Helen Grant Portrait

Helen Grant

Conservative - Maidstone and The Weald

Nationality and Borders Bill
15th Sep 2021 - 21st Sep 2021
Vice-Chair, Conservative Party
8th Jan 2018 - 24th May 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Feb 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Feb 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
International Development Sub-Committee on the Work of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact
14th Jul 2015 - 31st Oct 2016
International Development Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 31st Oct 2016
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Oct 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice) (Jointly with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2012 - 7th Oct 2013
Justice Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 31st Oct 2011


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Compensation (London Capital & Finance plc and Fraud Compensation Fund) Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 286 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 292
Speeches
Monday 14th June 2021
Football Governance

The governance of English football is broken; our national game, the beautiful game, is certainly in crisis; and now is …

Written Answers
Monday 13th September 2021
Television: Standards
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Department's news story, It’s …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 26th January 2021
Football (Regulation) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to establish an independent football regulator in England; to make provision for that regulator to license football clubs, …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 6th September 2021
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: Lord Rami Ranger
Address of donor: private
Estimate of the probable value (or amount of any donation): …
EDM signed
Wednesday 1st July 2020
National Museum of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic History and Culture
That this House recognises the important role played by the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Helen Grant has voted in 284 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Helen Grant voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
13 May 2020 - Remote Division Result: Agriculture Bill (Third Reading) - View Vote Context
Helen Grant voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 352 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 211
View All Helen Grant Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(2 debate interactions)
Nigel Evans (Conservative)
(1 debate interactions)
Sarah Champion (Labour)
(1 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(1 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Helen Grant's debates

Maidstone and The Weald Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Maidstone and The Weald signature proportion
Petitions with most Maidstone and The Weald signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.


Latest EDMs signed by Helen Grant

1st July 2020
Helen Grant signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 1st July 2020

National Museum of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic History and Culture

Tabled by: Oliver Heald (Conservative - North East Hertfordshire)
That this House recognises the important role played by the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC since it opened its doors to the public on 24 September 2016, documenting and enabling the study of the life, history and culture of African Americans; notes that …
15 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Jul 2020)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 9
Liberal Democrat: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Independent: 1
Labour: 1
19th December 2017
Helen Grant signed this EDM on Wednesday 20th December 2017

NATIONAL SIKH WAR MEMORIAL

Tabled by: Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Labour - Slough)
That this House appreciates the extraordinary bravery and sacrifices of Sikh soldiers in service of Great Britain, including during both World Wars, and supports the erection of a permanent national monument in a prime central London location to commemorate and highlight these contributions; notes that for over a decade there …
265 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Feb 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 171
Conservative: 33
Scottish National Party: 26
Independent: 10
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 9
Plaid Cymru: 3
Non-affiliated: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Helen Grant's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Helen Grant, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Helen Grant has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Helen Grant has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Helen Grant


A Bill to establish an independent football regulator in England; to make provision for that regulator to license football clubs, distribute funds within football, review English Football League club finances, and reform the governance of the Football Association; to require the regulator to take steps in connection with football supporters’ groups; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 26th January 2021
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Bank of England to meet standards for the representation of ethnic minority persons on banknotes; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 2nd April 2019
(Read Debate)

Helen Grant has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


11 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Department's news story, It’s time to level up Britain’s screens, published on 23 June 2021, what evidence his Department used to inform the assessment that choice is no longer an issue for UK viewers.

There is a wealth of evidence set out in our consultation document that supports the case we have made about the evolving media landscape and the challenges this presents for linear TV broadcasters. Linear TV viewing is down almost 60% amongst 16-25 year olds since 2010, whilst 16-34 year olds now spend almost twice as much time on YouTube and subscription VoD services than they do with broadcast content. There are now 315 channels, compared to 5 in 1982 when Channel 4 was established. Linear TV advertising revenues - which constituted 74% of Channel 4’s revenue in 2020 - have declined across the sector at a compound annual rate of 2.5% since 2015.

Moreover, Ofcom, in their latest recommendations to Government on the future of public service media, outlined what it called the ‘rapid change in the industry – driven by global commercial trends and a transformation in viewing habits - [which] is making it harder for public service broadcasters to compete for audiences and maintain their current offer”.

It is against this backdrop that the Government is taking action through a strategic review of the UK’s public service broadcasting system, with plans to bring forward a White Paper in the Autumn, to ensure that our traditional public service broadcasters are equipped to retain their place at the centre of the UK’s media ecosystem.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that under a potential change in ownership model Channel 4 would maintain its focus on producing content that appeals to young people.

Channel 4’s current remit and obligations are largely based on the key building blocks for public service broadcasting as set out in the 2003 Communications Act, with further changes made in the 2010 Digital Economy Act. The Government has made clear in the consultation that it intends to preserve Channel 4’s PSB remit.

The consultation also makes clear that the Government sees the value delivered to society through the obligations placed on Channel 4 to broadcast content appealing to young and diverse audiences. Indeed, we would expect the channel’s success with younger audiences to be something particularly appealing to potential buyers.

The Government is minded to retain such obligations, though it will be important to ensure its remit does not prohibit Channel 4’s future sustainability and its ability to broadcast relevant and quality content given the developments in the media landscape – with young audiences increasingly likely to consume content on non-linear platforms such as VoD services for example.

We are seeking views on the possible modernisation of Channel 4’s remit and obligations through the consultation.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that under a potential change in ownership model Channel 4 would maintain its current levels of investment in skills and productivity for young people.

The Government believes that a change in ownership could allow Channel 4 the best chance of responding effectively to current market dynamics and opportunities, with greater access to capital and more scope to form strategic partnerships and expand internationally.

We all have a role to play in ensuring that the UK has an effective skills system that meets the needs of employers and learners - including young people - and that everyone with talent and ambition, regardless of their background, should have the opportunity to build a successful career in the Creative Industries.

A thriving, sustainable Channel 4 could offer the best prospects for long term job creation for young people in the creative economy. That is why we are considering potential reform to gather views and evidence on how the channel’s future sustainability can be achieved.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential risk that the privatisation of Channel 4 would lead to the loss of distinctive UK content and a shift towards generic content tailored to an international audience.

The government is currently consulting on issues around the channel’s publisher-broadcaster restriction, its contribution to levelling up, and its remit.

We will use the responses to our consultation, and evidence received through it, to inform our decision-making. As such, it would not be appropriate for us to carry out an impact assessment until we have considered the responses and answered the questions set out in the consultation - until then, we do not know what specific impacts we are assessing.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make and publish the results of an assessment of the potential effect that a change in Channel 4’s ownership model may have on the levelling up of the UK’s creative sector outside of London.

The government is currently consulting on issues around the channel’s publisher-broadcaster restriction, its contribution to levelling up, and its remit.

We will use the responses to our consultation, and evidence received through it, to inform our decision-making. As such, it would not be appropriate for us to carry out an impact assessment until we have considered the responses and answered the questions set out in the consultation - until then, we do not know what specific impacts we are assessing.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking in relation to securing the contribution that Channel 4 makes to the UK’s creative economy through its (a) regional offices and employees, (b) 50 per cent commissioning spend outside of London and (c) investment in skills and apprenticeships across the country.

We value Channel 4’s contribution to the UK’s creative economy, and the consultation clearly states that we consider a continued and renewed commitment to it will be appropriate to any potential change of ownership.

We have also been clear that whatever Ministers decide, Channel 4 will continue to have a Public Service Broadcasting (PSB) remit. Currently all national PSBs, including those that are privately owned, have quotas for content outside of the M25.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have had with UK production companies on the potential impact that privatising Channel 4 may have on the future of the production sector.

The government recognises that Channel 4 has consistently delivered on its remit in the decades since being established, including supporting the UK’s independent production sector.

Forty years on, this sector is now flourishing. Independent production is increasingly less reliant on income from UK public service broadcasters, and will continue to be in demand for the high-quality, differentiated, distinctively British content it produces. In the 10 years between 2008 and 2018, the contribution of PSB commissions to sector revenue fell from 64% to 42%, due in large part to the growth of international revenue.

Potential reform of the publisher broadcaster restriction could enable Channel 4 to achieve greater financial diversification that will support its growth and long term sustainability, therefore increasing its ability to invest in UK content and the creative industries.

We are consulting on this so the government may take into account a broad range of evidence and views to shape its policy-making. Both officials and Ministers have also met regularly with key stakeholders from within the production sector, including PACT.

Whatever decision we make, it will not compromise this Government’s commitment to the independent production sector and wider creative economy. Our support for the UK film and TV industry has helped it bounce back from the impact of the pandemic when it had to shut-down in March 2020. For Q4 2020 the UK film and TV industry had the second highest production spend for any quarter on record - at £1.19 billion.

Last year, the government invested over £1 billion through the creative sector tax reliefs which support the UK screen sectors. In High-End TV, the UK has seen a production boom worth over £4 billion since a dedicated tax relief was introduced in 2013.

More than 600 productions have been supported by the government’s UK Film and TV Production Restart Scheme, protecting over 55,000 jobs and securing £1.9 billion of production spend.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that a potential change to Channel 4’s publisher-broadcaster model will not negatively effect businesses and employment in the UK’s production sector.

The government recognises that Channel 4 has consistently delivered on its remit in the decades since being established, including supporting the UK’s independent production sector.

Forty years on, this sector is now flourishing. Independent production is increasingly less reliant on income from UK public service broadcasters, and will continue to be in demand for the high-quality, differentiated, distinctively British content it produces. In the 10 years between 2008 and 2018, the contribution of PSB commissions to sector revenue fell from 64% to 42%, due in large part to the growth of international revenue.

Potential reform of the publisher broadcaster restriction could enable Channel 4 to achieve greater financial diversification that will support its growth and long term sustainability, therefore increasing its ability to invest in UK content and the creative industries.

We are consulting on this so the government may take into account a broad range of evidence and views to shape its policy-making. Both officials and Ministers have also met regularly with key stakeholders from within the production sector, including PACT.

Whatever decision we make, it will not compromise this Government’s commitment to the independent production sector and wider creative economy. Our support for the UK film and TV industry has helped it bounce back from the impact of the pandemic when it had to shut-down in March 2020. For Q4 2020 the UK film and TV industry had the second highest production spend for any quarter on record - at £1.19 billion.

Last year, the government invested over £1 billion through the creative sector tax reliefs which support the UK screen sectors. In High-End TV, the UK has seen a production boom worth over £4 billion since a dedicated tax relief was introduced in 2013.

More than 600 productions have been supported by the government’s UK Film and TV Production Restart Scheme, protecting over 55,000 jobs and securing £1.9 billion of production spend.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of delivering the Government’s objectives for Channel 4 by increasing the broadcaster's investment and commissioning more content under the corporation’s current ownership model.

The government is consulting on whether an alternative ownership model for Channel 4 (but one where it retains a public service remit) may be better for the broadcaster, and better for the country.

We want Channel 4 to continue to be a public service broadcaster, and we want it to and continue to contribute socially, economically and culturally to life across the UK. But all linear TV broadcasters are facing significant challenges in today’s changing media landscape and Channel 4 is uniquely constrained in its ability to meet these challenges while it remains under public ownership - particularly because its access to capital and ability to pursue strategic partnership opportunities is limited.

Moving Channel 4 into private ownership could allow it to access new capital, take advantage of international opportunities, and create strategic partnerships only available through the private sector.

Consulting on the broadcaster’s future is therefore about ensuring that Channel 4 can continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting for years to come, and how we ensure its ownership model best supports this aim.

No decisions have been made yet - the government, through its consultation, is seeking evidence from a wide range of stakeholders to inform its policy-making and a final decision on the ownership model of the channel.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what dates (a) he and (b) officials across Government have had discussions and meetings with (i) global media companies, (ii) UK broadcasters and (iii) financial institutions on the possibility of their purchasing Channel 4.

The government is consulting on whether an alternative ownership model for Channel 4 (but one where it retains a public service remit) may be better for the broadcaster, and better for the country.

We want Channel 4 to continue to be a public service broadcaster, and we want it to continue to contribute socially, economically and culturally to life across the UK. But all linear TV broadcasters are facing significant challenges in today’s changing media landscape and Channel 4 is uniquely constrained in its ability to meet these challenges while it remains under public ownership - particularly because its access to capital and ability to pursue strategic partnership opportunities is limited.

Moving Channel 4 into private ownership could allow it to access new capital, take advantage of international opportunities, and create strategic partnerships only available through the private sector.

Consulting on the broadcaster’s future is therefore about ensuring that Channel 4 can continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting for years to come, and how we ensure its ownership model best supports this aim.

The Government has not decided whether to sell Channel 4, or how Channel 4 may be sold. Ministers and DCMS officials are meeting with a broad range of stakeholders to discuss our ongoing consultation. Their views and evidence will inform our policy-making and a final decision.