010.

The provision and commissioning of police custody nurses is the responsibility of individual Police and Crime Commissioners, and police custody nurse staffing and availability levels are an operational policing matter in conjunction with the custody healthcare service provider. Information on these issues is not held centrally by the Home Office.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions custody nurses were not available in police stations when required in each year since 2010.

The provision and commissioning of police custody nurses is the responsibility of individual Police and Crime Commissioners, and police custody nurse staffing and availability levels are an operational policing matter in conjunction with the custody healthcare service provider. Information on these issues is not held centrally by the Home Office.

23rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the custody nurse vacancy rate was in (a) total and (b) each London borough in the Metropolitan Police area on 1 January of each year since 2010.

The provision and commissioning of police custody healthcare services including custody nurses is the responsibility of individual Police and Crime Commissioners, and healthcare staffing levels are an operational policing matter in conjunction with the custody healthcare service provider. Information on these issues is not held centrally by the Home Office.

23rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many crimes in (a) England and Wales, (b) London and (c) each London borough were related to or caused by some kind of mental health issue in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of crimes related to or caused by mental health issues. The Home Office receives data from police forces in England and Wales which show the number of offences recorded. It is not possible to determine which of these were related to or caused by any type of mental health issue.

23rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidents there were of no custody nurses being available in police stations when required in each year since 2010.

The provision and commissioning of police custody healthcare services including custody nurses is the responsibility of individual Police and Crime Commissioners, and healthcare staffing levels are an operational policing matter in conjunction with the custody healthcare service provider. Information on these issues is not held centrally by the Home Office.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the (a) longest, (b) shortest and (c) average time serving police borough commanders have been in post in London boroughs.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of police borough commanders in each London Borough, or the length of time that they have been in post. This information is likely to the held by the Metropolitan Police Force.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police borough commanders there have been in post in each London borough since 2008.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of police borough commanders in each London Borough, or the length of time that they have been in post. This information is likely to the held by the Metropolitan Police Force.

25th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Muslim women reported being the victim of abuse or hate crime in each police authority area in England and Wales in (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015; and how many such reports (i) have been investigated, (b) resulted in prosecution and (c) resulted in a conviction.

The Home Office does not hold the requested information. While the Home Office collects information on the number of recorded hate crimes by police force area, we cannot tell from these data the religion or the sex of the victim.

The Home Office does not hold information on prosecutions; these figures are the responsibility of the Ministry of Justice.

I refer the Right Honourable Member to my answer of 3 November in response to question 13254. In the future, we intend to collect a breakdown of religion-based hate crime data from the police to help forces build community trust, target their resources and enable the public to better hold them to account.

17th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people from (a) EU and (b) non-EU countries who have been classified as homeless have been returned to their home countries in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not record information in relation to homelessness. We do encounter rough sleepers during enforcement operations and, depending on the individual circumstances, non-UK rough sleepers can be removed or deported. In these situations, the Immigration Enforcement teams will ensure that vulnerable individuals are also connected to support services in their home countries.

For vulnerable individuals who are sleeping rough on the streets, there are locally funded reconnection services they can approach voluntarily to help them return to their home countries voluntarily and connect into support services there. We do not hold data on those who are returned using this service.

Therefore, any information we hold does not provide a complete and accurate picture of those who have returned home.

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of incidents in which tasers were used by the police in London in each of the last five years resulted in (a) an arrest, (b) a charge and (c) a conviction.

Accurate, consistent data on police use of force is essential to improve transparency around how the police are using their sensitive powers. That is why the Home Secretary asked Chief Constable David Shaw to carry out an in depth review of Taser data and other use of force, and present options for collecting, collating and publishing data on how force including Taser is being used, who it is being used on and what the outcomes are.

Data is not recorded centrally on how many and what proportion of incidents in which Tasers were used by the police in London in each of the last five years resulted in an arrest, a charge and a conviction.

Existing data on the police use of Taser by sex, age and ethnicity from 2010 to 2014, including that released under Freedom of Information, is not of a quality standard suitable for publication as Official or National statistics, and this data is not broken down by London borough.

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people on whom the police used tasers were (a) BAME, (b) women and (c) under the age of 18 in each London borough in each of the last five years.

Accurate, consistent data on police use of force is essential to improve transparency around how the police are using their sensitive powers. That is why the Home Secretary asked Chief Constable David Shaw to carry out an in depth review of Taser data and other use of force, and present options for collecting, collating and publishing data on how force including Taser is being used, who it is being used on and what the outcomes are.

Data is not recorded centrally on how many and what proportion of incidents in which Tasers were used by the police in London in each of the last five years resulted in an arrest, a charge and a conviction.

Existing data on the police use of Taser by sex, age and ethnicity from 2010 to 2014, including that released under Freedom of Information, is not of a quality standard suitable for publication as Official or National statistics, and this data is not broken down by London borough.

23rd Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people in (a) the UK and (b) London have gained dual citizenship (i) in total and (ii) with citizenship of each EU member state in each year from 2010 to 2015 to date.

No statistical information is available showing whether British citizens hold another citizenship.

23rd Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times tasers have been used by the police in each London borough in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold information centrally on the number of times Taser have been used by the police in each London borough over the last five years.

The Home Office publishes information on the number of times Taser have been used by police forces. The following table shows the number of times Taser has been used over the last five years by the London Metropolitan police and City of London police force.


Taser use by forces in London between 2010 and 2014

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

City of London

5

7

12

13

20

Metropolitan

359

378

755

2,110

1,942

Total

364

385

767

2,123

1,962

Source: Police use of Taser, England and Wales

Notes:

1. Since 2009 there was a continual roll out of Taser which saw all forces using Taser in 2013

2. Care should be taken when making comparisons between forces on the level of Taser use. This is due to the varying data quality across the forces and that the level of Taser use it likely to be highly correlated with the size of the population in the force area. Forces will also have different policies regarding Taser use.

3. There are a number of factors that may lead to an increase or a decrease in the use of Taser. These figures should not be used to interpret how any single factor is changing, for example, the level of crime.

23rd Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many incidents of each type of hate crime were recorded on public transport in London in each year since 2010.

The Home Office does not hold the requested data centrally. While the Home Office collects data on the number of hate crimes recorded by the police in London, we cannot tell from these data whether they took place on public transport or not. Furthermore, data are also collected from the British Transport Police but we cannot tell from these data whether the offence took place in London or elsewhere.

Recognising that hate crime is a serious and persistent issue, the Government is committed to developing a new hate crime action plan, working in partnership with communities to ensure we have strong measures to stop and respond to these deplorable crimes. In future, for the first time, the police will provide a breakdown in religion-based hate crime data to help forces build community trust, target their resources and enable the public to better hold them to account.

The most recently available figures for these police forces can be found in Hate Crimes, England and Wales, 2014/15, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hate-crime-england-and-wales-2014-to-2015

21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much was paid out in compensation (a) in total and (b) per case to victims of racial abuse by police officers in London in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office and may be held by the force itself.

16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints of racism upheld against Metropolitan Police officers resulted in (a) no action taken, (b) suspension, (c) other disciplinary measures and (d) dismissal in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) publishes quarterly data on police complaints for each force, which includes a breakdown of the nature of allegations recorded. The category of ‘Discriminatory Behaviour’ includes incidents of racism.

The IPCC also holds a more detailed breakdown of the category information, but does not hold information of the disciplinary outcomes subsequent to the complaints. This information may be held by the force itself.

I have asked the IPCC to write to the Honourable Member with the information it has available and will arrange for a copy to be placed in the House Library.

16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints of racism were (a) made and (b) upheld against Metropolitan Police officers in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) publishes quarterly data on police complaints for each force, which includes a breakdown of the nature of allegations recorded. The category of ‘Discriminatory Behaviour’ includes incidents of racism.

The IPCC also holds a more detailed breakdown of the category information, but does not hold information of the disciplinary outcomes subsequent to the complaints. This information may be held by the force itself.

I have asked the IPCC to write to the Honourable Member with the information it has available and will arrange for a copy to be placed in the House Library.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who were (a) under five, (b) five, (c) six, (d) seven, (e) eight, (f) nine, (g) 10, (h) 11, (i) 12, (j) 13, (k) 14, (l) 15 and (m) 16 were subject to stop and search in each year from 2010 to 2014 in (i) London and (ii) each London borough.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the age of people who are stopped and searched, or subsequently arrested.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people aged under 16 were (a) subject to stop and search and (b) subsequently arrested in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014 in (A) London and (B) each London borough.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the age of people who are stopped and searched, or subsequently arrested.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people of each recorded ethnic group were (a) subject to stop and search and (b) subsequently arrested in (i) London and (ii) each London borough in (A) 2010, (B) 2011, (C) 2012, (D) 2013 and (E) 2014

Table 1 shows the number of stops and searches made by police in the Metropolitan Police Service and the City of London Police combined, for each financial year from 2009/10-2013/14. Table 2 shows the number of these stops and searches that resulted in arrests in each of these years. In both tables data are shown for each different ethnic group, as well as a total across all groups.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally for lower levels of geography, such as individual London boroughs.

14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were (a) subject to stop and search and (b) subsequently arrested in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014 in (A) London and (B) each London borough.

Table 1 shows the number of stops and searches made by police in the Metropolitan Police Service and the City of London Police combined, for each financial year from 2009/10-2013/14. Table 2 shows the number of these stops and searches that resulted in arrests in each of these years. In both tables data are shown for each different ethnic group, as well as a total across all groups.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally for lower levels of geography, such as individual London boroughs.

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many officers there were in the British Transport Police in London in each year since 2008.

The Home Office collects figures on the number of officers in the British Transport Police, but cannot separately identify those who work in London.

The numbers of full time equivalent officers working in BTP included in the table below. These cannot be broken down regionally.

As at:

Number of officers

31 Mar 2008

2,579

31 Mar 2009

2,638

31 Mar 2010

2,677

31 Mar 2011

2,631

31 Mar 2012

2,557

31 Mar 2013

2,652

31 Mar 2014

2,912

30 Sep 2014

2,912

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of the Metropolitan Police Service were (a) female and (b) black and minority ethnic in each year since 2008.

Table 1 shows the number of police officers recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), and the proportion that were female or black and minority ethnic (BME) for each financial year from 2007/08 to 2013/14.

Table 2 shows the proportion of the total MPS workforce that was female or BME at the end of each financial year from 2007/08 to 2013/14.

Police officers recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service, 2007/08 to 2013/141,2,3
Metropolitan Police
Percentages
Total number of recruits (FTE) FemaleBlack and minority ethnic
2007/081,736 2913
2008/092,631 3113
2009/101,980 3015
2010/11432 2716
2011/121,498 2716
2012/13187 2420
2013/142,343 3016
Source: Home Office
Notes
1. Includes transfers from other England and Wales forces but does not include staff returning after a period of secondment.
2. This table contains full-time equivalent (FTE) figures that have been presented to the nearest whole number.
3. Breakdowns by ethnicity are not regularly published; they have not been verified by police forces and should be treated as provisional. Total police officer joiner figures, by police force area, rank and gender are published each year in the 'Police Workforce, England and Wales' (previously titled 'Police Service Strength, England and Wales') statistical publications which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales.
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers were recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service in each year since 2008; and what proportion of such officers were (i) female and (ii) black and minority ethnic.

Table 1 shows the number of police officers recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), and the proportion that were female or black and minority ethnic (BME) for each financial year from 2007/08 to 2013/14.

Table 2 shows the proportion of the total MPS workforce that was female or BME at the end of each financial year from 2007/08 to 2013/14.

Police officers recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service, 2007/08 to 2013/141,2,3
Metropolitan Police
Percentages
Total number of recruits (FTE) FemaleBlack and minority ethnic
2007/081,736 2913
2008/092,631 3113
2009/101,980 3015
2010/11432 2716
2011/121,498 2716
2012/13187 2420
2013/142,343 3016
Source: Home Office
Notes
1. Includes transfers from other England and Wales forces but does not include staff returning after a period of secondment.
2. This table contains full-time equivalent (FTE) figures that have been presented to the nearest whole number.
3. Breakdowns by ethnicity are not regularly published; they have not been verified by police forces and should be treated as provisional. Total police officer joiner figures, by police force area, rank and gender are published each year in the 'Police Workforce, England and Wales' (previously titled 'Police Service Strength, England and Wales') statistical publications which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales.
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of Metropolitan Police time was spent on the front line in each year since 2008.

The Home Office does not hold information centrally on the proportion of police time spent on the front line.

The Home Office does collect police officer functions data, which is used by HMIC to calculate the number of operational frontline police officers in each police force area. These figures (and information on visible police officers) are published from 2010 onwards as part of the ‘Valuing the Police’ inspection programme, which can be found at: http://www.hmic.gov.uk/data/valuing-the-police-data/. These figures relate to each officer’s predominant function over the year, rather than the proportion of their working time.

According to HMIC figures, as at 31 March 2015, 91% of Met police officers’ predominant function over the year was on the front line.

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service in each year since 2010; and how many such officers are (a) of BAME origin and (b) women.

The tables provided show the number of police officer and police staff joiners,
by joining type, for the Metropolitan Police Service from 2009/10 to 2013/14.
The tables include minority ethnic and female breakdowns.

Of the 79 people who provisionally accepted a place on the Metropolitan
Police’s innovative new programme Police Now, 16% are from an ethnic minority
background (correct as of January 2015).

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many administrative staff have been recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service in each year since 2010; and how many such staff are (a) of BAME origin and (b) women.

The tables provided show the number of police officer and police staff joiners,
by joining type, for the Metropolitan Police Service from 2009/10 to 2013/14.
The tables include minority ethnic and female breakdowns.

Of the 79 people who provisionally accepted a place on the Metropolitan
Police’s innovative new programme Police Now, 16% are from an ethnic minority
background (correct as of January 2015).

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of the Home Office transparency programme, any spend over £25,000 is available on the Department’s website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much and what proportion of her Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of her Department's budget she expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

This table shows what was spent on contracted out activities in the period
2009-10 to 2014-15, as a proportion of the Home Office's budget.

Figures in £ Millions

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

FY 11/12

FY 12/13

FY 13/14

FY 14/15

Spend on activities which were contracted out

32.30

74.53

47.88

40.84

48.52

118.35

Total Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit Budget

9,026.05

12,346.68

11,679.05

11,051.87

10,567.52

10,729.81

Proportion as a percentage

0.36

0.60

0.41

0.37

0.46

1.10

Note that:
• Her Majesty’s Passport Service was omitted from our 09/10 figures. At the
time, HMPO had its own accounts and budgets.
• For 14/15, expenditure on Information Technology and Communications was reclassified from an internal cost, to a contracted out service.
• Expenditure on Information Technology and Communications was reclassified
from an internal cost, to a contracted out service.
• Between 09/10 and 10/11we restated the Core Tables to reflect the inclusion
of a Police Grant (relating to the rates) that was previously paid by DCLG, but
which at that time became part of Home Office’s remit. This accounts for the
£3 billion step-change in Home Office expenditure

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost was of renaming (a) the Case Resolution Directorate in 2011 and (b) the Case Assurance and Audit Unit in 2013.

It is not possible to answer the question, as information is not held in the
appropriate format and to extract the data would incur disproportionate cost.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost was of running (a) the Case Resolution Directorate, (b) the Case Assurance and Audit Unit and (c) the Older Live Cases Unit in each year of those bodies' operations.

The operational costs of running the Case Resolution Directorate (excluding
enforcement costs, detention and removal escort costs or asylum and immigration
tribunal costs) was approximately £32 million per year. The costs are inclusive
of an outsourced administrative function in 2009-2011. Support costs for
applicants were accounted for separately for this period.

The total running costs of the Case Assurance and Audit Unit was £27.4 million
(2011/ 2012) and £19. 5million (2012/ 2013). The total running costs of the Older Live
Cases Unit was £7.8 million (2013/ 2014). The Older Live Cases Unit budget spend to
date for 2014/ 2015 is £1.87 million. Since setting up the Case Resolution Directorate,
operational running costs have decreased year on year.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many contract or temporary employees are employed in the Older Live Cases Unit; and what proportion of the overall staff count are contract or temporary employees.

There were 208 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) temporary agency workers employed on
OLCU casework at the end of Q1 2014, this was equal to 62.7% of the overall
staff at the time. FTE means that part time employees are counted by the
proportion of full time hours they work, so that staff working half the time of
an equivalent full time colleague would count as 0.5 FTE.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time staff are employed in the Older Live Cases Unit.

There were 332 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff employed by OLCU at the end of
Q1 2014. FTE means that part time employees are counted by the proportion of
full time hours they work, so that staff working half the time of an equivalent
full time colleague would count as 0.5 FTE.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many contract or temporary employees were employed in (a) the Case Resolution Directorate and (b) the Case Assurance and Audit Unit in each year of those bodies' existence; and what proportion of the overall staff of such bodies were contract or temporary employees.

The Case Resolution Directorate (CRD) employed a total of 350 temporary staff
during the summer 2011. It is not possible to provide a breakdown of how many
contract/ temporary employees were employed for each year that CRD was in
existence.

The Case Assurance and Audit Unit (CAAU) employed 98 Full Time Equivalent (FTE)
staff in 2011, 134 FTE staff in 2012 and 224 FTE staff in 2013. It is not
possible to break this down by how many were contract/temporary employees or
employed full time. FTE means that part time employees are counted by the
proportion of full time hours they work, so that staff working half the time of
an equivalent full time colleague would count as 0.5 FTE.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time employees were employed in (a) the Case Resolution Directorate and (b) the Case Assurance and Audit Unit in each year of those bodies' existence.

The Case Resolution Directorate (CRD) employed a total of 1300 caseworkers in
40 regional teams during its existence. It is not possible to provide a
breakdown by each year that CRD was in existence.

The Case Assurance and Audit Unit (CAAU) employed 98 Full Time Equivalent (FTE)
staff in 2011, 134 FTE staff in 2012 and 224 FTE staff in 2013. FTE means that
part time employees are counted by the proportion of full time hours they work,
so that staff working half the time of an equivalent full time colleague would
count as 0.5 FTE.

6th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to the public purse has been of the conversion of HM Prison The Verne into an immigration removal centre.

£5.4 million has been spent to date on the conversion of HM Prison The Verne into an Immigration Removal Centre.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason each foreign national in prison awaiting deportation who is beyond the end of their sentence is yet to be deported.

The information requested can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average length of time spent in prison awaiting deportation for those foreign national prisoners beyond the end of their sentence was in the latest period for which figures are available.

The average length of time Foreign National Offenders (FNOs) were held in
prison beyond the end of their sentence pending deportation, as of 31 December
2013 is 234 calendar days. This is the mean average, calculated using the table
shown below which was provided in response to PQ 195817.

It should be noted that the small number of FNOs who fall in the 24-60 and 60+
months categories (45 individuals out of 850) heavily skew the mean. By way of
context, the modal average length of time in prison for the same cases is 32
days.

[INSERT PQ TABLE HERE]

1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are
therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been
quality assured under National Statistics protocols.
2. Figures relate to main applicants only.
3. Figures relate to FNO cases who met the criteria for deportation only.
4. Figures rounded to the nearest 5 ( - = 0, * = 1 or 2) and may not sum to the
totals shown because of independent rounding.
5. Data is a snapshot of individuals detained in prison on 31 December 2013.


We make every effort to ensure that a person's removal by deportation
coincides, as far as possible, with his/her release from prison on completion
of sentence. Where a detainee refuses to cooperate with the removal or
deportation process, detention may be prolonged.

The Immigration Bill will have a significant impact on the ability of FNOs to
delay removal by mounting legal challenges whilst in the UK. The current
appeals system means that 17 different types of decision can be appealed. The
Immigration Bill will simplify the appeals system and mean that appeals can
only be brought where the Home Office has refused a protection (asylum or
humanitarian protection) claim, a human rights claim or a claim based on EU
free movement rights. It will also give us the power to certify that where
deportation will not cause serious irreversible harm, the appeal will be heard
after the FNO has left the country.



To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been spent on converting HM Prison The Verne for use as an immigration removal centre to date.

£4 million has been spent to date on the conversion of HM Prison The Verne into
an Immigration Removal Centre. The work is about 60% complete and in total is
expected to cost approximately £8.5 million in line with the approved budget.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign nationals in prison awaiting deportation beyond the end of their sentence have spent (a) up to one month, (b) up to two months, (c) up to six months, (d) up to 12 months, (e) up to 24 months, (f) up to 60 months and (g) over 60 months awaiting deportation.

The table below shows the number of time served Foreign National Offenders
(FNOs) in prison pending deportation, based on the length of time held beyond
the end of their sentence, as of 31 December 2013.

Time held beyond end of sentence

Total

0-1 month

110

1-2 months

110

2-6 months

285

6-12 months

200

12-24 months

100

24-60 months

35

60+ months

10

Grand Total

850

1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are
therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been
quality assured under National Statistics protocols.
2. Figures relate to main applicants only.
3. Figures relate to FNO cases who met the criteria for deportation only.
4. Figures rounded to the nearest 5 ( - = 0, * = 1 or 2) and may not sum to the
totals shown because of independent rounding.
5. Data is a snapshot of individuals detained in prison on 31 December 2013.

We make every effort to ensure that a person's removal by deportation
coincides, as far as possible, with his/her release from prison on completion
of sentence. Where a detainee refuses to cooperate with the removal or
deportation process, detention may be prolonged.

The Immigration Bill will have a significant impact on the ability of FNOs to
delay removal by mounting legal challenges whilst in the UK. The current
appeals system means that 17 different types of decision can be appealed. The
Immigration Bill will simplify the appeals system and mean that appeals can
only be brought where the Home Office has refused a protection (asylum or
humanitarian protection) claim, a human rights claim or a claim based on EU
free movement rights. It will also give us the power to certify that where
deportation will not cause serious irreversible harm, the appeal will be heard
after the FNO has left the country.


To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign nationals who have served their sentence but are awaiting deportation there are in each prison.

The number of Foreign National Offenders (FNOs) detained in prison beyond the
end of their sentence pending deportation (as of 31 December 2013) is shown in
the table below:

Prison Name

Total

HMP & YOI Isis

10

HMP Addiewell

*

HMP Altcourse

*

HMP Aylesbury

5

HMP Barlinnie

5

HMP Bedford

5

HMP Belmarsh

10

HMP Birmingham (Winson Green)

15

HMP Brinsford

5

HMP Bristol

5

HMP Brixton

10

HMP Bronzefield

10

HMP Bullingdon

25

HMP Bure

5

HMP Cardiff

5

HMP Channings Wood

*

HMP Chelmsford

15

HMP Coldingley

*

HMP Dartmoor

*

HMP Deerbolt

5

HMP Doncaster

10

HMP Dorchester

*

HMP Dovegate

*

HMP Drake Hall

5

HMP Dumfries

*

HMP Durham

*

HMP Eastwood Park

*

HMP Edinburgh

5

HMP Elmley

5

HMP Elmley (Sheppey Cluster)

30

HMP Erlestoke House

*

HMP Everthorpe

*

HMP Exeter

*

HMP Featherstone

5

HMP Feltham

15

HMP Forest Bank

15

HMP Garth

*

HMP Glen Parva

10

HMP Guys Marsh

5

HMP Haverrigg

*

HMP Hewell

15

HMP High Down

15

HMP Highpoint North

20

HMP Highpoint South

10

HMP Holloway

15

HMP Holme House

5

HMP Hull

*

HMP Huntercombe and Finnamore

35

HMP Lancaster Farms

*

HMP Leeds (Armley)

15

HMP Leicester

10

HMP Lewes

5

HMP Lincoln

20

HMP Lindholme

5

HMP Littlehey

15

HMP Liverpool

10

HMP Long Lartin

*

HMP Low Newton

*

HMP Maidstone

45

HMP Manchester

10

HMP Moorland

20

HMP New Hall

*

HMP Northumberland

*

HMP Norwich

10

HMP Nottingham

15

HMP Oakwood

5

HMP Parc

5

HMP Pentonville

45

HMP Peterborough

15

HMP Portland

5

HMP Preston

*

HMP Ranby

15

HMP Risley

15

HMP Rochester

*

HMP Send

*

HMP Shotts

*

HMP Stafford

5

HMP Standford Hill (Sheppey Cluster)

*

HMP Stoke Heath

5

HMP Styal

*

HMP Swinfen Hall

*

HMP Thameside

35

HMP The Mount

10

HMP Wakefield

*

HMP Wandsworth

45

HMP Wayland

*

HMP Whatton

*

HMP Winchester

*

HMP Wolds

*

HMP Woodhill

15

HMP Wormwood Scrubs

60

HMP Wymott

5

Grand Total

850


1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are
therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been
quality assured under National Statistics protocols.
2. Figures relate to main applicants only.
3. Figures relate to criteria FNO cases only.
4. Figures rounded to the nearest 5 ( - = 0, * = 1 or 2) and may not sum to the
totals shown because of independent rounding.
5. Data is a snapshot of individuals detained in prison on 31 December 2013.

We make every effort to ensure that a person's removal by deportation
coincides, as far as possible, with his/her release from prison on completion
of sentence. Where a detainee refuses to cooperate with the removal or
deportation process, detention may be prolonged.

The Immigration Bill will have a significant impact on the ability of FNOs to
delay removal by mounting legal challenges whilst in the UK. The current
appeals system means that 17 different types of decision can be appealed. The
Immigration Bill will simplify the appeals system and mean that appeals can
only be brought where the Home Office has refused a protection (asylum or
humanitarian protection) claim, a human rights claim or a claim based on EU
free movement rights. It will also give us the power to certify that where
deportation will not cause serious irreversible harm, the appeal will be heard
after the offender has left the country.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in how many immigration appeal hearings lost by the Government her Department failed to send a presenting officer in each of the last four years.

I will write to the Rt Hon Member.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, to how many immigration appeal hearings the Home Office failed to send a presenting officer in each of the last four years.

I will write to the Rt Hon. Member.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of the Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) transparency programme, monthly spend over £25,000 is available on the Gov.uk website for financial years 2010-11 to 2013-14:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-finance-transparency-dataset.

This data represents payments made centrally by the MOD. It does not include payments made by the MOD’s Trading Funds, payments made for warlike stores, and payments that would be exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of Information legislation (for example, for reasons of national security or commercial sensitivity).

No payments have been made over the period 2010-11 to 2013-14 to GEO Amey, Working Links, A4E, MTC Amey or GEO Group.

Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder:

http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

Expenditure on contracted-out services is summarised in the Ministry of Defence's (MOD) Annual Report and Accounts and has been as follows since 2009-10:

Financial Year

Expenditure (£ billion)

Expenditure as a percentage of Defence Budget[1]

2009-10

2.1

5.3%

2010-11

2.2

5.5%

2011-12

2.5

6.6%

2012-13

2.7

8.0%

The audited outturn for 2013-14 will be published in the MOD's 2013-14 Annual Report and Accounts which are due to be laid before Parliament in mid September 2014. Our in-year forecast for 2014-15 does not identify expenditure on contracted-out services discretely.

This expenditure represents the cost of the MOD's Service Concession Arrangements (formerly know as Private Finance Initiative Service Charges), Contractor Logistic Support and Integrated Operational Support contracts, finance lease service charges and External Assistance. This expenditure does not include those contracted-out services not reported centrally.

[1] Total DEL: Annual Report and Accounts.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many domestic violence refuge places there were in (a) London and (b) each London borough on (i) 1 January 2010 and (ii) 1 January 2016.

Data on the number of domestic violence refuge places is not held centrally. It is for local areas to assess their needs for domestic abuse services and to make decisions on the provision of safe accommodation, including refuges and support for victims of domestic abuse.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average monthly mortgage payment per household was in (a) London and (b) each London borough in each year since 2010.

The Department does not record or collect this information at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average age was of first time buyers was in each London borough in (a) 2010 and (b) the last year for which figures are available.

The Department does not record or collect this information at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what was the average deposit paid by first time buyers was in each London borough in (a) 2010 and (b) the last year for which figures are available.

The Department does not record or collect this information at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average size of mortgages in each London borough was in (a) 2010 and (b) the last year for which figures are available.

The Department does not record or collect this information at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
14th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much his Department spent on children's playgrounds in each year since 2008.

The Department of Communities and Local Government does not collect the information requested.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many people from (a) other EU countries and (b) non-EU countries who were deemed homeless have been returned to their home countries in each year since 2010.

The Department does not hold data centrally on the number of voluntary reconnections of non-UK rough sleepers. It is for local authorities to determine what homelessness services are required to best meet the needs of their local area. The Home Officeis responsible for administrative removal operations.

We expect people who come to this country to be able to support themselves, and if they cannot find work or accommodation then they should return home. For vulnerable individuals who are sleeping rough on the streets, there are locally funded reconnection services available to help them return to their home countries voluntarily and connect into support services there. In London, the Greater London Authority commission the London Reconnection Team, which is targeted at non-UK nationals with support needs.


Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many hostel places for the homeless there were in (a) London and (b) each London borough on 1 October in each year since 2008.

The Department does not hold information regarding the number of places in hostels for rough sleepers in London. It is for London boroughs to determine what homelessness services are required to best meet the needs of their local area, including provision of suitable accommodation.

This Government is committed to protecting the most vulnerable in society. One person without a home is one too many. That is why since 2010 we have invested more than £500 million to prevent and tackle homelessness in England. In London, we have given the Mayor £34 million to help tackle homelessness and rough sleeping, with an extra £8.5 million for this work in 2015/16.

We have supported local areas, including London, to improve the quality of hostels through the Homelessness Change Programme, which provided £42.5 million of capital funding in 2012 – 2015 for new and refurbished bed spaces and facilities to provide meaningful activities to supporta pathway to independent living. For 2015 – 2017, the Department of Health will make available funding for local areas, including London, to invest in tailored hostel accommodation to improve the physical and mental health of rough sleepers, and successful partnership bids will be announced shortly.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much was spent on returning people from (a) other countries and (b) non-EU countries who were deemed homeless to their home countries in each year since 2010.

The Department does not hold data centrally on the number of voluntary reconnections of non-UK rough sleepers. It is for local authorities to determine what homelessness services are required to best meet the needs of their local area. The Home Officeis responsible for administrative removal operations.

We expect people who come to this country to be able to support themselves, and if they cannot find work or accommodation then they should return home. For vulnerable individuals who are sleeping rough on the streets, there are locally funded reconnection services available to help them return to their home countries voluntarily and connect into support services there. In London, the Greater London Authority commission the London Reconnection Team, which is targeted at non-UK nationals with support needs.


Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the average cost of a home bought by a first-time buyer in each of the last 10 years for each London (a) borough and (b) constituency.

Statistics on the average dwelling price for first time buyers in London boroughs and constituencies are not available.

Statistics on house prices in England, London, London boroughs and constituencies are published by the Office for National Statistics at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/taxonomy/index.html?nscl=House+Price+Indices


Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of first time buyers there were in each London (a) borough and (b) constituency in each of the last 10 years.

The requested information is not available.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much the London Olympic council tax precept (a) has raised in each year of its existence and (b) is predicted to raise in the remaining years of its existence.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many (a) social and (b) affordable homes were built in (i) London and (ii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

Statistics on additional affordable housing provided in each local authority area in England are published in the Department’s live tables 1006 (social rent), and 1006a (affordable rent), which are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

These figures include both newly built housing and acquisitions.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many (a) children and (b) adults were living in overcrowded accommodation in (i) London and (ii) each London borough in each year since 2010.

According to the English Housing Survey, in 2010 there were 434,000 children and 708,000 adults living in overcrowded accommodation in London. For 2011, there were 435,000 children and 703,000 adults, and for 2012 there were 420,000 children and 693,000 adults living in overcrowded accomodation in London.

My Department does not record or collect the information requested at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
23rd Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he expects to reply to Question 224607, tabled by the hon. Member for Tooting on 20 February 2015 for answer on 24 February 2015.

Question 224607 was answered on 24 March 2015.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many council houses have been sold in (a) London and (b) each London borough since 2010.

Statistics on local authority right to buy sales in London and in each London Borough are published in the Department's live table 685 (annual) and 691 (quarterly) which are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-social-housing-sales

In England, council house building starts are now at a 23 year high and twice as many council homes have been built in the last 4 years than from 1997 to 2009. Previously, councils were not encouraged to build new homes from sales receipts and only 1 new council home was built for every 170 Right to Buy sales completed under the last Administration.

Since the Right to Buy was reinvigorated in England, £730 million in sales receipts are being re-invested in affordable house building; levering a further £1.7 billion of investment over the next 2 years. This means that in total, over £2.4 billion will be raised to invest in affordable house building as a result of the as a result of Right to Buy.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of people in (a) London and (b) each London borough who are under the age of 35 and live with their parents.

The information requested is not centrally held.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much from Right to Buy sales has been returned to the Treasury by each London borough in each of the last five years.

Since the reform of the Housing Revenue Account and the introduction of Self-Financing in April 2012, a proportion of receipts are paid to Treasury in order to (a) reflect the reduction in the amount owed by local authorities to Treasury as part of the Self-Financing Settlement and (b) to tackle the budget deficit left by the last Administration.

The attached table shows those parts of the receipts arising from Right to Buy (or equivalent) sales received in each London borough in the previous five financial years and the first three quarters of the current financial year which have been indicated as payable to the Treasury. Since the reinvigoration of Right to Buy in April 2012, the 29 London stock-holding authorities have retained approximately £406 million for the purposes of providing replacement social housing in their local areas.

Overall, Right to Buy increases housing investment and housing construction. Since the Right to Buy was reinvigorated across England, £730 million in sales receipts are being re-invested in affordable house building; levering a further £1.7 billion of investment over the next 2 years. This means that in total, over £2.4 billion will be raised to invest in affordable house building as a result of Right to Buy.

In England, council house building starts are now at a 23 year high and almost twice as many council homes have been built in the last 4 years than from 1997 to 2009. Previously, councils were not encouraged to build new homes from sales receipts and only 1 new council home was built for every 170 Right to Buy sales completed under the last Administration.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much his Department has spent on marketing in relation to the Right to Buy scheme in London in each year since 2010.

This Government is committed to supporting home ownership, and giving a helping hand to social tenants to move up the housing ladder. But our reinvigorated Right to Buy can only be exercised by eligible tenants if they know about it. It is also important that social tenants have sufficient information about their rights to make an informed decision, and to ensure that home ownership is the right choice for them in light of their financial circumstances.

Precise figures on spending in London cannot be disaggregated from the national Right to Buy campaign. We can identify £378,393 of spending in 2012-13 and £68,500 in 2013-14; there was no London-specific spending in 2010-11 or 2011-12. Figures for 2014-15 are not yet available.

I appreciate that the Labour Party in London has effectively called for the Right to Buy to be abolished, and will oppose social tenants being informed. Such are the enemies of aspiration. The Right to Buy improves social mobility and helps build mixed communities. As well as increasing home ownership and supporting new build construction (from replacement affordable homes), it gives something back to families who have worked hard, paid their rent and played by the rules. It allows buyers to do up their home, change their front door, improve their garden – without getting permission from the council. It gives people a sense of pride and ownership not just in their home, but in their street and neighbourhood.

Total national spending was £0 in 2010-11, £17,728 in 2011-12, £1.4 million in 2012-13 and £1.0 million in 2013-14. To place our information campaigns in context, DCLG has cut spending on marketing and advertising from £9.9 million in 2009-10 to £2.0 million in 2013-14.

The rt. hon. Member is a former Minister in this Department, so will be well acquainted with communications activity under the last Labour Government, such as departmental spending of:

  • £1.1 million a year on external public relations, despite having 103 in-house communications officers;
  • £15,000 on plugging the “Sustainable Communities summit” that was subsequently cancelled;
  • £1 million on marketing and public relations for eco-towns, despite the fact not a single house was ever built;
  • £3,520 on re-naming Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Fire Services to the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser, during one of New Labour’s republican phases of purging public references to the Monarchy;
  • £38,200 on sock puppet lobbyists, LLM Communications, astro-turfing friends for the friendless Regional Spatial Strategies;
  • £1,371 on re-branding of John Prescott’s ‘Office of the Deputy Prime Minister’ to the cut-price and pointless ‘Deputy Prime Minister's Office’;
  • £3,830 on the subsequent logo for the new Department for Communities and Local Government, followed by burning a further £24,765 on dropping the “D” and renaming it “Communities and Local Government”, despite being neither, in a futile attempt to sound achingly trendy.

We run a tighter ship. Right to Buy and the Fire Kills campaign are now the two primary campaigns we run, and both have a clear public benefit, in strong contrast to the culture of spin and excess in the spendthrift Labour years.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many people were recorded as living in overcrowded housing in each London Borough in each of the year since 2010.

My Department does not record or collect the information requested at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of new homes needed annually to meet London's housing needs into 2020.

From the 1 April 2012, the Mayor of London has had strategic oversight of housing, regeneration and economic development in London.

The Department does not estimate demand for housing. However, the Department publishes household projections, which are a trend-based view of the number of households that would form given projected population and previous demographic trends.

The most recent household projections are 2011-based. The projected household numbers are disaggregated by household type and are published at:

http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-communities-and-local-government/series/household-projections

I would observe that new home registrations rose by 30% in 2013 in England, the highest since 2007; and are up 60% in London, the highest for over two decades, this is in contrast to Wales which has a Labour Administration, where new home registrations are falling (source: NHBC).

More new council housing was started in London last year than in all the 13 years for the last Labour Government combined.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what proportion of new affordable homes in each London Borough were rented at below (a) 70 per cent, (b) 60 per cent and (c) 50 per cent of market rent in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally. Notwithstanding, I also refer the rt. hon. Member to the answer to him of 14 May 2014, Official Report, Column 638W.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many affordable homes were built in each London Borough in each year since 2010.

Statistics on delivery of affordable housing by local authority area are published in the Department’s live table 1008, which is available at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

These statistics include both newly built housing and acquisitions, and include figures for 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13. Further statistics will be published in due course.

My department holds some statistics for 2013-14, for affordable housing delivery through programmes reported by the Homes and Communities Agency and the Greater London Authority (but not through other sources).

In total, the combined figures show that almost 200,000 affordable homes have been delivered in England from 2010-11 to 2013-14, of which almost 49,000 are in London. We expect these figures to be revised upwards when full affordable housing supply statistics are published in due course.

The Government’s affordable housing programme for 2015 to 2018 aims to deliver 165,000 new affordable homes, and lever in a further £23 billion of public and private investment in affordable housing.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many council homes were built in each London Borough in each year since 2010.

More new council housing was started in London last year than in all the 13 years of the last Labour Government combined. Statistics on local authority (council) house building by local authority area are published in the Department’s live table 253, which is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-house-building

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average sector rent was in each London Borough in each year since 2010.

Information on average rents in the local authority sector for 2011-12 and 2012-13 can be found in section H of the datasets on the Department’s website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/local-authority-housing-statistics-data-returns-for-2011-to-2012 and

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/local-authority-housing-statistics-data-returns-for-2012-to-2013

Information on average rents in the private sector can be found on the Valuation Office’s website at:

http://www.voa.gov.uk/corporate/statisticalReleases/140610_Private_Rental_Market.html

Information on average social rents Private Registered Providers can be found on the Department’s website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-rents-lettings-and-tenancies

The tables below show how rents have fallen in real terms.


Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many homes in each London Borough failed to meet the decent homes standard in each year since 2010.

The last Labour Government failed to meet its Decent Homes target. It pledged in 2000 that: “We... are committed to ensuring that all social housing is of a decent standard within 10 years” (DETR, Quality and Choice: A Decent Home for All: The Housing Green Paper, April 2000, p.11). But almost one in ten homes failed to meet the standard by 2010.

Indeed, the last Labour Government actually cut the Decent Homes programme by £150 million in July 2009, cannibalising the housing programme to pay for other policies. I also observe the last Prime Minister planned to cut back housing investment, remarking before the general election: “Housing is essentially a private sector activity. Let's be honest about this... I don't see a need for us to continue with such a big renovation programme” (BBC Newsnight, 30 April 2010).

By contrast, the Coalition Government is investing £2.3 billion from 2011 to 2016 to improve the quality of existing social housing through the Decent Homes programme and large-scale voluntary transfer gap funding.

Across England, the number of non-decent local authority dwellings has fallen from 291,600 on 1 April 2010 to 184,100 in April 2013, and continues to fall thanks to our continuing investment.

The attached table shows figures for London Boroughs, based on their own estimates. Figures for some Boroughs fluctuate from year to year due to councils carrying out more thorough assessments on the state of individual properties; yet there is a clear downward trend across London.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many children were recorded as living in overcrowded housing in each London Borough in each year since 2010.

My Department does not record or collect the information requested at London borough level.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many properties in each London borough were classified as empty in each year since 2010.

Statistics on vacant dwellings in England by local authority district are published in the Department’s live table 615 which is available at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-dwelling-stock-including-vacants

It gives annual total numbers of empty homes and those vacant longer than six months and also vacants in the local authority, housing association and other public sector tenures.

The table below provides information on all vacants for individual London Boroughs for the last four years. It is a clear sign that the Government’s approach to reducing empty homes is working.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much his Department paid to (a) G4S, (b) Serco, (c) Sodexo, (d) GEOAmey, (e) Capita, (f) Atos, (g) Mitie, (h) Working Links, (i) A4E, (j) MTC Amey, (k) GEO Group and (l) Carillion in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2013-14.

As part of my Department’s transparency programme, any spend over £250.00 is available on the Department’s website. Since January 2011, all contracts over £10,000 in value are published on Contracts Finder (http://www.contractsfinder.co.uk/).

9th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much and what proportion of his Department's budget was spent on activities which were contracted out in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and how much and what proportion of his Department's budget he expects to be contracted out in 2014-15.

DCLG purchases a wide range of goods and services from outside suppliers. The information requested for the last five years is not centrally held in the form requested and would incur disproportionate cost to provide. However, details of all spending over £250 are available on my Department’s website as part of our transparency data.

I would add that we have recently adopted a shared services model with other departments, with our legal function being undertaken by Treasury Solicitors and our procurement being undertaken by the Crown Commercial Service. There is significant scope for further sharing of services.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average proportion of market rent of all affordable housing is in each London borough.

I have placed in the Library of the House, a table showing affordable and social rents as a proportion of market rents, for each London borough.

The affordable rent model allows for more new affordable housing to be delivered with lower levels of taxpayer capital subsidy and by levering in more private investment. The programme is helping deliver £15 billion of private investment in new affordable housing over the current spending review, alongside £4.5 billion of public investment. Social rent and affordable rent go hand in hand; both help provide accommodation for those on low incomes.

As the National Audit Office has observed: “the Department selected the best delivery model open to it for the funds it had available” and “the Department has so far achieved its policy objective to maximise the number of homes delivered within the available grant funding” (National Audit Office, “Financial viability of the social housing sector: introducing the Affordable Homes Programme”, 4 July 2012, HC465, pp.6-7).

I note in his recent Fabian Society pamphlet, the rt. hon. Member has complained that affordable rent would result in rents of 80 per cent of market rents in London. Whilst it varies by borough, as the table shows, for example, affordable rent levels are 38 per cent of average local market rents in Camden, 48 per cent in Islington, 54 per cent in Southwark and 35 per cent in Westminster, reflecting local circumstances.

I also observe that the housing policy announced at the Labour Party Conference in October 2012 also endorsed the use of affordable rents to build new homes; albeit this point is frequently lost on many Labour hon. Members who proceed to attack the basic principle of affordable rent in allowing more new affordable homes to be built using taxpayer capital subsidy.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many families were placed in temporary accommodation in each London borough in each of the last five years.

I refer the rt. hon. Member to Live Table 784 available on my Department's website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-homelessness

The numbers of households in temporary accommodation in London are still well belowthe level they were at their peak, under the previous Administration, when they hit more than 63,800. Councils have a responsibility to move homeless households into settled accommodation as quickly as possible and we made common sense changes to the law to enable them to use suitable private rented homes. Indeed, the average stay in temporary accommodation in England has been reduced from 20 months at the beginning of 2010 to 14 months now.

We have also seen a 42% reduction in the numbers of families with children in Bed and Breakfast for more than six weeks on this time last year across the country. The seven local authorities that we funded to tackle families in Bed and Breakfast have made significant progress achieving an overall reduction of 96% since the funding began.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average time was between (a) a crime being committed and an offender being sentenced, (b) sentencing and an appeal hearing, (c) end of trial to sentencing and (d) charge and the commencement of a trial in (i) England and Wales, (ii) London, (iii) each local justice area in London and (iv) each court in London in each year since 2010.

Information on average time between a crime being committed and an offender being sentenced, sentencing and an appeal hearing and end of trial to sentencing is not held.

Information on the average number of days taken from charge to main hearing for Crown Court criminal cases in England and Wales is published regularly as part of the Criminal Courts Statistics Quarterly, found at www.gov.uk/government/collections/criminal-court-statistics. The requested information can be found in the main tables, in Table T4.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
19th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the first drug scanner will be installed in a prison in England or Wales.

The Government is committed to reducing the supply of drugs into prison. The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) already deploys a comprehensive range of robust searching and security measures to detect items of contraband both at the point of entry to the prison and concealed within the prison. We will continue to explore new methods of preventing drugs coming into prisons and new generation body scanners are seen as a valuable part of this.

The first machine has been purchased and will be installed in a prison during April 2015. There will be a programme of work, led by NOMS, to assess the most effective way to deploy body scanners across the estate, based on experience of their use in an operational setting. NOMS will be supported in this by the Centre for Applied Science and Technology.

The initial assessment will also provide valuable information for the subsequent tendering exercise. The precise costs of the wider programme will depend on the initial assessment and on the procurement exercise which will be undertaken to ensure that best value for money is obtained.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
19th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much is being spent on drug scanners for jails in England and Wales.

The Government is committed to reducing the supply of drugs into prison. The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) already deploys a comprehensive range of robust searching and security measures to detect items of contraband both at the point of entry to the prison and concealed within the prison. We will continue to explore new methods of preventing drugs coming into prisons and new generation body scanners are seen as a valuable part of this.

The first machine has been purchased and will be installed in a prison during April 2015. There will be a programme of work, led by NOMS, to assess the most effective way to deploy body scanners across the estate, based on experience of their use in an operational setting. NOMS will be supported in this by the Centre for Applied Science and Technology.

The initial assessment will also provide valuable information for the subsequent tendering exercise. The precise costs of the wider programme will depend on the initial assessment and on the procurement exercise which will be undertaken to ensure that best value for money is obtained.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
19th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many drug scanners are being purchased for jails in England and Wales.

The Government is committed to reducing the supply of drugs into prison. The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) already deploys a comprehensive range of robust searching and security measures to detect items of contraband both at the point of entry to the prison and concealed within the prison. We will continue to explore new methods of preventing drugs coming into prisons and new generation body scanners are seen as a valuable part of this.

The first machine has been purchased and will be installed in a prison during April 2015. There will be a programme of work, led by NOMS, to assess the most effective way to deploy body scanners across the estate, based on experience of their use in an operational setting. NOMS will be supported in this by the Centre for Applied Science and Technology.

The initial assessment will also provide valuable information for the subsequent tendering exercise. The precise costs of the wider programme will depend on the initial assessment and on the procurement exercise which will be undertaken to ensure that best value for money is obtained.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the victims' surcharge has been (a) imposed, (b) collected, (c) cancelled and (d) outstanding for people receiving a (i) conditional discharge, (ii) fine, (iii) suspended sentence, (iv) community sentence and (v) custodial sentence in each financial year since 2010.

This Government takes recovery and enforcement of financial impositions very seriously and remains committed to finding new ways to ensure impositions are paid and to trace those who do not pay. The amount of money collected has risen year on year since 2012, and reached an all time high of £290 million at the end of 2013/14 and collections continue to rise.

The victim surcharge is an ancillary order made by the court when it sentences an offender. Revenue from the surcharge is ring fenced for victim services and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) distributes this through grants to Police and Crime Commissioners and centrally managed national victim services.

The Government set out its commitment to ensure offenders contribute more to the cost of victim support services and from October 2012 the victim surcharge on fines was increased and extended to a wider range of court disposals with the amount payable dependant on the seriousness of the sentence.

The table below shows the value of all victim surcharge orders made in each financial year since 2011/12 along with the amount of those impositions that were collected or cancelled in the same year of imposition and the amount that remained outstanding at the end of that year. This data is only available from 2011-12 onwards.

Year

Value imposed

Value collected in year of imposition

Value cancelled in year of imposition

Value outstanding at end of year of imposition

2011/12

£12,199,956

£6,810,532

£645,381

£4,744,043

2012/13

£15,508,307

£7,607,886

£888,027

£7,012,395

2013/14

£33,726,535

£15,343,460

£2,265,389

£16,117,686

It is not possible to provide the figures above separated by adults, youths and organisations without carrying out a manual search of all victim surcharge accounts.

It is not possible to identify how many times the victim surcharge has been imposed, collected, cancelled and outstanding by the type of sentences. The Ministry of Justice does not collate the information in the manner requested and could only be obtained by undertaking a manual search of all financial accounts which would incur disproportionate cost.

The Ministry of Justice holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales but not the specific circumstances of each case. This also does not include details of the amount of victim surcharge imposed for the majority of cases. Below is a link to our most recent statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/343330/sentencing-tables.xls

The total value of victim surcharge impositions outstanding, regardless of imposition date, at the end of 2013/14 was £21,110,000.

The ‘value outstanding’ figures includes accounts that were not due to be paid by the end of the period specified (either because they were imposed close to the end of the year or because they had payment timescales set by the courts for beyond the end of the financial year) and those that were being paid by instalments on agreed payment plans. Outstanding balances of victim surcharge impositions can also relate to amounts imposed on offenders who have also been given a custodial sentence and the victim surcharge cannot be enforced until they are released.

The value cancelled includes both administrative and legal cancellations. It is not possible to split the figures between the two types of cancellation.

Administrative cancellations only take place in certain circumstances and after all attempts to collect the amount outstanding have been made. These circumstances include where the offender has died, where they have emigrated with no prospect of return, where the offender has been sent to a psychiatric hospital for 12 months or more or where the offender cannot be traced and there has been a least 12 months from the point of imposition. It should be noted that administrative cancellations can be re-instated if the prospects of recovery improve (where, for example, a new address is found).

Legal cancellations occur after the case has been reconsidered by a judge or magistrate and further evidence has been presented. Legal cancellations can be as a result of a successful appeal, a change in financial circumstances of the offender or a committal to prison for non payment.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cumulative total is of (a) uncollected and (b) cancelled victims' surcharges.

This Government takes recovery and enforcement of financial impositions very seriously and remains committed to finding new ways to ensure impositions are paid and to trace those who do not pay. The amount of money collected has risen year on year since 2012, and reached an all time high of £290 million at the end of 2013/14 and collections continue to rise.

The victim surcharge is an ancillary order made by the court when it sentences an offender. Revenue from the surcharge is ring fenced for victim services and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) distributes this through grants to Police and Crime Commissioners and centrally managed national victim services.

The Government set out its commitment to ensure offenders contribute more to the cost of victim support services and from October 2012 the victim surcharge on fines was increased and extended to a wider range of court disposals with the amount payable dependant on the seriousness of the sentence.

The table below shows the value of all victim surcharge orders made in each financial year since 2011/12 along with the amount of those impositions that were collected or cancelled in the same year of imposition and the amount that remained outstanding at the end of that year. This data is only available from 2011-12 onwards.

Year

Value imposed

Value collected in year of imposition

Value cancelled in year of imposition

Value outstanding at end of year of imposition

2011/12

£12,199,956

£6,810,532

£645,381

£4,744,043

2012/13

£15,508,307

£7,607,886

£888,027

£7,012,395

2013/14

£33,726,535

£15,343,460

£2,265,389

£16,117,686

It is not possible to provide the figures above separated by adults, youths and organisations without carrying out a manual search of all victim surcharge accounts.

It is not possible to identify how many times the victim surcharge has been imposed, collected, cancelled and outstanding by the type of sentences. The Ministry of Justice does not collate the information in the manner requested and could only be obtained by undertaking a manual search of all financial accounts which would incur disproportionate cost.

The Ministry of Justice holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales but not the specific circumstances of each case. This also does not include details of the amount of victim surcharge imposed for the majority of cases. Below is a link to our most recent statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/343330/sentencing-tables.xls

The total value of victim surcharge impositions outstanding, regardless of imposition date, at the end of 2013/14 was £21,110,000.

The ‘value outstanding’ figures includes accounts that were not due to be paid by the end of the period specified (either because they were imposed close to the end of the year or because they had payment timescales set by the courts for beyond the end of the financial year) and those that were being paid by instalments on agreed payment plans. Outstanding balances of victim surcharge impositions can also relate to amounts imposed on offenders who have also been given a custodial sentence and the victim surcharge cannot be enforced until they are released.

The value cancelled includes both administrative and legal cancellations. It is not possible to split the figures between the two types of cancellation.

Administrative cancellations only take place in certain circumstances and after all attempts to collect the amount outstanding have been made. These circumstances include where the offender has died, where they have emigrated with no prospect of return, where the offender has been sent to a psychiatric hospital for 12 months or more or where the offender cannot be traced and there has been a least 12 months from the point of imposition. It should be noted that administrative cancellations can be re-instated if the prospects of recovery improve (where, for example, a new address is found).

Legal cancellations occur after the case has been reconsidered by a judge or magistrate and further evidence has been presented. Legal cancellations can be as a result of a successful appeal, a change in financial circumstances of the offender or a committal to prison for non payment.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many babies were born to women in prison in each year since 2010.

Information on the number of women who have given birth in prison is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. To provide this information, a manual search of every female prisoner’s record would be required.
Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been (a) imposed, (b) collected, (c) cancelled and (d) outstanding under the victims' surcharge in each financial year since 2010.

This Government takes recovery and enforcement of financial impositions very seriously and remains committed to finding new ways to ensure impositions are paid and to trace those who do not pay. The amount of money collected has risen year on year since 2012, and reached an all time high of £290 million at the end of 2013/14 and collections continue to rise.

The victim surcharge is an ancillary order made by the court when it sentences an offender. Revenue from the surcharge is ring fenced for victim services and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) distributes this through grants to Police and Crime Commissioners and centrally managed national victim services.

The Government set out its commitment to ensure offenders contribute more to the cost of victim support services and from October 2012 the victim surcharge on fines was increased and extended to a wider range of court disposals with the amount payable dependant on the seriousness of the sentence.

The table below shows the value of all victim surcharge orders made in each financial year since 2011/12 along with the amount of those impositions that were collected or cancelled in the same year of imposition and the amount that remained outstanding at the end of that year. This data is only available from 2011-12 onwards.

Year

Value imposed

Value collected in year of imposition

Value cancelled in year of imposition

Value outstanding at end of year of imposition

2011/12

£12,199,956

£6,810,532

£645,381

£4,744,043

2012/13

£15,508,307

£7,607,886

£888,027

£7,012,395

2013/14

£33,726,535

£15,343,460

£2,265,389

£16,117,686

It is not possible to provide the figures above separated by adults, youths and organisations without carrying out a manual search of all victim surcharge accounts.

It is not possible to identify how many times the victim surcharge has been imposed, collected, cancelled and outstanding by the type of sentences. The Ministry of Justice does not collate the information in the manner requested and could only be obtained by undertaking a manual search of all financial accounts which would incur disproportionate cost.

The Ministry of Justice holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales but not the specific circumstances of each case. This also does not include details of the amount of victim surcharge imposed for the majority of cases. Below is a link to our most recent statistics.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/343330/sentencing-tables.xls

The total value of victim surcharge impositions outstanding, regardless of imposition date, at the end of 2013/14 was £21,110,000.

The ‘value outstanding’ figures includes accounts that were not due to be paid by the end of the period specified (either because they were imposed close to the end of the year or because they had payment timescales set by the courts for beyond the end of the financial year) and those that were being paid by instalments on agreed payment plans. Outstanding balances of victim surcharge impositions can also relate to amounts imposed on offenders who have also been given a custodial sentence and the victim surcharge cannot be enforced until they are released.

The value cancelled includes both administrative and legal cancellations. It is not possible to split the figures between the two types of cancellation.

Administrative cancellations only take place in certain circumstances and after all attempts to collect the amount outstanding have been made. These circumstances include where the offender has died, where they have emigrated with no prospect of return, where the offender has been sent to a psychiatric hospital for 12 months or more or where the offender cannot be traced and there has been a least 12 months from the point of imposition. It should be noted that administrative cancellations can be re-instated if the prospects of recovery improve (where, for example, a new address is found).

Legal cancellations occur after the case has been reconsidered by a judge or magistrate and further evidence has been presented. Legal cancellations can be as a result of a successful appeal, a change in financial circumstances of the offender or a committal to prison for non payment.

17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many incidents there were of drugs being found in HM Prison (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year from 2010 to 2014.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) takes the issue of all contraband in prisons extremely seriously and deploys a comprehensive range of robust searching and security measures to detect items of contraband both at the point of entry to the prison and concealed within the prison. We do not tolerate drugs in prison and anyone caught with them will be punished and could face further prosecution.

There is growing evidence that there has been an increase in smuggling of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) into prisons. We have already announced a series of measures to crack down on this and will ensure Governors have the powers and support they need to tackle it.

In addition the Justice Secretary announced last week that NOMS will continue to invest in new technology, such as bodyscanners, to stop drugs getting into prisons.

The number of finds in each prison establishment for the calendar years 2010 through to 2014 is shown in the table below.

Table 1: Reported incidents of where a drug was found (1)

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Belmarsh

15

9

9

3

4

Feltham

8

12

19

12

11

Isis (2)

0

6

7

10

15

Pentonville

51

87

46

41

101

Thameside (3)

-

-

18

113

110

Wandsworth

3

7

7

25

11

Wormwood Scrubs

29

49

31

60

53

Source: National Offender Management Service NOMIS IRS

Key: ‘-‘ Establishment not operational

Notes on table:

(1) The table shows the number of reported incidents where a drug was declared to be found. More than one type of drug may be found in any one incident.

(2) Isis opened in July 2010

(3) Thameside opened in March 2012

All figures in this answer have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. The data are not subject to audit.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were tagged using GPS tagging technology on 1 March 2015.

On 1 March 2015 there were nine individuals subject to GPS tagging.

The programme to mobilise the contracts for the next generation of GPS tagging has begun. Testing of these tags in an operational setting is already underway. This will allow for greater use of this technology.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners there were in (a) HMP Belmarsh, (b) HMP Feltham, (c) HMP Isis, (d) HMP Pentonville, (e) HMP Thameside, (f) HMP Wandsworth and (g) HMP Wormwood Scrubs on 1 March (i) 2010 and (ii) 2015; and how many such prisoners were (A) Muslim and (B) foreign nationals.

We believe that foreign national offenders who have no right to remain in the UK should be removed at the earliest opportunity. That's why this Government has toughened the system, including by pursuing compulsory transfer agreements with European countries.

The Home Office have removed 22,000 foreign offenders since 2010 and this Government is removing 300 offenders under new 'deport first, appeal later' powers, with another 500 going through the system. We have cut the grounds on which criminals can appeal deportation.

Data in the exact format requested is not available but the table below sets out the information requested for each prison at the closest available dates.

31 March 2010

31 December 2014 (1)

HMP BELMASH

Prison population

862

881

Foreign National Prisoners

166

217

Muslim prisoners

127

265

HMYOI FELTHAM

Prison population

657

550

Foreign National Prisoners

179

82

Muslim prisoners

211

187

HMP ISIS (2)

Prison population

---

620

Foreign National Prisoners

---

81

Muslim prisoners

---

261

HMP PENTONVILLE

Prison Population

1,216

1,309

Foreign National Prisoners

357

393

Muslim prisoners

267

379

HMP THAMESIDE (3)

Prison population

---

894

Foreign National Prisoners

---

237

Muslim prisoners

---

242

HMP WANDSWORTH

Prison population

1,631

1,623

Foreign National Prisoners

572

582

Muslim prisoners

330

364

HMP WORMWOOD SCRUBS

Prison population

1,298

1,188

Foreign National Prisoners

447

441

Muslim Prisoners

305

343

1) The latest date for which data is available.

2) HMP Isis opened in July 2010.

3) HMP Thameside opened in March 2012, and became fully operational in Autumn 2012.

The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mobile telephones and sim cards were found in (a) HMP Belmarsh, (b) HMP Feltham, (c) HMP Isis, (d) HMP Pentonville, (e) HMP Thameside, (f) HMP Wandsworth and (g) HMP Wormwood Scrubs in each year between 2010 and 2014.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) takes the issues of mobile phones in prison very seriously and is committed to addressing the risks that they present. This is being achieved through a multi-layered approach to: minimise the number of mobile phones entering prisons, find phones that do get in and disrupt mobile phones that cannot be found.

It is already an offence to convey into or possess mobile phones or SIM cards within prison. New powers introduced in the Serious Crime Act will allow for unauthorised mobile phones to be de-activated if they are shown to be operating within a prison. NOMS is also investing in a range of new technology to detect phones within prison and block phone signals. Prisons are increasingly able to detect and seize illicit phones.

The number of finds in each prison establishment for the calendar years 2010 through to 2014 is shown in the table below. Please note that one find may constitute a mobile phone handset containing one SIM card or media card, a handset only, or a SIM card only.

Total Finds

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

HMP Belmarsh

7

25

9

118

175

HMP Feltham

33

65

45

18

27

HMP Isis[1]

3

47

39

16

4

HMP Pentonville

23

174

133

152

207

HMP Thameside[2]

0

0

9

97

34

HMP Wandsworth

63

121

118

113

163

HMP Wormwood Scrubs

65

245

39

146

239

All figures in this answer have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. The data are not subject to audit.


[1] HMP Isis became operational in mid-2010

[2] HMP Thameside became operational in late 2012

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many serious assaults on staff there were in HM Prison (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year since 2010.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) does not tolerate violence of any kind in prison and any assault is treated extremely seriously. A new joint protocol produced by the National Offender Management Service, Crown Prosecution Service and Association of Chief Police Officers was introduced on 27 February 2015. This puts robust and consistent arrangements in place to ensure that where possible, assaults on prison staff will be referred to the police for investigation and will be prosecuted through the courts.

Figures for serious assaults on staff at (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year between 2010 and 2013 are provided in table 1.

Table 1: Serious (1) assaults on staff, 2010 to 2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

Belmarsh

3

3

10

3

Feltham

10

4

5

13

Isis (2)

0

5

3

7

Pentonville

7

3

2

7

Thameside (3)

-

-

0

16

Wandsworth

6

3

3

4

Wormwood Scrubs

8

12

9

3

Key: ‘-‘ Establishment not operational

Notes on table:

(1) An assault is classified as serious if it complies with the definition set out in Prison Service Instruction 9/2014 the Incident Management Manual.

(2) Isis opened in July 2010

(3) Thameside opened in March 2012

Figures for prisoner assaults on staff at (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year between 2010 and 2013 are provided in table 2

Table 2: Assaults on staff, 2010 to 2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

Belmarsh

20

24

34

18

Feltham

124

119

112

141

Isis

9

50

66

56

Pentonville

78

96

81

71

Thameside

-

-

51

168

Wandsworth

59

68

30

21

Wormwood Scrubs

67

86

102

82

The National statistics for prisoner assaults on staff are published quarterly in the Safety in Custody statistics bulletin. Recent publications can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/safety-in-custody-statistics and https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/399135/safety-in-custody-assaults-sep-14.xls. The next publication on 30 April 2015 will include statistics for 2014.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoner on staff assaults there were in HM Prison (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year since 2010.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) does not tolerate violence of any kind in prison and any assault is treated extremely seriously. A new joint protocol produced by the National Offender Management Service, Crown Prosecution Service and Association of Chief Police Officers was introduced on 27 February 2015. This puts robust and consistent arrangements in place to ensure that where possible, assaults on prison staff will be referred to the police for investigation and will be prosecuted through the courts.

Figures for serious assaults on staff at (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year between 2010 and 2013 are provided in table 1.

Table 1: Serious (1) assaults on staff, 2010 to 2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

Belmarsh

3

3

10

3

Feltham

10

4

5

13

Isis (2)

0

5

3

7

Pentonville

7

3

2

7

Thameside (3)

-

-

0

16

Wandsworth

6

3

3

4

Wormwood Scrubs

8

12

9

3

Key: ‘-‘ Establishment not operational

Notes on table:

(1) An assault is classified as serious if it complies with the definition set out in Prison Service Instruction 9/2014 the Incident Management Manual.

(2) Isis opened in July 2010

(3) Thameside opened in March 2012

Figures for prisoner assaults on staff at (a) Belmarsh, (b) Feltham, (c) Isis, (d) Pentonville, (e) Thameside, (f) Wandsworth and (g) Wormwood Scrubs in each year between 2010 and 2013 are provided in table 2

Table 2: Assaults on staff, 2010 to 2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

Belmarsh

20

24

34

18

Feltham

124

119

112

141

Isis

9

50

66

56

Pentonville

78

96

81

71

Thameside

-

-

51

168

Wandsworth

59

68

30

21

Wormwood Scrubs

67

86

102

82

The National statistics for prisoner assaults on staff are published quarterly in the Safety in Custody statistics bulletin. Recent publications can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/safety-in-custody-statistics and https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/399135/safety-in-custody-assaults-sep-14.xls. The next publication on 30 April 2015 will include statistics for 2014.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners in (a) HMP Belmarsh, (b) HMP Feltham, (c) HMP Isis, (d) HMP Pentonville, (e) HMP Thameside, (f) HMP Wandsworth and (g) HMP Wormwood Scrubs on 1 March 2015 had previously (i) never been in prison, (ii) been in prison once before, (iii) been in prison between 2 and 5 times, (iv) been in prison between 6 and 10 times and (v) been in prison more than 10 times before.

In order to provide custodial histories relating to the number of times offenders have been to prison for the specific prison establishments would involve matching a total of 7,065 individual records to the police national computer (PNC) which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the National Tactical Response Group was called out in 2014; and to which prisons that group was called out in each month of that year.

The National Offender Management Service’s National Tactical Response Group (NTRG) is a specialist resource to assist both public and private sector establishments in safely managing and resolving serious incidents in prisons.

NTRG was called out on two hundred and twenty three occasions in 2014.

While NTRG staff have the specialist skills required to deal with such incidents they are also frequently called to attend as a precautionary measure with the vast majority of such incidents being dealt with very quickly with minimal disruption to the prison.

The following table sets out the number of occasions the NTRG were called out to public and private sector establishments from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 (not including aborted call-outs).

Date

Establishment

Occasions

January 2014

Aylesbury

1

Glen Parva

2

Hewell

1

High Down

1

Highdown

1

Holme House

1

Lancaster Farms

2

Leeds

2

Date

Establishment

Occasions

January 2014

Nottingham

1

Oakwood

1

Ranby

1

Risley

1

Wandsworth

1

Wealstun

1

Winchester

2

Woodhill

1

January 2014 Total

21

February 2014

Bullingdon

1

Glen Parva

1

Hewell

1

Highdown

1

Ranby

1

Wayland

1

Whitemoor

1

February 2014 Total

7

March 2014

Cardiff

3

Doncaster

1

Full Sutton

1

Hewell

1

Hindley

1

Lindholme

2

Lowdham Grange

1

Moorland

1

Northumberland

1

Nottingham

1

Ranby

4

Stoke Heath

1

March 2014 Total

18


Date

Establishment

Occasions

April 2014

Coldingley

1

Feltham

1

Forest Bank

1

Hewell

2

Hindley

1

Holme House

1

Liverpool

1

Moorland

3

Nottingham

3

Onley

2

Parc

1

Risley

3

Rye Hill

1

Wetherby

1

April 2014 Total

22

May 2014

Altcourse

1

Bristol

1

Buckley Hall

1

Cardiff

1

Guys Marsh

1

Haverigg

1

Hewell

1

High Down

1

Hindley

1

Nottingham

2

Peterborough

1

Portland

1

Ranby

1

Rochester

1

Wandsworth

1

Wetherby

2

May 2014 Total

18


Date

Establishment

Occasions

June 2014

Bullingdon

1

Channings Wood

1

Gartree

1

Glen Parva

1

Guys Marsh

2

Haverigg

1

Hewell

1

Leicester

1

Lincoln

1

Liverpool

1

Lowdham Grange

2

Nottingham

1

Oakwood

1

Stafford

1

Wayland

1

June 2014 Total

17

July 2014

Altcourse

1

Birmingham

1

Chelmsford

1

Deerbolt

2

Glen Parva

1

Haverigg

2

Hindley

2

Lindholme

3

Lowdham Grange

1

Nottingham

1

Parc

3

Pentonville

1

Peterborough

1

Preston

1

Ranby

2

Rochester

1

Rye Hill

1

Swaleside

1

Swinfen Hall

2

Werrington

1

Winchester

3

July 2014 Total

32


Date

Establishment

Occasions

August 2014

Alyesbury

1

Bullingdon

1

Channings Wood

1

Erlestoke

1

Harmondsworth

1

Hewell

1

Leicester

2

Moorland

2

Morton Hall

1

Norwich

1

Nottingham

3

Pentonville

1

Wayland

1

Wolds

1

Wormwood Scrubs

1

August 2014 Total

19

September 2014

Altcourse

2

Belmarsh

1

Cardiff

1

Deerbolt

2

Feltham

1

Haverigg

1

High Down

1

Highdown

1

Hindley

1

Lewes

1

Liverpool

2

Morton Hall

1

Nottingham

3

Oakwood

1

Pentonville

2

Peterborough

1

Ranby

1

Styal

1

Swaleside

1

Swinfen Hall

1

Wayland

1

Winchester

1

September 2014 Total

28


Date

Establishment

Occasions

October 2014

Altcourse

1

Belmarsh

1

Cardiff

2

Durham

1

Humber

1

Lewes

1

Liverpool

1

Manchester

1

Northumberland

1

Parc

1

Portland

1

Swaleside

1

Wayland

1

Wormwood Scrubs

1

October 2014 Total

15

November 2014

Brinsford

1

Chelmsford

1

Durham

1

Elmley

1

Haverigg

1

Humber

3

Lindholme

2

Northumberland

1

Portland

1

Swansea

1

November 2014 Total

13

December 2014

Highpoint

1

Hull

2

Humber

1

Isis

1

Lancaster Farms

1

Lindhome

1

Liverpool

1

Pentonville

1

Ranby

1

Rochester

1

Wandsworth

1

Whitemoor

1

December 2014 Total

13

Grand Total

223

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many full-time equivalent staff worked in the National Tactical Response Group on 1 March (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013, (e) 2014 and (f) 2015.

The central administrative database does not record staffing in sufficient detail to allow the number of staff employed in the National Tactical Response Group to be identified.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 18 December 2014, Official Report, columns 134-5WS, on transforming rehabilitation, whether any of the winning bidders for the running of the 21 community rehabilitation companies were not involved when the contracts went live on 1 February 2015.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014 and on 1 February 2015, new owners assumed control of the CRCs and delivery of probation services to low and medium risk offenders. On 1 February, all providers who signed contracts on 18 December 2014 assumed ownership of the CRC for which they had successfully bid.



Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he expects Section 28 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 to come into force.

Knives on our streets are a social scourge, and under this Government, criminals carrying knives are more likely to go to prison and to get longer sentences. Unlawful possession of a knife or offensive weapon is already a serious criminal offence (which carries a maximum 4 year custodial sentence). We have built on that in the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015, to make it absolutely clear that cautions should no longer be used for these offences.

Parliament has also decided that those caught for a second time in possession of a knife should face a minimum custodial sentence. The Ministry of Justice is currently considering how best to implement this provision, alongside the other legislative changes contained in the Act.

9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, who the members are of the appointment panel for the new Chief Inspector of Prisons.

The Selection Panel for the competition to recruit a new Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons were:

  • Dame Anne Pringle (Chair) – A Public Appointment Assessor nominated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments.
  • Antonia Romeo, the then Director of Criminal Justice, Ministry of Justice.
  • Lord Oliver Henley, former Minister of State, Home Office. He was the first independent selection panel member.
  • Amanda Sater, a member of the Youth Justice Board and the second independent selection panel member.
Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people leaving prison since 1 February 2015 after sentences of under 12 months have been supervised by a community rehabilitation company.

On 1 February 2015, provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 came into force, which extend post release supervision to offenders released from sentences of more than one day but less than 12 months. These provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015.

Official figures for the number of short sentenced offenders supervised by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) are not currently published. However, there will be a gradual increase in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts. We will closely monitor numbers of all offenders being released into the supervision of both the National Probation Service and CRCs, including those from sentences of less than 12 months.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of local magistrate advisory boards were (a) women, (b) men, (c) of BAME origin and (d) aged over 65 on 1 April (i) 1989, (ii) 1994, (iii) 2000, (iv) 2005, (v) 2010 and (vi) 2014.

I have interpreted ‘Local magistrate advisory boards’ to mean Advisory Committees on Justices of the Peace, the bodies responsible for recruiting and selecting magistrates in England and Wales.

We encourage applications from people from all walks of life who have the necessary skills, and we will continue to work to ensure that our magistrates reflect the make-up of modern Britain.

Diversity data for the Advisory Committees’ members is not recorded for the requested years prior to 2005. The available data is shown below.

Year (1 April)

Female

Male

BAME

Age over 65

2005

46%

54%

7%

36%

2010

47%

53%

9%

60%

2014

48%

52%

10%

53%

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, who the members are of each local magistrate advisory board.

I have interpreted ‘Local magistrate advisory boards’ to mean Advisory Committees on Justices of the Peace, the bodies responsible for recruiting and selecting magistrates in England and Wales.

To enable their work to be informed by a range of knowledge and experience, Advisory Committees are composed of both magistrates and non-magistrates. At least one third of each Committee’s members should be non-magistrates.

The attached table contains the names of each Committee’s members and indicates which of those members are magistrates.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of local magistrate advisory boards are (a) sitting magistrates and (b) non-magistrates.

I have interpreted ‘Local magistrate advisory boards’ to mean Advisory Committees on Justices of the Peace, the bodies responsible for recruiting and selecting magistrates in England and Wales.

To enable their work to be informed by a range of knowledge and experience, Advisory Committees are composed of both magistrates and non-magistrates. At least one third of each Committee’s members should be non-magistrates.

The attached table contains the names of each Committee’s members and indicates which of those members are magistrates.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Department's press release Damian Green: new rehabilitation powers for magistrates, published on 25 March 2014, when he plans to publish a White Paper on magistrates' reform.

The Government has no plans to publish a White Paper on magistrates’ reform before the General Election. The role of magistrates will be reviewed again once our rehabilitation and summary justice reforms have bedded down.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of the total work undertaken in magistrates' courts was presided over by (a) lay magistrates and (b) district judges on 1 April (i) 1989, (ii) 1994, (iii) 2000, (iv) 2005, (v) 2010 and (vi) 2014.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service does not centrally hold the data requested for 1st April 1989, 1994, 2000, and 2005. The records became centralised with a phased roll out of a case management system (Libra) in 2005. Therefore, records prior to that date are retained locally and would require a manual trawl to retrieve and could only be collected at a disproportionate cost. However, for 1st April 2010 and 2014 the data is set out in the following table:

Date

Judiciary

Cases

Number

%

01-Apr-10

Magistrates

10,512

93.0%

District Judges

797

7.0%

01-Apr-14

Magistrates

8,972

91.1%

District Judges

880

8.9%

The column headed 'Cases', provides a count of cases that have a hearing listed on the specified hearing date, it is possible for a single defendant to have more than one case listed at the same time. The data includes Criminal, Civil and Enforcement cases, but will exclude any family cases heard in the Magistrates' Courts. It is possible to have Magistrates sitting with District Judges in the same session; where this occurs the case will be counted under both.

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average age was of a magistrate on 1 April (a) 1989, (b) 1994, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010 and (f) 2014.

We encourage applications from people from all walks of life who have the necessary skills, and we will continue to work to ensure that our magistrates reflect the make-up of modern Britain.

Average age data for the magistracy is not recorded for 1989, 1994, and 2000. The available data is shown below.

Year

Average Age

2005

56

2010

58

2014

59

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of magistrates were aged (a) over 65, (b) 55 to 65, (c) 45 to 55, (d) 35 to 45, (e) 25 to 35 and (f) under 25 on 1 April (i) 1989, (ii) 1994, (iii) 2000, (iv) 2005, (v) 2010 and (vi) 2014.

Magistrates from diverse backgrounds are vital in retaining public confidence in our justice system. We encourage applications from people from all walks of life who have the necessary skills, and we will continue to work to ensure that our magistrates reflect the make-up of modern Britain.

Age diversity data for the magistracy is not recorded for 1989, 1994 and 2000. The available data is capable of being reported in the categories shown below.

Year

Under 30

30-39

40-49

50-59

60-70

2005

>1%

>4%

15%

42%

39%

2010

>1%

>4%

14%

31%

51%

2014

>1%

>3%

12%

28%

57%

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of magistrates were (a) female, (b) male and (c) of BAME origin on 1 April (i) 1989, (ii) 1994, (iii) 2000, (iv) 2005, (v) 2010 and (vi) 2014.

Magistrates from diverse backgrounds are vital in retaining public confidence in our justice system. We encourage applications from people from all walks of life who have the necessary skills, and we will continue to work to ensure that our magistrates reflect the make-up of modern Britain.

Ethnic diversity data for the magistracy is not recorded for 1989, 1994, and 2000. The available data is shown below.

Year

Male

Female

BAME

1989

57%

43%

-

1994

54%

46%

-

2000

51%

49%

-

2005

50%

50%

7%

2010

49%

51%

8%

2014

48%

52%

9%

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many magistrates there were on 1 April (a) 1989, (b) 1994, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010 and (f) 2014.

The number of Magistrates for the period requested are:

Year (at 1 April)

Magistrates

1989

28,211

1994

30,054

2000

30,308

2005

28,253

2010

28,607

2014

21,745

12th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers who have received severance or redundancy packages since May 2010, have subsequently been re-employed as prison officers.

50 prison officers who received a severance package since May 2010 have subsequently been re-employed as prison officers (up to 30 September 2014). The majority of the officers who have been re-employed have returned on a fixed-term basis as part of the HM Prison Service Reserves, which has been established to support capacity changes and fluctuations in staffing numbers. In total less than 1% of the officers who received a severance package since May 2010 have returned to work for NOMS.

This figure is rounded to the nearest 10, in line with the departmental policy for presenting staffing data.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers have taken severance and redundancy packages in each month since May 2014.

Information on the amount paid to prison officers in severance since May 2014 is not currently available. Invoices relating to severance payments made for this period have not been received by Departments.

Information, from personnel records, on the number of prison officers who have left NOMS for reasons that would typically attract a severance payment is contained in the table. Severance payments are usually received by staff leaving NOMS due to medical inefficiency and through voluntary exit schemes. No voluntary exit schemes involving prison officers have been initiated in 2014/15. The small number, which amounts to five or fewer, of exits under these terms relate to officers who had previously agreed an exit but whose departure had been delayed into this year.

Monthly Headcount of Prison Officers Leaving NOMS Due To Reasons Attracting Severance/Redundancy Payments (Voluntary Exit Schemes And Medical Inefficiency Cases) May - September 2014

Month

Headcount of Leavers

May 2014

10

Jun 2014

20

Jul 2014

20

Aug 2014

20

Sep 2014

20

Notes:

A small number of officers leaving for medical inefficiency may be re-designated and will not receive a severance payment.

Figures are derived from Official Statistics and in line with our obligations under the Statistics and Registration Act 2007 and the Official Statistics Code of Practice, staff numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has saved as a result of the implementation of each of the legal aid provisions in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012.

It is not possible at this point to establish the precise savings resulting from the legal aid reforms contained in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. There are still ongoing cases that started prior to the reforms. As a result, the reforms have not yet reached steady state and the full savings have not yet been fully realised.

However, the NAO recently concluded in their report: Implementing reforms to civil legal aid, that the MoJ is on track to deliver £300m of savings.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been paid in severance and redundancy packages to prison officers in each month since May 2014.

Information on the amount paid to prison officers in severance since May 2014 is not currently available. Invoices relating to severance payments made for this period have not been received by Departments.

Information, from personnel records, on the number of prison officers who have left NOMS for reasons that would typically attract a severance payment is contained in the table. Severance payments are usually received by staff leaving NOMS due to medical inefficiency and through voluntary exit schemes. No voluntary exit schemes involving prison officers have been initiated in 2014/15. The small number, which amounts to five or fewer, of exits under these terms relate to officers who had previously agreed an exit but whose departure had been delayed into this year.

Monthly Headcount of Prison Officers Leaving NOMS Due To Reasons Attracting Severance/Redundancy Payments (Voluntary Exit Schemes And Medical Inefficiency Cases) May - September 2014

Month

Headcount of Leavers

May 2014

10

Jun 2014

20

Jul 2014

20

Aug 2014

20

Sep 2014

20

Notes:

A small number of officers leaving for medical inefficiency may be re-designated and will not receive a severance payment.

Figures are derived from Official Statistics and in line with our obligations under the Statistics and Registration Act 2007 and the Official Statistics Code of Practice, staff numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications for legal aid in domestic violence cases were (a) granted and (b) refused in (i) the last full financial year before the provisions in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 came into force and (ii) in each financial year since those provisions came into force.

This Government is exceptionally clear that where people have suffered or are suffering from domestic violence, legal aid must be available to help them break free from the abusive relationship.

Official statistics on legal aid are published quarterly on the Gov.uk website at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the eligibility criteria for legal aid are for those seeking Female Genital Mutilation protection orders.

We are committed to tackling and preventing the harmful and unacceptable practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). This is why we are strengthening the law in this area through the Serious Crime Bill, including by introducing Female Genital Mutilation Protection Orders, to protect potential or actual victims of FGM. Civil legal aid will be available in relation to the making, varying, discharge and appeal of these orders. Criminal legal aid will be available in relation to a prosecution for breach of such an order.

We will consider how best to apply the means and merits tests as part of the preparations for implementing FGM Protection Orders, subject to the Bill becoming law.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
6th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, to what conditions and restrictions imposed by his Department Mr Paul McDowell will be subject in seeking future employment.

On further employment Mr McDowell will still be bound by the terms and conditions of his appointment. He will be obliged to keep confidential any restricted information which he has received or obtained during the course of the appointment.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
6th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he was first informed that Mr Paul McDowell had tendered his resignation as Chief Inspector of Probation; and when he accepted that resignation.

The Secretary of State was informed on Friday 30 January 2015 that Mr McDowell had tendered his resignation. The Secretary of State accepted the resignation on the same day. This was the outcome of careful consideration on both sides and preceded the transfer of ownership of all the Community Rehabilitation Companies on 1 February 2015.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
6th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times and on what dates he met Mr Paul McDowell during the period in which he held the post of Chief Inspector of Probation.

The Secretary of State met Paul McDowell 5 times during the period in which he held the post of Chief Inspector of Probation.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
6th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the final decision on whether to appoint a candidate to the role of Chief Inspector of (a) Probation and (b) Prisons rests with the Secretary of State alone.

Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation is appointed by the Secretary of State after consideration of the pre-appointment hearing report by the Justice Select Committee. By convention Her Majesty the Queen is informed of the appointment.

Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Prisons is appointed by Her Majesty the Queen on the recommendation of the Secretary of State after consideration of the pre-appointment hearing report by the Select Committee.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
6th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much Mr Paul McDowell will receive in the financial package agreed as part of his resignation as Chief Inspector of Probation.

A settlement has been agreed in line with Treasury guidelines. The Department has agreed to pay Mr McDowell the equivalent of six month's salary, the sum incorporating payment of his notice period which has been paid in lieu.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
5th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, who in his Department took the decision not to disclose to the House of Commons Justice Committee the family connections of Mr Paul McDowell to Sodexo Justice Services as part of the pre-appointment scrutiny process.

The documentation sent to the pre-appointment scrutiny committee by the Ministry of Justice’s Arms Length Bodies Governance Division.

The family connections of Mr McDowell with Sodexo Justice Services were considered carefully by the selection panel which followed the Commissioner for Public Appointments Code of Practice.

At the time of the pre-appointment scrutiny of Mr McDowell, Sodexo were only at an early stage of the bidding process for contracts under Transforming Rehabilitation. There was no actual or perceived conflict of interest at that time nor any certainty that a risk of conflict would arise at a later date.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what consultant, non-executive directors and associates have worked with Just Solutions International since it was established; when each such person was appointed; and what the remuneration of each such person for that work is.

Just Solutions International (JSi) is a brand within the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) that the Agency adopted in early 2013.

The Ministry of Justice contracted with PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC) for the provision of support for the development by NOMS of a business model to generate commercial income through the provision of advice and support to other governments on prison and probation issues.

The contract was awarded to PwC in September 2012 and was for a period of 8 months from January to August 2013. The amount paid for the provision of services was £101,179 excluding VAT. A redacted version of the contract was published under the transparency agenda and can be found on the Contract Finder website at the following link:

https://online.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk:443/Common/View%20Notice.aspx?site=1000&lang=en&NoticeId=790687.

In addition to this contract, NOMS, through JSi, worked with PwC in Pakistan supporting reform of Punjab prisons. The amount paid to PwC for their services was £7,308.40 excluding VAT by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost was of the most recent recruitment process for the Chief Inspector of Probation that led to the appointment of Mr Paul McDowell.

The recruitment of Mr Paul McDowell as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation (HMCIP) was fully compliant with the Commissioner for Public Appointments’ Code of Practice.

Shortlisting was undertaken by a panel comprising:

- A panel chair nominated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments;

- A Ministry of Justice Director; and

- Two independent members.

The shortlist was approved by the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister under the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000.

The interviews were conducted by the same Panel, with the outcomes communicated to the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister. The Secretary of State for Justice referred to preferred candidate to the Justice Select Committee for a pre-appointment hearing. On consideration of the Select Committee’s report the Secretary of State for Justice confirmed the appointment and by convention, the Queen was informed.

The total cost of the appointment process for Paul McDowell as HMCIP, including the cost of external agency use, was £30,903.90 (inclusive of VAT).

The Government recognises the need to attract a strong and diverse range of candidates for all public appointments. For this reason, recruitment consultants may be used to assist with competitions for particularly significant roles, such as Chief Inspector of Probation, to ensure that this need is met and where advertising alone may not suffice.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, who was involved in the (a) shortlisting and (b) final appointment of Mr Paul McDowell as Chief Inspector of Probation.

The recruitment of Mr Paul McDowell as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation (HMCIP) was fully compliant with the Commissioner for Public Appointments’ Code of Practice.

Shortlisting was undertaken by a panel comprising:

- A panel chair nominated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments;

- A Ministry of Justice Director; and

- Two independent members.

The shortlist was approved by the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister under the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000.

The interviews were conducted by the same Panel, with the outcomes communicated to the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister. The Secretary of State for Justice referred to preferred candidate to the Justice Select Committee for a pre-appointment hearing. On consideration of the Select Committee’s report the Secretary of State for Justice confirmed the appointment and by convention, the Queen was informed.

The total cost of the appointment process for Paul McDowell as HMCIP, including the cost of external agency use, was £30,903.90 (inclusive of VAT).

The Government recognises the need to attract a strong and diverse range of candidates for all public appointments. For this reason, recruitment consultants may be used to assist with competitions for particularly significant roles, such as Chief Inspector of Probation, to ensure that this need is met and where advertising alone may not suffice.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department spent on external agencies involved in the appointment process of Mr Paul McDowell as Chief Inspector of Probation.

The recruitment of Mr Paul McDowell as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation (HMCIP) was fully compliant with the Commissioner for Public Appointments’ Code of Practice.

Shortlisting was undertaken by a panel comprising:

- A panel chair nominated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments;

- A Ministry of Justice Director; and

- Two independent members.

The shortlist was approved by the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister under the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000.

The interviews were conducted by the same Panel, with the outcomes communicated to the Secretary of State for Justice as the appointing Minister. The Secretary of State for Justice referred to preferred candidate to the Justice Select Committee for a pre-appointment hearing. On consideration of the Select Committee’s report the Secretary of State for Justice confirmed the appointment and by convention, the Queen was informed.

The total cost of the appointment process for Paul McDowell as HMCIP, including the cost of external agency use, was £30,903.90 (inclusive of VAT).

The Government recognises the need to attract a strong and diverse range of candidates for all public appointments. For this reason, recruitment consultants may be used to assist with competitions for particularly significant roles, such as Chief Inspector of Probation, to ensure that this need is met and where advertising alone may not suffice.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the Minister plans to answer Question 216465 tabled on 28 November 2014.

I answered the right hon. member's question on 3 December, stating that I would write to him when the data was available. I hope to be able to do this next week.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of section 28 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 on the number of prison places which are required.

Knives on our streets are a social scourge, and under this Government, criminals carrying knives are more likely to go to prison and to get longer sentences. Unlawful possession of a knife or offensive weapon is already a serious criminal offence (which carries a maximum 4 year custodial sentence). We are building on that in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, to make it absolutely clear that cautions should no longer be used for these offences.

Parliament has also decided that those caught for a second time in possession of a knife should face a minimum custodial sentence.

The Ministry of Justice has undertaken an analysis of the prison places which would be required as a result of the implementation of section 28 of the Bill. This will be published alongside the final Impact Assessments for the Bill when it receives Royal Assent.

This Government will always ensure that we have enough prison places for those sent to us by the courts.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times police cells were used to hold prisoners overnight in each month in 2014.

As part of standard logistical arrangements, there are occasions where prisoners may be temporarily held overnight in police cells. We are categorically not using police cells due to a lack of space but because it is not always possible to transfer prisoners from courts to prisons in the time available at the end of court sittings – we have over half a million prisoner transfers a year so it is unsurprising that occasionally we cannot get prisoners back to their prison for one night. This is not the same as using Operation Safeguard, as in 2007-08.

The number of prisoners held overnight in a police cell has come down to around 1,400 in 2013-14, after reaching a peak of over 50,000 in 2007-08. Police cells, under Operation Safeguard, have not been used since 22 September 2008 and no police cells under Operation Safeguard have been on stand by since the end of October 2008.

The following table shows the total number of prisoners who were temporarily held overnight in police cells in England and Wales in each month in 2014. The totals include adults, young adults (18 to 20-year-olds) and young people (15 to 17-year-olds).


Month in 2014

Number of Prisoners

January

168

February

372

March

175

April

64

May

46

June

112

July

274

August

116

September

62

October

96

November

149

December

111

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 on the number of prison places which are required.

The Ministry of Justice has undertaken analysis of the prison places that would be required as a result of the implementation of the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill. Impact Assessments have been published which include estimates for all policies which would either lead to an impact of £5m per annum or more on the public sector, or are likely to attract high levels of interest. These Impact Assessments include estimates of the prison places required and are available here:

http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2014-15/criminaljusticeandcourts/documents.html

An updated overarching and final Impact Assessment will be published when the Bill achieves Royal Assent.

This Government will always ensure that we have enough prison places for those sent to us by the courts.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, by what date all the Transforming Rehabilitation contracts with (a) Tier 1, (b) Tier 2 and (c) Tier 3 providers will be signed.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014. There was strong competition for these contracts in all regions, and all of the new owners have experience working with offenders or across the Criminal Justice System. On 1 February 2015, new owners will assume control of the CRCs and we will transition to the delivery of probation services under the new contracts.

The remaining provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also come into force on 1 February, including those which extend supervision after release to offenders released from sentences of more than 1 day but less than 12 months. The latter provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015. As a result, there will be a gradual increase after that date in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts.

Contracts with the CRCs will require them to supervise, and provide services to, any offender released from custody in their cohort on licence – including both offenders released from custodial sentences of 12 months or more and any released from shorter custodial sentences on licence.

Under the new contracts, CRCs are required to enter into subcontracts with the pre-approved Tier 2 or 3 providers named in the contracts, as soon as reasonably practicable after 1 February 2015 (and in any event within 6 months of that date). Additional Tier 2 and 3 providers may be added to the CRCs’ supply chains over time as needed, subject to the subcontracting arrangements stated in the contracts. To provide continuity of service provision, existing contracts have been novated to CRCs.

The mobilisation and transition phase of the Programme is being carried out in a controlled way that gives time for new processes to bed in and to ensure public safety at every stage.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date the supervision of people on short prison sentences by Community Rehabilitation Companies will begin.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014. There was strong competition for these contracts in all regions, and all of the new owners have experience working with offenders or across the Criminal Justice System. On 1 February 2015, new owners will assume control of the CRCs and we will transition to the delivery of probation services under the new contracts.

The remaining provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also come into force on 1 February, including those which extend supervision after release to offenders released from sentences of more than 1 day but less than 12 months. The latter provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015. As a result, there will be a gradual increase after that date in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts.

Contracts with the CRCs will require them to supervise, and provide services to, any offender released from custody in their cohort on licence – including both offenders released from custodial sentences of 12 months or more and any released from shorter custodial sentences on licence.

Under the new contracts, CRCs are required to enter into subcontracts with the pre-approved Tier 2 or 3 providers named in the contracts, as soon as reasonably practicable after 1 February 2015 (and in any event within 6 months of that date). Additional Tier 2 and 3 providers may be added to the CRCs’ supply chains over time as needed, subject to the subcontracting arrangements stated in the contracts. To provide continuity of service provision, existing contracts have been novated to CRCs.

The mobilisation and transition phase of the Programme is being carried out in a controlled way that gives time for new processes to bed in and to ensure public safety at every stage.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date the successful bidders will assume control of the Community Rehabilitation Companies.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014. There was strong competition for these contracts in all regions, and all of the new owners have experience working with offenders or across the Criminal Justice System. On 1 February 2015, new owners will assume control of the CRCs and we will transition to the delivery of probation services under the new contracts.

The remaining provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also come into force on 1 February, including those which extend supervision after release to offenders released from sentences of more than 1 day but less than 12 months. The latter provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015. As a result, there will be a gradual increase after that date in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts.

Contracts with the CRCs will require them to supervise, and provide services to, any offender released from custody in their cohort on licence – including both offenders released from custodial sentences of 12 months or more and any released from shorter custodial sentences on licence.

Under the new contracts, CRCs are required to enter into subcontracts with the pre-approved Tier 2 or 3 providers named in the contracts, as soon as reasonably practicable after 1 February 2015 (and in any event within 6 months of that date). Additional Tier 2 and 3 providers may be added to the CRCs’ supply chains over time as needed, subject to the subcontracting arrangements stated in the contracts. To provide continuity of service provision, existing contracts have been novated to CRCs.

The mobilisation and transition phase of the Programme is being carried out in a controlled way that gives time for new processes to bed in and to ensure public safety at every stage.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what dates the Transforming Rehabilitation contracts with (a) Tier 1, (b) Tier 2 and (c) Tier 3 providers were signed.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014. There was strong competition for these contracts in all regions, and all of the new owners have experience working with offenders or across the Criminal Justice System. On 1 February 2015, new owners will assume control of the CRCs and we will transition to the delivery of probation services under the new contracts.

The remaining provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also come into force on 1 February, including those which extend supervision after release to offenders released from sentences of more than 1 day but less than 12 months. The latter provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015. As a result, there will be a gradual increase after that date in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts.

Contracts with the CRCs will require them to supervise, and provide services to, any offender released from custody in their cohort on licence – including both offenders released from custodial sentences of 12 months or more and any released from shorter custodial sentences on licence.

Under the new contracts, CRCs are required to enter into subcontracts with the pre-approved Tier 2 or 3 providers named in the contracts, as soon as reasonably practicable after 1 February 2015 (and in any event within 6 months of that date). Additional Tier 2 and 3 providers may be added to the CRCs’ supply chains over time as needed, subject to the subcontracting arrangements stated in the contracts. To provide continuity of service provision, existing contracts have been novated to CRCs.

The mobilisation and transition phase of the Programme is being carried out in a controlled way that gives time for new processes to bed in and to ensure public safety at every stage.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Transforming Rehabilitation contracts with Tier 1 providers state (a) that people on short prison sentences must be supervised and (b) the date from which such supervision must be provided.

Contracts were signed on behalf of the Secretary of State for Justice with the new owners of the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on 18 December 2014. There was strong competition for these contracts in all regions, and all of the new owners have experience working with offenders or across the Criminal Justice System. On 1 February 2015, new owners will assume control of the CRCs and we will transition to the delivery of probation services under the new contracts.

The remaining provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also come into force on 1 February, including those which extend supervision after release to offenders released from sentences of more than 1 day but less than 12 months. The latter provisions apply to any offender whose offence was committed on or after 1 February 2015. As a result, there will be a gradual increase after that date in the number of offenders eligible for post-release supervision as cases flow through the courts.

Contracts with the CRCs will require them to supervise, and provide services to, any offender released from custody in their cohort on licence – including both offenders released from custodial sentences of 12 months or more and any released from shorter custodial sentences on licence.

Under the new contracts, CRCs are required to enter into subcontracts with the pre-approved Tier 2 or 3 providers named in the contracts, as soon as reasonably practicable after 1 February 2015 (and in any event within 6 months of that date). Additional Tier 2 and 3 providers may be added to the CRCs’ supply chains over time as needed, subject to the subcontracting arrangements stated in the contracts. To provide continuity of service provision, existing contracts have been novated to CRCs.

The mobilisation and transition phase of the Programme is being carried out in a controlled way that gives time for new processes to bed in and to ensure public safety at every stage.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many books were received by his Department during December 2014 as part of the books for prisoners campaign; and where those books were distributed.

377 books were donated in December 2014 and we are in the process of arranging for them to be sent to a prison library. Books which have been donated previously were sent to HMP Pentonville and HMP East Sutton Park.

In accordance with national policy, all of the books are searched before being made available to the library service. The books will be available for any prisoner at the relevant establishments to borrow and will be formally donated to the library service.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which countries Just Solutions International (JSI) has worked with since it was established; what contracts it has with foreign companies; what visits Ministers in his Department have made relating to JSI; and what payments JSI has received from foreign contracts.

Just Solutions International (JSi) is a brand within the National Offender Management Service (NOMS). Over the last two years, NOMS has worked with the following countries, some of them under the JSi brand. As the NOMS commercial work through the JSi brand is not separated out from non-commercial international work, the list below simply indicates where a charge to the country or the EU was applied (*). This does not include visits by other Governments to the UK for purposes of information exchange:

Pakistan

Libya

Oman (*)

Seychelles (*)

Nigeria

Macedonia

Bermuda (*)

Cayman Islands (*)

China (*)

Kosovo (*)

Turkey (*)

NOMS does not have any contracts with foreign companies related to commercial work routed through the JSi brand and has not previously entered into any nor received payments relating to such contracts.

No Ministerial visits abroad have been arranged to support NOMS’ commercial work.

Specifics of payments for commercial contracts delivered cannot be provided as they are commercially sensitive.

Part of the rationale for our work with other countries is to impact positively on human rights practices. We believe that by bringing our standards on issues such as human rights into international delivery we will improve detention practices. Our correctional services provide a gold standard in human rights, and are well viewed by other Governments who take a similar view to us on the paramount importance of the protection and promotion of human rights. When other countries approach us for assistance, we are clear that we will only offer advice and support that complies with our own stringent human rights standards.

It has been government policy for many years to work with overseas governments and help them develop their criminal justice systems.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
13th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the naming of specific companies in the Criminal Justice (Electronic Monitoring) (Responsible Person) Order 2014 is legal under EU competition law.

The procurement competition which appointed the company named on the current Order as the provider of electronic monitoring services was carried out in accordance with EU procurement law.

The Order reflects the outcome of that procurement process by making the named company the person responsible for monitoring offenders who are subject to an electronic requirement where a court decides to impose such a requirement as part of certain sentences named in the Order.

12th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what new additional capacity in the adult prison estate is (a) planned or (b) under construction; which prisons are so affected; how many additional units are being created through such work; and when each additional space will come on stream.

This Government will always ensure that we have enough prison places for those sent to us by the courts and we continue to modernise the prison estate so that it delivers best value for the taxpayer.

We have a long term strategy for managing the prison estate which will provide more adult male prison capacity than we inherited from the previous Government. We also have a range of contingencies available to manage temporary or unexpected increases in the population.

Four new house-blocks (which will be completed by May 2015) consisting of a total of 1,250 new places are being delivered at HMPs Thameside, The Mount, Parc and Peterborough. These places will open when they are required.

We are also delivering around 500 places by April 2015 through small scale investments at the following prisons:

Cardiff

Chelmsford

Deerbolt

Hatfield

Hewell

Hollesley Bay

Humber

Kirkham

Lancaster Farms

Littlehey

The Mount

Norwich

Standford Hill

Stoke Heath

Swansea

Thorn Cross

Wandsworth

Warren Hill

Wymott

We are also constructing a new, modern 2,106 place prison for North Wales in Wrexham, to be opened in 2017.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
12th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the expected capacity of the adult (a) male and (b) female prison system will be in (i) June 2015, (ii) January 2016, (iii) June 2016, (iv) January 2017, (v) June 2017, (vi) January 2018, (vii) June 2018, (viii) January 2019, (ix) June 2019 and (x) January 2020.

Decisions on the number of spaces required in each year, up to 2020, will depend on population trends and projections over the coming years.

This Government will always ensure that we have enough prison places for those sent to us by the courts and we continue to modernise the prison estate so that it delivers best value for the taxpayer.

We have a long term strategy for managing the prison estate which will provide more adult male prison capacity than we inherited from the previous Government.We also have a range of contingencies available to manage temporary or unexpected increases in the population.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
8th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether it remains the policy of his Department not to fund Christmas parties for staff.

The Departmental policy sets out that when providing in-house hospitality, no alcohol is to be paid for from Departmental funds. Christmas parties are organised and paid for by individual members of staff.

Employees are expected to behave in accordance with the standards set out in the Civil Service Code and the Departmental Conduct policy.

8th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date the Legal Aid Agency introduced a prescribed time period of 24 months for evidence relating to domestic violence cases.

The 24 month time period was set out in the Civil Legal Aid (Procedure) Regulations 2013 which came into force on 1 April 2013.

This Government is absolutely clear that victims of domestic violence should receive legal aid where it is needed to help break free from abusive relationships. Since the reforms were introduced last year thousands of people have successfully applied for legal aid where domestic violence is involved.

The 24 month time limit for evidence does not exclude victims where the abuse occurred over two years ago. The time limit relates to the date the evidence was obtained, not the date of the abuse itself. Some forms of evidence can be obtained several months or even years after the abuse has been experienced.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what Just Solutions International's operating profit or loss has been in each of the last five years.

Just Solutions International is not a trading body but is part of the National Offender Management Service. It does not therefore make separate profits or losses.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
18th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people serving custodial sentences in each year since 2010 have been sectioned under the Mental Health Act 1983.

By virtue of Section 47 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (the 1983 Act), the Secretary of State for Justice may, by warrant, direct that a sentenced prisoner be removed and detained in a secure hospital provided that he is satisfied by reports from at least two registered medical practitioners that:

· the person is suffering from mental disorder; and

· the mental disorder is of a nature or degree which makes it appropriate for him to be detained in hospital for medical treatment; and

· appropriate treatment is available for him.

The number of prisoners serving custodial sentences who have been admitted to hospital after the issue of a transfer direction under the 1983 Act in each year since 2010 is set out in the table below. Such transfers directions are valid for 14 days. The figures for total admissions include sentenced prisoners admitted to hospital more than once in a given year.

Table One

Year Total Admissions

2010 446

2011 442

2012 462

2013 457

Once a transfer direction has been issued, it is the Secretary of State’s expectation that the prisoner is always transferred to hospital within 14 days.

However, there may be exceptional circumstances in which the transfer does not take place or is delayed. Such circumstances may include:-

· the proposed hospital bed placement becomes unexpectedly unavailable and the transfer direction expires after 14 days (in which case the Secretary of State will issue a new direction once a new bed placement has been confirmed);

· other court proceedings may intervene, with a new court order superseding the transfer direction

The number of transfer directions issued under section 47 the Act in respect of prisoners serving custodial sentences in each year since 2010 is set out in the table below.

Table Two

Year Total of Directions Issued

2010 451

2011 444

2012 458

2013 463

It should also be noted that as the direction is valid for 14 days, it may be issued in late December one calendar year with the actual admission to hospital not taking place until early January the next calendar year.

For the reasons set out above, the number of transfer directions issued in each year will not match exactly the number of hospital admissions in that year. However, the difference between the figures for any given year is small.

Notes

1. Table One - These figures include those admitted more than once in the year

2. Table One - The data is drawn from Ministry of Justice/National Offender Management Service casework systems and from published Offender Management Annual and Quarterly tables. The link is: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-december-2013-and-annual

3. 2013 is the latest year for which we have audited and published statistics.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
18th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many of those serving custodial sentences who were sectioned under the Mental Health Act 1983 were (a) moved and (b) not moved to secure mental health establishments before the section expired in each year since 2010.

By virtue of Section 47 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (the 1983 Act), the Secretary of State for Justice may, by warrant, direct that a sentenced prisoner be removed and detained in a secure hospital provided that he is satisfied by reports from at least two registered medical practitioners that:

· the person is suffering from mental disorder; and

· the mental disorder is of a nature or degree which makes it appropriate for him to be detained in hospital for medical treatment; and

· appropriate treatment is available for him.

The number of prisoners serving custodial sentences who have been admitted to hospital after the issue of a transfer direction under the 1983 Act in each year since 2010 is set out in the table below. Such transfers directions are valid for 14 days. The figures for total admissions include sentenced prisoners admitted to hospital more than once in a given year.

Table One

Year Total Admissions

2010 446

2011 442

2012 462

2013 457

Once a transfer direction has been issued, it is the Secretary of State’s expectation that the prisoner is always transferred to hospital within 14 days.

However, there may be exceptional circumstances in which the transfer does not take place or is delayed. Such circumstances may include:-

· the proposed hospital bed placement becomes unexpectedly unavailable and the transfer direction expires after 14 days (in which case the Secretary of State will issue a new direction once a new bed placement has been confirmed);

· other court proceedings may intervene, with a new court order superseding the transfer direction

The number of transfer directions issued under section 47 the Act in respect of prisoners serving custodial sentences in each year since 2010 is set out in the table below.

Table Two

Year Total of Directions Issued

2010 451

2011 444

2012 458

2013 463

It should also be noted that as the direction is valid for 14 days, it may be issued in late December one calendar year with the actual admission to hospital not taking place until early January the next calendar year.

For the reasons set out above, the number of transfer directions issued in each year will not match exactly the number of hospital admissions in that year. However, the difference between the figures for any given year is small.

Notes

1. Table One - These figures include those admitted more than once in the year

2. Table One - The data is drawn from Ministry of Justice/National Offender Management Service casework systems and from published Offender Management Annual and Quarterly tables. The link is: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-december-2013-and-annual

3. 2013 is the latest year for which we have audited and published statistics.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
18th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent on external legal fees relating to each case involving substantive judicial review hearings since May 2010; and what the outcome of the proceedings was in each such case.

The Department does not keep a central record of the external legal spend and the outcome in every judicial review brought against it or its associated bodies.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the prescribed time period of evidence relating to legal aid funding of domestic violence cases refers to the time of the first application or the evidence of domestic violence.

The Civil Legal Aid (Procedure) Regulations set out that once a legal aid certificate is granted, subsequent applications for either a new form of civil legal services or for new proceedings to be added to a certificate, and for which a new determination is being sought, will require further evidence to be provided.

This Government is absolutely clear that victims of domestic violence should get legal aid where it is needed to help break free from the abusive relationship. Since the reforms were introduced last year thousands of people have successfully applied for legal aid where domestic violence is involved.

The 24 month time limit for evidence does not exclude victims where the abuse occurred over two years ago. The time limit relates to the date the evidence was obtained, not the date of the abuse itself. Some forms of evidence can be obtained several months or even years after the abuse has been experienced.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many clerical agency staff his Department has employed in each month since July 2014.

Since April 2010 we have cut our overall spend on temporary staff by £35.5m. We only use temporary staff to fill business-critical posts and essential frontline services where they can provide a fast, flexible and efficient way to obtain necessary skills that are not currently available in-house. We will continue to examine our use of contractors and look for further reductions.

In responding to each question we have utilised data provided by our contracted supplier of temporary clerical staff.

1) The following amounts (exclusive of VAT) have been spent on clerical agency staff across -

July 2014 - £3,421,108.62 (5 week period)

August 2014 - £2,711,052.38 (4 week period)

September 2014 - £2,946,902.62 (4 week period)

October 2014 - £4,060,595.46 (5 week period)

November 2014 - £3,082,356.77 (4 week period)

2) The following number of clerical agency staff have been utilised –

July 2014 - 2117 (Actual)

August 2014 - 2129 (Actual)

September 2014 - 2271 (Actual)

October 2014 - 2509 (Actual)

November 2014 - 2257 (Actual)

17th Dec 2014