Implement sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials

The Government should explore using the new sanctions regime that allows individuals and entities that violate human rights around the world to be targeted, to impose sanctions on members of the Nigerian government and police force involved in any human rights abuses by the Nigerian police.

221,249 Signatures

Status: Open
Opened: 20 Oct 2020, 10:48 a.m.
Last 24 hours signatures : 4
Estimated Final Signatures: 224,274

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Recent Documents related to Implement sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials

1. Implement sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials
12/10/2020 - Petitions

Found: The Government should explore using the new sanctions regime that allows individuals and entities that

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12/04/2018 - Parliamentary Research

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3. Richard Ratcliffe, Free Nazanin Campaign - written evidence
23/01/2019 - Inquiry: Global Britain: The future of UK sanctions policy - Foreign Affairs Committee
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Found: days on spurious charges as diplomatic leverage. Members of the Committee have raised her case in Parliament

4. Magnitsky legislation
27/07/2018 - Parliamentary Research

Found: Dawson Contents: 1. Legislation elsewhere 2. UK Government™s increasing acceptance of Magnitsky powers 3

5. Foreign and Commonwealth Office - written evidence
15/01/2019 - Inquiry: Global Britain: The future of UK sanctions policy - Foreign Affairs Committee
- View source

Found: Commonwealth Office (FSP0015)  INTRODUCTION  Sanctions are a foreign policy and national security tool

Latest Documents
Recent Speeches related to Implement sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials

1. Nigeria: Sanctions Regime
23/11/2020 - Westminster Hall

1: e-petition 554150, relating to Nigeria and the sanctions regime.It is a pleasure to serve under your - Speech Link

2. Exiting the European Union (Sanctions)
03/02/2021 - Commons Chamber

1: move,That the Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 608) - Speech Link
2: the following motions:That the Burundi (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 (S.I., 2019, No. 1142) - Speech Link
3: Parliament, be approved.That the Cyber (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 597) - Speech Link

3. Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime
06/07/2020 - Commons Chamber

1: statement on the global human rights sanctions regulations. As we forge a dynamic new vision for a truly global - Speech Link
2: cross-party backing since then, from hon. Members in all parts of the House, including five former Foreign - Speech Link

4. Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020
29/07/2020 - Lords Chamber

1: Monday 6 July under the powers provided by the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018. The regulations - Speech Link

5. Persecution of Christians and Freedom of Religion or Belief
21/10/2020 - Westminster Hall

1: remind hon. Members that there have been some changes to normal practice in order to support the new call list - Speech Link
2: religion or belief. I led on this work across Government from September 2019 to September 2020. I stepped - Speech Link

Latest Speeches
Recent Questions related to Implement sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials
1. Human Rights: Sanctions
asked by: Neil Coyle
21/07/2020
... when he plans to publish the process by which civil society organisations can share evidence of alleged human rights abuses with the Government for the purpose of the next round of Magnitsky sanctions designations.

2. Human Rights: Sanctions
asked by: Lisa Nandy
13/07/2020
... what role Parliament will have in (a) the identification of people liable for sanctions under the new Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime and (b) holding the Government to account on the operation of that regime.

3. Human Rights: Sanctions
asked by: Lisa Nandy
13/07/2020
... what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to enable select committee chairs to request and receive reports from the Government on those who may be liable for sanctions under the new Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime.

4. Human Rights: Sanctions
asked by: Anthony Mangnall
01/09/2020
... what steps he is taking to co-ordinate the use of the Global Human Rights sanction regime with his counterparts overseas.

5. Human Rights: Sanctions
asked by: Lisa Nandy
15/06/2020
... what progress the Government is making on introducing a UK autonomous global human rights sanctions regime.

Latest Questions

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There have been deeply concerning reports of a Nigerian police force unit (SARS) engaging in illegal activities and human rights abuses, and there have also been reports of police firing at protestors calling for SARS to be disbanded.

Deploying sanctions would provide accountability for and be a deterrent to anyone involved in violations of human rights.


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Government Response

We were concerned by violence during recent protests and await the outcome of Nigerian investigations into reports of police brutality. We do not publicly speculate on future sanctions designations.


The UK Government is deeply concerned by violence during recent protests in Nigeria, which tragically claimed lives. Our thoughts are with the families of all those affected.

The Foreign Secretary issued a statement on 21 October calling for an end to the violence and for the Nigerian Government to urgently investigate reports of brutality by its security forces and hold those responsible to account. The Minister for Africa tweeted on 16 October, noting the Nigerian people’s democratic and peaceful calls for reforms, and again on 21 October, encouraging the Nigerian authorities to restore peace and address concerns over brutality towards civilians. He reiterated these messages when he spoke to Foreign Minister Onyeama on 23 October. The British High Commissioner in Abuja has also raised the protests with representatives of the Nigerian Government and will continue to do so.

We welcome President Buhari’s decision to disband the Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad (FSARS) and the establishment of judicial panels of inquiry to investigate alleged incidents of brutality by the security services. They must investigate all incidents, including in Lagos, fully. The Minister for Africa tweeted on 29 October stressing the importance of the police and military’s cooperation with the panels. He raised this, and the need for the panels to urgently start investigations, when he spoke to the Governor of Lagos on 11 November.

The UK Government will continue to work with the Nigerian Government and international and civil society partners to support justice, accountability and a more responsive policing model in Nigeria. We will continue to push for the Nigerian security services to uphold human rights and the rule of law, investigate all incidents of brutality, illegal detentions and use of excessive force, and hold those responsible to account.

On 6 July, the Government established the Global Human Rights sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018. In a statement to Parliament, the Foreign Secretary set out in full the scope of the UK’s new Global Human Rights sanctions regime. He announced the first tranche of designations, as well as the Government’s approach to future designations.

This sanctions regime will give the UK a powerful new tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. The sanctions regime is not intended to target individual countries. It will allow for sanctions to be imposed on individuals and entities involved in serious human rights violations or abuses around the world.

We will continue to consider potential designations under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime. It is longstanding practice not to speculate on future sanctions designations as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations.

The UK Government will keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office


MPs spoken contributions during 23 Nov 2020 petition debate