Written Question
Employment Tribunals Service: Ethnic Groups
7 Jul 2020, 5:25 p.m.

Questioner: Imran Hussain

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of employment tribunal claims were successful in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those claimants came from each ethnic group.

Answer (Chris Philp)

HM Courts & Tribunals Service does not hold the data being requested.

The official statistics can provide information on the percentage of cases successful at hearing but they are not separated by ethnic group.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics


Written Question
Ministry of Justice: Coronavirus
7 Jul 2020, 5:24 p.m.

Questioner: John McDonnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Procurement Policy Note 04/20: Recovery and Transition from COVID-19, published on 9 June 2020, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of maintaining the provision of contractual relief as a result of covid-19 in line with Procurement Policy Notice 02/20; which (a) companies and (b) work areas will be affected by changes to that contractual relief; and what the timeframe is for proposals to change that contractual relief.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Ministry of Justice has reviewed Procurement Policy Note 04/20 and maintenance of the provisions within that will continue to be provided as appropriate and on a case by case basis. We will continue to monitor the suppliers currently in receipt of the relief under the measures and we are working with them on individual transition plans to move out of the relief period by the end of October as set out in the Policy Note.
The Department is working closely with suppliers that are not currently in receipt of any relief measures to provide support and avoid them getting into any financial difficulty.
The Department considers the identity and category of those suppliers in receipt of the relief measure to be commercially sensitive information.


Written Question
Prison Accommodation
7 Jul 2020, 5:22 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the 27 January 2020 report of the Comptroller and Auditor General entitled Improving the Prison Estate, what estimate he has made of the number of prison places that will be lost in the next five years as a result of estate disrepair.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As stated in the Comptroller and Auditor General’s report, the Ministry estimates that currently approximately 500 places are lost permanently each year due to deterioration in the material fabric of the estate. This is based on the average losses of places that the prison estate has experienced over the last few years, on the assumption that funding levels do not increase significantly beyond those seen over the period.

This estimate of capacity loss is kept under review to reflect developments in the prison estate, including levels of investment and maintenance.

We have secured an additional £156 million for financial year 2020/21, which will be targeted at addressing some of the most urgent maintenance issues across the prison estate.

In addition, one thousand temporary cells are in the process of being installed across the estate. This will allow the Prison Service to increase capacity and help to speed up maintenance by enabling us to close places, in order to carry out refurbishment work more quickly


Written Question
Prisoners' Release: Coronavirus
7 Jul 2020, 5:21 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on new community cases of covid-19 resulting from infected prison leavers.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold the information requested.


Written Question
Prisons: Coronavirus
7 Jul 2020, 5:19 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been diverted to another custodial facility during (a) transfers and (b) new entrances as a result of limited capacity in the reverse cohorting unit of the initially intended facility in each week since the cohorting strategy was introduced.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government acted quickly to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prisons by implementing restricted regimes to comply with national social distancing guidance and limiting inter-prison transfers. Prisons have also implemented a ‘compartmentalisation’ strategy to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals. Latest public health advice suggests these measures have limited the spread of the virus and minimised the number of deaths.

The decision as to where prisoners are transferred following a court appearance is managed by HMPPS. When local prisons have insufficient capacity in their reverse cohorting units to accept all prisoners from their assigned court(s) for that day, prisoners are diverted to another local prison where space is available in their reverse cohorting unit.In all cases, the receiving prison will always be suitable to manage the requirements of a newly remanded or convicted prisoner.

The table below shows the number of prisoners since 01st April who, rather than being taken to the local prison assigned to the court where their hearing was held, were diverted to another local prison where space was available in their reverse cohorting unit.

April

May

June

Total

Total number of prisoners who, following a court appearance were diverted to another prison where space was available in their Reverse Cohorting Unit

1377

715

452

2544

Since 31 March, all inter-prison transfers have required approval by the HMPPS command structure before any transfer has taken place. Decisions to approve transfer take into account the available capacity in reverse cohorting units to ensure any prisoner transferred, can be held separately from the remainder of the general population in their new prison for 14 days. As such, there have been no prisoners diverted to another prison as a result of limited capacity in the reverse cohorting unit of the initially intended prison.


Written Question
Family Proceedings: Mediation
7 Jul 2020, 5:11 p.m.

Questioner: Thangam Debbonaire

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendations of the Family Mediation Council of 6 May 2020 on the diversion of potential litigants away from the Court system to Family Alternative Dispute Resolution options.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

It can be a difficult time for families and parents, with Covid-19 placing relationships under additional pressures. Mediation can play an important role in helping families resolve conflict in the best interests of their children without the need to come to court. We are committed to championing mediation as an alternative to court for suitable families and are grateful for the FMC for their proposals. We welcome the chance to work closely with the sector, to improve outcomes for families, and manage demand in court through the promotion of alternative dispute resolution.


Written Question
Child Arrangement Orders: Coronavirus
7 Jul 2020, 3:11 p.m.

Questioner: Catherine West

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure that HM Courts and Tribunal Service respond to applications for courts to to enforce child Arrangement orders within a reasonable time frame during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Alex Cunningham)

HM Courts and Tribunals Service is working closely with the Judiciary and family justice agencies to ensure that urgent cases are prioritised. The greater use of audio and video technology for family hearings, where appropriate, has ensured that enforcement applications can continue to be heard.

How enforcement applications are dealt with is a judicial decision and the senior judiciary has issued the following guidance:

https://www.judiciary.uk/announcements/coronavirus-crisis-guidance-on-compliance-with-family-court-child-arrangement-orders/


Written Question
Treatment Of, and Outcomes For, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Individuals in the Criminal Justice System Independent Review
7 Jul 2020, 3:06 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Tackling Racial Disparity in the Criminal Justice System: 2020 Update, published in February 2020, what recent assessment he has made of the degree of implementation of Lammy Review recommendations (a) 28 and (b) 29 in private prisons in England and Wales.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

The Government is committed to advancing each recommendation of the Review in some way. Where a recommendation cannot be implemented in full or exactly as set out, alternative approaches have been sought to achieve the same aim. The Government’s response has also identified actions going beyond the Review’s recommendations. Progress on recommendations and additional actions, and decisions on other areas of disparity where the principle of “explain or change” needs to apply, are overseen by a CJS Race and Ethnicity Board. The Board was created in response to the Review.

The Government provided a detailed public update on progress against each of the 35 recommendations of the Lammy Review, and the other related activities, in February 2020 in the “Tackling racial disparity in the Criminal Justice System” update: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tackling-racial-disparity-in-the-criminal-justice-system-2020.

Private prison providers are conscious of the importance of a representative work force. Local demographics are individual to each establishment depending on their location. Providers continue to consider BAME opportunities in recruitment drives and onsite race and diversity committees are consulted in relation to BAME issues. As with all report recommendations, the controller teams on site, who manage performance at each privately managed prison, continue to monitor the progress of provider action in this area.


Written Question
Prisoners: Exploitation
7 Jul 2020, 12:13 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of prisoners in (a) adult male, (b) adult female and (c) youth custodial facilities have a (i) history of exploitation through modern slavery, (ii) history of child criminal exploitation, and (iii) National Referral Mechanism referral.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The information requested is not collated or held by the Ministry of Justice.

There is an assessment process for offenders upon arrival into custody where this information may be divulged voluntarily. Numerous support services are available through local prison mechanisms.

A Mental Support Health Programme is currently in the process of rollout via the Prison Radio network, and National Referral Mechanism training will be offered to all prison and probation staff, along with an accessible e-learning package.

Data regarding the National Referral Mechanism can be found via the link below, however these statistics are the responsibility of the Home Office: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics


Written Question
Prisoners' Release
7 Jul 2020, 12:08 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect of extended periods under a restricted regime prior to release on the (a) mental health, (b) physical health, (c) relationship with families and others, and (d) prospects for employment of prison leavers.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of prisoners very seriously. We recognise that anxieties regarding Covid-19 and the regime restrictions required for infection control may exacerbate mental health needs and increase the risk of self-harm among prisoners, we are continuing to work to mitigate this as far as possible.

In response to Covid-19, visits have unfortunately been suspended and people in prison are spending more time in their cells. They are, however, being given access to services including telephone contact with loved ones, access to health services and where possible time in the open air. The Samaritans phone service is being kept available at this time, and we are working with the Samaritans to ensure that the Listener peer support scheme continues to function effectively. We are continuing to provide care and support to people at risk of self-harm or suicide through ACCT (Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork) case management. For those with severe mental health issues, we are doing everything we can to ensure that the process for referral, assessment and transfer to mental health hospitals continues in as normal a way as possible.

As of week commencing 23rd March, all Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) have been operating under the obligations within their Exceptional Delivery Models (EDM). As a result CRCs have adapted to an alternative way of working, albeit on a temporary basis, in order to adhere to the social distancing measures announced by the Prime Minister. All CRCs have a responsibility to ensure the health and wellbeing of their service users during the pandemic. The EDMs are subject to robust assurance and compliance activities, which are carried out by the Authority on a regular basis to ensure that CRCs continue to operate to their contracted obligations and continue to deliver front line probation services to protect the public.

We have invested an additional £22m per annum over the remaining life of the CRC contracts to deliver an enhanced Through the Gate resettlement service to people leaving prison to prepare them for release. The enhanced service includes the requirement that CRCs complete specific, tailored, tasks to help prisoners to secure and maintain settled accommodation, gain employment and manage debt and their financial affairs. During the Covid period most of this support is being provided remotely after CRCs invested in greater use of mobile technology to maintain levels of contact with offenders in the community in a safe and efficient manner. After a prison sentence, service users are supervised and supported by Probation Officers in the Community.


Written Question
Prisoners' Release: Coronavirus
7 Jul 2020, 12:08 p.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the the provision of (a) mental health support and (b) other forms of personal advice and support for prison leavers on release during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of prisoners very seriously. We recognise that anxieties regarding Covid-19 and the regime restrictions required for infection control may exacerbate mental health needs and increase the risk of self-harm among prisoners, we are continuing to work to mitigate this as far as possible.

In response to Covid-19, visits have unfortunately been suspended and people in prison are spending more time in their cells. They are, however, being given access to services including telephone contact with loved ones, access to health services and where possible time in the open air. The Samaritans phone service is being kept available at this time, and we are working with the Samaritans to ensure that the Listener peer support scheme continues to function effectively. We are continuing to provide care and support to people at risk of self-harm or suicide through ACCT (Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork) case management. For those with severe mental health issues, we are doing everything we can to ensure that the process for referral, assessment and transfer to mental health hospitals continues in as normal a way as possible.

As of week commencing 23rd March, all Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) have been operating under the obligations within their Exceptional Delivery Models (EDM). As a result CRCs have adapted to an alternative way of working, albeit on a temporary basis, in order to adhere to the social distancing measures announced by the Prime Minister. All CRCs have a responsibility to ensure the health and wellbeing of their service users during the pandemic. The EDMs are subject to robust assurance and compliance activities, which are carried out by the Authority on a regular basis to ensure that CRCs continue to operate to their contracted obligations and continue to deliver front line probation services to protect the public.

We have invested an additional £22m per annum over the remaining life of the CRC contracts to deliver an enhanced Through the Gate resettlement service to people leaving prison to prepare them for release. The enhanced service includes the requirement that CRCs complete specific, tailored, tasks to help prisoners to secure and maintain settled accommodation, gain employment and manage debt and their financial affairs. During the Covid period most of this support is being provided remotely after CRCs invested in greater use of mobile technology to maintain levels of contact with offenders in the community in a safe and efficient manner. After a prison sentence, service users are supervised and supported by Probation Officers in the Community.


Written Question
Probation
7 Jul 2020, 12:06 p.m.

Questioner: Paul Holmes

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of adopting a trauma-informed approach within the probation service.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) understands that experiences of violence, abuse and trauma are common in the lives of offenders and that this can impact on reoffending and rehabilitation. Recognising there is a greater prevalence of trauma amongst women, staff working with female offenders across Prison and Probation services have adopted trauma-informed approaches following the rollout of briefing materials and toolkits, and consideration will be given to wider rollout following the evaluation of such approaches.


Written Question
Probation
7 Jul 2020, 11:54 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Update to the Draft Target Operating Model for Probation Services in England and Wales, what the timescale is for the Effective Interventions Panel to conclude its assessments of Rehabilitation Activity Requirements.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As set out in the Target Operating Model for the Future of Probation Services in England and Wales, the National Probation Service will deliver Structured Interventions for lower risk individuals who are not suitable for Accredited Programmes.

The Effective Interventions Panel will be convened in the autumn of 2020 to assess and approve current Rehabilitation Activity Requirements (RARs) to be delivered as Structured Interventions in the future delivery model.

The Panel will use the set of effective interventions principles created by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel (CSAAP) for the assessment of Accredited Programmes, to ensure Structured Interventions are based on evidence of what works in reducing reoffending.

The suite of Structured Interventions which meet the criteria will be included in a Directory of Services for the Judiciary and other partners and stakeholders.


Written Question
Probation
7 Jul 2020, 11:54 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Update to the Draft Target Operating Model for Probation Services in England and Wales, published in June 2020, whether the assessments of Rehabilitation Activity Requirements by the Effective Interventions Panel will be published.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As set out in the Target Operating Model for the Future of Probation Services in England and Wales, the National Probation Service will deliver Structured Interventions for lower risk individuals who are not suitable for Accredited Programmes.

The Effective Interventions Panel will be convened in the autumn of 2020 to assess and approve current Rehabilitation Activity Requirements (RARs) to be delivered as Structured Interventions in the future delivery model.

The Panel will use the set of effective interventions principles created by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel (CSAAP) for the assessment of Accredited Programmes, to ensure Structured Interventions are based on evidence of what works in reducing reoffending.

The suite of Structured Interventions which meet the criteria will be included in a Directory of Services for the Judiciary and other partners and stakeholders.


Written Question
Probation
7 Jul 2020, 11:54 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Update to the Draft Target Operating Model for Probation Services in England and Wales, published in June 2020, what criteria the Effective Interventions Panel plans to use to assess Rehabilitation Activity Requirements.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As set out in the Target Operating Model for the Future of Probation Services in England and Wales, the National Probation Service will deliver Structured Interventions for lower risk individuals who are not suitable for Accredited Programmes.

The Effective Interventions Panel will be convened in the autumn of 2020 to assess and approve current Rehabilitation Activity Requirements (RARs) to be delivered as Structured Interventions in the future delivery model.

The Panel will use the set of effective interventions principles created by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel (CSAAP) for the assessment of Accredited Programmes, to ensure Structured Interventions are based on evidence of what works in reducing reoffending.

The suite of Structured Interventions which meet the criteria will be included in a Directory of Services for the Judiciary and other partners and stakeholders.


Written Question
Probation
7 Jul 2020, 11:54 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Update to the Draft Target Operating Model for Probation Services in England and Wales, published in June 2029, if he will publish a list of the Rehabilitation Activity Requirements that will be considered by the Effective Interventions Panel.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

As set out in the Target Operating Model for the Future of Probation Services in England and Wales, the National Probation Service will deliver Structured Interventions for lower risk individuals who are not suitable for Accredited Programmes.

The Effective Interventions Panel will be convened in the autumn of 2020 to assess and approve current Rehabilitation Activity Requirements (RARs) to be delivered as Structured Interventions in the future delivery model.

The Panel will use the set of effective interventions principles created by the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel (CSAAP) for the assessment of Accredited Programmes, to ensure Structured Interventions are based on evidence of what works in reducing reoffending.

The suite of Structured Interventions which meet the criteria will be included in a Directory of Services for the Judiciary and other partners and stakeholders.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what representations he has received from construction firms on contracts for the construction of each of the four planned prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, if his Department plans to (a) decommission and (b) reduce the capacity of any existing prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what category of prison each of the four planned prisons will be.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what plans he has for the integration of in-cell technology in each of the four planned prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of the 29 June 2020, whether all of the prison places at each of the four planned prisons will be for adult male prisoners.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what training facilities are planned to be built at each of the four planned prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what the timescale is for the tender process for construction of each of the four planned prisons.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Prisons: Construction
7 Jul 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Questioner: Ms Lyn Brown

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to his Written Statement of 29 June 2020, what estimate he has made of the effect on overcrowding in the prison estate of each of the four planned prisons over each of the first five years following opening.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

Four new prisons are to be built across England over the next six years. Together, these four prisons will create around 65% of the 10,000 additional places announced by the Prime Minister in 2019 and will build on the designs we are already progressing with at the new prisons at Wellingborough and Glen Parva as well as on the work we have done to ensure faster, better value and more efficient construction. In response to 65975 and 65982, we currently plan for these prisons to be Category C adult male resettlement prisons.

In response to 65976, the tendering process for the prisons has not yet been finalised so the timescale for that process is not yet available. No decisions have been made as to who will construct or operate these four new prisons. In response to 65977, we are engaging with suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Construction Framework.

In response to 65979, all the accommodation in these new prisons is planned to be uncrowded. The Prime Minister’s investment and pledge to create 10,000 additional prison places will have a positive impact on lowering the proportion of crowding within the prison estate. However, the extent to which the proportion of prisoners held in crowded accommodation will reduce will be dependent on levels of demand in the system.

In regards to 65981, no prison closures are planned as part of this announcement. The Prime Minister has made clear his focus on tackling crime and prison population projections indicate these additional prison places are required.

We are putting evidence at the heart of the design process. Understanding the needs of the prisoners who will be housed in the new prisons and what we know works to help address their offending behaviour means we are designing prisons and regimes that support governors to deliver the right outcomes for offenders and so make the public safer. In response to 65978, these prisons will incorporate a range of workshops which will enable prisoners to choose between various industries and support them in developing practical skills for work outside prison. central services hubs will bring together education, healthcare, reception, library and multi-faith spaces. Some of which could be utilised by staff and prisoners to hold larger meetings, activities, charities and community events. These services will be scaled to the number of prisoners in each prison and their needs.

Access to modern, robust technology is a vital part of current prison design and operations and will remain so for these four new prisons. In relation to 65980, we are also acutely aware of the importance of in-cell technology in the modern prison estate. We will include robust modern digital infrastructure in the new prisons. Decisions about what technology will be deployed in cells and elsewhere will be taken in due course.


Written Question
Solicitors: Legal Aid Scheme
6 Jul 2020, 5:57 p.m.

Questioner: Karl Turner

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many firms of solicitors hold a criminal legal aid contract as at 1 July 2020.

Answer (Alex Chalk)

Please note for the figures provided that some firms may have more than one office. There are currently 1,146 firms holding a criminal legal aid contract, and this equates to 1,694 offices. This data is correct as at 2 July 2020.