Nic Dakin Portrait

Nic Dakin

Labour - Former Member for Scunthorpe

Opposition Whip (Commons)
18th Oct 2016 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments Committee
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
12th Dec 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Procedure Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Procedure Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Education)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Opposition Whip (Commons)
7th Oct 2011 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
8th May 2015 - 18th Sep 2015
Procedure Committee
11th Oct 2011 - 30th Mar 2015
Education Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 7th Nov 2011


Division Voting information

Nic Dakin has voted in 1759 divisions, and 6 times against the majority of their Party.

24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 115 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 64 Noes - 271
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 69 Labour Aye votes vs 138 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 126 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 228
12 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour Aye votes vs 2 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 17 Noes - 346
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 29 Labour No votes vs 83 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 100 Noes - 331
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Nic Dakin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Labour Aye votes vs 57 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
View All Nic Dakin Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Nic Dakin's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Nic Dakin

24th July 2019
Nic Dakin signed this EDM on Thursday 25th July 2019

COMMERCIAL LOCAL RADIO AND BAUER

Tabled by: John Grogan (Labour - Keighley)
That this House notes that the commercial local radio industry is now dominated by two media giants Global and Bauer; further notes that Bauer will own 36 per cent of commercial local radio licences in the UK if their purchase of four whole groups of radio stations namely UKRD, Wireless …
24 signatures
(Most recent: 3 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 13
Scottish National Party: 4
Liberal Democrat: 3
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 1
3rd April 2019
Nic Dakin signed this EDM on Wednesday 3rd April 2019

FIREFIGHTERS MEMORIAL DAY 4 MAY 2019

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House joins with firefighters across the United Kingdom on Firefighters Memorial Day in remembering the bravery and sacrifice of over 2,300 firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty; extends its sympathies especially on this memorial day to all the bereaved families of fallen firefighters; …
80 signatures
(Most recent: 8 May 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 56
Conservative: 7
Scottish National Party: 6
Independent: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Plaid Cymru: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Nic Dakin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Nic Dakin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Nic Dakin

Tuesday 5th July 2016

Nic Dakin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Nic Dakin


A Bill to require schools in England to provide access to their premises and pupils to representatives from post-16 education establishments and others providing guidance on careers, training and courses; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 28th February 2017
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to introduce free school meal arrangements for children over the age of 16 who attend colleges to bring them into line with arrangements for children who attend schools, academies and free schools; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 6th November 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide for charitable healthcare providers taking on new responsibilities from the National Health Service to be able to recover value added tax on the same non-business supplies as the NHS in respect of those responsibilities; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 8th March 2011

Nic Dakin has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


972 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
20 Other Department Questions
25th Sep 2019
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, how much money has been claimed by Members for travel costs to return to Parliament following the Supreme Court ruling on the Government's prorogation of Parliament.

IPSA provides funding for MPs to travel in order to fulfil their parliamentary duties. This includes travel from anywhere in the UK back to Westminster, for parliamentary reasons. Following the Supreme Court’s judgement and the resumption of Parliament on 25 September 2019, IPSA also funded MPs’ travel costs from other countries where necessary, in order for them to return to Parliament.

In accordance with the Scheme of MPs’ Business Costs and Expenses, MPs have a period of 90 days from when they incur a cost to submit a claim for reimbursement, accompanied by evidence. It will therefore not be possible to assess how much money has been claimed by MPs for their travel back to Parliament as a result of the Supreme Court’s judgement until 90 days after the 25 September 2019.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost has been to the taxpayer of the unlawful prorogation of Parliament.

The full financial cost to the House of Commons Service is not yet known as some costs such as those relating to cancelled leave will take time to confirm. In-House Services and Participation are the teams anticipated to be the most impacted in financial terms. Current estimated costs from these two teams are as follows:

In-House Services
An estimated £173k in lost banqueting sales (gross), resulting in £102k off the catering services bottom-line. This includes staff recall costs.

Participation
Estimated lost revenue of up to £50k (£44k lost ticket sales and up to £6k if the Jubilee shop remains closed or there are fewer visitors) due to the expectation that the Palace of Westminster would be closed on Saturday 12 October to prepare for State Opening.

Total costs to the taxpayer will include other costs that fall outside of the House of Commons Service, including costs for the House of Lords and IPSA (in relation to costs for MPs returning to Westminster).

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, whether she discussed the Secretary of State for International Development's meetings with Israeli Government Ministers and officials at her meeting with the Israeli Prime Minister on 2 November 2017.
4th Mar 2016
To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the proposed changes to the Landfill Communities Fund on the restoration and repair of listed church properties and church buildings.

The Church of England has engaged with the recent consultation from the Treasury over the future of the Landfill Communities Fund. Local churches are able to apply to the fund to support restoration, extension and repair projects.

Local parishes have benefitted from this generosity since its creation in 1996. Over its lifetime the scheme has enabled churches across the country to benefit from an approximate £75 million worth of repairs. As part of its submission the Church of England asked the Treasury to consider reducing the administrative burdens on applicants to the fund.

The Church has since received assurances that the scheme will continue and we await with interest further detailed announcements from the Treasury regarding the operation of the fund.

23rd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will publish details of the Global Challenges research fund announced in the Government strategy paper, UK aid: tackling global challenges in the national interest, published on 23 November 2015.

I will publish further details of the Global Challenges Research Fund alongside allocation of the Science Budget shortly.

18th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department has taken to embed the Family Test into its policy making.

Officials in my Department have liaised with the Department for Work and Pensions as the lead Department for the Family Test to embed it into the policy process. This has included training officials on applying the Test, disseminating relevant evidence, learning materials and best practice.

10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the contribution international students studying in the UK make to British soft power overseas; and if he will make a statement.

The presence of international students in the UK, and UK students going overseas, helps build relationships and understanding which have life-long effects. There is no limit on the number of bona fide overseas students able to study in the UK, and the UK is the second most popular destination for international students after the USA.

The wider benefit to the UK of international students was considered in a Department for Business, Innovation and Skills research paper which highlighted the value of alumni becoming informal ambassadors for the UK, with the benefits increasing as they become more influential in their home country. Research by the British Council suggests that the average level of trust in the UK is 16% higher amongst those who had participated in cultural relations activities such as education.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps his Department has taken to embed the family test into its policy making.


The Family Test is an integral part of the policy making process and is applied in a proportionate way in the development of all new policy in line with the Family Test guidance, published by DWP –


https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/368894/family-test-guidance.pdf.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he is taking to tackle homophobic bullying in universities.

Homophobia has no place on a university campus, nor anywhere else. This is a serious matter where a zero tolerance approach is required. Universities are already tackling the issue through a range of initiatives, including working with expert organisations such as Stonewall.

Universities have duties through the Equality Act 2010 and in particular the Public Sector Equality Duty applies to publicly funded universities and requires them to have “due regard” to the need to eliminate discrimination, harassment and victimisation of students on the grounds of sexual orientation. Institutions themselves are responsible for making sure that their policies and practice meet their legal duties.

However, more can be done. The Department is working with Universities UK, the body that represents universities, which has established a task force to explore what more can be done by universities to address harassment. The task force, which will involve the Department along with students and relevant sector bodies, will look at harassment in all its forms whether related to gender, religion and belief, sexual orientation or disability. Although it is for the task force to decide what the outcomes will be it is likely that the focus will be on practical actions to support universities to combat these issues and to safeguard students.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, with reference to Reviewing post-16 Education and Training Institutions, published by his Department on 20 July 2015, whether he plans to include (a) free schools for 16 to 19 year olds and (b) university technical colleges in the area reviews of post-16 education and training announced in that document; and if he will make a statement.

The Area reviews which were announced on 20 July are primarily focused on further education and sixth form colleges to ensure that there is a high quality and financially resilient set of colleges in each area. However each review will consider a broader analysis of the wider post -16 provision including school and university offer. Under the guidance that we have published on 8 September we have set out the process and expectation that other providers, such as free schools with 16-19 provision and university technical colleges can opt in to the review process.

We expect the analysis about providers not in scope to help in wider deliberations about the area which will be considered by the Regional Schools Commissioner, local authorities, Local Enterprise Partnerships and of course the providers themselves

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether small businesses will be able to access funding from the proposed apprenticeship levy in order to recruit apprentices; and if he will make a statement.

Further details on the implementation of the apprenticeships levy will be set out later this year.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what forecast he has made of the number of adults who will be participating in non-apprenticeship vocational training by 2020.

The Department does not produce forecasts for Further Education & Skills learner numbers.

3rd Jun 2015
To ask the hon. Member for Mole Valley representing the House of Commons Commission, what recent progress has been made on the operation of Parliament's Asbestos Management Plan; and if he will make a statement.

Owing to its historic nature, asbestos deposits are present within the Palace of Westminster. The Parliamentary Estates Directorate operates an Asbestos Management Plan which it uses to safely manage asbestos across the whole of the parliamentary estate, in full compliance with the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

During the successful installation of new, modern equipment in the plant room that supplies the Chamber and adjacent offices, a series of asbestos reassurance tests have been carried out. Traces of asbestos were recently found in the ventilation trunking, but extensive sampling at the vents has provided very high confidence that it is not becoming airborne.

Professor R J Willey, Managing Director of ACS Physical Risk Control Ltd has undertaken an urgent review of the evidence, and concluded: “It is my considered Opinion that, after the discovery, proper procedures were timeously followed. Detailed investigation of the results of air tests taken, over a considerable period following the discovery, show quite conclusively that there was negligible risk to any persons supplied with air from the duct system. Providing current conditions are maintained, there will be negligible risk to any persons supplied with air in the future from the duct system.”

The Commission and the House authorities regard the safety of Members, staff and the visiting public as their highest priority. Steps have therefore been taken to ensure that the ventilation system is not disturbed in any way. Steps will also be taken to eradicate the asbestos in the trunking by the end of 2015, but in the meantime we are content with this authoritative advice that there is no reason to stop using the Chamber, or the adjacent offices and spaces.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, what the Government's policy is on online voting.

The Government is open to all ideas to improve our democratic system. However, online voting has been piloted in various countries, including the UK, and concerns have been raised concerning integrity, security and cost. Therefore, whilst online voting may be something for the Government to consider in the future, it has not been a priority in the Government’s programme.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what funding has been allocated for adult skills in (a) Yorkshire and the Humber and (b) each parliamentary constituency in Yorkshire and the Humber in 2015-16; and what the percentage change is between that funding and the funding allocated in 2014-15.

The Skills Funding Agency does not allocate funding to specific geographical areas. The Agency allocates funding to colleges and training providers, some of whom operate on very local geographic footprints, whilst others provide training and skills services to learners and employers across the country. College and training providers are required to work with local enterprise partnerships and local stakeholders to ensure that what they deliver locally is responding to local needs.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many and what proportion of people who enter higher education at the age of 18 do so with BTEC qualifications as the entry criteria.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills does not hold information on the entry criteria for higher education courses.

18th Dec 2014
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, when the Government will report on the findings of the pilot scheme allowing councils to use DVLA data to match voters during the transition to individual electoral registration; and what plans he has to extend that scheme.

The DVLA pilot scheme aims to support Electoral Registration Officers in fulfilling their responsibilities for improving the accuracy and completeness of the electoral register. The evaluation will be published in due course and any considerations to extend this scheme will depend on the outcome of the pilots.

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will bring forward assistance for energy intensive industries from 2016 to 2015.

Energy intensive industries already benefit from compensation for the indirect cost of the EU ETS and the Carbon Price Floor. As announced in Budget, Government is seeking to compensate electricity intensive industries (EIIs) for the indirect costs of the Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed in Tariff (FiT). Government is also seeking to exempt EIIs from the costs of Contracts for Difference (CfDs) - both compensations are subject to consultation and state aid approval.

The 2016/17 timescale takes into account the time it may take EU for state aid clearance, as it took 18 months to obtain European state aid clearance for the Carbon Price Floor. Government will keep the timetable under review and press for the earliest possible resolution.

19th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent representations he has received from industry on the effect of the use of land management measures on performance and productivity.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not received any recent direct representations from industry regarding the effect of load management on performance and industry.

National Grid recently announced two new balancing services to balance supply and demand in the coming winters. One of these, Demand Side Balancing Reserve (DSBR), will extend existing arrangements for companies to receive payment to reduce their electricity use or switch to on-site generators for short periods when instructed by National Grid.

12th Jul 2018
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to tables three and seven of the Crown Prosecution Service Annual Report 2016-17, what the reasons are for conviction rates in Magistrates Courts being higher than those in Crown Court; and what assessment his Department has made of the reasons for defendants having a 25 per cent greater chance of acquittal at a Crown Court than at a Magistrates Court.

The latest annual report and accounts are now available on the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) Website. The table below shows that, during each of the last four most recently available years, conviction rates have remained stable in both magistrates’ courts and at the Crown Court.

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

Magistrates' Courts Conviction Rate

84.2%

83.8%

84.8%

84.8%

Crown Court Conviction Rate

79.4%

79.2%

78.9%

79.9%

Data Source: CPS Management Information System

Cases prosecuted at magistrates’ courts tend to comprise minor or less serious offences with a greater proportion of defendants pleading guilty (78.0% during 2017-18, compared to 70.9% at the Crown Court). By way of example, motoring cases comprise over 21% of cases in the magistrates’ courts but only 2% in the Crown Court.

In contrast, a greater proportion of cases triable on indictment at the Crown Court are serious and complex in nature, and defendants are more likely to plead not guilty. During the most recent year, 16.8% of prosecutions at the Crown Court resulted in a trial, with a conviction after contest rate of 54.0%, compared to 9.1% of magistrates’ courts prosecutions and a conviction after contest rate of 62.1%.

22nd Jun 2018
To ask the Attorney General, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of the reduction in the number of CPS staff on the number of criminal charges brought in England and Wales between 2010 and 2017.

Whilst the Crown Prosecution Service has seen a reduction of staff, this does not necessarily correlate to the decreasing caseload. During the same period, the volume of police charged cases and referrals for pre-charge decisions has declined. Importantly, the Crown Prosecution Service has maintained its conviction rate of around 84% throughout this time.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Attorney General, what steps his Department has taken to embed the family test into its policy making.

The Family Test was announced by the Prime Minister in August 2014 and introduced in October 2014. DWP published guidance for Departments and officials on how the test should be applied when formulating policy and whenever appropriate the Law Officers’ Departments would follow that guidance.


28th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Answer of 30 September 2019 to Question 290323 on Civil Servants and Ministerial Policy Advisers, the Answer of 7 October 2019 to Question 291490 on Democracy: Subversion and pursuant to the Answer of 21 October 2019 to Question 529 on Ministerial Policy Advisers, what assessment he has made of compliance by (a) officials and (b) special advisers that (i) developed and (ii) recommended proposals on the unlawful prorogation of Parliament with National Security vetting requirements in relation to activities intended to undermine Parliamentary democracy by political means.

Over and above routine security practices in place for vetted individuals, no further assessment has been made. In relation to the decision to prorogue Parliament, at all times the Government acted in the good faith and belief that its approach was both lawful and constitutional.

With regards to security practices, it would be inappropriate to comment on the compliance of any individual as to their National Security Vetting outside of the proper channels for doing so; these being internal to the security vetting regime. All such channels are confidential in order to ensure the integrity of the process, and the privacy and confidentiality of the subject(s).

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will amend the Crown Commercial Service energy frameworks for the supply of (a) gas, (b) electricity and (c) liquid fuels to ensure energy is supplied from fully renewable sources whenever possible.

Each Government department makes their own purchasing decisions as to which source of fuel they wish to use through Crown Commercial Service (CCS) energy framework agreements.

Current framework agreements include options to solely use renewable energy sources. A number of departments are currently supplied by 100% green energy, including DEFRA, HMT, Environment Agency, and the National Audit Office.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what processes the Government has in place to ensure that special advisers continue to comply with requirements of the national security Vetting Decision Framework subsequent to having previously declared that they have not been involved in actions intended to overthrow or undermine Parliamentary democracy by political, industrial or violent means.

The National Security Vetting process does not differentiate between special advisers and civil servants. Once a candidate is cleared and commences tenure, there are a series of processes to provide assurance and periodic review, as appropriate. For security reasons, these activities are not in the public domain.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which provider supplies energy to his Department; how much CO2 was emitted through his Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria his Department uses to select an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps his Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

Energy is supplied by EDF Energy and British Gas (electricity) and Corona Energy (gas).

The amount of CO2 emitted is published in the department's annual report and accounts and can be found using the link below on page 21/22. https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819251/CO-ARA-2018-19-Final.pdf

The Cabinet Office does not purchase its own energy and uses the Crown Commercial Services energy frameworks for supply of utilities.

Recent steps taken to reduce CO2 emissions is published in the department's annual report and accounts and can be found using the link below on page 21/22. https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819251/CO-ARA-2018-19-Final.pdf

The department always considers energy saving and sustainable options when considering the undertaking of work on the estate.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 290324, which other Departments have plans to switch to a green energy provider within the next 12 months.

The information requested is not held centrally by Cabinet Office.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether there have been any changes to the Ministerial Code of Conduct since July 2019.

Responsibility for the Ministerial Code rests with the Prime Minister. The Ministerial Code sets out the standards of propriety and behaviour expected of all Ministers and was updated and re-issued by the Prime Minister on 23 August.

The updated Code includes a new section setting out the policy for ministers taking parental leave and other extended absences from Government, as well as a number of updates, including obligations related to Cabinet confidentiality and the acceptance of foreign decorations.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish an updated List of Ministerial Responsibilities online.

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer given to PQ286680 9 September 2019

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government form Security check / counter terrorist check questionnaire: NSV001, what definitions the Government uses for (a) overthrowing and (b) undermining parliamentary democracy; and what criteria the Government uses to determine those actions.

For National Security Vetting purposes, Government policy does not define the terms ‘overthrowing’ or ‘undermining’ in any manner more explicit than the terms already indicate. The question asked of vetting candidates refers to ‘political, industrial or violent means’ and this offers context for prospective candidates to understand what types of activities are being referred to.

There are too many hypothetical examples for a comprehensive list to be feasible. Each candidate is assessed on a case by case basis, giving due regard to the guidance offered by the classified Vetting Decision Framework. Where candidates disclose a potentially adverse association of any kind, assessment of their suitability to hold a security clearance will take into account:

  1. the nature and closeness of the association in question;

  2. the self-stated or privately stated aims of individuals or organisations that wish to replace the United Kingdom’s current parliamentary political system; and

  3. the assessments of relevant agencies involved in investigating or monitoring such individuals or organisations.

An example of ‘undermining parliamentary democracy’ would be if the vetting candidate disclosed that a family member had historic links to violent extremist groups.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
24th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether (a) civil servants and (b) special advisers are required to declare whether they have ever been involved in actions intended to overthrow or undermine Parliamentary democracy by political, industrial or violent means in order to gain (i) employment and (ii) security clearance.

All civil servants and special advisers who are subject to National Security Vetting are asked the following three questions as part of the clearance process:

“Have you ever been involved in actions intended to overthrow or undermine Parliamentary democracy by political, industrial or violent means?”

“Have you ever been a member of, or supported, a group or groups involved in any of the above activities?”

“Have you ever had a close association with anyone, including a member of your family, who, to your knowledge, has been a member of or given active support to any such group or activities?”

National Security Vetting is a prerequisite for employment in a large subset of Civil Service roles, including sensitive posts and special advisers. For less sensitive roles that do not require vetting, these assurances are not asked of prospective candidates.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will sign his Department up to the UK Steel charter.

The Government is working hard to make sure that UK producers of steel have the best possible chance of competing for contracts.

In 2015, we introduced the steel procurement guidelines (Procurement Policy Note 16/15, revised in 2016) to level the playing field for UK steel producers by requiring public authorities to include wider social and economic benefits in their procurement decisions, not just price. This means UK firms can compete more effectively with international suppliers for major projects.

However, the Cabinet Office itself does not buy steel and consequently we will not be signing the UK Steel Charter.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
27th Jun 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has had discussions with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the UK Steel charter.

We have regular discussions about the procurement of steel with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which has asked all government departments to consider guidance on steel procurement and to notify of any upcoming opportunities for industry.

More broadly, the government is committed to supporting the steel sector to realise the broader commercial opportunities that are open to it, which could be worth an additional £3.8 billion a year by 2030. We are establishing the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund – backed by up to £315m of investment – to help businesses with high energy use (including steel companies) to cut their bills and transition UK industry to a low carbon future.

We are also providing up to £66m through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund to help steel and other foundation industries develop radical new technologies.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
5th Feb 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the additional cost to Government Departments of the House of Commons sitting through what was originally intended to be the February recess.

Government departments continue to work throughout the year, whether or not Parliament is in recess.

15th Jun 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many scientists sit on the UK Honours Science and Technology Committee.

Four members of the Science and Technology Honours Committee are scientists by background. Membership of the Committee can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/honours-committees.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what percentage of adults with a learning disability in (a) England, (b) Yorkshire and Humberside and (c) Scunthorpe constituency were in paid work in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016 and (iii) 2017.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Government Ministers are routinely accompanied by Government officials when they meet foreign government ministers and officials.

It is longstanding and established practice that Ministers are accompanied by officials when meeting foreign Government Ministers and officials.

11th Sep 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 9289, on iron and steel: procurement, what progress each Government department is making in delivering greater UK steel content in line with the Government's new public procurement guidelines published in April 2016.

This information is not held centrally.

All public authorities are required to implement government guidelines that set out how government buyers should source steel for major projects so that the true value of UK steel is taken into account in major procurement decisions.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken to embed the family test into its policy making.

Officials in my Department have liaised with the Department for Work and Pensions as the lead Department for the Family Test to embed it into the policy process. This has included training officials on applying the Test, disseminating relevant evidence, learning materials and best practice.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if she will make it her policy to introduce regulations comparable to EU right to repair regulations for appliances after the UK leaves the EU.

The Government supports measures which help to reduce the environmental impact of appliances and earlier this year voted in favour of new EU ecodesign measures which aim to improve both the energy efficiency and resource efficiency of products, for example by requiring them to be more easily repairable.

Although the UK will not be subject to these new ecodesign rules which will take effect after we have left the EU, we intend to consult on new UK ecodesign measures, including both energy efficiency requirements and requirements on repairability.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 290324, when a decision was taken to ensure that the Department's electricity will be supplied solely from renewable resources.

The decision to ensure that the Department's electricity will be supplied solely from renewable resources was made in March 2019.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if she will write to her Cabinet colleagues to (a) inform them that her Department is adopting energy suppliers that solely use renewable energy under the Crown Commercial Service energy frameworks for the supply of gas, electricity and liquid fuels and (b) encourage them to adopt similar policies for their Departments.

The Department is currently working with the Government Property Agency and Office of Government Property to contribute to a sustainable estates strategy for all Government Departments. The Office of Government Property has oversight of the government estates strategy, and BEIS colleagues will be contributing to the development of their proposals for Spending Review 2020.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she will take to ensure there is no price disparity in electricity costs for the UK steel sector compared with its international competitors.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. The ability of our steel industry to compete globally and across Europe is a priority for this Government.

We have taken steps to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for the steel sector and other key energy intensive industries. This includes paying over £300m compensation to the steel sector since 2013.

We have a number of funds available to energy intensive industries, including steel, to help them increase energy efficiency and transition to a low carbon future. These funds include the £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme and the recently announced £250 million Clean Steel Fund.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment she has made of the benefits to the (a) economy and (b) steel sector of the UK steel sector’s commitment to increase capital investment in the UK by a quarter should steps be taken to reduce the price disparity on electricity costs between the UK steel sector and its international competitors.

The ability of our steel industry to compete globally and across Europe is a priority for this Government. We therefore provide electricity cost compensation and exemption support to maintain the UK’s reputation as an attractive location for these businesses.

In 2017, the Department commissioned independent research identifying high value opportunities for UK steel, worth up to £3.8 billion a year by 2030(1). To access these opportunities, as well as match funding grants for R&D, significant investment will need to be made by the sector.

We have a number of funds available to energy intensive industries, including steel, to help them increase energy efficiency and transition to a low carbon future. These funds include the £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme and the recently announced £250 million Clean Steel Fund.

1. Future capacities and capabilities of the UK steel industry: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-steel-industry-future-market-opportunities

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of non-competitive electricity prices on the steel sector’s ability to compete internationally.

We recognise that industrial consumers currently pay higher electricity prices than elsewhere in the EU. No specific assessment has been made on the impact of electricity price differential on UK steel sector’s competitiveness.

The ability of our steel industry to compete globally and across Europe is a priority for this Government. We therefore provide electricity cost compensation and exemption support to maintain the UK’s reputation as an attractive location for these businesses.

We have a number of funds available to energy intensive industries, including steel, to help them increase energy efficiency and transition to a low carbon future. These funds include the £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme and the recently announced £250 million Clean Steel Fund.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress her Department has made towards achieving the 2017 Conservative manifesto ambition to deliver lowest energy costs in Europe for (a) households and (b) businesses.

With around 60 domestic suppliers in the market households can make big reductions to their bills when they switch and save. As we continue to work with Ofgem to reform the sector our price cap on standard variable tariffs protects people who can’t or don’t switch, saving them between £75-£100 per year, in addition to the protection provided by the pre-payment meter price cap.

The Government is also committed to minimising energy costs for businesses. We are consulting on the final design of the £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to support businesses with high energy use to cut their bills and emissions. This is in addition to the steps we have taken to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for key Energy Intensive Industries (EIIs) in sectors such as steel, plastics, cement and chemicals. This includes a package of relief for EIIs worth over £900 million since 2013 until the end of financial year 2018/19.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of higher electricity prices since 2016 on the steel industry.

We have not made a specific assessment of the effect of higher electricity prices on the steel industry. The ability of our steel industry to compete globally and across Europe is a priority for this Government. We therefore provide electricity cost compensation and exemption support to maintain the UK’s reputation as an attractive location for these businesses. We also have a number of funds available, or in development, that support energy intensive industries, including steel, to help them increase energy efficiency and transition to a low carbon future. These funds include the £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme and the recently announced £250 million Clean Steel Fund.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how the Government plans to meet the projected shortfall in electricity supply by 2050 while achieving net zero-emissions targets; what changes to Government policy will be required; what energy mix will provide the best value for money for the taxpayer to meet that shortfall; and how much of that growth in electricity output will come from onshore wind power.

This Government is committed to delivering net zero emissions by 2050 which will require significant effort in all sectors. We are currently considering next steps in the light of the recent commitment to net zero. In power, we have made great progress in decarbonising electricity generation whilst meeting demand, and over half our electricity generation was from low-carbon sources last year, up from 23% in 2010.

As we continue to reduce emissions the exact mix of the electricity system will be affected by the approach to decarbonisation in other sectors, technology costs and the emergence of new technologies. It is not for government to prescribe the proportion of generation that will come from any specific technology in 2050; rather the role of government will be to enable the market to deliver the levels of deployment required whilst minimising both emissions and systems costs.

A diverse mix is likely to be required. We agree with the CCC Net Zero report that the falling cost of renewables means that they are likely to provide the majority of capacity in any low cost, low carbon system. Renewable generation would be complimented with firm low-carbon generation provided from sources such as nuclear and gas or biomass generation with carbon capture, usage and storage. In addition, we expect to see a significant increase in the levels of flexibility and storage in the electricity system.

We will be setting out our more detailed plans in due course in a future White Paper.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the recommendation to align UK industrial electricity prices with such prices in Germany and France in the report entitled The Energy Price Gap, published by UK Steel in October 2019.

We are looking carefully at the analysis in the UK Steel report. The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. Our policies include providing electricity cost compensation and exemption support to maintain the UK’s reputation as an attractive location for energy intensive industries including steel. The £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund will also support businesses with high energy use to cut their bills and emissions.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if she will introduce (a) discounts on energy network costs, (b) a Capacity Market Levy exemption, (c) 100 per cent compensation for the indirect costs of carbon and (d) other substantive measures to lower electricity prices for the UK steel sector.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive.

Network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator, and we continue to support Ofgem to enable all interested parties to engage in its work to reform network charging arrangements.

Our assessment is that both exempting electricity intensive industries from Capacity Market costs and providing 100% compensation for the indirect costs of carbon would not be compatible with current State aid guidelines. The Capacity Market will ensure that all energy consumers – including the steel sector – benefit from a secure and affordable supply of electricity. Eligible businesses in the steel sector already benefit from the maximum rate of compensation for the indirect costs of carbon that is allowable under current State aid guidelines. The £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund will also support businesses with high energy use to cut their bills and emissions.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how the Government plans to meet the projected shortfall in electricity supply by 2050 while achieving net zero-emissions targets; what changes to Government policy will be required; what energy mix will provide the best value for money for the taxpayer to meet that shortfall; and how much of that growth in electricity output will come from onshore wind power.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
24th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which provider supplies energy to her Department; how much CO2 was emitted through her Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria her Department uses to select an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps her Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

I am responding in relation the Departmental headquarters building at 1 Victoria Street, London SW1H 0ET, where most staff are based.

Energy is supplied by Corona (gas) and EDF (electricity), and the total carbon emissions for 2018/19 was 2607.31 tonnes of CO2e. The Department does not hold the figure for how much of this specifically relates to energy consumption.

The Department uses the Crown Commercial Services energy frameworks for the supply of utilities, which can be used to secure the supply of energy from renewable resources. The Department is committed to reducing the impact of its operations on the environment and achieving net zero emissions by 2025, which is why from 1 October 2019, electricity will be supplied solely from renewable resources. In addition, work is already underway to source the gas supply solely from renewable resources.

The Department has established a cross-departmental programme of measures to achieve its net zero emissions commitment, including measures to increase energy efficiency, such as: replacing all lighting with LED bulbs managed by presence and daylight-saving monitors; and the installation of a fully automated energy management system.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to maintain the provisions of the Working Time Directive after the UK leaves the EU.

This Government is committed to maintaining and enhancing workers’ rights after the UK leaves the EU. The Working Time Directive is transposed into UK law through the Working Time Regulations 1998. The EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 ensures that these and other Regulations will be retained when the UK leaves the EU.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government has made an estimate of the cost of electricity in the steel sectors in (a) the UK, (b) Germany and (c) France.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of uncompetitive electricity prices in the UK steel sector on that sector’s ability to compete internationally.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of high electricity prices on the resilience of the UK steel industry.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to UK Steel's report entitled The Energy Price Scandal, published in December 2018, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of implementing the recommendations made in that report to reduce the disparity between industrial electricity prices in the UK and those in Germany and France.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will commit to providing competitive power prices for the steel sector.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to provide a higher level of exemption to the UK steel sector for the costs of renewables.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing (a) German, French and Netherlands-style discounts on network costs, (b) a Capacity Market Levy exemption, (c) 100 per cent compensation for the indirect costs of carbon and (d) other substantive measures to lower the high electricity prices faced by the UK steel sector.

Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010 while between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh.

The steel sector has received more than £291 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive [accurate as at 31/05/19], including over £53 million during 2018. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.

11th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which sectors are facing labour shortages; and what steps he plans to take with cabinet colleagues to support future recruitment and training for those sectors.

The Department for Education’s (DfE) Employer Skills Survey provides a comprehensive picture of labour and skills shortages by sector, occupation and region across the UK. DfE is running the survey later this year, with publication expected in Spring 2020.

The Government is already working to support recruitment and training across the UK for different sectors through the Industrial Strategy. This sets out a long-term plan to boost productivity and earning power across the country, including through the four Grand Challenges, which position the UK at the forefront of the industries of the future.

Through the Industrial Strategy, we committed £406m investment in education and skills. In addition, through this year’s Autumn Budget the Government has invested over £1bn to support students throughout their education and give people the tools they need to succeed in the new economy.

Our reforms to the skills system place employers at the centre, making the system more responsive to deliver the skills employers need and which the economy demands.

26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to help ensure that assets returned to the UK from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel when the UK leaves the EU are used to benefit of the steel industry.

The Government will decide on expenditure in the next Spending Review after EU Exit. Science and innovation have been made a priority by the UK Government and is at the heart of the Department’s Industrial Strategy, in recognition of the strong economic benefits of public investment in science and innovation and its capacity to leverage private investment. The Government is continuing to work with the steel sector, trade unions and Devolved Administrations to develop a long-term viable solution for the UK steel industry.

26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) the EU on the allocation of Research Fund for Coal and Steel assets after the UK leaves the EU.

The Government will decide on expenditure in the next Spending Review after EU Exit. Science and innovation have been made a priority by the UK Government and is at the heart of the Department’s Industrial Strategy, in recognition of the strong economic benefits of public investment in science and innovation and its capacity to leverage private investment. The Government is continuing to work with the steel sector, trade unions and Devolved Administrations to develop a long-term viable solution for the UK steel industry.

22nd Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect of a 10 percent tariff on UK-produced cars exported to the EU on the (a) automotive supply chain and (b) steel industry.

We expect that the EU’s most favoured nation (MFN) tariff regime would apply to UK exports to the EU in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal. There is no indication that the EU would modify its MFN regime as a result of our exit. Consistent with WTO rules, the EU must apply tariffs equally to imports from all countries where there is not a trade agreement or any other preferential arrangement in place. In the event of no deal, this includes the UK.

Both the UK and the EU share a strong commercial interest in preserving the integrated supply chains of the automotive and steel sectors. As set out in the Political Declaration, the UK and the EU have agreed on a free trade area for goods. This will combine deep regulatory and customs cooperation with no tariffs and no quotas, underpinned by provisions ensuring open and fair competition. We will need to agree the balance as part of the future negotiations. The Political Declaration is clear about the UK’s and the EU’s wish to be as ambitious as possible.

BEIS Ministers and officials regularly engage with the automotive industry, including bilaterals with manufacturers, interactions via trade associations, and through BEIS’s participation in the Automotive Council. This insight supports policy development within BEIS and work with other Departments. The automotive sector is a key consumer of UK steel therefore, any reduction in demand from the automotive sector would have an impact on UK steel producers. BEIS is working closely with steel producers to assess the impacts of EU Exit on their businesses, including their interaction with customers in the automotive industry. These conversations are commercially sensitive.

18th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives from Ofgem on the effect of the timing of the current Targeted Charging Review on investment in (a) renewables, (b) energy efficiency, (c) innovation and (d) on site generation for businesses.

Ofgem’s Targeted Charging Review is seeking to ensure all parties connected to the electricity network make a fair contribution to its fixed costs. As was outlined in the ‘After the Trilemma’ speech of 15 November 2018, it is important that we develop an energy system that discourages free riding and ensures a fair distribution of such costs.

Network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator, and decisions on its Targeted Charging Review are for it to make. However, Government is working to understand the wider policy implications of their proposals across a range of priorities, and expects Ofgem to take decisions in line with their primary duty to protect current and future consumers. The regular discussions which Ministers and officials have with Ofgem and other stakeholders are supporting our consideration. The analysis which Ofgem published as part of its recently closed consultation shows that the proposals could affect investment decisions across a number of technologies, but no final decisions have been taken on timing or other aspects.

18th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the timing of Ofgem's Targeted Charging Review on (a) the deployment of distributed generation technologies, (b) businesses with onsite generation and renewables and (b) the transition to a low carbon, flexible energy system.

Ofgem’s Targeted Charging Review is seeking to ensure all parties connected to the electricity network make a fair contribution to its fixed costs. As was outlined in the ‘After the Trilemma’ speech of 15 November 2018, it is important that we develop an energy system that discourages free riding and ensures a fair distribution of such costs.

Network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator, and decisions on its Targeted Charging Review are for it to make. However, Government is working to understand the wider policy implications of their proposals across a range of priorities, and expects Ofgem to take decisions in line with their primary duty to protect current and future consumers. The regular discussions which Ministers and officials have with Ofgem and other stakeholders are supporting our consideration. The analysis which Ofgem published as part of its recently closed consultation shows that the proposals could affect investment decisions across a number of technologies, but no final decisions have been taken on timing or other aspects.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February 2019 to Question 217094, what estimate he has made of the cost to the UK Steel industry of preparing for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. The Government is undertaking extensive engagement with the UK steel sector on EU Exit. Through these conversations, individual companies have informed us of actions they are taking to prepare for all eventualities but such information is clearly commercially sensitive.

5th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support the UK steel industry in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

We are committed to supporting vital industries in any EU exit scenario, including taking action to provide continuity for British businesses in trading arrangements wherever possible and establishing the Trade Remedies Authority to protect the steel sector and others from unfair trading practices. Extensive engagement has taken, and is taking, place between Government and the steel industry to communicate actions businesses can take in preparation and to explore the implications of different scenarios on the sector.

Our ambitious Industrial Strategy comprises policies to build an economy fit for the future, helping to foster a competitive environment where businesses can have the confidence to invest in UK steel manufacturing and thrive. We commissioned independent research to identify high value opportunities for UK steel, worth up to £3.8 billion a year by 2030. Through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, the Government will be supporting the transformation of our foundation industries – including steel – by providing up to £66 million, subject to industry co-funding, to develop radical new technologies and establish innovation centres of excellence.

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate the Government has made of the cost of energy in the steel sectors in the (a) UK, (b) Germany and (c) France.

An estimate based on the latest ONS data available shows energy costs in 2016 for the manufacture of basic iron and steel in the UK at £1.5bn[1]. Eurostat data is not published at a detailed enough level to allow for a robust estimate of energy costs specific to the steel sector for different EU countries.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive.

As announced in the Budget on 29 October 2018, £315 million is being provided for an Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to support industrial energy efficiency and decarbonisation projects to bring energy costs down for vital industries, including the steel sector. Furthermore, our Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme is now open to applications for feasibility and/or preliminary engineering studies. We will publish our response to the consultation on widening eligibility for the exemption schemes for energy intensive industries in due course.

We also continue to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for key energy intensive industries. This includes a package of relief for these industries worth over £850 million since 2013, of which £271m has been provided to the steel sector in compensation as of 30 November 2018.

[1] ONS Input-Output Supply Use Tables. Data for 2016. Energy costs defined as the intermediate consumption from Manufacture of Basic Iron and Steel (24.1-3) of; Coal and lignite (05); Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas (06) + Metal Ores (07); Coke and refined petroleum products (19); Electricity, transmission and distribution (35.1); and Gas; distribution of gaseous fuels through mains; steam and air conditioning supply (35.2-.3).

19th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the report entitled, Cost of energy: independent review, published by his Department in August 2017, if he will make it his policy to place all electricity policy costs into a single levy; and exempt energy intensive industry from those costs.

We have taken a range of actions to reduce the cost of electricity for energy intensive industries, including a package of relief worth over £850 million since 2013, supplemented by the announcement of a £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund at the Budget.

As my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy made clear in his speech of 15th November 2018 (available on gov.uk), a full exemption from all historic policy costs for all industry would add around £1.5 billion to household bills by 2020, and any future decisions must take full account of the impacts on other bill payers.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to introduce a Steel Sector Deal.

The Government remains committed to a strong steel industry. Last year we commissioned independent research which identified future domestic market opportunities for the UK steel sector worth an additional £3.8 billion per year by 2030. In our continuing sector deal discussions, we are actively encouraging the UK steel sector to come forward with their plans to exploit these opportunities and improve their competitiveness. In parallel we are also discussing with individual steel producers their investment plans for a sustainable future. We will continue to work closely with the sector, their supply chains, the trade unions, and the devolved administrations.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of the recommendations to close the gap between UK and EU industrial electricity prices for steel producers in the report, The energy price scandal, a fair power deal for UK steel, published by UK Steel in December 2018.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. The ability for our industries to be able to compete across Europe and globally is a priority for this Government.

As set out in the recent energy speech by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Government recognises that industrial electricity prices are currently higher than those in some competitor economies. The principles set out in the speech are intended to deliver policies that will lower the costs of the electricity system permanently and further details will be set out in a White Paper next year.

At the same time as reducing the costs of electricity production, the Government wants to increase industrial energy efficiency. As announced in the Budget on 29 October 2018, £315 million is being provided for an Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to support industrial energy efficiency and decarbonisation projects to bring energy costs down for vital industries, including the steel sector. Furthermore, our Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme is now open to applications for feasibility and/or preliminary engineering studies. We will publish our response to the consultation on widening eligibility for the exemption schemes for energy intensive industries in due course.

Meanwhile, we are continuing to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for key energy intensive industries. This includes a package of relief for these industries worth over £850 million since 2013, of which £271m has been provided to the steel sector in compensation to the steel sector as of 30 November 2018.

We welcome the recent report by UK Steel regarding high electricity prices and will give its recommendations careful consideration.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to close the gap between industrial electricity prices in the UK and those in France and Germany.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. The ability for our industries to be able to compete across Europe and globally is a priority for this Government.

As set out in the recent energy speech by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Government recognises that industrial electricity prices are currently higher than those in some competitor economies. The principles set out in the speech are intended to deliver policies that will lower the costs of the electricity system permanently and further details will be set out in a White Paper next year.

At the same time as reducing the costs of electricity production, the Government wants to increase industrial energy efficiency. As announced in the Budget on 29 October 2018, £315 million is being provided for an Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to support industrial energy efficiency and decarbonisation projects to bring energy costs down for vital industries, including the steel sector. Furthermore, our Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme is now open to applications for feasibility and/or preliminary engineering studies. We will publish our response to the consultation on widening eligibility for the exemption schemes for energy intensive industries in due course.

Meanwhile, we are continuing to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for key energy intensive industries. This includes a package of relief for these industries worth over £850 million since 2013, of which £271m has been provided to the steel sector in compensation to the steel sector as of 30 November 2018.

We welcome the recent report by UK Steel regarding high electricity prices and will give its recommendations careful consideration.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 160 of the Industrial Strategy, published in November 2017, what progress his Department has made on reducing electricity prices for businesses.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. The ability for our industries to be able to compete across Europe and globally is a priority for this Government.

As set out in the recent energy speech by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Government recognises that industrial electricity prices are currently higher than those in some competitor economies. The principles set out in the speech are intended to deliver policies that will lower the costs of the electricity system permanently and further details will be set out in a White Paper next year.

At the same time as reducing the costs of electricity production, the Government wants to increase industrial energy efficiency. As announced in the Budget on 29 October 2018, £315 million is being provided for an Industrial Energy Transformation Fund to support industrial energy efficiency and decarbonisation projects to bring energy costs down for vital industries, including the steel sector. Furthermore, our Industrial Heat Recovery Support Programme is now open to applications for feasibility and/or preliminary engineering studies. We will publish our response to the consultation on widening eligibility for the exemption schemes for energy intensive industries in due course.

Meanwhile, we are continuing to reduce the cumulative impact of energy and climate change policies on industrial electricity prices for key energy intensive industries. This includes a package of relief for these industries worth over £850 million since 2013, of which £271m has been provided to the steel sector in compensation to the steel sector as of 30 November 2018.

We welcome the recent report by UK Steel regarding high electricity prices and will give its recommendations careful consideration.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK has the lowest energy prices in the EU.

The Government has taken a range of actions to reduce the cost of energy – including protecting 11 million households from poor value energy tariffs through the introduction of a price cap, and providing a package of relief for energy intensive industries worth over £850 million since 2013, supplemented by the announcement of a £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Scheme at the Budget.

In his speech of 15th November (available on gov.uk), my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy set out his strategic approach to ensure consumers get a fair deal for their energy, while opening up the market to competition.

7th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Cost of Energy Review published in October 2017, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the cost of electricity.

The Government has taken a range of actions to reduce the cost of energy – including protecting 11 million households from poor value energy tariffs through the introduction of a price cap, and providing a package of relief for energy intensive industries worth over £850 million since 2013, supplemented by the announcement of a £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Scheme at the Budget.

In his speech of 15th November (available on gov.uk), my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy set out his strategic approach to ensure consumers get a fair deal for their energy, while opening up the market to competition.

15th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) fulfils its mission to push the frontiers of human knowledge and understanding by appointing active research scientists to the UKRI Board.

In line with the Higher Education and Research Act (2017), the Government has appointed UKRI Board members with experience across research, innovation and development, and on commercial and financial matters. This enables the UKRI Board to support and hold the organisation to account, ensuring it delivers effectively, rather than to supply discipline-specific expertise. That expertise is provided by the councils, who are uniquely positioned to understand the latest challenges and opportunities in their specific field, and they include a range of experts, including active researchers.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will amend the Equality Act 2010 to require employers to (a) allow paid breaks for breastfeeding mothers, (b) provide facilities for them to feed and store milk and (c) produce a formal written policy on breastfeeding.

There are clear legal requirements on employers in relation to workplace risk assessments and women who have recently given birth. Under Regulation 3 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (MHSWR), employers and self-employed people must assess the health and safety risks arising out of their work. Under the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, employers must provide suitable rest facilities. Employers must provide suitable rest facilities for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.

The Health and Safety Executive has recently completed a review of its guidance for employers and workers, including pregnant women and new mothers. The guidance, “New and expectant mothers who work”, contains a clear recommendation that employers provide a private, healthy and safe environment for nursing mothers to express and store milk. It makes clear that it is a mother’s decision whether she wishes to breastfeed on her return to work. The guidance also suggests that written notification from a woman that she is pregnant or breastfeeding can prompt the employer to revisit their risk assessment to identify if they need to do more to avoid exposing the mother or baby to risk.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of proposals to remove appeal rights in the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill on levels of investment in (a) the energy sector and (b) other sectors; and if he will make a statement.

The Bill, subject to the will of Parliament, will place a new duty on Ofgem to implement a cap on standard variable and defaults tariffs, so it does not remove an existing right of appeal. Energy companies would be able to challenge Ofgem’s decision on the setting of the cap by way of judicial review.

The Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill is also clear that Ofgem must have regard to the need to ensure that holders of supply licences who operate efficiently are able to finance activities authorised by the licence. It would be for the independent regulator, Ofgem, to make its assessment of efficient operations. Ofgem is not required to have regard to investment projects that are outside the scope of the activities authorised by the supply licence.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy for what reason his the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill proposes a removal of appeal rights to the Competition and Markets Authority, and if he will make a statement.

The draft Bill would place a new duty on Ofgem to implement a cap on standard variable and default tariffs, so it does not remove an existing right of appeal.

Energy companies would be able to challenge Ofgem’s decision on the setting of the cap by way of judicial review, and the Government believes that a Court is capable of considering these matters.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill, through what route will organisations (a) challenge and (b) appeal the level of a price cap in the event that the right to appeal to an independent body is removed, and if he will make a statement.

The draft Bill would place a new duty on Ofgem to implement a cap on standard variable and default tariffs, and provides a bespoke power for Ofgem to implement the price cap through an amendment to the licence conditions. Energy companies would be able to appeal an Ofgem decision on whether to proceed with the licence modification by way of judicial review. It does not remove an existing right of appeal.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons his Department's impact assessment for the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill does not include quantitative data on the effect of a price cap on (a) investment in the energy sector and (b) customers, and if he will make a statement.

As set out in the Impact Assessment for the draft Bill, the costs and benefits will depend on the detailed methodology the independent regulator Ofgem adopts to set the level of a tariff cap. The Government does not wish to pre-judge Ofgem’s work in establishing the methodology by including quantified analysis of the costs and benefits in the Impact Assessment.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill, whether he plans to publish quantitative data on the effect of a price cap on (a) levels of investment in the energy sector and (b) costs to customers before a Bill is presented to Parliament, and if he will make a statement.

As set out in the Impact Assessment for the draft Bill, the costs and benefits will depend on the detailed methodology the independent regulator Ofgem adopts to set the level of a tariff cap. The Government does not wish to pre-judge Ofgem’s work in establishing the methodology by including quantified analysis of the costs and benefits in the Impact Assessment.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy for what reasons the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill does not propose a review of the effect of the energy price cap in 2020, (a) every six months and (b) quarterly; and if he will make a statement.

The draft Bill proposes to require Ofgem to review and report on whether the conditions for effective competition are in place and to make a recommendation to the Secretary of State. This will inform the Secretary of State’s decision on whether the cap should remain in force. The first review and report would be in 2020 and each year, up to 2023, that the price cap remains in place. The first review in 2020 is to allow key reforms of the market, such as the smart meters programme, to be implemented while ensuring protection for dis-engaged consumers from poor value tariffs.

In designing the methodology for setting the level of the price cap we would expect that Ofgem would need to consider how to take account of relevant changes in costs such as for wholesale energy.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy what assessment his Department has made of the effect of an energy price cap on the a (a) rise and (b) fall in wholesale energy prices.

In designing the method for setting the level of the price cap we would expect that Ofgem would need to consider how to take account of relevant changes in wholesale energy prices, whilst maintaining incentives for switching and enabling effective competition.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons the draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill proposes he rather than Ofgem or the Competition and Markets Authority makes the final decision on extending or terminating a domestic energy price cap in 2020.

The decision on whether to introduce a price cap will be made by Parliament approving a Government Bill on a matter that was a manifesto commitment. It is therefore right for Government to decide whether such a price cap would remain in place, after a report and recommendation from Ofgem.

8th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the time period is for the funding settlement for Growth Hubs which the Government committed itself to in its Industrial Strategy.

Through the Industrial Strategy White paper we have announced our intention to ensure all businesses in every region have access to a ‘Growth Hub’. We will build on this programme, providing continued funding to Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) for Growth Hubs to enable them to carry on building their reach, developing peer to peer networks and signposting businesses to the best support available from the private and public sectors.

We will confirm the level and duration of funding to be awarded to LEPs for their Growth Hubs at the earliest possible opportunity.

8th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Industrial Strategy, published in November 2017, (a) what additional funding will be made available and (b) what the length of the funding settlement will be for Growth Hubs.

Through the Industrial Strategy White paper we have announced our intention to ensure all businesses in every region have access to a ‘Growth Hub’. We will build on this programme, providing continued funding to Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) for Growth Hubs to enable them to carry on building their reach, developing peer to peer networks and signposting businesses to the best support available from the private and public sectors.

We will confirm the level and duration of funding to be awarded to LEPs for their Growth Hubs at the earliest possible opportunity.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to protect British companies who are planning to use their EU emissions trading system allowance provided in 2018 to meet their 2017 obligations.

The Government recognises the desire for clarity regarding the UK’s participation in the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) as we withdraw from the EU. To provide certainty to business and others, the Government has proposed moving forward the 2018 reporting and compliance deadlines for UK participants to before the date of the UK’s withdrawal in 2019. Subject to responses from our consultation published on 6 November, we intend to have this measure in place before the end of the year.

This change will render unnecessary the alternative measures proposed in a recently agreed amendment to the EU ETS Directive, which would mean that allowances issued by the UK in 2018 would not be usable for compliance. The UK will continue to engage with the EU institutions, Member States and others to reach an agreed position.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 9980, on iron and steel: procurement, what progress his Department has made on delivering greater UK steel content in line with the public procurement guidelines published by the Government in April 2016.

All public authorities are required to implement government guidelines that set out how government buyers should source steel for major projects so that the true value of UK steel is taken into account in major procurement decisions.

We are currently checking that central government departments are implementing the guidelines in their procurement decisions. We have also published future steel requirements to 2020, to enable UK steel manufacturers to better plan and bid for government contracts.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the announcement made by his Department on 3 April 2016, New public sector boost for UK steel, when he plans to announce the list of approved steel suppliers; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is working hard to make sure that UK producers of steel have the best possible chance of competing for and winning contracts. In April 2016, we announced a range of measures to support the industry including new public procurement guidelines to help UK steel suppliers compete effectively with international suppliers, publishing details of upcoming steel requirements for national infrastructure projects, and setting up an approved list of steel producers to provide steel for government contracts. Following consultation, we concluded with industry agreement that a list of suppliers would not achieve the desired outcome of levelling the playing field.

We published a steel pipeline in December 2016 which shows how the Government plans to use three million tonnes of steel until 2020 on infrastructure projects such as High Speed 2 (HS2), the construction of Hinkley Point, and the maintenance and upgrading of the UK’s motorway network. We plan to publish the pipeline annually.

23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the border adjustment mechanism proposed by the European Parliament ENVI Committee for the EU Emissions Trading Scheme on lime manufacturers in the UK.

The use of Border Adjustment Mechanisms in the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) could potentially have a number of serious negative effects on the world trade system. For this reason, the Government supports the provision of free allowances as the best way to protect industries from the risk of carbon leakage.

14th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to commence reporting on UK steel content in relation to procurement by its departments.

Last Autumn, the Government issued guidance to central government departments on how to ensure that they take full account of the value provided by UK steel producers when conducting their procurement activities. This guidance has now been extended to the wider public sector. Since publication of the guidance, Government has been working closely with departments to monitor its impact and ensure delivery. There are no plans to share this data publicly, due to its provisional nature.

The Government has just published its indicative future steel requirements to 2020, to enable UK steel manufacturers to better plan and bid for government contracts.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to secure contingency funding for the continuation of compensation for the indirect costs of the Renewables Obligation and small scale Feed-in Tariffs for energy intensive industries beyond April 2017.

We aim to introduce an exemption for Energy Intensive Industries from the indirect costs of the Renewables Obligation and small-scale Feed-in Tariffs from 1 April 2017. It is not currently necessary to allocate contingency funding for the continuation of compensation beyond April 2017.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to expedite the Government's application to the European Commission to exempt energy intensive industries from the indirect costs of the Renewables Obligation and small scale Feed-in Tariffs and ensure legislation is in place by April 2017.

We are engaging with the European Commission about our state aid pre-notification to move from compensation to exemption for the indirect cost of the Renewables Obligation (RO) and small-scale Feed-in Tariffs (FiT). We aim to introduce the exemption for Energy Intensive Industries (EIIs) from 1 April 2017.

The Government continues to provide relief to those EIIs most affected by the rising cost of electricity and has paid over £360m in compensation since August 2013.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the likely proportion of capacity that diesel generation could make up in the Capacity Market T-4 auction in winter 2016-17; and if he will make a statement.

Updated prequalification results for the 2016 four-year ahead Capacity Market auction have been published on the Electricity Market Reform Delivery Body’s website[1]. Nearly twenty per cent of the pre-qualified capacity is new-build, and around two thirds of this is from combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs). Up to 1GW of diesel engines (existing and new) have also prequalified. The competitive nature of the auction means it is difficult to predict the specific technologies and projects that will win agreements.

On 16th November 2016, the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs published a consultation on reducing emissions from Medium Combustion Plant and Generators to improve air quality[2] – the proposed limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides will apply from 1 January 2019 to any new build generator in scope of the legislation and winning an agreement in this year’s Capacity Market auction.

[1] https://www.emrdeliverybody.com/CM/prequalification.aspx

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/improving-air-quality-reducing-emissions-from-medium-combustion-plants-and-generators

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the likely amount of investment in new large-scale gas power stations that will be delivered through the Capacity Market T-4 auction in winter 2016-17; and if he will make a statement.

Updated prequalification results for the 2016 four-year ahead Capacity Market auction have been published on the Electricity Market Reform Delivery Body’s website[1]. Nearly twenty per cent of the pre-qualified capacity is new-build, and around two thirds of this is from combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs). Up to 1GW of diesel engines (existing and new) have also prequalified. The competitive nature of the auction means it is difficult to predict the specific technologies and projects that will win agreements.

On 16th November 2016, the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs published a consultation on reducing emissions from Medium Combustion Plant and Generators to improve air quality[2] – the proposed limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides will apply from 1 January 2019 to any new build generator in scope of the legislation and winning an agreement in this year’s Capacity Market auction.

[1] https://www.emrdeliverybody.com/CM/prequalification.aspx

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/improving-air-quality-reducing-emissions-from-medium-combustion-plants-and-generators

28th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 27 October 2016 to Question 49056, when he was made aware that French steel was being used to build the Trident successor submarines.

This procurement predates the Government’s steel procurement reforms. Since December 2015, and the publication of steel specific procurement guidance, departments including the Ministry of Defence, are now required to ensure that relevant social and economic factors are taken into account in their procurements, to help ensure UK firms can compete on a level playing field.

18th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department was notified of the decision to use French steel to build the Trident successor submarines.

The management of the steel procurement process for the Successor Programme is the responsibility of the Prime Contractor, BAE Systems. The Ministry of Defence conducted a technical assessment during the tendering process to ensure bids met specifications. Overall, 85% of BAE System's supply chain for the new submarines is based in the UK. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is working closely with the Ministry of Defence and the Crown Commercial Service in the implementation of steel-specific guidance on future procurements.

18th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what type of assessment his Department has made of whether the use of French steel for successor Trident submarines meets the Government's procurement guidelines.

The Government wants UK companies to be successful in public procurement, and has published guidelines for departments to apply on major projects when sourcing and buying steel. These requirements, which were introduced after the procurement for the Successor Programme had started, ensure social and economic factors can be taken into account when Government procures steel.

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 September 2016 to Question 45149, how many climate change experts are employed by his Department; and if he will make a statement.

The Department’s activity to tackle climate change cuts across the work of various teams and is undertaken by officials across a number of professions, including policy advisors, scientists, engineers and economists. In addition the Department has access to a range of experts from outside the Department including academia and organisations such as the Met Office Hadley Centre. Consequently, it is not possible to provide an exact number of officials who could be called climate change experts.

24th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which provider supplies energy to his Department; how much CO2 was emitted through his Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria his Department uses to selecting an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps his Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

The Department’s energy is supplied by HMRC, from whom DCMS leases office space. As such we have no direct contact or relationship with any supplier.

CO2 emissions are calculated at a building level and we are unable to accurately report on the Department’s emissions. DCMS does not have control over the building wide activities of other departments based at 100 Parliament St, or policies around building sustainability made by HMRC.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make it his Department's policy to sign up to the UK Steel Charter.

We have discussed the procurement of steel with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which has asked all Government departments to consider guidance on steel procurement and to notify of any upcoming opportunities for industry.

More broadly, the Government is committed to supporting the steel sector to realise the broader commercial opportunities that are open to it, which could be worth an additional £3.8 billion a year by 2030. We are establishing the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund – backed by up to £315m of investment – to help businesses with high energy use (including steel companies) to cut their bills and transition UK industry to a low carbon future. We are also providing up to £66m through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund to help steel and other foundation industries develop radical new technologies.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether officials in his Department have had discussions with officials in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the UK Steel Charter.

We have discussed the procurement of steel with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which has asked all Government departments to consider guidance on steel procurement and to notify of any upcoming opportunities for industry.

More broadly, the Government is committed to supporting the steel sector to realise the broader commercial opportunities that are open to it, which could be worth an additional £3.8 billion a year by 2030. We are establishing the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund – backed by up to £315m of investment – to help businesses with high energy use (including steel companies) to cut their bills and transition UK industry to a low carbon future. We are also providing up to £66m through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund to help steel and other foundation industries develop radical new technologies.

20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what role his Department plans to play in the adoption of the updated Nutrient Profile Model due for issue during 2018.

The Department is working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care as the lead department on the development of the updated Nutrient Profile Model, which will be put forward for public consultation shortly.

The adoption of the model is a matter for Ofcom and the Advertising Standards Authority.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 9980, on iron and steel: procurement, what progress her Department has made on delivering greater UK steel content in line with the public procurement guidelines published by the Government in April 2016.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has does not carry out any function requiring the procurement of steel.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department has taken to embed the family test into its policy making.

Officials in my Department have liaised with DWP as the lead Department for the Family Test to embed it into the policy process. Thiscould includetraining officials on applying the Test, disseminating relevant evidence, learning materials and best practice.

30th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government’s apprenticeship and levy statistics, published in October 2019, how many of the 780 recorded accounts of apprenticeship levy voucher transfers resulting on starts on standards were transferred from levy-paying companies to non-levy paying small to medium-sized employers; and what proportion of those apprenticeships were in the construction sector.

Levy-paying employers in England do not use digital vouchers. Employers that pay the apprenticeship levy use funds in their apprenticeship service accounts to pay for training and assessment and to transfer to other employers


In October 2019, the apprenticeships and levy statistics publication reported that there were 780 transferred commitments that have materialised into apprenticeship starts as recorded on the Individualised Learner Record (ILR) as at 31 August 2019. Of these, 20 (2.7%) were starts in the Construction, Planning and Built Environment sector subject area.

Please note:
1) The figures above are rounded to the nearest 10 and percentage to 1 decimal place.

2) The percentage is derived from unrounded figures.

3) The figures above show only those transfers where a start is taking place on a standard in the Construction, Planning and Built Environment sector subject area. The construction industry sector could include starts on standards in other sector subject areas (i.e. Business, Administration and Law).

We are unable to identify whether a transfer between apprenticeship service accounts was from a levy-paying company to a non-levy paying company as we do not centrally hold data on the size of employer and their industry sector. This means we cannot identify if these transfers of levy funds were to the apprenticeship service accounts of small to medium-sized employers. The Department for Education does, however, periodically perform an analysis linking ILR data to the Inter-Departmental Business Register data (held by the Office for National Statistics) to identify the size and industry sector of employers, with the most recent analysis covering the 2016/17 academic year. Thes statistics are available at the following link:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/apprenticeships-in-england-by-industry-characteristics.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
30th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Level 2 apprenticeship starts there were in construction in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2017-18, (c) 2016-17 and (d) 2015-16.

The below table shows level 2 apprenticeship starts in the construction industry sector for the 2015/16 and 2016/17 academic years. This is the latest available data, and it is taken from the ‘Apprenticeships in England by Industry Characteristics’ statistics publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/apprenticeships-in-england-by-industry-characteristics.

Table 1: Level 2 apprenticeship starts in the construction industry sector: 2015/16 to 2016/17

Academic year

Number of level 2 apprenticeship starts

2015/16

19,470

2016/17

18,390

Notes:

1) All numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.

We also publish apprenticeship starts by sector subject area. The number of level 2 apprenticeship starts for the sector subject area ‘Construction, Planning and the Built Environment’ for the academic years 2015/16 to 2017/18 is shown in the table below, along with starts in the first 3 quarters of the 2018/19 academic year. Data for 2015/16 to 2017/18 are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804343/Monthly-apprenticeship-starts-fwk-tool_May-2019.xlsx.

Data for the first 3 quarters of 2018/19 are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/814997/Apprenticeship-starts-ach-framework-standard-tool_201718_Q3-201819_July2019.xlsx.

Table 2: Level 2 apprenticeship starts in Construction, Planning and the Built Environment sector subject area: 2015/16 to Q3 2018/19

Academic year

Number of level 2 apprenticeship starts

2015/16

16,670

2016/17

15,840

2017/18

14,770

2018/19 (August to April 19) provisional

11,630

Notes:

1) The data source is the Individualised Learner Record (ILR).

2) In this table, numbers are a count of the number of starts at any point during the period. Learners starting more than one apprenticeship will appear more than once.

3) Apprenticeship starts include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the ILR.

4) For the 2018/19 academic year (reported to date), numbers are counted only for months August 18 to April 19 (quarter 3).

5) All numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
30th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how a student completing an On-Site Construction T Level will transition onto a Level 2 apprenticeship in bricklaying should that student need more training in hand skills on that specialist pathway.

The T level in On-Site Construction incorporates a number of occupational standards, including level 2 Bricklayer. A T level student who chooses the bricklaying occupational specialism will therefore develop many of the skills included in the level 2 Bricklayer apprenticeship. Once the T level qualification has been approved, we will be able to assess more accurately any differences between the competence conveyed by the level 2 Bricklayer apprenticeship and the T level in On-Site Construction.

Under current apprenticeship rules, a T level student would be able to progress to a level 2 apprenticeship if it allows them to acquire substantive new skills and the content of the training is materially different from their T level. The apprenticeship would need to be a minimum of 12 months in duration and involve at least 20% off-the-job training.

Our analysis of the overlap between the approved T level qualification and the level 2 apprenticeship will therefore be important in determining progression options, including eligibility for an apprenticeship at the same or a lower level.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
30th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress he has made on promoting the vocational pathways available for students wishing to pursue a career in construction to (a) teachers, (b) students, (c) careers advisors and (d) parents and guardians.

Careers guidance is improving steadily across the country following the publication of the government’s careers strategy in December 2017. Schools and colleges are making good progress against the Gatsby benchmarks and showing improvements on every dimension of careers support. That means that young people are getting better information about the labour market, different education and training pathways and access to personal guidance to formulate ideas into a careers plan. Teachers are helping students to link their curriculum learning to future careers.

Through the Baker Clause, the department is improving the visibility and quality of advice on vocational routes by requiring schools to invite other providers to talk to students about the technical qualifications and apprenticeships that they offer.

The Careers & Enterprise Company is making sure that every young person has access to encounters with employers from a variety of sectors, which may include the construction industry. Information on a variety of careers, including construction, can also be found on the National Careers Service website.

The department promotes technical pathways, including for students interested in construction. We recently launched our T level communications campaign, aimed at young people, parents, teachers and employers. A new website (www.tlevels.gov.uk.) includes the function to search for providers delivering T levels from September 2020, including those in Construction (‘Design, Surveying and Planning’).

Apprenticeships available in the sector include Construction Site Engineering Technician, Installation Electrician and Civil Engineering Site Management. Our apprenticeships campaign, Fire It Up, demonstrates that apprenticeships are an aspirational choice for anyone with passion and energy. We have also developed Amazing Apprenticeships, a website and resource portal for schools and teachers.

In addition, we offer a free service to schools through the Apprenticeship Support and Knowledge (ASK) project to ensure that teachers have the knowledge and support to enable them to promote apprenticeships to their students. During the 2018-19 academic year, the ASK programme reached over 300,000 students across 2,368 establishments and from September 2019, it has been extended to include years 7 to 9.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 2 October 2019 to Question 290326 and to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 290324, if he will introduce the same policy as the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and switch to an electricity provider that supplies electricity solely from renewable resources within the next 12 months; and for what reason his Department has not already ensured its electricity is supplied solely from renewable resources.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer my right hon. Friend, the Minister for School Standards, Nick Gibb gave on 2 October 2019 to Question 290326.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's publication, Apprenticeship and levy statistics: December 2018, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the reduction in Level 2 and Level 3 apprenticeship starts of 32 per cent between 2015-16 and 2017-18.

The underlying principle of an apprenticeship is that it is a job, and employers are able to create the apprenticeship starts that best meet their skills needs. It is for employers to decide which standards will help to meet their skills needs.

60% of standards are at Levels 2 and 3 and with 470 standards available, there is an offer at every level. Starts at Levels 2 and 3 still make up the vast majority of the programme (almost 82% in the first half of 2018-19).

Our reforms are supporting a healthier balance across all levels and it is encouraging to see that apprenticeships are helping people to train in skilled occupations at all levels, and progress in their careers.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the March 2019 report by the National Audit Office and current inquiry by the Public Accounts Committee into apprenticeships, if he will launch a public consultation on the future of the apprenticeships programme.

We welcome the Public Accounts Committee’s recent report and were pleased that the Committee has acknowledged our focus on putting quality at the heart of our apprenticeship reforms.

The government is carefully considering the Committee’s findings and will respond in due course. We keep all aspects of our policy under review in order that apprenticeships continue to support employers in developing the skills they need to grow, in addition to offering value for money for the taxpayer.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether apprenticeship levy-paying employers will continue to be able to use half of the funds that they contribute to the apprenticeship levy; and if he will make a statement.

Levy-paying employers are able to use all of the funds that they contribute to the apprenticeship levy and which are available to them in their apprenticeship service account. In addition, employers receive a 10% top-up to the funds entering their account every month which they are also able to spend on apprenticeship training and assessment.

We continue to keep all aspects of funding policy under review.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to help apprenticeship levy-paying employers to use more of the levy funding available to them than the 15 per cent that they used between 2017 and 2019; and if he will make a statement.

Spending on apprenticeships is demand-led. Employers can choose the type, level and quantity of apprenticeships that they offer, as well as when they offer the apprenticeships, to meet their current and future skills needs.

Between May 2017 and April 2019, levy-paying employers spent 18% of the funds available to them on the training and assessment of new apprentices. In addition, levy-paying employers will also have benefitted from ongoing funding for apprenticeships for their employees which started prior to the introduction of the levy. They will also benefit from additional payments to support apprentices employed with levy-payers (such as English and Maths teaching and payments to support disadvantaged learners), and 95% of the funding for training for any apprenticeships started once their levy funds have been exhausted.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency works closely with employers, for example through webinars and employer roadshows, to encourage them to increase the number of apprenticeships that they offer and make the most of the long-term benefits that apprenticeships can bring to their organisations. We have ongoing face-to-face support for over 1,000 of the largest levy-paying employers through our national account managers, and ongoing support via telephone for small and medium-sized enterprises to encourage them to invest their levy funds.

To further support all employers to make the long-term, sustainable investment in training, we have increased the amount that levy-paying employers can transfer to other employers from 10% to 25%.

We do not anticipate that all levy-payers will use all the funds in their accounts. Income from the levy is also used to fund apprenticeship training for non-levy paying employers.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the reduction in retail sector apprenticeship starts between 2012 and 2017.

The retail framework had around 1,000 starts in 2017/18, with a further 8,300 on the new retail standards. Two of the largest supermarkets were involved in the design of these standards.

It is important to recognise that apprenticeships are paid jobs and can be subject to wider labour market and economic pressures. The impact of a number of companies closing down, online shopping and automation means that there has been a general decrease in recruitment within the retail sector.

In 2018, I hosted a roundtable with employers in the retail sector, including John Lewis and Greene King, to explore some of the challenges and opportunities for apprenticeships in retail, and we continue to work closely with employers to better understand these.

Earlier this year, I met with the British Retail Consortium, and I am in regular contact with ministers from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the issue.

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 June 2019 to Question 267319 on Apprentices: Taxation, how frequently his Department plans to publish expiry of funds information for the apprenticeship levy.

We do not currently intend to publish expiry of funds information for the apprenticeship levy as a matter of course.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will sign his Department up to the UK Steel charter.

The department’s commercial activities comply with current government policy on steel procurement as set out in Cabinet Office guidance, Procurement Policy Note 11/16.

The department is happy to commit to supporting the charter where this is relevant to our commercial activities and only where consistent with the relevant regulations.

The department is reviewing the charter and the steps within it, and will discuss with other departments as appropriate in due course.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has had discussions with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the UK Steel charter.

The department’s commercial activities comply with current government policy on steel procurement as set out in Cabinet Office guidance, Procurement Policy Note 11/16.

The department is happy to commit to supporting the charter where this is relevant to our commercial activities and only where consistent with the relevant regulations.

The department is reviewing the charter and the steps within it, and will discuss with other departments as appropriate in due course.

25th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to invest in ESOL provision for (a) refugees and (b) migrants.

The government recognises that learning English is essential to enabling refugees to rebuild their lives. The government has committed to developing a new strategy for English for speakers of other languages in 2019. The strategy will provide a shared vision for all publicly funded English language provision, including addressing the needs of refugees and migrants. Funding for all programmes beyond 2019/20, including any potential funding for this strategy, will be set during the upcoming Spending Review.

24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve access to English for Speakers of Other Languages for refugees.

The government recognises that learning English is essential to enabling refugees to rebuild their lives. The government has committed to developing a new strategy for English for speakers of other languages in 2019. The strategy will provide a shared vision for all publicly funded English language provision, including addressing the needs of refugees and migrants. Funding for all programmes beyond 2019/20, including any potential funding for this strategy, will be set during the upcoming Spending Review.

20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much apprenticeship levy was paid by levy employers in (a) May 2017 and expired in April 2019 and (b) June 2017 and expired in May 2019 because the funds had not been used.

When employers pay the Apprenticeship Levy, their contribution (as well as a 10% top up) is made available to them via the digital apprenticeship service to spend on apprenticeships in England.

We recognise that employers want and need flexibility. Employers have 24 months to spend their levy and levy-paying employers can transfer 25% of funds to other employers.

The amount of funds entering employers’ digital apprenticeship service accounts in May 2017 was £135 million, of which £11 million in unspent funds expired in May 2019. This was the first month of expiry of funds. The amount of funds entering employer’ accounts in June 2017 was £152 million, for which the expiry of unspent funds will occur at the end of June 2019.

These figures are for employers in England and include the 10% government top up. The proportion of an employer’s levy contributions made available as funds in their digital apprenticeship service account depends on how many of their employees live in England and the proportion of their pay bill paid to these employees.

Unspent funds are used to support existing apprenticeships learners, levy paying employers who spend more than the funds available in their accounts and to fund training for non-levy paying employers.

We do not currently intend to publish expiry of funds information on a monthly basis.

20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish from May 2019 the monthly (a) proportion and (b) amount of unused apprenticeship levy following the expiry of the two-year period for its use.

When employers pay the Apprenticeship Levy, their contribution (as well as a 10% top up) is made available to them via the digital apprenticeship service to spend on apprenticeships in England.

We recognise that employers want and need flexibility. Employers have 24 months to spend their levy and levy-paying employers can transfer 25% of funds to other employers.

The amount of funds entering employers’ digital apprenticeship service accounts in May 2017 was £135 million, of which £11 million in unspent funds expired in May 2019. This was the first month of expiry of funds. The amount of funds entering employer’ accounts in June 2017 was £152 million, for which the expiry of unspent funds will occur at the end of June 2019.

These figures are for employers in England and include the 10% government top up. The proportion of an employer’s levy contributions made available as funds in their digital apprenticeship service account depends on how many of their employees live in England and the proportion of their pay bill paid to these employees.

Unspent funds are used to support existing apprenticeships learners, levy paying employers who spend more than the funds available in their accounts and to fund training for non-levy paying employers.

We do not currently intend to publish expiry of funds information on a monthly basis.

20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the new EdTech Leadership Group will be convened; and how the leadership group will be selected.

The EdTech Leadership Group is due to convene for the first time before summer recess.

Members of the group have been selected on the basis of their experience and ability to influence either the education technology industry or the education sector to further the aims of the Government’s education technology strategy. Members were also selected to ensure a balance of experience between the technology industry and education sectors (ensuring representation across different age-phases of education).

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Audit Office report, The apprenticeships programme, published on 6 March 2019, HC 1987, what assessment he has made of the future financial sustainability of the apprenticeship levy; and if he will make a statement.

The apprenticeship levy is collected by HM Revenue and Customs from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million.

Separately, HM Treasury have set the Department for Education a budget for apprenticeships in England for the current Spending Review period (to 2019-20). This budget is distinct from the levy and is not dependent on receipts from the levy. This budget is used to fund new apprenticeship starts for both levy and non-levy paying employers and must also cover the ongoing costs of apprentices that are already in training.

In 2019-20 funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England is over £2.5 billion, double what was spent in 2010-11.

Currently, we expect to remain within budget in this spending review period to the end of the 2019-20 financial year. A detailed breakdown of spending for 2018-19 will be published in the Education and Skills Funding Agency Annual Report and Accounts.

The level of funding for the apprenticeship programme beyond 2019-20 will be determined by the forthcoming Spending Review.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 April 2019 to Question 243426, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of levy funds in employers’ accounts that will (a) expire and (b) be spent on apprenticeships before they expire; and if he will make a statement.

Levy-paying employers have up to 24 months from the point at which funds enter their account to spend the funds available. The 24 month expiry period is designed to give employers time to develop their apprenticeship programmes whilst encouraging employers to take action to create new apprenticeship opportunities. Funds will only expire on a month by month basis from May 2019 if an employer has spent less on apprenticeship training and assessment in the past 2 years than the amount that went into their account in May 2017.

We do not anticipate that all levy-payers will use all the funds in their accounts, though they are able to. Income from the levy is used to fund apprenticeship training for both levy paying and non-levy paying employers.

Levy-paying employers are now able to transfer up to 25% of the annual value of their levy funds to other employers.

In May 2019, the 24-month expiry date will be reached for the earliest declared levy funds. We forecast that when the first ‘expiry’ period arrives in May, approximately £12 million pounds will remain unspent, representing 9% of the total levy funding that employers collectively paid in April 2017.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships there are in non-levy paying businesses; what other Government programmes will be funded by expired apprenticeship levy funds; and if he will make a statement.

In the first half of 2018/19 academic year there have been 214,200 apprenticeship starts reported to date. Of these, 105,700 (49%) starts have been directly supported by funds from levy payer’s apprenticeship service accounts. There have also been 108,500 (51%) starts which have not been supported directly by levy funds, and the majority of these starts will be with non levy-paying employers.

We publish data on apprenticeship starts on a monthly basis at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

In the 2019-20 financial year, the annual funding allocated to the Department for Education for apprenticeships in England is over £2.5 billion. This funding is distinct from levy receipts and is used to fund new apprenticeship starts for both levy and non-levy paying employers, and to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices that are already in training. It is therefore not possible to provide data on how many apprenticeship starts have been funded by unspent employer levy funds as all apprenticeship starts are funded from the Department for Education’s budget. At present, there are no plans to spend expired levy funds on programmes other than apprenticeships.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has received representations from employers on the effect of the 20 per cent off-the-job training standard on delivering apprenticeships.

The requirement for a minimum of 20% off-the-job training is an important quality requirement and one of the core, longstanding principles of an apprenticeship.

We work with employer representative bodies to ensure policy and funding rules are well understood and to gain insight into how apprenticeships are being delivered. There are a number of employers represented on our Apprenticeships Stakeholder Board where the off-the-job training has been discussed. The effect of the 20% off-the-job training standard is frequently raised with me when I meet businesses.

We have recently issued updated off-the-job training guidance and products to support employers, training providers and apprentices to understand what good off-the-job training looks like and the benefits of it. These were developed in response to employer feedback and were tested with stakeholders prior to publication.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 April 2019 to Question 243426 on apprenticeships: Taxation, what steps his Department is taking to increase the amount of apprenticeship levy funds that employers are using; and if he will make a statement.

We continue to work with levy-paying employers to make sure that they can make the most of the opportunities that our reforms present, and we’ve responded to their feedback. In April 2019, we increased the amount that levy-payers can transfer to smaller employers or other organisations from 10 to 25% of their funds each year, helping them use their levy funds to support apprenticeship starts in their supply chain or meet local skills shortages.

The number of employer-designed apprenticeship standards available now stands at 440, giving employers more choice than ever and allowing them to spend their levy funds to develop the skills they need.

Since April 2016, we have provided ongoing face-to-face support for over 1,100 of the largest levy-paying employers through our national account managers. Since April 2018, we have extended support over the phone to a further 3,500 large levy-paying employers. Our support focuses on helping these businesses to build large-scale, high-quality programmes that deliver a return on their investment.

We have also led a major awareness-raising campaign among the remaining levy-paying employers, raising awareness of the opportunity to utilise their investment and helping them understand how to use transfers.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the proportion of employer apprenticeship levy funds that will be used in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022; and if he will make a statement.

Since 2017, we have introduced substantial changes to the apprenticeship funding system that make it challenging to predict the proportion of levy funds that will be used this year and over the next few years.

The apprenticeships system is now employer-led and so employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer and when. This means that the use of levy funds is a matter for individual employers. We do not expect employers to use all of their levy funds, but they are able to.

The provider and employer market continues to adapt to the reforms to the apprenticeships system that were made in 2017. We have also made additional changes to funding policy this year, increasing the cap on transfers from 10% to 25% and are reducing co-investment for small employers from 10% to 5%. The effect of these changes on behaviour will only become apparent in the future.

In combination, these factors mean that it is not possible to make a single reliable estimate of future levy usage.

When the reforms were designed, we estimated that employers would use around half of the levy funds available to them, on average, once the changes to the apprenticeships programme had bedded in. However, levy-paying employers have taken on fewer starts and used a smaller proportion of their levy funds than anticipated. Nevertheless, we expect employers to use an increasing proportion of their levy funds as they continue to develop their use of apprenticeships, and as a consequence of employers choosing more higher-cost, higher-level apprenticeships since 2017.

The forthcoming Spending Review, announced by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer at Spring Statement, will determine the level of funding for the apprenticeship programme from April 2020. As part of this process we will consider any changes that may be required to future funding arrangements, and the impact this might have on employers’ use of their levy funds. Until then it is not possible to estimate employers’ use of their levy funds from 2020 onwards.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department made before the introduction of the apprenticeship levy of the (a) proportion of apprenticeship levy funds that employers would use, (b) number of apprenticeships that would be delivered and (c) amount of employer apprenticeship levy funds that would be unspent between 2017 and 2019; and if he will make a statement.

In forecasts made before the introduction of the apprenticeship levy, it was anticipated that employers would use 13% of the levy funds available to them in the 2017-18 financial year. Data from the apprenticeship service show that employers used 9% (£191m) of the funds available to them in 2017-18.

Our annual budgets for the current Spending Review period (to the end of the 2019-20 financial year) were set to fund 3 million high quality apprenticeship starts by 2020, based on the mix of training levels and subjects that we expected employers to choose.

The apprenticeship levy helps to fund all apprenticeships for levy and non levy-paying employers. At the time that the levy was introduced, it was anticipated that a proportion of levy funds would remain unspent by employers. We have anticipated that employers will not use all the funds available to them, though they are able to.

The annual apprenticeships budget, set in advance by HM Treasury, is not dependent on levy receipts and must fund all learners in the system. When allocating this budget to fund apprenticeships, we included sufficient flexibility to accommodate variations in the level of employer demand.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeship starts have been funded by unspent employer levy funds in (a) 2018 and (b) to the end of March 2019.

In the first half of 2018/19 academic year there have been 214,200 apprenticeship starts reported to date. Of these, 105,700 (49%) starts have been directly supported by funds from levy payer’s apprenticeship service accounts. There have also been 108,500 (51%) starts which have not been supported directly by levy funds, and the majority of these starts will be with non levy-paying employers.

We publish data on apprenticeship starts on a monthly basis at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

In the 2019-20 financial year, the annual funding allocated to the Department for Education for apprenticeships in England is over £2.5 billion. This funding is distinct from levy receipts and is used to fund new apprenticeship starts for both levy and non-levy paying employers, and to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices that are already in training. It is therefore not possible to provide data on how many apprenticeship starts have been funded by unspent employer levy funds as all apprenticeship starts are funded from the Department for Education’s budget. At present, there are no plans to spend expired levy funds on programmes other than apprenticeships.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the Government’s progress on delivering three million apprenticeships by 2020; and if he will make a statement.

In 2015 we set an ambitious goal of 3 million high quality apprenticeships by 2020 and that remains our ambition, but we will not sacrifice quality to meet this figure. We have introduced a wide range of reforms to apprenticeships to improve their quality and to encourage employers across England to increase the number of apprenticeships that they offer.

There have been 1,709,500 apprenticeship starts in England between May 2015 and January 2019.

We regularly report on progress toward the target in our apprenticeships and traineeships publications, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-apprenticeships.

To support all employers to make the long-term, sustainable investment in training, in April 2019 we halved the co-investment rate from 10% to 5% for new starts and have increased the amount that levy-paying employers can transfer to other employers from 10% to 25%.

We are working to raise awareness of apprenticeships across the country and the benefits that they bring to both employers and apprentices. Our ‘Fire It Up’ communication campaign seeks to change the way that people think about apprenticeships and to demonstrate that apprenticeships are an aspirational choice for anyone.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the importance of Level 2 and Level 3 apprenticeships in delivering three million apprenticeships by 2020; and if he will make a statement.

Our reforms allow employers to choose the type, quality, level and frequency of apprenticeships that they offer in order to meet their current and future skills needs.

Level 2 and 3 apprenticeships play an important role in meeting these needs as well as providing valuable opportunities for individuals. Apprenticeships at these levels still account for the vast majority of apprenticeship starts. For example, in the first half of 2018/19, there were nearly 175,000 starts at levels 2 and 3, which represents 82% of total starts for the period.

There are now 440 industry-designed standards, of which 269 are at levels 2 and 3, meaning there are apprenticeship opportunities at all levels. During the first half of 2018/19, nearly 60% of starts were on these new standards. We can see that employers are moving quickly to this new higher quality offer.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria his Department is using to assess the performance of the apprenticeship levy; and if he will make a statement.

We have implemented a range of reforms to ensure more high quality apprenticeship opportunities, including the introduction of the apprenticeship levy, new funding system and industry-designed standards. Our reforms are still relatively recent and it will take time for the full benefits of the apprenticeships programme to be realised.

Our apprenticeships reform programme benefits realisation strategy, published in March 2017, sets out a broad range of performance measures for the programme. Measures include the number of apprenticeship starts, earnings upon completion, results from employer and learner surveys and the Further Education (FE) Skills Index, which is a measure of the productivity impact of the programme over time.

The Skills Index enables us to compare the value of skills investments across the FE sector, including apprenticeships. The Skills Index looks at the number of learners and the employment rate for those learners as well as expected additional earnings. We have added a value of 2% to apprenticeships between the 2016/17 and 2017/18 academic years which we attribute to an increased volume of advanced and higher apprenticeship achievers as well as a small shift towards sectors with higher wage returns.

We publish annual updates against our progress. Our last update, published on 30 April 2019, can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apprenticeship-reform-programme-benefits-realisation-strategy.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 23 April 2019 to Question 243420, what data the Government uses to determine the number of (a) apprenticeships delivered in each sector and (b) apprenticeship levy funded apprenticeships delivered in each sector; and if he will make a statement.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency does not require levy-paying employers to document their industry sector when registering an apprenticeship service account, neither does it require employers who do not pay the levy to register an industry sector before training their apprentices.

For the period covering the 2012/13 to 2016/17 academic years, the Department for Education used the Individualised Learner Record (ILR) matched with the Inter-Departmental Business Register to determine the number of apprenticeship starts in each industry sector. This information is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/apprenticeships-in-england-by-industry-characteristics. Figures for the 2017/18 academic year are planned to be published in Autumn 2019.

The department also uses data from the apprenticeship service and the ILR to obtain figures on the number of levy and non-levy supported apprenticeship starts broken down by apprenticeship sector subject area. The latest statistics covering sector subject area breakdowns for apprenticeship starts are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the apprenticeship levy is being spent on MBA or equivalent qualifications.

Successful completion of the level 7 Senior Leader standard may lead to either of the three qualifications: MA, MSc or MBA.

The total percentage spend by both levy and non-levy employers on the level 7 Senior Leader apprenticeship standard for the past 2 financial years is below:

Year

Standard

Percentage

2017-18

Senior Leader level 7 Standard

0.02%

2018-19*

Senior Leader level 7 Standard

0.51%

TOTAL : 0.28%

*2018-19 is provisional data.

The figures are based on the number of all apprenticeship starts for the level 7 Senior Leader apprenticeship standard by levy and non-levy employers against total apprenticeship spend for both financial years.

Details of the Senior Leader standard can be found on the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education’s website at: https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/senior-leader/.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the highest amount is of apprenticeship levy funds that an employer can spend for a single apprenticeship.

The new 30-band funding structure was introduced on 1 August 2018 for all new apprenticeship starts. Details can be found within ‘Apprenticeship Funding in England’ published on GOV.UK, available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/788312/Apprenticeship_funding_in_England_from_April_2019.pdf.

These bands range from £1,500 to £27,000 and set the maximum price that the government will contribute towards the training and assessment for an individual apprenticeship.

The funding band upper limit of £27,000 is the maximum amount of government funds that levy-paying employers can draw down from their apprenticeship service accounts to put towards the cost of an individual apprenticeship.

For non-levy-paying employers, at least 95% of the apprenticeship training and assessment costs will be paid for by the government, up to the agreed funding band limit.

We know that some employers will wish to use specific delivery models or provide additional training to their apprentices, which goes beyond what is set out in the standard. Employers are free to agree a price above the funding band upper limit but must pay for any additional costs above this.

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the future financial sustainability of the apprenticeship levy; and if he will make a statement.

The apprenticeship levy is collected by HM Revenue and Customs from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million.

Separately, HM Treasury have set the Department for Education a budget for apprenticeships in England for the current Spending Review period (to 2019-20). This budget is distinct from the levy and is not dependent on receipts from the levy. This budget is used to fund new apprenticeship starts for both levy and non-levy paying employers and must also cover the ongoing costs of apprentices that are already in training.

In 2019-20 funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England is over £2.5 billion, double what was spent in 2010-11.

Currently, we expect to remain within budget in this spending review period to the end of the 2019-20 financial year. A detailed breakdown of spending for 2018-19 will be published in the Education and Skills Funding Agency Annual Report and Accounts.

The level of funding for the apprenticeship programme beyond 2019-20 will be determined by the forthcoming Spending Review.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the amount of Apprenticeship Levy funding that has been spent on (a) Level 2 apprenticeships, (b) Level 3 apprenticeships, (c) Level 4 apprenticeships, (d) Level 5 apprenticeships and (e) Level 6 apprenticeships since 2017, and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury provides the Department for Education with a fixed annual budget for apprenticeships, separate from employers’ levy funds. This budget covers the costs of existing apprentices and new apprenticeship starts for all employers, as well as the running costs of the programme.

The amount spent on apprenticeships starts with all employers, by level, between the introduction of the levy in May 2017 and February 2019, is set out in the attached table. The amount spent in levy-paying employers is given separately. Both sets of figures include payments for additional support to learners, such as for English and maths training.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the funds employers have paid into the apprenticeship levy has been disbursed on apprenticeships since 2017; and if he will make a statement.

From the introduction of the apprenticeship levy in May 2017 to the end of January 2019, the most recent month for which data are available, levy-paying employers utilised £601 million of the funds available to them to pay for apprenticeship training in England. This represents 15% of the total funds entering employers’ accounts in the same period (£3,905 million). The total drawdown of £601 million does not include other costs, such as incentives and additional payments for disadvantaged apprentices.

Once levy funds enter employers’ accounts, they can be used to pay for training for 24 months before they begin to expire on a rolling, month-by-month basis. We don’t anticipate that all levy-payers will use all the funds in their accounts, though they are able to. Income from the levy is also used to fund apprenticeship training for non-levy paying employers.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the requirement for 20 percent off-the-job training on the number of Level 2 apprenticeship starts; and if he will make a statement.

The requirement for a minimum of 20% off-the-job training was introduced to the funding rules in May 2017 alongside other elements of our apprenticeship reforms – including the introduction of the apprenticeship levy. It is not possible to evaluate in isolation the effect of 20% off-the-job training on level 2 apprenticeship starts.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the amount that the retail sector has (a) paid into the apprenticeship levy and (b) used to fund apprenticeships since 2017, and if he will make a statement.

The apprenticeship levy is collected from employers by HM Revenue and Customs.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency does not require levy-paying employers to register an industry sector when registering an apprenticeship service account and is therefore unable to supply the information on apprenticeships spending by the retail sector since 2017.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the (a) economic and (b) employment benefits of each apprenticeship level; and if he will make a statement.

Research published in 2015 demonstrates the high level of return to investment delivered by the apprenticeship programme. Apprenticeships at level 2 and level 3 deliver £26 and £28 of economic benefits respectively for each pound of government investment. This can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/435166/bis_15_323_Measuring_the_Net_Present_Value_of_Further_Education_in_England.pdf.

In October 2018, we published our Further Education: Outcome Based Success publication 2010/11 – 2015/16, which covers the destinations (into employment and learning), earnings and the progression of learners: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-outcome-based-success-measures.

The publication reveals the average earnings, by level, of those who achieved an apprenticeship in 2015/16, one year after completion:

  • Level 2: £15,700
  • Level 3: £17,700
  • Level 4: £22,100
  • Level 5: £25,100

Over the past few years we have introduced major reforms to apprenticeships. As the system is still adapting, it is too early to know the full economic and earnings benefits that these changes will bring.

Our Apprenticeships Reform Programme Benefits Realisation Strategy, published in March 2017, sets out a broad range of success measures for the programme. We publish annual progress updates, of which the most recent can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/707896/Progress_report_on_the_Apprenticeships_Reform_Programme_May_2018.pdf.

We will be publishing our 2019 update shortly.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the apprenticeship levy funding has been spent on the administrative costs of the (a) Education and Skills Funding Agency and (b) Institute for Apprenticeships since 2017, and if he will make a statement.

Employers’ levy funds are available for them to use to cover the cost of the training and assessment of their apprentices. Employers have 24 months to spend their funds from the point they enter their accounts. These funds are not used to support the administrative costs of the system.

Separate to this, HM Treasury provides the Department for Education, including the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (the Institute), with fixed annual administration and programme budgets.

In 2017-18, the ESFA spent £36 million (equating to less than 2 percent) of the £2 billion apprenticeships programme budget on the cost to deliver and run the programme. In addition, the Institute spent £3.8 million programme budget on running the programme.

The Department for Education (including the ESFA and the Institute) are also provided with administration budgets. In 2017-18, the administration spend was approximately £6.4 million in the department, and £33 million in the ESFA. This includes an estimate of the proportion of departmental overhead costs attributable to the apprenticeships programme. In addition, £4.6 million related to administration spend for the Institute.

The department will publish spending on the running costs of the programme for 2018-19 in its annual report and accounts.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of apprenticeship starts for (a) Level 2 apprenticeships, (b) Level 3 apprenticeships, (c) Level 4 apprenticeships, (d) Level 5 apprenticeships and (e) Level 6 apprenticeship in (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021, and if he will make a statement.

​The department does not produce forecasts for apprenticeship starts by level. Apprenticeships are paid jobs and their availability is dependent on employers offering opportunities and hiring apprentices to meet their skills needs; employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many and when.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the amount that employers will pay into the apprenticeship levy in 2020; how much apprenticeships will cost in 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The apprenticeship levy is collected by HM Revenue and Customs from all UK employers with a pay bill in excess of £3 million. In the 2019/20 financial year, it is forecast that UK employers will pay £2.8 billion into the levy. Forecasts for future levy receipts are published by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and updated monthly and they can be found here: https://obr.uk/efo/economic-fiscal-outlook-march-2019/.

The amount raised by the levy is distinct from the Department for Education’s ring-fenced apprenticeship budget, which is set to fund apprenticeships in England only. The budget has been set in advance by HM Treasury for the current spending review period which runs until the end of 2019/20.

In 2019/20, over £2.5 billion will be available for investment in apprenticeships in England. Currently, we expect to remain within budget in the 2018/19 and 2019/20 financial years. The level of funding for the programme beyond 2020 will be determined by the forthcoming Spending Review.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the information gathered by the annual Destinations of Leavers of Higher Education survey; and if he will make a statement.

The government believes it is vital students can access detailed and accurate information on the potential outcomes of higher education when making decisions about their future.

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey is a valuable source of information on the activities of students 6 months after they graduate and is used widely by students, the sector and government. It is overseen by the Higher Education Statistics Agency who in 2017 announced the replacement of DLHE with a new Graduate Outcomes survey. The new survey focuses on outcomes 15 months after graduation, and so will provide a longer-term view of graduate destinations. It uses a centralised collection system with the intention of improving consistency and robustness. Results of the first Graduate Outcomes survey for 2017/18 leavers will be published in 2020.

Further information on the new graduate outcomes survey can be found here:

https://www.graduateoutcomes.ac.uk/about-survey.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of universities collecting destination routes of all students beyond the current annual survey of graduate destinations; and if he will make a statement.

The government believes it is vital students can access detailed and accurate information on the potential outcomes of higher education when making decisions about their future.

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey is a valuable source of information on the activities of students 6 months after they graduate and is used widely by students, the sector and government. It is overseen by the Higher Education Statistics Agency who in 2017 announced the replacement of DLHE with a new Graduate Outcomes survey. The new survey focuses on outcomes 15 months after graduation, and so will provide a longer-term view of graduate destinations. It uses a centralised collection system with the intention of improving consistency and robustness. Results of the first Graduate Outcomes survey for 2017/18 leavers will be published in 2020.

Further information on the new graduate outcomes survey can be found here:

https://www.graduateoutcomes.ac.uk/about-survey.

21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total spend has been on (a) level 2 (b) level 3 and (c) above level 3 apprenticeships in each of the last three financial years; and if he will make a statement.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) publishes details of apprenticeships spend in its annual reports and accounts. Overall spend for the last 3 financial years can be found at the following links: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727363/ESFA_ARA_2017-18_WEB.pdf, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630972/2016_to_2017_SFA_ARA_web_version.pdf and https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630097/EFA_2016-17_Annual_Report_and_Accounts_PRINT.pdf.

The ESFA does not publish spend by level of apprenticeship. Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand-led and employers can choose the amount, frequency and level of apprenticeships that they offer.

The following table provides an estimate of spend at level 2, level 3 and level 4 and above in each of the last 3 financial years alongside total published spend.

Estimated apprenticeship participation spend by level from 2015-16 to 2017-18 (in millions of pounds)

Financial year

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4+

Participation spend

Total published spend

2015-16

£756

£638

£47

£1,441

£1,540

2016-17

£771

£686

£75

£1,533

£1,632

2017-18

£672

£724

£126

£1,522

£1,580

The analysis provided is based on provider earnings data taken from the Individualised Learner Record and adjusted proportionately to match participation spend figures. The amount that providers claim in earnings may differ from the amount that the provider is paid following reconciliation. These estimated spend figures will therefore not fully align with actual spend. Total spend, published in the ESFA annual report and accounts, which includes participation and non-participation, is provided alongside for reference.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been allocated to schools and colleges through the large programme uplift in each year since its introduction.

The total funding allocated for the large programme uplift since its introduction in the 16 to 19 funding formula in 2016/17 has been as follows:

Academic Year

Large Programme Funding

2016/17

£8.14 million

2017/18

£7.75 million

2018/19

£7.24 million

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department plans to update its document, Teachers’ standards: Guidance for school leaders, school staff and governing bodies, last updated in June 2013; and for what reason care experienced children are not identified as a cohort of children in Standard 5 of that document.

The Department is committed to ensuring that all children, regardless of background, have the opportunity to fulfil their potential. There are currently no plans to update the document, Teachers’ Standards: Guidance for school leaders, school staff and governing bodies. The document does reflect the needs of looked after children by setting out the expectation for teachers to: have a secure understanding of how a range of factors can inhibit pupils’ ability to learn and; have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils, and be able to use and evaluate distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support them.

Further information, including the reports of the independent review of the Teachers’ standards, is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/teachers-standards.

20th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much money from the public purse has been spent by (a) further education colleges and (b) academies in offering subsidies to attract students in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally. The department does not collect information regarding such subsidies.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that school admissions authorities are aware of the guidance to give second highest priority in their over-subscription criteria to children who were previously in state care outside of England.

In December 2017 the Department announced that, when the opportunity arises, it intends to amend the School Admissions Code to require admission authorities to give children who were previously in state care outside of England highest priority for admission into school.

Until such time when the relevant changes to the Code can be made, admission authorities have been asked to use their current flexibilities in setting their own admission arrangements to grant such children second highest admissions priority in their oversubscription criteria.

To further encourage admission authorities to make this change, additional advice was issued about this matter to all local authorities, with a request that it is circulated to all own admission authorities in their respective areas in August 2018.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2018 to Question 153261 on Teachers: Recruitment, if he will provide the finalised (a) total spending and (b) under-spend on teacher training bursaries in the 2017/18 academic year now that that academic year has concluded.

Following the conclusion of the 2017/18 academic year, we require teacher training providers to complete a rigourous financial assurance exercise to demonstrate that they have properly administered training bursary funding on behalf of the Department. This exercise will be complete at the end of the 2018-19 financial year, at which time finalised spend figures will be available.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will amend the eligibility criteria to lead a basic maths Centre for Excellence so that it is based on the total number of students with low prior attainment in maths rather than the number of students contained in the 2017 maths progress measure.

There are no plans to amend the eligibility criteria for the basic maths Centres for Excellence programme. The Centres for Excellence programme will build on the success of the Maths Hubs model in schools, adapting it to improve the quality of teaching post-16.

The eligibility criteria is for institutions to have a minimum of 250 maths students with prior attainment below a grade 4 included in the maths progress measure. This will make sure institutions have a substantial number of students at the end of their 16-19 study programme who have directly benefited from the programme as they work towards achieving a GCSE standard pass in maths. We view this as an important criterion as we trial teaching approaches and evaluate their impact on the quality of teaching and learning over the length of the study programme to inform a wider rollout.

We have allowed and have actively encouraged institutions to partner up to be Centres for Excellence through consortium bids. This will also serve to encourage improved networking between a mix of institutions and institution types with a shared goal of improving maths teaching and attainment.

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2018 to Question 153261, on teachers: recruitment, how his Department plans to use the money within the remaining budget.

Spend on teacher bursaries is determined by the number of trainee teachers recruited annually. As recruitment varies year-on-year it is difficult to accurately predict expenditure when budgets are set, which means that underspends and overspends often materialise. All underspends are collected centrally and targeted towards high-priority areas of education spending.

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 2 July 2018 to Question 156624, how many and what proportion of maths teachers in receipt of bursaries are still teaching after (a) three, (b) four and (c) five years.

The Department is currently undertaking detailed analysis of teacher training and school workforce data to explore the proportion of bursary holders awarded qualified teacher status (QTS) and the progression of bursary holders into the state funded workforce in England. This will include analysis of employment and retention rates by trainee bursary status (whether a trainee received a bursary), and whether the subject for which a trainee received a bursary is the subject they go on to teach. The Department intends to publish this analysis later in the year.

Table 8 of the School Workforce Census 2017 includes analysis of teacher retention rates over time, but this data is not currently available by subject and does not consider whether the teacher received a bursary during teacher training. This table is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/school-workforce-in-england-november-2017.

Whilst not a direct measure of retention, the Department has recently published new analysis of employment rates of trainees awarded QTS in state-funded schools in England. This analysis does not consider whether a trainee received a bursary during their teacher training, but does include employment rates by subject in Table T1.4 of the Teacher Analysis Compendium (February 2018) is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/teachers-analysis-compendium-3. Analysis of teacher wastage rates can also be found by subject in Tables T2.1 to T2.4 of the Teacher Analysis Compendium (May 2017) is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/teachers-analysis-compendium-2017.

The Department is piloting a phased bursary for mathematics trainee teachers starting initial teacher training in the 2018/19 academic year, which comprises a lower bursary upfront followed by two additional early-career payments once in teaching. The pilot will test whether this approach secures a greater supply of teachers than the upfront bursary.

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 2 July 2018 to Question 156624, how many and what proportion of teachers of subjects other than maths are still in teaching after (a) three, (b) four and (c) five years.

The Department is currently undertaking detailed analysis of teacher training and school workforce data to explore the proportion of bursary holders awarded qualified teacher status (QTS) and the progression of bursary holders into the state funded workforce in England. This will include analysis of employment and retention rates by trainee bursary status (whether a trainee received a bursary), and whether the subject for which a trainee received a bursary is the subject they go on to teach. The Department intends to publish this analysis later in the year.

Table 8 of the School Workforce Census 2017 includes analysis of teacher retention rates over time, but this data is not currently available by subject and does not consider whether the teacher received a bursary during teacher training. This table is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/school-workforce-in-england-november-2017.

Whilst not a direct measure of retention, the Department has recently published new analysis of employment rates of trainees awarded QTS in state-funded schools in England. This analysis does not consider whether a trainee received a bursary during their teacher training, but does include employment rates by subject in Table T1.4 of the Teacher Analysis Compendium (February 2018) is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/teachers-analysis-compendium-3. Analysis of teacher wastage rates can also be found by subject in Tables T2.1 to T2.4 of the Teacher Analysis Compendium (May 2017) is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/teachers-analysis-compendium-2017.

The Department is piloting a phased bursary for mathematics trainee teachers starting initial teacher training in the 2018/19 academic year, which comprises a lower bursary upfront followed by two additional early-career payments once in teaching. The pilot will test whether this approach secures a greater supply of teachers than the upfront bursary.

22nd Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of initiatives to encourage more people to enter the teaching profession.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has made it his top priority to ensure teaching remains an attractive and fulfilling profession.

In addition to a £30 million investment in tailored support for the schools that struggle the most with recruitment and retention, the Department offers several other financial incentives to encourage the recruitment of high quality graduates into teaching. These include; tax-free bursaries, worth up to £26,000 for priority subjects and tax-free scholarships of up to £28,000 in five subjects. The Department is piloting a new approach for mathematics trainee teachers in 2018/19, which tests whether offering some of the bursary once the teacher is employed is effective in incentivising both recruitment and retention. The Department recruited more trainee teachers in 2017/18 than in 2016/17 (a 3% rise).

13th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether there has been an under-spend in the budget for teacher bursaries in each of the last three years.

The table shows the budget and the actual spend for training bursaries in each of the last three complete financial years along with the value of any underspend. These figures take account of the income generated by recovery of unused funding in respect of trainees who withdrew or deferred from training each year as identified through routine assurance processes. The financial year 2017-18 figure consists in part of financial information relating to the 2017/18 academic year, which is yet to conclude, and is subject to further routine assurance before being finalised.

Financial year

Total amount spent on bursaries

Total budget

Underspend

2015-16

£163,730,014

£161,544,000

(£2,186,014)

2016-17

£184,166,893

£188,755,000

£4,588,107

2017-18

£183,327,995

£224,094,000

£40,766,005

13th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment the Government has made of the merits of funding tuition fees for prospective teachers to encourage more teachers into the teaching profession.

The Department is committed to ensuring that we recruit the best graduates into the teaching profession, which is why generous bursaries and scholarships are offered to trainees in priority subjects. In addition to this, teachers will benefit from the newly announced student loan repayment threshold rise and, from September 2018, the Department is piloting a new programme to reimburse student loan repayments for languages and science teachers in the early years of their careers.

The Department is developing a recruitment and retention strategy which will make recommendations on the best way to attract graduates into the teaching profession, and will publish the outcomes of this in due course.

13th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of effect of the Teacher Supply Model on teacher recruitment in the last 12 months.

The Department uses the Teacher Supply Model (TSM) to estimate, at a national level, the number of postgraduate trainee teachers required each year.

In 2017/18 more trainees were recruited than in the previous year, but despite our improved performance, we fell short of the TSM target by 10%.

The growing pupil population in recent years has seen targets rise; for 2017/18 the target grew by 6% from the previous year. The 2018/19 TSM target has increased further by 4%.

The Department recognises the scale of the challenge this presents, which is why generous tax-free bursaries and scholarships worth up to £28,000 for trainees in priority subjects continue to be offered for 2018/19. The Department has also expanded the number of subjects in which schools and universities can recruit without centrally imposed limits, meaning that no good candidate should be turned away owing to the lack of a place.

4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education for what reasons the Post-16 skills plan for (a) protective services, (b) sales, marketing and procurement, (c) Social Care and (d) transport and Logistics will be delivered primarily through apprenticeships.

Following extensive analysis and stakeholder engagement, the Independent Panel on Technical Education led by Lord Sainsbury, identified that four technical routes would be better suited to delivery via work-based training (apprenticeships), rather than classroom-based provision (T Levels). These were ‘Transport and Logistics’, ‘Sales’, ‘Marketing and Procurement’, ‘Social Care’ and ‘Protective Services’. The government accepted these recommendation and these routes formed the basis for developing the occupational maps, which are now owned by the Institute for Apprenticeships.

T Levels will not be available in all areas for which vocational qualifications currently exist. This is because some occupations are more suitable for delivery through an apprenticeship. However, our review of level three qualifications – confirmed in the recent response to the T Level consultation – will be comprehensive, and will ensure that there is continued provision where there is a genuine need for a qualification. For example, where they serve a genuine and useful purpose, are of a high quality and enable students to progress to meaningful outcomes.

4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that T-levels enable learners to move between disciplines as their priorities and interests change.

We recognise that, as is the case for current provision, some students will choose to change T Levels after starting their course. We want to ensure that T Level courses accommodate this flexibility.

We will be working with the providers of the first T Levels in 2020/21 and 2021/22 to explore how courses could be designed which allow students to change to another T Level early on in the course without it affecting their progress. The core component of the T Level includes content common across all T Levels within a route, which will help when students move between courses. Where students transfer onto another T Level within the same route, where possible, we will make sure that if they have already attained the core component and this is recognised in their new T Level.

Once T Level content is finalised, we will work with higher education providers to identify where a bridging provision may be needed, to allow students to progress from T Levels to an academic route should they wish to do so.

T Levels are much broader in content than apprenticeships. Students will learn about a range of different occupations in the sector and develop skills common to each, meaning they will have more options and scope to move occupations once in work.

4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) current year 9 learners and (b) future cohorts are aware of T-levels.

We are already communicating with the education sector and employers to increase awareness and understanding of T Levels. As we move towards the first teaching of T Levels in 2020, the scale and pace of this communication will increase to make sure that parents, teachers, students and careers professionals know about T Levels and when they will be available.

Schools are legally responsible for providing independent careers guidance for all year 8-13 pupils on the full range of education and training options, including further technical education and apprenticeships. The government’s careers strategy sets out how we will go further to make sure that young people can talk regularly to employers and training providers to inform the decisions that they make at important transition points. The strategy includes new legislation, introduced in January 2018, which requires all maintained schools and academies to make sure that there is an opportunity for a range of providers to talk to year 8-13 pupils about approved technical education qualifications or apprenticeships. Further information about the new law can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/skills-minister-highlights-new-provider-access-law-for-schools. The Careers & Enterprise Company are also building on their network of Enterprise Coordinators, Advisors and Cornerstone Employers.

14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Education report entitled How well do schools prepare children for their future published in May 2017, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of taking steps to encourage an increase in the number of qualified careers guidance counsellors and the number of institutions in which they work.

The careers strategy makes clear that personal guidance from a qualified practitioner is important to help individuals make informed choices about their education, training and careers.

Secondary schools and colleges are responsible for making sure their students receive independent careers guidance with a qualified careers adviser whenever significant study or career choices are being made. We recognise the value of personal guidance and expect all schools to work towards meeting the eight Gatsby Career Benchmarks by the end of 2020. The benchmark on personal guidance advises that all young people should have a careers interview by the age of 16, and the opportunity for one further such interview by age 18.

To target support for those who need it most, the government has announced £2.5 million of funding for new innovative, cost effective models, for delivering personal careers guidance in schools and colleges. The funding will be used for personal guidance for young people, the training and ongoing continuing professional development of career guidance professionals and the development of a pipeline of qualified career guidance professionals for the future.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Education entitled How well do schools prepare children for their future, published in May 2017, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the recommendation that his Department should investigate ways to further professionalise the careers guidance sector.

The government’s careers strategy is clear that personal guidance is an important element of a high quality careers programme in schools. The government expects all schools to work towards meeting the eight Gatsby Career benchmarks by the end of 2020. The Gatsby benchmark on personal guidance advises that all young people should have a careers interview by the age of 16, and the opportunity for one further such interview by age 18. This will make sure that all young people have opportunities for personal guidance with a careers professional whenever significant study or career choices are being made.

The Career Development Institute (CDI) is doing excellent work to put in place programmes to train and upskill careers professionals, including a new focus on digital skills. The government’s careers statutory guidance encourages schools to search for qualified careers practitioners in their area on CDI’s UK Register of Career Development Professionals.

We are investing £2.5 million to support the development of new cost-effective models for delivering personal guidance to clusters of schools and colleges. The funding will support the provision of personal guidance to young people, the training and ongoing continuing professional development (CPD) of career guidance professionals and the development of a pipeline of qualified career guidance professionals for the future. The Careers & Enterprise Company will shortly publish a prospectus setting out more details. These projects, and the resulting case studies, will be used to showcase successful and affordable delivery of the Gatsby benchmark on personal guidance.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will review the elements of the early years and primary curricula that include baby and child swimming; and if he will make teaching swimming part of early years and primary professional training with regular updates included in continuing professional development.

Swimming and water safety is compulsory in Physical Education (PE) at primary level.

There are no current plans to review the PE national curriculum requirements, which can be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-physical-education-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-physical-education-programmes-of-study#swimming-and-water-safety.

The Initial Teacher Training (ITT) criteria require that all accredited providers of ITT design their programmes to enable trainee teachers to meet the standards for Qualified Teacher Status which specify that trainees must demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge across the relevant subjects and curriculum areas. For primary teacher trainees this will include PE, of which swimming and water safety are integral to the programmes of study. The department does not set a minimum amount of training time for individual subjects for courses of ITT. This gives providers flexibility to design their programmes in a way that works best for them and for their candidates.

The Early Years Foundation Stage statutory framework does not mandate swimming, however it does set out that early years practitioners should support children to know the importance of physical exercise for good health. It is up to early years practitioners to determine how they should help children to achieve this goal.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
29th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the advanced maths premium to cover all pupils studying level 3 maths.

The Advanced Maths Premium provides schools and colleges with £600 per year for every additional pupil studying advanced mathematics post-16. It is a short term measure to support schools and colleges to tackle the barriers to increasing participation particularly in areas where take-up is currently low. This approach aims to support and encourage schools and colleges to continue to expand their mathematics curriculum above current levels.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether Ofsted plans to refer to the Gatsby Foundation’s eight benchmarks for good careers advice when inspecting schools and colleges.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the Member for Scunthorpe and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether its is planned to measure and report on the progress of schools against the Gatsby Foundation’s eight benchmarks for good careers advice.

The Careers & Enterprise Company recently published its ‘State of the Nation 2017’ research paper which is available at www.careersandenterprise.co.uk/sites/default/files/uploaded/careers-enterprise-compass-state-of-the-nation.pdf. The paper, which was published in conjunction with the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, showed that 51% of schools had met two or more Gatsby benchmarks. Over 79% of schools met one or more benchmark. These figures are based on the secondary schools that took part in the self-assessment exercise.

The Careers & Enterprise Company will publish this report annually to show what progress schools have made in meeting the Gatsby Benchmarks. As the Minister responsible for careers, I will have regular and frequent meetings with stakeholders to make sure progress continues.

22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to her Department's press release, Careers guidance for modern country announced on 4 December 2018, how the £5 million allocated to boosting careers support in the areas of the country most in need will be distributed.

The government’s careers strategy, published on 4 December 2017, sets out a long- term plan to build a careers system that will help young people and adults choose the career that is right for them.

The strategy provided £5 million of funding to test 20 career hubs linking together schools, colleges, universities and other local organisations. We are investing over £70 million on careers each year until 2020 to support young people and adults. Future investment on careers, as with all departmental expenditure, will be considered as part of the next Spending Review.

To target more support on those who need it most, the government has announced a further £5 million investment fund in 2018-2019. The fund will be split as follows:

  • £2.5 million of funding to help disadvantaged pupils to get the additional support they need to prepare for work, including opportunities for mentoring and guidance.

  • £2.5 million of funding to support the development of new innovative, cost effective models, for delivering personal careers guidance to schools and colleges.

More information about careers hubs and the investment fund can be found in The Careers & Enterprise Company’s implementation plan: https://www.careersandenterprise.co.uk/sites/default/files/uploaded/careers-enterprise-careers-strategy-implementation-plan.pdf.

Further information, including prospectuses inviting bids, will be published by The Careers & Enterprise Company in Spring 2018.

22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Careers Strategy: making the most of everyone’s skills and talents, published in December 2017, what plans his Department has for the future funding of careers hubs after the £5 million has been allocated.

The government’s careers strategy, published on 4 December 2017, sets out a long- term plan to build a careers system that will help young people and adults choose the career that is right for them.

The strategy provided £5 million of funding to test 20 career hubs linking together schools, colleges, universities and other local organisations. We are investing over £70 million on careers each year until 2020 to support young people and adults. Future investment on careers, as with all departmental expenditure, will be considered as part of the next Spending Review.

To target more support on those who need it most, the government has announced a further £5 million investment fund in 2018-2019. The fund will be split as follows:

  • £2.5 million of funding to help disadvantaged pupils to get the additional support they need to prepare for work, including opportunities for mentoring and guidance.

  • £2.5 million of funding to support the development of new innovative, cost effective models, for delivering personal careers guidance to schools and colleges.

More information about careers hubs and the investment fund can be found in The Careers & Enterprise Company’s implementation plan: https://www.careersandenterprise.co.uk/sites/default/files/uploaded/careers-enterprise-careers-strategy-implementation-plan.pdf.

Further information, including prospectuses inviting bids, will be published by The Careers & Enterprise Company in Spring 2018.

22nd Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) careers advice and (a) guidance his Department has made available for pupils with SEND.

Secondary schools and colleges are responsible for making sure that all pupils, including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), receive high quality careers information, advice and guidance. We revised our statutory guidance for schools in January 2018 to make clear that schools should follow the Gatsby Charitable Foundation’s benchmarks of excellent careers provision. Our guidance includes advice for schools to help them make sure that all pupils, including those with SEND, are supported to fulfil their potential.

The government’s careers strategy contains a number of proposals to improve careers advice for pupils with SEND, including:

  • A good practice guide for schools and colleges by The Careers & Enterprise Company and the Gatsby Foundation.
  • Training for Enterprise Advisers (senior volunteers from business who support schools with their careers programme) so they are confident helping people with SEND.
  • Funding for the Education and Training Foundation to provide professional development for practitioners working with young people with SEND.

We will also be funding grants to establish good practice in innovative ways of working with young people with SEND and their parents, to inspire them to look at broader careers and further education options.

20th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2017 to Question 120167, what employment-related statistics for students with learning difficulties the Government collects.

To observe transitions between education and employment, the Department for Education relies on data matching between its own administrative sources on educational activities and other data held by Her Majesties Revenue and Customs, the Department for Work and Pensions, and local authority data.

Outputs from the matched data have been successful in showing the positive outcomes of learners who have recently completed education, without placing any additional burden on schools or other education providers.

Outcomes for school and college students reaching the end of key stage 4 (KS4) (compulsory schooling) and key stage 5 (KS5) (16 to 18 study) are published in the publication ‘Destinations of KS4 and KS5 pupils’, which uses a concept of sustained destinations (to education, any employment or training) in its measures. Students are counted in the employment category only if they were not also in education in each of the six months considered.

The publication includes outcomes at national and local authority level for those identified as having special educational needs (SEN) or disabilities in schools, and learners with a learning difficulty or disability (LLDD) in colleges. From 2016 young people with a SEN are grouped into those with an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan and those identified as requiring support and, at KS4, information on primary need type is also given. Information about destinations after KS5 is only available for students who completed level 3 (advanced) qualifications meaning many SEN or LLDD learners aged 16 to 18 are not currently in scope for these statistics. The publication is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/destinations-of-ks4-and-ks5-pupils-2016.

Additionally, destinations of adult (19+) further education and all age apprenticeships are published. This publication presents sustained employment for all completers, regardless of education destination. Other definitions and reporting timelines are consistent with those used in ‘Destinations of KS4 and KS5 pupils’. Learners can be identified using the category ‘Learners with Learning Difficulties and/or Disabilities (LLDD)’. The publication is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/further-education-outcome-based-success-measures-2014-to-2015.

In addition to data collected by government, the Higher Education Statistics Agency collects and publishes information on the “Destinations of leavers from Higher Education”. This publication identifies employment outcomes of leavers from UK higher education institutions six months after graduating, and includes information for students identified as having a disability. The publication is available at: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/news/29-06-2017/sfr245-destinations-of-leavers.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of students with learning difficulties were in full-time employment within one year of leaving that education during the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 academic years.

Figures for the proportion of students with learning difficulties in full-time employment within one year of leaving education are not available.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will promote active travel schemes as part of the PE and Sport Premium available to schools in England.

The PE and Sport Premium is available to primary schools to improve the quality of PE and sport. Department for Education guidance to schools, available at

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pe-and-sport-premium-for-primary-schools, sets out that funding can be used to embed physical activity into the school day through active travel to and from school, active playgrounds and active teaching. We promoted this guidance on 24 October as part of our announcement of doubling the PE and Sport Premium to £320 million.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 9980, on iron and steel: procurement, what progress her Department has made on delivering greater UK steel content in line with the public procurement guidelines published by the Government in April 2016.

In line with PPN 16/15, the Education and Skills Funding Agency provides a 6 monthly project pipeline forecast and an estimate of the value of steel that is likely to be used for the school projects to Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and Her Majesty’s Treasury’s Central Support Team. It is understood that this information forms an input into information shared with the UK steel lobby.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions she has had with the Careers and Enterprise Company on providing careers education to more schools than the 1,700 that have signed up for the scheme to date.

The Department works with the Careers & Enterprise Company and I met with representatives of The Company recently. We will increase the quality and coverage of careers and enterprise provision in schools and colleges through use of the Enterprise Adviser Network, improving connections between schools, colleges and employers and raising the aspirations of young people.

The Network has now grown to over 1,800 schools and colleges across England, over 50% of all mainstream secondary schools. By the end of the year, we aim for over 2,000 secondary schools and colleges to be signed up to the Enterprise Adviser Network.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many secondary schools in Scunthorpe constituency have been allocated a careers and enterprise company adviser.

The department is working closely with the Careers and Enterprise Company (CEC) and I met with representatives of the Company recently.

The CEC set up its Enterprise Adviser Network in 2015 to work with schools and colleges to increase opportunities for young people to learn more about the world of work. Over 1,800 Enterprise Advisers are now working with schools and colleges to support their careers and enterprise provision.

In Scunthorpe there are five education establishments that have signed up to the network, of which one has been matched with an Enterprise Adviser and the others are in the process of being matched.

6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the work of the Careers and Enterprise Company to help young people into work; and whether her Department plans to provide support to that company in future.

The Government wants to improve careers education and guidance for all ages. We are investing over £70 million this year to support young people and adults to get high quality careers provision.

The Careers & Enterprise Company (CEC) has made excellent progress to date in several areas, including:

  • launching its Enterprise Adviser Network to provide more opportunities for young people to learn about the world of work. To date over 1,800 Enterprise Advisers are working with schools and colleges to support their careers and enterprise strategies and link up with employers.

  • an investment fund which is helping proven careers and enterprise activities to reach 250,000 young people, with 75% going to the geographical areas most in need of support.

  • providing funding for 39 mentoring programmes that support young people most at risk of not achieving their potential.

We remain committed to working with the CEC in the future and building on the good work carried out to date.

14th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2017 to Question 1097, how much funding was allocated to 16-to-19 education in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to his previous question number 3689, which was answered on 12 July:

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2017-07-07/3689/.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of her Department's budget allocated to 16 to 19-year old education was reallocated to other budgets in the financial years (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17.

Budgets for 16 to 19-year-old education are set on the basis of the established 16 to 19 funding rates and formula, using estimates of student numbers. In 2014-15 and 2015-16 student numbers and associated costs were lower than these estimates, which resulted in lower spending than the forecast, by £135m and £132m respectively, representing 2.2% of the budget. This was available for reallocation. Because this resulted from student numbers which were slightly lower than forecast, it did not affect funding per student. Final expenditure is not yet available for 2016-17 and will be published in Education and Skills Funding Agency accounts in due course.

7th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department allocated to 16 to 19-year-old education in each financial year since 2014-15.

Department for Education expenditure on 16 to 19-year-old education is reported in Education Funding Agency (EFA) accounts. The 2014-15 accounts are published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/526237/efa_annual_report_and_accounts_final_26_may_2016.pdf.

The relevant information is included in the following lines from table 5 (Programme Costs) on page 155:

  • Local authority maintained schools with sixth forms;
  • Academies with sixth forms; and
  • Young people aged 16-19 years in further education.

The 2015-16 accounts are published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/579174/EFA_annual_report_and_accounts_2015_to_2016__Web_Accessible_.pdf:

The relevant information is included in the following lines from table 3 (Grant Expenditure) on page 115:

  • Local authority and other maintained schools with sixth forms;
  • Academies – Grants to academies with sixth forms; and
  • 16-19 Further Education.

The accounts for 2016-17 have not yet been published.

Funding allocations to the sector, are made on an academic year basis rather than by financial year. Allocations are published each year and the data for 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-education-funding-allocations#published-allocations.

Funding allocations for 2017/18 have not yet been published. Funding for 16 to 19-year-old education includes Total Programme Funding and High Needs funding in the allocations tables.

As EFA accounts are published by financial year, and funding allocations are made by academic year, the two sets of figures are not directly comparable.

7th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department spent on 16 to 19-year-old education in each financial year since 2014-15.

Department for Education expenditure on 16 to 19-year-old education is reported in Education Funding Agency (EFA) accounts. The 2014-15 accounts are published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/526237/efa_annual_report_and_accounts_final_26_may_2016.pdf.

The relevant information is included in the following lines from table 5 (Programme Costs) on page 155:

  • Local authority maintained schools with sixth forms;
  • Academies with sixth forms; and
  • Young people aged 16-19 years in further education.

The 2015-16 accounts are published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/579174/EFA_annual_report_and_accounts_2015_to_2016__Web_Accessible_.pdf:

The relevant information is included in the following lines from table 3 (Grant Expenditure) on page 115:

  • Local authority and other maintained schools with sixth forms;
  • Academies – Grants to academies with sixth forms; and
  • 16-19 Further Education.

The accounts for 2016-17 have not yet been published.

Funding allocations to the sector, are made on an academic year basis rather than by financial year. Allocations are published each year and the data for 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-education-funding-allocations#published-allocations.

Funding allocations for 2017/18 have not yet been published. Funding for 16 to 19-year-old education includes Total Programme Funding and High Needs funding in the allocations tables.

As EFA accounts are published by financial year, and funding allocations are made by academic year, the two sets of figures are not directly comparable.

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her most recent estimate is of the number of pupils in each year group in each university technical college.

There are 48 open university technical colleges (UTCs). The January 2016 census is the most recently published number of pupils on roll at UTCs, which was published in June 2016. This covers all UTCs open in the 2015/16 academic year and can be found in the penultimate document (SFR20_2016_Schools_NCYear_UD) of the underlying data here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/532042/SFR20_2016_Underlying_Data.zip

January 2017 census data will be published in summer 2017.

11th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's policy is on grammar schools in failing school improvement partnerships becoming academy sponsors of those schools.

The Department for Education encourages high performing schools, including grammar schools, to sponsor weaker schools. Any organisation interested in becoming an academy sponsor must apply through a rigorous process that is decided by the relevant Regional Schools Commissioner on behalf of the Secretary of State.

Further details can be found on the sponsorship section on the Department website - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/academy-sponsorship.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how long Regional Schools Commissioners (RSCs) have taken, by year and by RSC, to find appropriate sponsors for schools from when they are notified that the school is in special measures to having a sponsor taking over that school.

We routinely publish all open academy details and academy projects in development.

These details can be easily accessed online and you can find this information here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development

The ‘Sponsored Pipeline’ tab features a list of sponsored academy projects currently in progress, the local authority in which they are located and, where applicable, the agreed sponsor.

We do not hold data on the time taken to match a sponsor with a school.

Information on school Ofsted inspection outcomes can be found on the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/monthly-management-information-ofsteds-school-inspections-outcomes


7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on how many occasions in 2015 and 2016 Ofsted has required governors to sign a declaration that they will not share an Ofsted Report on their school or college with anyone else.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw. I have asked him to write to you and a copy of his reply will be placed in the libraries of the House.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to her Department's report Cost of school uniform 2015, published in June 2015, what steps she is taking to reduce the financial hardship reported by parents and carers as a result of purchasing their child's school uniform; and if she will make a statement.

It is for a school’s governing body (or the academy trust) to decide what their school uniform should be and how it should be sourced. The Department has issued guidance for all schools on the need to give highest priority to cost considerations when setting their uniform policy. The guidance emphasises the importance of ensuring that uniform is easily available and affordable for all parents.

Local authorities and academies have discretion within their budgets to provide school clothing grants or to help with the cost of school clothing in cases of financial hardship. Our guidance states that individual schools may also consider running their own schemes to provide assistance.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to make support available to parents and carers who are required to purchase new school uniform due to academisation; and if she will make a statement.

It is for a school’s governing body (or the academy trust) to decide what their school uniform should be and how it should be sourced. The Department has issued guidance for all schools on the need to give highest priority to cost considerations when setting their uniform policy. The guidance emphasises the importance of ensuring that uniform is easily available and affordable for all parents.

Local authorities and academies have discretion within their budgets to provide school clothing grants or to help with the cost of school clothing in cases of financial hardship. Our guidance states that individual schools may also consider running their own schemes to provide assistance.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to reduce any financial hardship which parents and carers may face when purchasing school uniforms; and if she will make a statement.

It is for a school’s governing body (or the academy trust) to decide what their school uniform should be and how it should be sourced. The Department has issued guidance for all schools on the need to give highest priority to cost considerations when setting their uniform policy. The guidance emphasises the importance of ensuring that uniform is easily available and affordable for all parents.

Local authorities and academies have discretion within their budgets to provide school clothing grants or to help with the cost of school clothing in cases of financial hardship. Our guidance states that individual schools may also consider running their own schemes to provide assistance.

7th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that school pupils and their parents or guardians are aware of the health benefits of nursery and school milk consumption.

We encourage schools to create a whole-school culture that promotes health and well-being so that all our children are fit, healthy and able to learn. We know schools treat this seriously, and many take their own steps to promote their milk provision. School governing boards are responsible for their food policies (including milk) and we trust them to decide what is best.

The new national curriculum, which came into effect in September 2014, also sets the expectation that across a variety of subjects, pupils are taught about the importance of healthy eating and nutrition. Since its introduction, we have strengthened the requirements on schools to teach children about food, nutrition and healthy eating and how to cook a range of dishes. For example, in primary schools, children are taught about healthy eating, where their food comes from, and how to prepare and cook a range of dishes. In secondary schools, cookery is now compulsory and children are taught to cook a range of healthy and nutritious meals. They are equipped with knowledge about healthy eating and what is meant by a balanced diet.

The current EU School Milk scheme is very well-established across the UK and plays a valuable role in encouraging consumption of milk from an early age. The EU Commission recently introduced legislation for a new scheme from August next year which includes a focus on the role of education in supporting milk consumption. We are working closely with stakeholders on our plans to implement the new scheme.

2nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2016 to Question 44997, in what ways the Government is (a) encouraging a wider range of young people into apprenticeships and (b) increasing the proportion of BAME apprenticeship starts by 20 per cent by 2020.

We are committed to ensuring that apprenticeships are as accessible as possible to all people from all backgrounds.

We are undertaking a range of activities to increase the awareness amongst young people of the available apprenticeship options, including the four-year Get In Go Far campaign that launched in May 2016. The campaign aims to influence public perceptions, awareness and attitudes towards apprenticeships as a route into a successful career, helping young people aged 14-24 to get the skills they need, and encouraging more young people to apply and more employers to offer apprenticeship opportunities.

As part of reforms to the routes from compulsory school to employment, we set out new professional and technical routes, which will all lead to employment or degree-level study. This aims to ensure that young people have the education and skills to get into higher paid, long-term employment, including apprenticeships.

We are increasing numbers of traineeships to further support young people, including those from areas of disadvantage, into apprenticeships and further work. Traineeships show good representation for both BAME and LDD groups (22.6% and 19.7% respectively).

We remain committed to increasing the proportion of apprenticeships starts from people from BAME communities and have already put in place measures to support this, including: encouraging more people from BAME communities to apply for apprenticeships through communications and marketing; providing BAME role models in the Get in Go Far campaign; helping BAME apprenticeship applicants to have better rates of success in applications; and establishing a network of employer diversity ‘champions’.

Recommendations from the LLD Taskforce led by Paul Maynard were accepted and published on 11 July, and will benefit a broader group of disabled apprentices. Work has begun on its implementation.

1st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 16 to 18 year olds have undertaken an apprenticeship in each of the last five years; and how many of those apprentices were (a) male, (b) female and (c) from an ethnic minority.

The tables below show apprenticeship participation by learners aged 16 to 18 year olds by ethnicity and gender in latest 5 academic years for which data is available.

Apprenticeship Participation by Age and Ethnicity (2010/11 to 2014/15)

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Age

Ethnicity

Number

Number

Number

Number

Number

16-18

Asian/ Asian British

6,240

6,300

5,200

5,750

6,280

Black/ African/ Caribbean/ Black British

3,830

3,850

3,310

3,090

3,170

Mixed/ Multiple Ethnic Group

4,270

4,240

4,000

4,220

4,560

Other Ethnic Group

730

770

830

800

880

Total BAME

15,070

15,160

13,330

13,860

14,890

White

186,730

173,240

166,580

170,410

177,770

Not Known/Not Provided

1,320

1,180

1,400

1,540

1,460

16-18 Total

203,120

189,580

181,310

185,820

194,110

Grand Total

665,900

806,500

868,700

851,500

871,770

Apprenticeship Participation by Age and Gender (2010/11 to 2014/15)

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Age

Gender

Number

Number

Number

Number

Number

16-18

Female

89,090

81,640

78,900

80,760

82,710

Male

114,040

107,940

102,410

105,050

111,400

16-18 Total

203,120

189,580

181,310

185,820

194,110

Grand Total

665,900

806,500

868,700

851,500

871,770

13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of any correlation between the size of a school sixth form and the grade awarded by Ofsted for its sixth form provision.

The Department for Education has not made any assessment of the correlation between the size of a school’s sixth form and the grade awarded by Ofsted to that school with respect to its sixth-form provision. We continue to monitor school and sixth form performance on an ongoing basis using a range of metrics, including Ofsted inspection outcomes, minimum standards and performance table data.

13th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools with sixth forms there are where the proportion of students achieving GCSE A*-C in English and A*-C in mathematics is lower than the national average in each respective subject.

43.9% of schools with sixth-forms have a percentage of students achieving GCSE A*-C in English, which is lower than the corresponding national average. 45.4% of schools with sixth-forms have a percentage of students achieving GCSE A*-C in maths, which is lower than the corresponding national average.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Skills Plan, what her policy is on the future provision of BTECs.

As set out in our Post 16 Skills Plan, we will take forward the recommendations of the Sainsbury Review to put in place a world-class technical option that provides preparation for highly skilled employment. The technical option will be a prestigious and high-quality option for 16 year olds as an alternative to academic study. Applied general qualifications such as BTECs are not designed to be part of the technical education option. We plan to review the contribution of these qualifications to preparing students for higher education and the impact any reform would have on widening participation. We will announce our decisions later in the year.

It is important that individuals are able to switch between the academic and technical options so that students’ options are not closed down. Flexible learning will be important to learners of all ages, given the changing labour market. We accepted the Sainsbury panel’s recommendation that there should be appropriate bridging courses to make movement between the two options easily accessible and will be looking at options for putting these courses in place.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Skills Plan, what her policy is on enabling students to continue to study a mixture of both (a) academic and (b) vocational subjects.

As set out in our Post 16 Skills Plan, we will take forward the recommendations of the Sainsbury Review to put in place a world-class technical option that provides preparation for highly skilled employment. The technical option will be a prestigious and high-quality option for 16 year olds as an alternative to academic study. Applied general qualifications such as BTECs are not designed to be part of the technical education option. We plan to review the contribution of these qualifications to preparing students for higher education and the impact any reform would have on widening participation. We will announce our decisions later in the year.

It is important that individuals are able to switch between the academic and technical options so that students’ options are not closed down. Flexible learning will be important to learners of all ages, given the changing labour market. We accepted the Sainsbury panel’s recommendation that there should be appropriate bridging courses to make movement between the two options easily accessible and will be looking at options for putting these courses in place.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on the relative proportion of children from poorer backgrounds who attend religiously selective schools.

Underlying data for ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ provides information for each school, including religious denomination (where applicable), alongside the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals.

This is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2016

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to implement the measures in the Skills Plan.

The Post-16 Skills Plan sets out our plans to radically reform technical education provision and the wider skills system in England to ensure they match the best in the world, tackling long-standing issues which have harmed our nation’s productivity and international competitiveness. We are committed to taking forward this ambitious programme in full, implementing the reforms in a lasting and coherent way.

We have already started work to identify pathfinder technical education routes; design the new functions within an expanded Institute for Apprenticeships; map the occupations within each route to identify what technical qualifications should be included within their scope; design the employer panels that will develop new standards where required; and develop ‘transition year’ arrangements for young people not ready to progress into mainstream technical or academic provision at 16, or later if their education has been delayed. In addition, we are continuing to implement those reforms which are already in train, such as the programme of locally led area reviews of post-16 provision.

Later in the autumn, we will publish an implementation plan, setting out in greater detail how we will deliver the Post-16 Skills Plan and how we will engage with key stakeholders, including colleges and employers, on the ongoing design and delivery of our proposals.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what work her Department is undertaking to determine how effectively schools use assessment data to improve educational outcomes.

We trust schools to implement an assessment system that uses data effectively to support teaching and improve educational outcomes. Following the removal of levels, schools now have the freedom to determine their own system for non-statutory assessment between key stages, tailored to the needs of their pupils and their curriculum.

The Department supports and encourages the use of assessment to support effective teaching. This has included setting up the Commission on Assessment Without Levels to provide guidance for schools when devising and implementing their systems for non-statutory assessment. The Commission completed and published its final report in September 2015 and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/commission-on-assessment-without-levels-final-report.

As part of the Government’s ‘Workload Challenge’, the Department set up three independent review groups to address ineffective marking, use of planning and resources and data management. These reports included clear messages to empower classroom teachers and school leaders to challenge unproductive practice. They also included specific recommendations for Government, which we have accepted. The workload review reports were published on 26 March 2016 and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reducing-teachers-workload/reducing-teachers-workload.

Assessment was also one of the areas considered by the independent expert group, chaired by Stephen Munday CBE, which has developed a framework of core content for initial teaching training (ITT). The group’s report, including the new framework of core content for ITT, was published on 12 July 2016 and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-government-response-to-carter-review.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what representations her Department has received on the recommendations of the Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group entitled Eliminating unnecessary workload associated with Data Management published in March 2016; and from whom those representations were received.

We established three independent review groups to tackle workload related to data management, marking and lesson planning. Members of the review groups included serving teachers and head teachers, teaching unions and Ofsted.

No formal representations have been received on the recommendations in the data management report although all three reports have been well received by the profession and ongoing discussions are taking place with teachers and their representatives to help embed their principles and implement the recommendations.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the reasons are for the omission of any substantive reference to religious education in the Educational Excellence Everywhere white paper, published by her Department in March 2016; and how the level of provision of such education will be benchmarked in (a) local authority schools and (b) academies.

The white paper sets out the Government’s plans for the next five years, building on and extending our reforms to achieve educational excellence everywhere. The white paper is clear that we will ensure a knowledge-rich curriculum is complemented by the development of the character traits and fundamental British values that will help children succeed, and that includes encouraging mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and for those without faith.

We believe in the importance of Religious Education (RE) to develop children’s knowledge of the values and traditions of Britain and other countries, and to foster understanding among different faiths and cultures. That is why RE remains compulsory at all Key Stages and why all schools have a duty to teach a broad and balanced curriculum.

Local authorities are responsible for providing an agreed syllabus for their local area which must reflect the fact that the religious traditions in Great Britain are in the main Christian whilst taking account of the teaching and practices of the other principal religions represented in Great Britain. Maintained schools without a religious designation must follow the agreed syllabus. Voluntary controlled schools and foundation schools with a religious designation follow the locally agreed syllabus, unless parents request a denominational syllabus.

Academies without a religious designation can either follow the locally agreed syllabus, or develop their own syllabus that meets the same requirements as a locally agreed syllabus.

Voluntary aided schools and academies with a religious designation can teach RE in accordance with their trust deeds and/or the tenets of their faith.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of (a) getting young people engaged in sport and fitness early and (b) encouraging schools to implement initiatives such as The Daily Mile in order to help combat obesity in children.

This government is committed to promoting physical activity among young people and we want all pupils to be healthy and active. PE remains a compulsory subject at all four key stages in the national curriculum, and this sets out the expectation that pupils should be physically active for sustained periods of time. Schools have the flexibility to use the primary PE and sport premium, worth £160m this year, to improve the quality of the physical activity offer to their pupils. From 2017 we are doubling the primary PE and sport premium to £320m a year, and the forthcoming childhood obesity strategy will contain a number of measures which will complement our existing policies to promote physical activity for primary pupils.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how the Government ensures that schools are held accountable for their statutory responsibilities in respect of the provision of religious education.

Religious education (RE) is compulsory in all state-funded schools, including academies and free schools. As part of Ofsted school inspections, inspectors consider whether schools are providing a broad and balanced curriculum, which meets pupils’ needs and statutory requirements. If it becomes evident during the course of an inspection that a school is not teaching RE, this should be reflected in the school’s inspection report. Faith schools are required to arrange a separate inspection of denominational religious education and collective worship, leading to published reports.

Every school must have a complaint procedure. If an individual is concerned that a school is not teaching religious education, they should follow the schools’ complaint procedure in the first instance. If the complaint is not resolved, then the issue can be escalated to the Department’s School Complaints Unit for maintained schools, or the Education Funding Agency for academies, free schools, university technical colleges or studio schools. Information about complaint procedures for schools can be found at www.gov.uk/complain-about-school.

4th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the process is for (a) ensuring that religious education is taught to all pupils in all schools and (b) reporting schools that are not teaching religious education.

Religious education (RE) is compulsory in all state-funded schools, including academies and free schools. As part of Ofsted school inspections, inspectors consider whether schools are providing a broad and balanced curriculum, which meets pupils’ needs and statutory requirements. If it becomes evident during the course of an inspection that a school is not teaching RE, this should be reflected in the school’s inspection report. Faith schools are required to arrange a separate inspection of denominational religious education and collective worship, leading to published reports.

Every school must have a complaint procedure. If an individual is concerned that a school is not teaching religious education, they should follow the schools’ complaint procedure in the first instance. If the complaint is not resolved, then the issue can be escalated to the Department’s School Complaints Unit for maintained schools, or the Education Funding Agency for academies, free schools, university technical colleges or studio schools. Information about complaint procedures for schools can be found at www.gov.uk/complain-about-school.

20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what role her Department has in drafting the Government's childhood obesity strategy; and when that strategy is due to be published.

We are working closely with colleagues both at the Department of Health and across Whitehall on the Childhood Obesity Strategy. Tackling obesity, particularly in children, is one of our major priorities. The Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the late summer, will consider all the factors that contribute to a child becoming overweight and obese, and set out our plans to tackle this major challenge.

The Obesity Strategy will complement our existing measures to promote school-based physical activity for pupils. PE remains a compulsory subject at all four key stages in the national curriculum, and the national curriculum sets out the expectation that pupils should be physically active for sustained periods of time. In addition, we have ring-fenced over £450 million to improve PE and sport in primary schools (2013/14 - 2015/16), and committed to doubling the primary PE and sport premium to £320 million a year from September 2017 using revenue from the soft drinks industry levy.

20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department has taken to work with the Department of Health on its upcoming childhood obesity strategy to encourage school-based activities to promote physical activity among young people.

We are working closely with colleagues both at the Department of Health and across Whitehall on the Childhood Obesity Strategy. Tackling obesity, particularly in children, is one of our major priorities. The Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the late summer, will consider all the factors that contribute to a child becoming overweight and obese, and set out our plans to tackle this major challenge.

The Obesity Strategy will complement our existing measures to promote school-based physical activity for pupils. PE remains a compulsory subject at all four key stages in the national curriculum, and the national curriculum sets out the expectation that pupils should be physically active for sustained periods of time. In addition, we have ring-fenced over £450 million to improve PE and sport in primary schools (2013/14 - 2015/16), and committed to doubling the primary PE and sport premium to £320 million a year from September 2017 using revenue from the soft drinks industry levy.

15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 6 June 2016 to Question 38401, whether she plans to publish her response to the School Teachers' Review Body report on teachers' pay from September 2016 and the draft 2016 School Teachers' Pay and Conditions document for consultation and information before 14 July 2016.

We will continue to consider carefully the report from the School Teachers’ Review Body and its recommendations. We will publish the report, together with our response and a draft revised School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document, as soon as we have completed our consideration of it.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to respond to the School Teachers' Review Body report on teachers' pay from September 2016; and when she plans to publish the draft 2016 School Teachers' Pay and Conditions document for consultation and information.

We are currently considering the School Teachers’ Review Body’s report, its publication and the publication of the draft School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she still plans to introduce compulsory resit tests in (a) English reading and (b) mathematics for year 7 pupils who do not reach the required standard at the end of key stage 2.

The Secretary of State has already announced the Government’s plans to introduce resits in Year 7. This announcement can found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/nicky-morgan-no-tolerance-of-areas-where-majority-of-pupils-fail.

We have been clear that the resits will not be implemented in the next academic year and that we will engage with the education sector to make sure the tests are introduced in a way that works for schools. Further information will be provided in due course.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the statutory framework is for the accreditation of teachers in England; and whether her Department has plans to change that framework.

All teachers recommended for the award of qualified teacher status (QTS) must demonstrate that they meet the Teachers’ Standards in full, at the appropriate level (available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teachers-standards). Trainees undertaking a course of initial teacher training must also satisfy the requirements of the Secretary of State’s Criteria for ITT (available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-criteria), including having passed the professional skills tests in literacy and numeracy.

Our recent White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, set out our proposals to replace the current QTS with a new, more challenging accreditation based on teachers’ effectiveness in the classroom. We will be setting out further detail of how and when we intend to implement the new system shortly.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.28 of the White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016, when her Department plans to consult sector bodies on the proposed creation of centres for excellence for initial teacher training; and how that consultation will take place.

The Government’s White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, confirmed that we intend to use a new set of quality criteria to determine how initial teacher training (ITT) places are allocated to training providers in future, ensuring that training is concentrated with the highest-quality providers. On the basis of these criteria, which will include factors such as the quality of trainees recruited, the quality of the training programmes, and the quality of outcomes for trainees, we will designate some providers as Centres of Excellence. We expect to set out further details of the quality criteria that will apply for the 2017/18 training year, and which providers will be designated as Centres of Excellence, when we confirm the methodology for allocating places, which is currently under discussion.

The Department for Education has actively been engaging the ITT sector in discussions about the proposals in the White Paper, including the establishment of ITT Centres of Excellence. Engagement to date has included a series of roundtable discussion events for university- and school-led providers and their representative bodies, such as the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) and the National Association of School-Based Teacher Trainers (NASBTT).

We expect to confirm the allocations methodology for 2017/18 after further consultation with providers and their representative organisations over the summer, in time for the start of recruitment in the autumn term.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.28 of the White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016, with which (a) individuals, (b) organisations and (c) universities she has had discussions regarding the establishment of centres for excellence in initial teacher training.

The Government’s White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, confirmed that we intend to use a new set of quality criteria to determine how initial teacher training (ITT) places are allocated to training providers in future, ensuring that training is concentrated with the highest-quality providers. On the basis of these criteria, which will include factors such as the quality of trainees recruited, the quality of the training programmes, and the quality of outcomes for trainees, we will designate some providers as Centres of Excellence. We expect to set out further details of the quality criteria that will apply for the 2017/18 training year, and which providers will be designated as Centres of Excellence, when we confirm the methodology for allocating places, which is currently under discussion.

The Department for Education has actively been engaging the ITT sector in discussions about the proposals in the White Paper, including the establishment of ITT Centres of Excellence. Engagement to date has included a series of roundtable discussion events for university- and school-led providers and their representative bodies, such as the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) and the National Association of School-Based Teacher Trainers (NASBTT).

We expect to confirm the allocations methodology for 2017/18 after further consultation with providers and their representative organisations over the summer, in time for the start of recruitment in the autumn term.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.28 of the White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016, how her Department plans to determine which universities will be able to establish a centre of excellence in initial teacher training.

The Government’s White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, confirmed that we intend to use a new set of quality criteria to determine how initial teacher training (ITT) places are allocated to training providers in future, ensuring that training is concentrated with the highest-quality providers. On the basis of these criteria, which will include factors such as the quality of trainees recruited, the quality of the training programmes, and the quality of outcomes for trainees, we will designate some providers as Centres of Excellence. We expect to set out further details of the quality criteria that will apply for the 2017/18 training year, and which providers will be designated as Centres of Excellence, when we confirm the methodology for allocating places, which is currently under discussion.

The Department for Education has actively been engaging the ITT sector in discussions about the proposals in the White Paper, including the establishment of ITT Centres of Excellence. Engagement to date has included a series of roundtable discussion events for university- and school-led providers and their representative bodies, such as the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) and the National Association of School-Based Teacher Trainers (NASBTT).

We expect to confirm the allocations methodology for 2017/18 after further consultation with providers and their representative organisations over the summer, in time for the start of recruitment in the autumn term.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much capital spending was committed to university technical colleges in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015 and (d) 2016.

The Department for Education publishes capital spend data on individual university technical colleges once contracts have been awarded and the schools are open. This information can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/capital-funding-for-open-free-schools

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which university technical colleges closed in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015 and (d) 2016.

No University Technical Colleges (UTCs) closed in 2013 or 2014.

Two UTCs, Black County UTC and Hackney UTC, closed in August 2015 and two UTCs, Central Bedfordshire UTC and UTC Lancashire, are due to close at the end of the 2015/16 academic year.

Once closed, the change is reflected in our published list of open UTCs which can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/free-schools-open-schools-and-successful-applications

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students were on the roll of university technical colleges in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015 and (d) 2016.

According to published January census data, the number of pupils on roll in all University Technical Colleges (UTCs) was 795 in academic year 2012/13, 2,946 in 2013/14 and 6,363 in 2014/15.

The census data for January 2016 has not yet been published. However, the 2015 October census data shows 9,454 pupils on roll in all UTCs in the 2015/16 academic year.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) physics and (b) chemistry trainee teachers undertook a pre-initial teacher training subject knowledge enhancement course, broken down by subject and length of course, in each of the last five years.

The subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) programme supports universities and schools in filling teacher training places in priority subjects. It enables candidates who have the potential to be excellent teachers to overcome gaps in their subject knowledge that would otherwise mean that they would not be recruited to a teacher training course.

Tables 1 and 2 contain the number of trainees (by length of course) registered on SKE courses in chemistry and physics from 2011/12 to 2015/16.

Table 1: Physics SKE recruitment for academic years 2011/12 to 2014/15, and claims to date for academic year 2015/16.

Number of trainees

Duration of SKE course (weeks)

2011/12 [1]

2012/13 [1]

2013/14 [1]

2014/15 [1]

2015/16 [2]

2

187

133

N/A

N/A

N/A

4

53

62

N/A

N/A

N/A

8

29

32

161

151

28

12

55

64

45

43

32

16

58

48

13

27

19

18

0

0

0

0

1

20

4

2

7

12

23

24

51

36

54

49

48

26

0

0

13

1

0

28

56

34

20

3

15

32

6

0

5

4

7

36

57

50

4

32

19

Table 2: Chemistry SKE recruitment for academic years 2011/12 to 2014/15, and claims to date for academic year 2015/16.

Number of trainees

Course duration (weeks)

2011/12 [1]

2012/13 [1]

2013/14 [1]

2014/15 [1]

2015/16 [2]

2

172

83

N/A

N/A

N/A

4

63

66

N/A

N/A

N/A

8

7

14

156

161

52

10

0

0

1

4

0

12

61

73

69

56

36

16

52

19

24

23

24

20

1

1

9

12

15

24

65

40

28

36

39

28

44

31

0

4

2

32

19

0

5

10

7

36

95

93

17

22

17

[1] Submitted trainee data and accepted claims for the full academic year.

[2] Accepted claims as at 6 May 2016.

The final 2015/16 data will not be available until after the end of the academic year; however, the number of people using SKE in the current academic year is 59% of last year’s total which, if previous years’ trends apply to the current year, would suggest increased use of SKE compared to 2014/15.

6th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support the Government plans to provide for the removal of asbestos in maintained schools that are to be converted into academies.

The Government takes the issue of asbestos in schools very seriously and is supporting those in schools and responsible bodies who have the legal responsibility for safely managing asbestos in their schools.

The Department provides funding to schools to help them keep their school buildings in a good state of repair. Between 2015 and 2018 this investment will total £4.2 billion and schools and responsible bodies are able to use this funding to remove asbestos where that is appropriate.

For maintained schools, the local authority as responsible body receives an annual allocation of capital funding to repair and upgrade existing buildings. Local authorities are expected to treat fairly those schools considering conversion to an academy and to honour any commitments of capital funding that they have made, in respect of building projects at those schools.

Following conversion, a school can be part of a larger multi-academy trust, a smaller multi-academy trust or a standalone academy. Larger multi-academy trusts (MATs) have access to annual formulaic school condition allocations (SCA), which they can pass on to their constituent schools to address any serious asbestos concerns. For stand-alone academies and academies in smaller multi academy trusts, funding is available through the condition improvement fund (CIF) where they bid for capital funding. As set out in the guidance for prospective bidders, the highest priority is given to health and safety issues due to the poor condition of buildings, including emergency asbestos removal.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.30 of her Department's white paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016, what evidence her Department is taking into account to decide which (a) metrics and (b) other factors will be used to decide which providers are awarded multi-year allocations of initial teacher training places.

As set out in our recent White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, we plan to introduce ‘Centres of Excellence’ in Initial Teacher Training which will receive multi-year allocations. We are currently engaging the sector and working to establish the criteria for determining which providers will be designated as a ‘Centre of Excellence’. At this stage, no firm decisions have been taken.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on the relationship between the degree classifications of trainee teachers with their later performance in a teaching career.

In order to complete initial teacher training successfully, all trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards in full. The standards emphasise the importance of the basics of good teaching, such as strong subject knowledge and effective behaviour management. Following the review teacher training by Sir Andrew Carter, we have a commissioned an expert group to develop a new framework of content for training, based closely on the Teachers’ Standards and reiterating the requirement to place a clear focus on essentials such as the effective development of subject knowledge and being able to identify and respond to special educational needs. The group will be making its recommendations to Ministers shortly.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.28 of her Department's white paper Educational Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016, what factors will be taken into account in assessing which graduates are well-qualified for a teaching career for the purposes of the allocation of initial teacher training places to university providers.

As set out in our recent White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, we plan to introduce ‘Centres of Excellence’ in Initial Teacher Training which will receive multi-year allocations. We are currently engaging the sector and working to establish the criteria for determining which providers will be designated as a ‘Centre of Excellence’. At this stage, no firm decisions have been taken.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the statistical or other criteria are which her Department plans to apply in assessing which providers are to be given a multi-year allocation of initial teacher training places.

As set out in our recent White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, we plan to introduce ‘Centres of Excellence’ in Initial Teacher Training which will receive multi-year allocations. We are currently engaging the sector and working to establish the criteria for determining which providers will be designated as a ‘Centre of Excellence’. At this stage, no firm decisions have been taken.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on evidence suggesting a link between the A-level results of trainee teachers and their later performance when in a teaching career.

In order to complete initial teacher training successfully, all trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards in full. The standards emphasise the importance of the basics of good teaching, such as strong subject knowledge and effective behaviour management. Following the review teacher training by Sir Andrew Carter, we have a commissioned an expert group to develop a new framework of content for training, based closely on the Teachers’ Standards and reiterating the requirement to place a clear focus on essentials such as the effective development of subject knowledge and being able to identify and respond to special educational needs. The group will be making its recommendations to Ministers shortly.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to ensure that proposed Ofsted local area inspections include a requirement that Local Offers should contain clear information about local play opportunities and entitlements.

The Children and Families Act 2014 requires local authorities to develop and publish a Local Offer setting out the support they expect to be available for children and young people with special educational needs or disabilities in their local area. The Local Offer must include information about leisure activities which may include information about play opportunities.

The Ofsted and Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspections will consider how effectively the local area identifies, meets the needs of and improves the outcomes of the wide range of different groups[1] of children and young people who have special educational needs or disabilities as defined in the Act and described in the Code of Practice.

Ofsted and CQC will draw on a range of sources, including the local offer, to identify key lines of enquiry and to support assessment of the effectiveness of the local area.

Ofsted and CQC will publish an inspection report that will outline the evidence that inspectors reviewed and provide a summary of key findings including the local area’s strengths and areas requiring further development.

The inspection framework and handbook are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-area-send-inspection-framework

[1] These groups of children and young people are detailed in Part 2 of the ‘Handbook for the inspection of local areas’ effectiveness in identifying and meeting the needs of children and young people who have special educational needs and/or disabilities’.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what representations her Department received on exempting the armed forces from providing recruits under the age of 18 with the minimum standards required under the Education and Skills Act 2008; and if she will make a statement.

The Education and Skills Act 2008 requires young people to participate in education or training until they are 18. Young people can participate through full-time education, work combined with part-time education or training, or by undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship.

The 16 and 17 year olds joining the armed forces are under a contract of employment but they are not exempt from their duty to participate. Most of these young people meet their duty to participate by undertaking an apprenticeship.

We have agreed with the Ministry of Defence that serving in the armed forces is a valid and valuable career route which provides relevant training for young people.

Apprenticeships are embedded across initial training in the armed forces, with over 95% of all young recruits (no matter what their age or prior qualifications) enrolling in an apprenticeship each year.

All apprenticeships require a minimum of 280 Guided Learning Hours (GLHs) within a 12 month period. The same GLH requirement applies to the small number of young people in the armed forces who are not on an apprenticeship.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of 16 and 17 year olds participated in full-time education in England in (a) 2005 and (b) 2015.

The proportion of 16 and 17 year olds in full-time education in England was 70.3% at the end of 2005 and 82.2% at the end of 2014 (provisional figures). These figures are published in Table A7 of the ‘Additional tables – rates’ in the Statistical First Release (SFR) ‘Participation in education, training and employment’ and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-neet

Figures for end 2015 are not yet available but will be published on 30th June 2016 as part of the above series.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department requires the armed forces to provide entrants aged under 18 with 280 guided learning hours per year towards accredited qualifications.

The Education and Skills Act 2008 requires young people to participate in education or training until they are 18. Young people can participate through full-time education, work combined with part-time education or training, or by undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship.

The 16 and 17 year olds joining the armed forces are under a contract of employment but they are not exempt from their duty to participate. Most of these young people meet their duty to participate by undertaking an apprenticeship.

We have agreed with the Ministry of Defence that serving in the armed forces is a valid and valuable career route which provides relevant training for young people.

Apprenticeships are embedded across initial training in the armed forces, with over 95% of all young recruits (no matter what their age or prior qualifications) enrolling in an apprenticeship each year.

All apprenticeships require a minimum of 280 Guided Learning Hours (GLHs) within a 12 month period. The same GLH requirement applies to the small number of young people in the armed forces who are not on an apprenticeship.

3rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the level of regional variation in the proportion of initial teacher training places allocated to providers with an outstanding Ofsted rating in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and whether her Department plans to take such variation into account when assessing which providers will be given a multi-year allocation of initial teacher training places.

For the 2016/17 Initial Teacher Training (ITT) recruitment round, the Department operated a system of recruitment controls and not allocations. We continue to monitor daily the recruitment at a regional level and have the power to enact regional controls if we see a large disparity in recruitment for a region. A guide to the 2016/17 ITT recruitment round methodology can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/468099/ITT_recruitment_control_guidance_2016-17_v1.1.pdf

We are currently engaging the sector and working to establish the criteria for determining which providers will be designated as a ‘Centre of Excellence’ and receive multi-year allocations, but at this stage no firm decisions have been taken.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answers of 2 and 8 February 2016 to Questions 25202 and 23871, and the update provided by Ofqual, what further progress has been made on A levels in (a) French, (b) German, (c) Spanish, (d) Religious Studies and (e) Geography being approved ready for first teaching from September 2016.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have therefore asked its Chief Regulator, Sally Collier, to write directly to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.29 of her Department's White Paper, Educational excellence everywhere, published in March 2016; what measure her Department plans to use to determine what constitutes a high quality trainee.

High-quality trainee teachers are central to our ambition of achieving educational excellence everywhere. The White Paper confirmed that we will introduce new quality criteria to inform the allocation of training places to providers of initial teacher training (ITT) for both schools and universities. This will include an assessment of the quality of trainees recruited to ITT courses.

We will announce further details of the criteria we intend to use shortly; this will begin to inform the allocation of training places to schools and universities from the 2017/18 training year. We anticipate refining the criteria over the coming years, taking account of feedback from the sector and the way in which providers are responding.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 2.12 of her Department's White Paper, Educational excellence everywhere, published in March 2016; how she plans to reform the National College of Teaching and Leadership so that it can ensure the national and regional supply of teachers.

All executive agencies are required to undertake a review every three years. The National College of Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) Triennial Review is being led by Roger Pope, Chair of NCTL.

We expect to confirm the results of that review later this year.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on delivery of initial teacher training of all schools becoming academies.

Academies have the same opportunities as maintained schools to become involved in teacher training, either through the School Direct programme, becoming a School Centred Initial Teacher Training provider (SCITT), or partnering with a university teacher training provider.

Academies also benefit from additional freedoms to recruit subject experts who do not have Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), but can add real value to the classroom. Schools that are part of multi-academy trusts (MATs) can also benefit from the ability to use their greater resources to attract the teachers they need.

Our proposals to replace QTS with a new, stronger accreditation will mean schools will be able to put those subject experts who have not been through ITT on a pathway to formal accreditation. We expect the vast majority of teachers will continue to train through ITT, particularly as more schools become directly involved in the selection and training of new teachers. 94 per cent of teachers in academies hold QTS, demonstrating that head teachers value high-quality ITT.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department plans to take to ensure that the number of qualified teachers does not decrease proportionately or in real terms by 2022.

As announced in our White Paper, Educational Excellence Everywhere, our proposals to replace Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) with a new, stronger accreditation will raise the bar for new teachers. While we expect the vast majority of new teachers to continue to complete initial teacher training (ITT), these proposals will also mean that schools can put teachers who have not completed a period of ITT onto a pathway to formal accreditation.

We will set out further details of how and when we intend to implement the new accreditation process shortly. Until then, the Department has no plans to change the regulations which permit academies and maintained schools to employ teachers who do not hold QTS.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to section 2.28 of the White Paper, Educational excellence everywhere, published in March 2016, by what criteria her Department will assess which higher education institutions are assessed as the best universities for education and teacher training.

Our recent White Paper made a commitment to raising the quality of initial teacher training so that teaching continues to be a profession that attracts the brightest and the best. We want to ensure that training places are allocated to providers – both schools and universities – with a proven track record of effectively recruiting high-quality trainees, delivering high-quality programmes of training, and securing the best possible outcomes for trainees.

We will be setting out further detail of our plans to implement these reforms shortly. This will include confirming details of the quality criteria that we intend to use to inform the allocation of places to universities and schools for the training year 2017/18. We are currently holding discussions with stakeholders, including ITT providers and their representative bodies, to inform the development of appropriate criteria.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 3.30 of Educational excellence everywhere, Cm 9230, when she plans to amend the academy articles of association models to remove the requirement for new academy trusts and school governing boards to elect parent governors; and if she will take steps to enable existing academies to make that change.

The model articles of association give multi-academy trust (MAT) boards the freedom to appoint a local governing body. The board is also free to decide on what, if any, governance functions they delegate to subsidiary governance structures at the level of either individual schools or clusters of schools. Whatever arrangements MATs use, they must set out and publish on their website their chosen arrangements in a clear scheme of delegation.

The White Paper Educational Excellence Everywhere outlines our intention to place a new expectation on all academies to put in place specific arrangements to engage with all parents in a meaningful way to listen to their views and feedback. To enable a move to fully skills-based governance, the White Paper also announces an end to our requirement on new and existing trusts to reserve places on the board for elected parents.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 3.35 of Educational excellence everywhere, Cm 9230, if she will issue guidance on levels of remuneration for non-executive academy trust directors.

Academy trusts are independent charities and must comply with charity law. This means that trust directors can only receive payment for carrying out trustee duties with Charity Commission authorisation.

The Charity Commission will only authorise payment to academy trustees where it has been clearly shown to be in the charity’s interests. They will consider issues such as the reasons for payment, whether conflicts of interests are managed appropriately, whether the Principal Regulator (for academies this is the Secretary of State for Education) is agreeable and whether payment of any trustees is in the longer-term interests of the charity. These arrangements are set out in the Department’s Governance Handbook, available on GOV.UK at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/governance-handbook. It is up to trusts to decide on the level of any such remuneration.

Academy trusts operate under a robust accountability system which holds them to account for the results they achieve and their use of resources. This includes a requirement to publish audited accounts each year allowing the wider public chance to hold academy trusts to account to help make sure that spend is securing better outcomes for pupils.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 3.35 of Educational excellence everywhere, Cm 9230, what powers she has to require local authority maintained schools to provide details of everyone involved in governance for a new database; and when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to bar unsuitable individuals from being governors of maintained schools.

The Education Act 2002 gives the Secretary of State the power to give guidance to maintained schools governing bodies about their constitution. She also has a number of other information gathering powers in legislation. We expect to use this combination to make provision for the database by 1 September 2016. We also intend to bring forward legislation on barring unsuitable individuals from being governors of maintained schools at the earliest opportunity.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 3.28 of Educational excellence everywhere, Cm 9230, when she plans to amend the model articles of government of academies to require each school in a multi-academy trust to have a school level governing body; and whether she plans that those model articles will set out the role of school level governing bodies to focus on understanding and championing the needs of pupils, parents and the wider local community.

The model articles of association give multi-academy trust (MAT) boards the freedom to appoint a local governing body. The board is also free to decide on what, if any, governance functions they delegate to subsidiary governance structures at the level of either individual schools or clusters of schools. Whatever arrangements MATs use, they must set out and publish on their website their chosen arrangements in a clear scheme of delegation.

The White Paper Educational Excellence Everywhere outlines our intention to place a new expectation on all academies to put in place specific arrangements to engage with all parents in a meaningful way to listen to their views and feedback. To enable a move to fully skills-based governance, the White Paper also announces an end to our requirement on new and existing trusts to reserve places on the board for elected parents.

24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2016 to Question 29811, on further education, how many meetings have been held for area reviews in (a) Birmingham and Solihull, (b) Greater Manchester, (c) Sheffield City Region, (d) Tees Valley, (e) Sussex, (f) Solent and (g) West Yorkshire in each of the last nine months.

A wide range of meetings are held within each area review, which is a locally owned process designed to meet the needs of each local area. Bilateral meetings will often take place, for instance, between individual colleges which might be exploring restructuring options. Local stakeholders will often meet in smaller groupings to discuss particular issues or themes, for example local enterprise partnerships and local authorities may have set up separate meetings. Additionally, some local stakeholders will seek meetings to ensure their involvement at particular points, for example local MPs once recommendations emerge.

The number and type of meetings are likely to vary with each review, depending on local provision, circumstances and issues as well as local interest in engaging with the review work. The following focuses on the formal meetings which are a core part of the area review process and would therefore be consistent across the country.

A number of formal area review steering group meetings have taken place in each area since September 2015. No steering group meetings were held prior to September 2015. Meetings held between September 2015 and March 2016 are as follows:

  • In Birmingham and Solihull, one meeting was held in each of the following months: September, October, November, December, January and March.

  • In Greater Manchester, one meeting was held in each of the following months: September, November and December.

  • In Sheffield City Region, one meeting was held in each of the following months: September, November, December and March.

  • In Tees Valley, one meeting was held in each of the following months: October, November, December, February and March.

  • In Sussex, one meeting was held in each of the following months: October, December, January, February and March.

  • In the Solent, one meeting was held in each of the following months: November, December, January and March.

  • In West Yorkshire, one meeting was held in each of the following months: November, December, January and March.
24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2016 to Question 29811, on further education, if she will publish the minutes of each of those meetings.

Minutes of the steering group meetings are not published as they are a series of internal discussions during which local stakeholders review post-16 provision in their area and work towards a set of recommendations. As such, each local steering group has space and autonomy to develop their proposals and discuss local issues effectively.

The Department is committed to making the outcomes transparent, and once each review reaches its conclusions, there will be a summary report published at the end of each Area Review process.

23rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that local authorities are required to take action on education and early years settings that intentionally exclude disabled children and do not meet their legal duties to such children under the Equality Act 2010.

Promoting equality in education settings is a priority for this Government. In combination with our guidance to schools on managing medical conditions, the Equality Act 2010 provides a broad basis for ensuring that disabled pupils are included and supported to achieve their full potential.

The Equality Act requires all schools (whether maintained or academy) to produce an accessibility plan. These plans ensure that all aspects of school life are accessible to disabled pupils. The Act also requires Local Authorities to produce accessibility strategies with the same aims as the school-level plan, but with different coverage. There is no evidence of schools or early years settings systematically refusing to accept disabled children. However, we do take action where individual cases are brought to our attention.

Our Early Implementer Package for the new extended childcare offer will include testing how we can improve access for children with SEN and disabilities. This will provide critical information before the national rollout.

Any exclusions from school must be lawful, reasonable and fair. Schools have a legal duty not to discriminate against a pupil because of a protected characteristic. The statutory guidance on exclusion emphasises the importance of early intervention to address underlying causes of disruptive behaviour, including an assessment of whether suitable provision is in place to support any SEN or disability a pupil may have. It also states that headteachers should, as far as possible, avoid excluding permanently any pupil with a statement of SEN.

In certain circumstances, governing bodies must review head teachers’ decisions to exclude and have the power to reinstate a pupil. Where a governing body upholds a permanent exclusion, parents can request that the decision is reviewed by an independent review panel. However, the governing body has the final say on whether the pupil can return to the school. Parents can request that a SEN expert provides impartial advice to the panel.

Parents can also make a claim to the First-tier Tribunal (SEN and Disabilities) when it is alleged that an exclusion relates to disability discrimination. The Tribunal has the power to order the pupil’s reinstatement.

When Ofsted inspect a school and look at the behaviour management policies they can also consider whether the school is disproportionately excluding pupils with disabilities and can use this to inform their assessment.

23rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what evidence her Department holds on the relationship between the A-level grades achieved by prospective teachers and their later performance in the classroom.

Evidence, including a seminal McKinsey study from 2007 (How the world’s best-performing schools come out on top), shows that teacher quality and impact cannot be predicted by a single factor such as A-Level grades, but result from a complex combination of factors including academic achievement combined with characteristics and attributes such as communication skills, willingness to learn and motivation to teach.

The Teachers’ Standards, developed by a group of leading teachers and heads, clearly define the core elements of effective teaching – including strong subject knowledge and the promotion of scholarship, as well as skills such as classroom management. All new teachers must demonstrate that they are meeting the standards at the end of their initial training.

It is important that providers of initial teacher training are able to select and recruit candidates on the basis of their potential and their academic achievement to date; this is why we are giving schools much greater say in recruiting and training candidates who can be successful in the classroom. This year, over half of all postgraduate trainees are coming through school-led routes.

23rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the conclusion of the report from the charity Sense, Making the case for play, published in February 2016, that a misguided interpretation and approach to health and safety is creating a barrier to accessing play settings and activities for children with multiple needs.

The government recognises that play has an important role in supporting all young children to develop and prepare for later learning, and the Early Years Foundation Stage is clear that “practitioners must consider the individual needs, interests, and stage of development of each child in their care… to plan a challenging and enjoyable experience for each child in all of the areas of learning and development.” Health and safety should not create a barrier to accessing play activities for children with multiple needs.

The staff working in early years settings as Early Years Educators (level 3) and Early Years Teachers (graduates) are required to have an understanding of different pedagogical approaches, including the role of play in supporting early learning and development. The criteria for the Early Years Educator and standards for Early Years Teacher Status qualifications are set by the department. However, it is the responsibility of early years settings to provide play opportunities for their children and pupils, including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

Ofsted conducts a regular cycle of inspection to ensure that provision meets the required quality and safety standards and assesses the extent to which the learning and care provided by the setting meets the needs of the range of children who attend, including the needs of any children who have SEND.

The Childcare Act 2016 expands the free childcare entitlement from 15 to 30 hours for three- and four-year-olds of working parents. As part of the Early Implementer Package announced on 2 February 2016, local authorities involved will be using the opportunity to test and showcase how childcare can be delivered in a way that improves access for children with SEND. The department also launched a consultation on 3 April 2016 seeking views on key elements of the operation and delivery of the 30 hours and we welcome views on provision for children with SEND. The consultation is available on GOV.UK at: www.gov.uk/government/consultations/30-hour-free-childcare-entitlement

4th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2016 to Question 24002, on further education, how many steering group meetings of area reviews of post-16 education and training in (a) Birmingham and Solihull, (b) Greater Manchester, (c) Sheffield City Region, (d) Tees Valley, (e) Sussex, (f) Solent and (g) West Yorkshire took place without representatives of the (i) regional schools commissioner and (ii) local enterprise partnership being present in each of the last six months.

There are a range of ways in which Regional Schools Commissioners (RSCs) and members of Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) can contribute to area reviews, for instance through the National Area Review Advisory Group.

It is expected that there will be at least five steering group meetings in each review. To date all Wave 1 Area Reviews have held a number of local steering group meetings and RSCs and LEPs are members. They or their representatives have attended the majority of these meetings.

In Birmingham and Solihull, one meeting in December 2015 took place without an RSC representative present.

In Greater Manchester, one meeting in November 2015 took place without an RSC representative present and one meeting in December 2015 took place without either an RSC or LEP representative present.

In Sheffield City Region, one meeting in December 2015 took place without an RSC representative present.

In Tees Valley, all meetings have taken place with a RSC or LEP representative present.

In Sussex, one meeting in February 2016 took place without an RSC representative present.

In the Solent, one meeting in November 2015 and one meeting in January 2016 took place without an RSC representative present.

In West Yorkshire, one meeting in November 2015, one meeting in December 2015 and one meeting in January 2016 took place without an RSC representative present.

Both a RSC and LEP representative have been present at all other steering group meetings of the Wave 1 area reviews.

4th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance her Department issues to schools on tackling the problems of traffic congestion at the school gate during school drop-off and pick-up.

The local authority (LA) is responsible for enforcing parking restrictions around schools. The LA must also promote sustainable travel and transport, and strategies for encouraging walking, cycling and public transport should form part of that. The duty applies to all children and young people of compulsory school age who travel to receive education or training in a local authority’s area and is reinforced by the Department’s home to school transport statutory guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445407/Home_to_School_Travel_and_Transport_Guidance.pdf

4th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the recommendation in the report by Sense, Making the Case for Play, for play to be included as part of the ministerial brief of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Childcare and Education.

The Department for Education recognises that play has an important role in supporting all young children to develop and prepare for later learning. The importance of play is already recognised within the early years legislation covered by Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Childcare and Education’s portfolio.

Play is covered in the statutory Early Years Foundation Stage framework and states: Each area of learning and development must be implemented through planned, purposeful play and through a mix of adult-led and child-initiated activity. Play is essential for children’s development, building their confidence as they learn to explore, to think about problems, and relate to others. Children learn by leading their own play, and by taking part in play which is guided by adults. The framework is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-foundation-stage-framework--2

The staff working in early years settings as Early Years Educators (level 3) and Early Years Teachers (graduates) are required to have an understanding of different pedagogical approaches, including the role of play in supporting early learning and development. The criteria for the Early Years Educator and standards for Early Years Teacher Status qualifications are set by the department. However, it is the responsibility of early years settings to provide play opportunities for their children and pupils, including those with special educational needs and disabilities.

Ofsted registers childcare provision on the Early Years Register and the General Childcare Register and conducts a regular cycle of inspection to ensure that provision meets the required quality and safety standards.

In judging the quality and standards of early years provision, Ofsted inspectors must assess the extent to which the learning and care provided by the setting meets the needs of the range of children who attend, including the needs of any children who have special educational needs or disabilities. At August 2015, 85 per cent of providers on the Early Years Register were rated good or outstanding for overall effectiveness.

4th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she has taken to ensure that adequate ring-fenced funding is provided to local authorities so they can successfully deliver the Government's childcare provision targets.

We have already announced over £1bn more for the early years entitlements within the ring-fenced Dedicated Schools Grant by 2019-20, which includes £300m to uplift the funding rate to providers. The increase to the funding rate is based on robust evidence from the Review of the Cost of Childcare. We have made clear our commitment to maximise the amount of this funding which reaches front line childcare providers, and will consult on proposals for achieving this as part of our consultation on early years funding reform later this year.

3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions her Department has had with the Department for Transport on steps to meet the Government's objective to increase the proportion of children walking to school from 46 per cent to 55 per cent.

The Department supports the Department for Transport’s target to increase the numbers of pupils walking to school. Local authorities have a duty to promote sustainable school travel and transport, and our statutory guidance on home to school transport states that strategies for encouraging walking should form part of that duty. Departmental officials have recently met the Living Streets Charity to discuss how we can further help local authorities in promoting walking to school and we continue to support and promote initiatives such as Living Streets, Modeshift and Sustrans both by engaging with consultations and through our guidance.

The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445407/Home_to_School_Travel_and_Transport_Guidance.pdf

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has spent on marketing for the Future Teaching Scholars programme to date.

The management of the Future Teaching Scholars programme is contracted to the delivery organisation, Education Development Trust. Any money spent on marketing is determined by the Education Development Trust.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has allocated to the Future Teaching Scholars programme for the 2016-17 cohort.

Funding for the Future Teaching Scholars programme is allocated by financial year rather than by cohort. £1.3m has been allocated for financial year 2016-17. This covers the £15,000 financial incentive to Scholars, continued marketing expenditure, and all programme delivery costs.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many applicants to the Future Teaching Scholars programme to date have been (a) women and (b) men.

To date we have received applications from 27 women and 23 men. We remain confident that we will secure 110 scholars by the end of summer 2016.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) people who will apply for 2016-17 cohort of the Future Teaching Scholars programme, (b)applicants that will join that scheme for that year and (c) such applicants that will complete that training.

The Future Teaching Scholars programme is currently recruiting high achieving A level students, with the aim of securing up to 110 Scholars to start the programme in academic year 2016-17. All Scholars will be rigorously selected, including assessment of their commitment to teaching.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many spaces have been set aside on initial teacher training courses for the 2016-17 cohort of the future teaching scholars programme.

There will be places available for all Scholars after they successfully complete their undergraduate degree and commence their initial teacher training from the 2019-20 academic year.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many applications her Department received to the first application round for the Future Teaching Scholars programme.

The Future Teaching Scholars programme received 50 applications in the first recruitment round. We remain confident that we will secure 110 scholars by the end of summer 2016.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the staffing complement is of the office of each regional schools commissioner; and what the staff grade is of each post in each such office.

At present, each RSC office employs between 8 and 10 members of staff. In line with the Department's commitment to greater transparency, staffing structure information for each RSC office, including staff count for each grade, pay scale and location, is published on GOV.UK at: http://reference.data.gov.uk/gov-structure/organogram/?pubbod=department-for-education

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what duties are placed on regional school commissioners to consult with local authorities on school place planning.

Local authorities are responsible for ensuring there are sufficient school places in their local area.

The RSCs are responsible for approving the sponsors of new free schools and intervening in underperforming academies and free schools in their area. The RSCs consider basic need when making decisions on proposed changes to academies, and must consider any representations from local authorities.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in the office of each regional schools commissioners are employed under a contract of employment to another third party.

The regional school commissioners currently have one agency worker and one inward secondee from a County Council.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the specialist contractors hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners are required to declare any interests relevant to their employment by her Department.

Contractors procured to support the academies and free schools programme are required to declare conflicts of interest.

The contract states, “The Contractor is required to declare to the Contract Manager any interests and/or links, including other contracts or positions held whether they be paid or unpaid or relationships with, but not limited to, schools, education providers or other external organisations involved in the provision of education or education services so the Contract Manager may assess whether any conflicts of interest, whether potential, actual or perceived, and as reasonably judged by the Contract Manager, may have the potential to present reputational, operational or legal or risks to the Contractor and to the Department in allocating any particular project.

"If such a conflict of interest does arise, or may arise, the Contractor will declare it to the Department immediately and accept that the Department may ask the Contractor to immediately cease any involvement with the task giving rise to the conflict.”

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish the terms and conditions of the contracts of the specialist contractors hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners.

The Department will publish an award notice on GOV.UK that names suppliers that have been awarded contracts, business addresses and contract values over £20,000. The Department will also be publishing related supplier contracts that support the academy and free school programme on Contract Finder on GOV.UK by 31 March 2016.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which specialist contractors her Department has hired to advise regional school commissioners.

The Department will publish an award notice on GOV.UK that names suppliers that have been awarded contracts, business addresses and contract values over £20,000. The Department will also be publishing related supplier contracts that support the academy and free school programme on Contract Finder on GOV.UK by 31 March 2016.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the daily rate of pay is for specialist contractors hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners.

The department does not publish daily rates for specialist contractors. Doing so would prejudice commercial interests.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what training is provided to specialist contractors hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners on their responsibilities related to the Civil Service Code.

The specialist contractors that support the academies and free school programme are directed in advance of commencing any work that their conduct and behaviour when delivering the Department’s business complies with the Civil Service Code’s principles.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many specialist contractors hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners there are; and how much her Department spent on such contractors in the last financial year.

The Department has contracted 92 suppliers to provide education specialist contractors to support the academies and free school programme. Further details can be found in Annex G of the supplementary evidence submitted to the Education Select Committee on the role of RSCs, which can be found here:

http://data.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/committeeevidence.svc/evidencedocument/education-committee/the-role-of-regional-schools-commissioners/written/25134.html

In financial year 2014-15, the Department spent £1,112,580.53 on education specialist contractors to support the regional school commissioners.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what functions are delegated to each specialist contractor hired by her Department to advise regional school commissioners.

Invitation to tender including the contract was published on contracts finder on GOV.UK on 12 August 2015 at:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/fcbd797d-c613-47f5-8853-79f2ad7d74a9

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which academies and academy chains employ trustees and directors who are paid salaries in excess of £142,500.

The information is available about each academy trust in the notes to their financial statements which are published online by the Department for Education and at Companies House.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) trustees and (b) directors of academies and academy chains are paid salaries in excess of £142,500.

The information is available about each academy trust in the notes to their financial statements which are published online by the Department for Education and at Companies House.

1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she expects A-level courses in (a) French, (b) German, (c) Spanish, (d) religious studies and (e) geography to be approved by awarding bodies for teaching from September 2016; and if she will make a statement.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have therefore asked its Chief Regulator, Glenys Stacey to write directly to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2016 to Question 24002, how many steering group meetings of the area reviews of post-16 education and training have taken place in (a) Birmingham and Solihull, (b) Greater Manchester, (c) Sheffield City Region, (d) Tees Valley, (e) Sussex, (f) Solent and (g) West Yorkshire since September 2015; and which such steering group meetings regional schools commissioners attended.

All Wave 1 Area Reviews have held a number of local steering group meetings, of which RSCs are members. Dates of some of the steering group meetings are in the public domain, as are details of membership of the steering groups.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of her Department's budget has been spent on the Troops to Teachers scheme to date; and on what that budget was spent.

To date, £4.3m has been spent on the programme, the majority of which has been initial, one-off start-up costs. The funding has been allocated to trainee salaries in addition to programme costs to deliver the degree qualification and teacher training requirements.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers have been recruited through the Troops to Teachers scheme.

One cohort has completed their training to date with a further two cohorts currently in training. In total, 144 teachers have been recruited through the scheme.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the retention rate is of teachers recruited through the Troops to Teachers scheme.

There has only been one cohort to complete to date. The retention rate for this cohort was 76 per cent.

The current retention rate for cohort 2 is 90 per cent, and for cohort 3 it is 96 per cent.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she expects A-Levels in (a) French, (b) German, (c) Spanish, (d) Religious Studies and (e) Geography to be approved by awarding bodies for teaching from September 2016; and if she will make a statement.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have therefore asked its Chief Regulator, Glenys Stacey, to write directly to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on which dates the relevant (a) regional schools commissioner and (b) chief executive of the local enterprise partnership have attended steering group meetings of the area reviews of post-16 education and training in (i) Birmingham and Solihull, (ii) Greater Manchester, (iii) Sheffield City Region, (iv) Tees Valley, (v) Sussex, (vi) Solent and (vii) West Yorkshire; and if she will make a statement

There are a range of ways in which Regional Schools Commissioners (RSCs) and members of Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) contribute to area reviews, for instance through the Area Review Advisory Group.


All Wave 1 Area Reviews have held a number of local steering group meetings, and RSCs and LEPs are members. In terms of specific attendance, an RSC may attend in person, or may instead send a representative. The area review guidance published in September 2015 does indicate that the LEP should be a member of the local steering group, but it does not require a particular representative to attend. LEPs do not usually have chief executives.


RSC and LEP representatives have attended various steering group meetings in Birmingham and Solihull, Greater Manchester, Sheffield City Region, Tees Valley, Sussex, Solent and West Yorkshire from September 2015 to the present.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the regional schools commissioners have oversight of performance of sixth forms in academies; and if she will make a statement.

Regional Schools Commissioners are responsible for monitoring the performance of academies within their region, including performance at sixth form level. Decisions regarding intervention action are informed by the academy’s performance against minimum standards, including the 16-19 minimum standards, and Ofsted judgements, as well as local intelligence.

22nd Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to ensure that all higher education institutions are able to fill their teacher training course places.

Higher education institutions (HEIs) are responsible for their own recruitment to initial teacher training (ITT) courses, both through offering their own ITT places and supporting the wider school-led system.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) has introduced a new system for postgraduate ITT recruitment for the 2016/17 academic year. Full information has been published on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-recruitment-controls

The Government is committed to attracting more top graduates into teaching, and has already announced increased bursaries and other financial incentives in those core academic subjects that best help children achieve their potential; including tax free bursaries of up to £30,000.

The Department for Education has launched a programme of marketing activities highlighting the benefits of a career in teaching to attract people into the profession. This includes TV advertising, the “Get into Teaching” website, digital advertising and activity on social media. Officials attend more than 40 graduate recruitment and Train to Teach events each year in order to promote teaching to those interested in applying.

19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of teaching vacancies at the start of September 2016.

The department collects the number of teacher vacancies in November each year. The November 2015 collection is still underway as schools, Local Authorities and Academy Trusts have until the end of January 2016 to provide their workforce data.

The latest available data on the number of vacancies in schools is from the November 2014 School Workforce Census which was published in July 2015 and is available from table 14 at the following web link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-workforce-in-england-november-2014

The published data shows that 0.3% of teaching posts in state funded schools in England were vacant in November 2014.

19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many higher education institutions have had their funding allocated by the National College of Teaching and Leadership reduced as a consequence of training more teachers than places allocated in each academic year since 2010-11.

We have not reduced the funding for any higher education institutions (HEIs) as a consequence of training more teachers than places allocated since 2010-11.


19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what records her Department keeps of the number of unfilled teaching positions at secondary schools (a) nationally and (b) in each local authority area.

The number of vacancies in each primary and secondary school is collected as part of the annual November School Workforce Census. The latest national and local authority level statistics were published in July 2015 and are located at the following web link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-workforce-in-england-november-2014

As part of the School Workforce Census collection each state funded school is asked to provide details of the teacher vacancies they have on Census day. Under the Department’s long-standing standard definition, a post is vacant if it is unfilled or temporarily-filled by a teacher on a contract of less than one term. The vacancy must have been advertised, be vacant at the time of the Census and there should still be an intention to fill it.

The complete guidance on how schools provide School Workforce Census data (including the vacancy data) is available at the following web link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-workforce-census

The published data shows that 0.3% of teaching posts in state funded schools in England were vacant in November 2014.


19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places were available on teacher training courses at higher education institutions in each academic year since 2009-10.

We have changed the approach to initial teacher training (ITT) allocations for the 2016 to 2017 academic year. The National College of Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) will not be allocating a specific number of places to individual organisations for postgraduate ITT courses due to start in the 2016 to 2017 academic year. Instead, eligible schools, school-centred initial teacher training providers (SCITTs) and higher education institutions (HEIs) will be able to recruit (subject to a limited number of controls) as many trainees as they feel they need – until the overall system has recruited sufficient trainees. For 2016/17 the number of places available for HEIs to recruit to (based on the estimate of trainee need as per the teacher supply model) can be found on GOV.UK:

Prior to 2016/17 we have operated an allocations system for School Direct lead schools, SCITTs and HEIs. For recent years detailed initial and final allocations data for HEIs can be found on GOV.UK:




For 2012/13 and earlier published allocations data can be found on the national archives (http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130423140808/http:/education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/TIM/m002013/index.shtml). An extract detailing the relevant years is shown below. It should be noted that this data cannot be disaggregated into HEIs and non-HEIs but is included for information.


England

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

Primary

18,050

18,640

19,730

20,840


Secondary by subject

Art

595

515

320

320

Citizenship3

265

260

185

180

Economics, Dance, Media, Performing Arts, Other subjects5,6

295

260

210

220

English & Drama

2,535

2,415

2,100

2,010

Geography

715

665

615

625

History

620

545

545

545

Mathematics2

2,685

2,635

2,635

2,635

Foreign Languages5

1,525

1,390

1,490

1,575

Music

635

570

390

380

Physical Education

1,380

1,180

890

835

Religious Education

695

655

460

450

Science2,6

3,405

3,195

2,835

2,835

Technology4

2,770

2,560

1,880

1,845

Vocational subjects5,7

..

..

..

..

Margin of Flexibility/Secondary Reserve8

..

..

..

..


Total Secondary

18,120

16,845

14,555

14,455


Primary and Secondary

36,170

35,485

34,285

35,295

Notes:

  1. 1999/2000 places exclude 600 Maths and Science Scheme places.
  2. Citizenship includes Personal Social Health & Economic Education and Social Studies
  3. Technology includes Design and Technology, Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and Business Sudies.
  4. Classics/Ancient Languages are included in 'Other' until 2010/11 inclusive, and in Foreign Languages from 2011/12.
  5. Places for vocational subjects from 2006/07 onwards are included with the allocation for related academic subject: Science includes places for Applied Science, Design and Technology includes both Manufacturing and Engineering, ICT includes Applied ICT, Business Studies includes Applied Business, Geography includes Leisure and Tourism, Art includes Applied Art and Other subjects includes Health and Social Care and subjects relating to the new diploma subjects.
  6. In 2004/05 places for vocational subjects were shown separately.
  7. In 2003/04 the margin of flexibility included places for a vocational subjects pilot. The margin of flexibility/secondary reserve constituted places that the Training and Development Agency for Schools could allocate to any secondary subject, to support providers whose baselines would otherwise be below economic levels; to ensure the appropriate denominational balance; and to help providers with a high proportion of places in shortage subjects and who therefore had particular uncertainty of income. The margin of flexibility included in the places for 2000/01 and 2001/02 is equivalent to the provision the Teacher Training Agency had in 1999/2000 to move places between secondary subjects within certain parameters, but is now given explicitly.

... Not applicable

19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much has been deducted from funding allocated by the National College of Teaching and Leadership to higher education institutions who have trained more teachers than places allocated in each academic year since 2010-11.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) have not reduced the funding for any higher education institutions (HEIs) who have trained more teachers than places allocated since the academic year 2010-11. The NCTL continues to have the right to impose penalties, but have not exercised this previously. The decision to exercise this right in the academic year 2016/17 will be made after institutions submit their trainee registration information.


19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of qualified teachers.

Teaching continues to be a hugely popular career. The number of teachers returning to the classroom continues to rise and in 2015/16 we recruited more trainee primary school teachers than our target. We recognise the challenge school leaders face in some parts of the country, and are working to address this with action.

We are committed to attracting more top graduates into teaching, and have already announced increased bursaries and other financial incentives in those core academic subjects that help children achieve their potential; including tax free bursaries of up to £30,000.

We have significantly expanded the School Direct teacher training route which gives schools more opportunity to recruit and train their own high-quality teachers and future leaders. This year over 10,000 trainees are starting School Direct courses, up from 9,000 last year.

We have funded the expansion of Teach First into every region of England. Teach First will have the scope to reach 90 per cent of eligible schools by 2016, boosting our commitment to recruit more top teachers in rural, coastal and disadvantaged areas.

In addition, the Department recently announced the ‘Supporting Returning Teachers’ pilot, to support secondary schools to improve teacher recruitment in priority subjects by removing the barriers that prevent inactive but qualified teachers from returning to the classroom. As part of this pilot, we are helping schools to provide a tailored package of support for those wishing to return to the profession and offering grant funding of up to £1,900 per teacher recruited.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether new guidance has been issued to her Department on drafting responses to written parliamentary questions.

The Department for Education regularly refreshes its internal guidance on drafting responses to written parliamentary questions to ensure that it is up to date.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's spending on (a) temporary agency staff and (b) consultants was as a proportion of her Department's total budget in each year since 2010-11.

The table below shows the Department’s budget for each the financial year requested and the total figure spent on temporary agency staff and consultants. The table also shows the percentage of the budget spent on temporary agency staff and consultants.

FY 2010-11

FY 2011-12

FY 2012-13

FY 2013-14

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16 To Dec 2015

Department Total Budget

£58,242.15m

£56,407.12m

£57,956.19m

£57,094.72m

£59,483.69m

£55,874.16m

Total for Contingent Labour and Consultancy

£36.07m

£10.18m

£7.60m

£10.27m

£16.36m

£16.44m

Percentage of Department Budget

0.06%

0.02%

0.01%

0.02%

0.03%

0.03%


The Department publishes data relating to the number of consultants and temporary agency staff each month. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

Temporary Agency staff are recruited in line with the Department’s policy, which states that ‘agency workers should be used when there is a need to cover a gap for a short period of up to a maximum of 12 weeks and/or when resources are required quickly.’

The Department publishes data relating to which part of the organisation consultants and temporary agency staff are engaged. Information relating to which directorate they are engaged with is not recorded. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

The Department does not record the equivalent Civil Service salary band for consultants and temporary staff.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the equivalent Civil Service salary band was of each (a) consultant and (b) temporary staff member employed within her Department in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the Department’s budget for each the financial year requested and the total figure spent on temporary agency staff and consultants. The table also shows the percentage of the budget spent on temporary agency staff and consultants.

FY 2010-11

FY 2011-12

FY 2012-13

FY 2013-14

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16 To Dec 2015

Department Total Budget

£58,242.15m

£56,407.12m

£57,956.19m

£57,094.72m

£59,483.69m

£55,874.16m

Total for Contingent Labour and Consultancy

£36.07m

£10.18m

£7.60m

£10.27m

£16.36m

£16.44m

Percentage of Department Budget

0.06%

0.02%

0.01%

0.02%

0.03%

0.03%


The Department publishes data relating to the number of consultants and temporary agency staff each month. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

Temporary Agency staff are recruited in line with the Department’s policy, which states that ‘agency workers should be used when there is a need to cover a gap for a short period of up to a maximum of 12 weeks and/or when resources are required quickly.’

The Department publishes data relating to which part of the organisation consultants and temporary agency staff are engaged. Information relating to which directorate they are engaged with is not recorded. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

The Department does not record the equivalent Civil Service salary band for consultants and temporary staff.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) consultants and (b) temporary staff her Department employed in each of the last five years; and what the length of contract was for each such person.

The table below shows the Department’s budget for each the financial year requested and the total figure spent on temporary agency staff and consultants. The table also shows the percentage of the budget spent on temporary agency staff and consultants.

FY 2010-11

FY 2011-12

FY 2012-13

FY 2013-14

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16 To Dec 2015

Department Total Budget

£58,242.15m

£56,407.12m

£57,956.19m

£57,094.72m

£59,483.69m

£55,874.16m

Total for Contingent Labour and Consultancy

£36.07m

£10.18m

£7.60m

£10.27m

£16.36m

£16.44m

Percentage of Department Budget

0.06%

0.02%

0.01%

0.02%

0.03%

0.03%


The Department publishes data relating to the number of consultants and temporary agency staff each month. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

Temporary Agency staff are recruited in line with the Department’s policy, which states that ‘agency workers should be used when there is a need to cover a gap for a short period of up to a maximum of 12 weeks and/or when resources are required quickly.’

The Department publishes data relating to which part of the organisation consultants and temporary agency staff are engaged. Information relating to which directorate they are engaged with is not recorded. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

The Department does not record the equivalent Civil Service salary band for consultants and temporary staff.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in which directorates (a) consultants and (b) temporary staff employed by her Department worked in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the Department’s budget for each the financial year requested and the total figure spent on temporary agency staff and consultants. The table also shows the percentage of the budget spent on temporary agency staff and consultants.

FY 2010-11

FY 2011-12

FY 2012-13

FY 2013-14

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16 To Dec 2015

Department Total Budget

£58,242.15m

£56,407.12m

£57,956.19m

£57,094.72m

£59,483.69m

£55,874.16m

Total for Contingent Labour and Consultancy

£36.07m

£10.18m

£7.60m

£10.27m

£16.36m

£16.44m

Percentage of Department Budget

0.06%

0.02%

0.01%

0.02%

0.03%

0.03%


The Department publishes data relating to the number of consultants and temporary agency staff each month. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

Temporary Agency staff are recruited in line with the Department’s policy, which states that ‘agency workers should be used when there is a need to cover a gap for a short period of up to a maximum of 12 weeks and/or when resources are required quickly.’

The Department publishes data relating to which part of the organisation consultants and temporary agency staff are engaged. Information relating to which directorate they are engaged with is not recorded. This data has been published for 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16. The publication page for each of the years published can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-monthly-workforce-management-information

The Department does not record the equivalent Civil Service salary band for consultants and temporary staff.

13th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many requests her Department has received under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 for documents relating to the opening of (a) academies and (b) free schools; and how many of those requests it responded to within the 20 working day time limit.

Quarterly and annual statistics on Freedom of Information requests received by a number of central government monitored bodies (including all departments of state), including timeliness of reply, are published by the Ministry of Justice at:


https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-foi-statistics


The Department received 1,039 requests relating to academies and 666 relating to free schools between the first quarterly period of 2010 and third quarterly period of 2015. Of these, 854 and 470 respectively were answered within the 20 working day time limit.


The Department is not able to determine how many of these requests were related to the opening of particular schools without incurring disproportionate cost.

13th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has spent on lawyers in cases relating to the release of departmental documents under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 in each year since 2010.

Legal costs relating to Freedom of Information are not held centrally by the Department and the cost of determining these over the past five years would exceed the disproportionate limit. The costs of internal lawyers’ time are not held in such a way that they can be separately identified.


13th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment she has made of her Department's performance in adhering to the statutory time limit for responding to Freedom of Information requests.

The Secretary of State publishes statistics on the Department’s performance in responding to Freedom of Information (FOI) requests, including on timeliness. These can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-foi-statistics.

13th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many requests under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 that were initially refused by her Department were subsequently granted in each year since 2010.

Quarterly and annual statistics on Freedom of Information requests received by a number of central government monitored bodies (including all departments of state), including the number and outcomes of internal reviews of FOI responses, are published by the Cabinet Office at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-foi-statistics.


6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 3 December 2015 to Question 18680, for what reasons her Department does not hold information on (a) the number of academies in England that were in deficit and (b) the total deficit of those academies in each year since 2009-10.

The Department for Education does not hold this information in the form requested and it could be calculated only at disproportionate cost.

Academy trust accounts have only been consolidated into those of the department from 2012-13 (academic year 2011/12). Analysis of academy trusts in deficit before then would require reviewing individually each trust’s accounts.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Higher Education Funding Council for England plans to permit universities and higher education providers to re-offer a place to applicants for PGCE courses in 2016-17 if applicants with offers decide to withdraw their application or choose an alternative offer.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership is responsible for the management of initial teacher training places and national teacher recruitment.

Data on allocations to universities and higher education providers for 2015/16 can be found online in table A2b: www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-recruitment-controls


We have introduced a new system for postgraduate ITT recruitment for the 2016/17 academic year. Full information has been published on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-recruitment-controls

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many PGCE places were allocated to universities and higher education providers for entry in 2015-16; and what the planned allocation of such places is for entry in 2016-17.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership is responsible for the management of initial teacher training places and national teacher recruitment.

Data on allocations to universities and higher education providers for 2015/16 can be found online in table A2b: www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-recruitment-controls


We have introduced a new system for postgraduate ITT recruitment for the 2016/17 academic year. Full information has been published on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-itt-recruitment-controls

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many academies were in deficit in each year since 2009-10; and what the total deficit was in academies in each such year.

The Department does not hold this information in the form requested. Academies are operated by the legal entity of academy trusts, many of which operate multiple academies across multiple local authorities. As such, it is not possible to give local authority figures.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many academies in each local authority area were in deficit in each year since 2009-10; and what the total deficit was in academies in each such area in each of those years.

The Department does not hold this information in the form requested. Academies are operated by the legal entity of academy trusts, many of which operate multiple academies across multiple local authorities. As such, it is not possible to give local authority figures.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of classroom teachers earning £65,000 or more per year are women.

The data provided to the Department for Education by schools in the School Workforce Census, November 2014, shows that 72 per cent of classroom teachers earning £65,000 or more were women.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers or trainee teachers received each of the scholarship and bursaries for teacher training courses in each subject in each of the last four years.

Initial teacher training (ITT) bursaries of varying amounts are available to eligible trainees, depending on the academic year in which they undertake their ITT, the subject in which they are training to teach and their highest relevant academic award. The amounts and eligible subjects change each year based on assessment of need informed by the targets and past performance.


Scholarships are awarded to those trainees who have gone through an additional selection procedure over and above that of their chosen ITT provider. These were available in 2012/13 in physics, and from 2013/14 in chemistry, computing, maths and physics.


The table below shows a breakdown of the total number of trainees who have received training bursaries and scholarships (where relevant) over the last full four academic years, 2011/12, 2012/13, 20/13/14 and 2014/15.


Table 1: Summary of the number of trainees that received training bursaries or scholarships in academic years 2011/12, 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15


Academic year

Bursary

Scholarship

Total

2011/12

6348

0

6,348

2012/13

16759

87

16,846

2013/14

17434

201

17,635

2014/15

16359

422

16,781


26th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect on the academic performance of sixth form students of the use of unconditional offers of places by universities.

It is for individual higher education institutions to determine their own admission arrangements. No assessment has been made of the effect on the academic performance of sixth form students of the use of unconditional offers of places by universities.


2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department has provided to the Baker Dearing Trust in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement.

The Baker Dearing Educational Trust’s annual accounts are published each year. They show that the Baker Dearing Educational Trust has received grant funding to provide pre-approval support to groups that wish to apply to the Department to open a University Technical College as set out in the table below:

Calendar Year

Funding Received

2011

£151,923

2012

£150,095

2013

£153,458

2014

£213,191

Between 1 January 2015 and 30 September 2015, the department paid the Baker Dearing Educational Trust grant funding of £116,912. The Baker Dearing Educational Trust’s accounts for 2015 will be published in due course.

The first grant to the Baker Dearing Educational Trust in April 2011 was awarded directly to the trust. Subsequent grants have been awarded after a competitive tender process.

2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils (a) in each age group were enrolled at each university technical college (UTC) in the 2014-15 academic year and (b) were enrolled in each UTC in September 2015.

Figures for the number of pupils enrolled in each UTC by age group are available in the underlying data of the ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics: January 2015 statistics’, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2015


The figures for the numbers of pupils enrolled in each UTC for the academic year 2015/16 are not yet available.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the accessibility of the Sevenoaks Annex of Weald of Kent Grammar School to school-age people living in the community served by the original school.

Departmental advice for academies wishing to make a change to their existing arrangements is available on GOV.UK.

The new annexe will serve the same age range as the existing site of Weald of Kent Grammar School, which is 11-19. The admission arrangements apply across the whole school. It is the responsibility of the academy trust as the admission authority to ensure that admission arrangements are compliant with The School Admissions Code.

The newly expanded school will better meet the needs of school-age people in the community that it serves, with over 41% of students at the existing site already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) guidance she has provided and (b) information her Department holds on which age groups the Sevenoaks Annexe of Weald of Kent Grammar School, recently approved by her Department plans to serve.

Departmental advice for academies wishing to make a change to their existing arrangements is available on GOV.UK.

The new annexe will serve the same age range as the existing site of Weald of Kent Grammar School, which is 11-19. The admission arrangements apply across the whole school. It is the responsibility of the academy trust as the admission authority to ensure that admission arrangements are compliant with The School Admissions Code.

The newly expanded school will better meet the needs of school-age people in the community that it serves, with over 41% of students at the existing site already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.

28th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) guidance she provides and (b) information her Department holds on the admissions arrangements for the Sevenoaks Annexe of Weald of Kent Grammar School, recently approved by her Department.

Departmental advice for academies wishing to make a change to their existing arrangements is available on GOV.UK.

The new annexe will serve the same age range as the existing site of Weald of Kent Grammar School, which is 11-19. The admission arrangements apply across the whole school. It is the responsibility of the academy trust as the admission authority to ensure that admission arrangements are compliant with The School Admissions Code.

The newly expanded school will better meet the needs of school-age people in the community that it serves, with over 41% of students at the existing site already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to issue guidance about the next phase of A Level reform; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for Education is currently consulting on draft content for some of the GCSEs and A levels which will be first taught in September 2017. These are GCSEs in astronomy, business, economics, engineering, geology, psychology and sociology; and AS and A levels in environmental science, history of art, music technology and philosophy. The department is also consulting on content for GCSE, AS and A level in design and technology, for first teaching in September 2017. The results of these consultations will be announced later in the year.

GCSEs and A levels in other subjects are under development, for first teaching in September 2017, and there will be consultations in due course.

For all subjects, content documents have been drafted by awarding organisations, with advice from subject experts and oversight from the Department for Education and Ofqual.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how she plans to ensure that there are sufficient A Level and GCSE examination markers in 2016; and if she will make a statement.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its Chief Regulator, Glenys Stacey, to write to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House Library.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June to Question 3853, when the consultation on the future of community languages will be launched.

The Department for Education is currently in discussion with awarding organisations, Ofqual and others, including foreign embassies, to consider how best to maintain as wide a range of languages as possible at GCSE and A level. We are continuing to develop proposals to achieve this and will hold a more formal, public consultation in due course. I announced on 22 July 2015 that to avoid any gap in provision in certain languages we will, where necessary, extend the timetable for awarding organisations to continue with existing qualifications until September 2018.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the Government plans to issue guidance on progress of pupils with SEN.

The majority of pupils at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 with diagnosed special educational needs (SEN) have progress measured in the same way as all pupils – from their end of Key Stage 1 results to their end of Key Stage 2 results.

The Department for Education has announced an expert review of assessment for pupils who, for many reasons, are working below the standard of national curriculum tests. This group of pupils includes some children with SEN, who may be assessed by p-scales or who may be working above p-scales but below the standard of the tests.

The review will advise on the best way to assess the attainment and progress of these pupils. The department expects the group carrying out the review to publish its final report by December 2015.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what entry-level qualifications are available to students with special educational needs who are educated in a special school setting.

A list of entry level qualifications approved by the Secretary of State and other Ofqual regulated qualifications is published online at

http://register.ofqual.gov.uk/Qualification.

These are the qualifications that can be available to pupils under the age of 19 with special educational needs in maintained special schools, academies and free schools. Non-maintained special schools can offer a range of qualifications which are approved under section 98 of the 2000 Act. It is for the school to choose which of these qualifications are suitable to meet the needs of its particular pupils.

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department has provided to further education and sixth form colleges since 2010 to support them in tackling homophobic and transphobic bullying.

The Department for Education does not allocate monies to further education and sixth form colleges specifically to tackle homophobic and transphobic bullying. Institutions are expected to manage these issues as part of their duty of care to their students. They may use a portion of their revenue funding to do so as they see fit. However, the Department funds a range of other activities and initiatives, such as changes to teacher training, to confront this issue.

The Government has awarded £2million to eight charities in 2015/16 to provide specialist support and training for thousands of teachers to combat homophobic, transphobic and biphobic (HBT) bullying in primary and secondary schools. This is on top of £1.3 million given to various anti-bullying charities to combat all forms of bullying in schools. The Department also provided £4 million to charities to tackle bullying in schools in 2013-15.

29th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much (a) lamb, (b) beef, (c) pork and (d) poultry meat is purchased annually by schools and colleges for consumption; and what proportion of such meat is British in origin.

Schools and colleges are responsible for their meals services and how and where they choose to buy their produce. The Department for Education does not collect this information.

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on plans by awarding organisations to offer A levels in (a) Polish, (b) Gujarati, (c) Panjabi, (d) Bengali, (e) Turkish, (f) Urdu and (g) Modern Hebrew; and whether she plans to consult on the future availability of such qualifications in those subjects.

The department is aware of the awarding organisations’ plans to withdraw qualifications in particular languages, and is working with those organisations and Ofqual to consider how best to enable as wide a range of languages as possible to be maintained at GCSE and A level.

The government wants to see all pupils provided with the opportunity to take a core set of academic subjects, including modern foreign languages. The number of pupils entering for a modern language GCSE has increased by 20% since 2010. There are considerable benefits to learning a second language, and the government is keen to see the range of languages at GCSE and A level preserved. To this end, the Secretary of State has written to all the exam boards to express her concern about their decision to stop awarding qualifications in some languages. She has asked the awarding organisations to continue to work with Ofqual and will launch a consultation on how best to secure the future availability of these qualifications.

16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 June 2015 to Question 900313, if she will ensure that sixth form colleges are treated on the same basis as schools, academies, free schools and university technical colleges for the recovery of VAT.

Funding decisions will be considered in the round at the Spending Review.

9th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to ensure sixth form colleges are funded on the same basis as other post-16 providers.

The funding for all 16 to 19 pupils comes from the same funding formula, irrespective of whether the provision is a sixth form college, a further education college, a school, an academy or a free school.

There is no factor within the 16-19 funding formula that differentiates between type of institution.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions her Department has had with the awarding organisations on the number of people needed to mark A Level examinations in summer 2015; and if she will make a statement.

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have therefore asked its Chief Regulator, Glenys Stacey, to write directly to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2015 to Question 226295, what assessment her Department has made of the appropriateness of decisions taken by individual awarding organisations on the future of particular A levels; and what guidance she provided to those organisations on that issue.

In June 2014 Ofqual consulted on a set of proposals about how GCSE and A level subject availability should be determined from September 2017. The consultation can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/377804/2014-06-24-completing-gcse-as-and-a-level-reform.pdf

Ofqual’s consultation set out the proposed process for reform and principles it would use to determine if a subject is likely to lead to the development of the GCSE, AS and A level qualifications. Ofqual’s consultation states that exam boards are likely to take the opportunity to review their range of subjects.

Ofqual will announce in due course which A levels can be reformed for introduction in 2017.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many new (a) academies, (b) free schools, (c) university technical colleges and (d) new school sixth forms that are entitled to VAT reimbursements have been created in each year since 2010.

The Department for Education does not hold data on the value of the VAT reimbursed to new academies, free schools and university technical colleges, and has not made an estimate.

All new academies, free schools and university technical colleges are entitled to reimbursement of VAT incurred on their non-business expenditure, under section 22B of the VAT Act 1994. The numbers of each education body created in each year (and which are still open) since 2010 are:

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/2015 (up to 1 March 2015)

(a) academies including 16-19 academies

895

920

1059

927

579

(b) free schools

0

23

56

94

82

(c) university technical colleges

1

1

3

12

13

In addition, one new maintained school for 16 to 19 year old students opened in 2010/11 and is entitled to reimbursement of VAT.

18th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2015 to Question 225406, what estimate she has made of the value of the VAT reimbursed to new (a) academies, (b) free schools and (c) university technical colleges created since 2010.

The Department for Education does not hold data on the value of the VAT reimbursed to new academies, free schools and university technical colleges, and has not made an estimate.

All new academies, free schools and university technical colleges are entitled to reimbursement of VAT incurred on their non-business expenditure, under section 22B of the VAT Act 1994. The numbers of each education body created in each year (and which are still open) since 2010 are:

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/2015 (up to 1 March 2015)

(a) academies including 16-19 academies

895

920

1059

927

579

(b) free schools

0

23

56

94

82

(c) university technical colleges

1

1

3

12

13

In addition, one new maintained school for 16 to 19 year old students opened in 2010/11 and is entitled to reimbursement of VAT.

4th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to announce which A-levels will no longer be available in (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18.

Ofqual has already announced the A levels which will be withdrawn from September 2015. The list of subjects can be found here

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/381968/2014-12-02-completing-gcse-as-and-a-level-reform.pdf

Ofqual will announce the list of A levels that will no longer be available from September 2016 shortly.

In June 2014 Ofqual consulted on a set of proposals about how GCSE and A level subject availability should be determined from September 2017, and will announce its decisions shortly. Ofqual has been clear that any subject not reformed for first teaching in 2015 or 2016 must either be reformed for first teaching in 2017 or withdrawn.

27th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2015 to Question 225258, how many 16 to 18 year olds studied for BTEC qualifications at each level in (a) schools, (b) sixth form colleges and (c) further education colleges in each year from 2006-07 to 2011-12.

The number of 16 to 18 year olds entered for one or more BTEC qualifications between 2007/08 and 2011/12 is shown in the tables below, by level and institution type. The analysis is based on data collected by the Department from examination awarding organisations. Figures for 2006/07 are not readily available.

Entry Level

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Schools (state-funded, including special schools)

300

300

300

500

600

Sixth Form Colleges

100

100

100

200

200

FE Colleges

2,400

2,700

4,100

7,500

8,000

Level 1

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Schools (state-funded, including special schools)

1,000

900

1,100

1,900

3,100

Sixth Form Colleges

1,100

1,000

1,000

1,100

1,000

FE Colleges

12,900

14,900

19,500

29,100

30,900

Level 2

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Schools (state-funded, including special schools)

13,400

14,700

16,000

17,200

16,900

Sixth Form Colleges

5,500

6,000

6,600

8,900

7,600

FE Colleges

40,200

47,500

54,700

61,300

61,800

Level 3

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Schools (state-funded, including special schools)

8,300

13,300

20,300

31,100

41,700

Sixth Form Colleges

7,400

9,900

12,400

17,100

20,700

FE Colleges

66,500

82,300

95,300

103,700

121,500

Note that where a learner was entered for BTECs at more than one level, the highest level has been shown in the table.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether sixth form colleges can apply for academy status; and if she will make a statement.

It would be legally possible for a sixth form college to become an academy, but the Department is not currently able to consider applications. This is because we have not yet been able to resolve difficult issues such as the cost of VAT and the handling of existing debts held by sixth form colleges. We are looking at these issues, but cannot promise to solve them.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many 16 to 18 year olds are studying for BTEC qualifications at each level in (a) schools, (b) sixth form colleges and (c) and further education colleges.

The number of 16 to 18 year olds entered for one or more BTEC qualifications in the 2012/13 academic year, the latest year of data available, is shown in the table below, by level and institution type. The analysis is based on data collected by the Department from examination awarding organisations.

Entry Level

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Schools (state-funded, including special schools)

400

2,800

15,300

51,200

Sixth Form Colleges

200

1,100

6,800

28,200

FE Colleges

5,500

28,700

55,600

141,600

Note that where a learner was entered for BTECs at more than one level, the highest level has been shown in the table.

2nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she will publish her Department's review of its asbestos in schools policy.

The Department for Education is working with stakeholders, experts and the Health and Safety Executive to thoroughly consider the latest evidence, and determine appropriate policy responses. We will provide an update on the management of asbestos in schools shortly.

16th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many complaints have been (a) made and (b) upheld about individual inspections in (i) early years provision, (ii) primary schools, (iii) secondary schools, (iv) sixth form colleges and (v) further education colleges in the last three academic years.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw. A copy of his reply will be placed in the library of the House.

2nd Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department provided to the A-level Content Advisory Board in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15.

The A-level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) was established by the Russell Group in 2013, to review the subject content for facilitating A levels. The Department for Education provided £100,360.61 to ALCAB in 2013-14, and has provided £361,034.53 in 2014-15. No funds for ALCAB have been included in expenditure plans for 2015-16.

ALCAB have made their final recommendations for A and AS level subject content in mathematics, further mathematics, modern languages, ancient languages, and geography. These new qualifications are designed to prepare young people to meet the demands of universities and employers. We will soon be publishing our response to ALCAB’s recommendations.

2nd Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether funding of the A-level Content Advisory Board is included in her Department's current expenditure plans for 2015-16.

The A-level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) was established by the Russell Group in 2013, to review the subject content for facilitating A levels. The Department for Education provided £100,360.61 to ALCAB in 2013-14, and has provided £361,034.53 in 2014-15. No funds for ALCAB have been included in expenditure plans for 2015-16.

ALCAB have made their final recommendations for A and AS level subject content in mathematics, further mathematics, modern languages, ancient languages, and geography. These new qualifications are designed to prepare young people to meet the demands of universities and employers. We will soon be publishing our response to ALCAB’s recommendations.

2nd Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the work of the A-level Content Advisory Board; and if she will publish any such assessments made.

The A-level Content Advisory Board (ALCAB) was established by the Russell Group in 2013, to review the subject content for facilitating A levels. The Department for Education provided £100,360.61 to ALCAB in 2013-14, and has provided £361,034.53 in 2014-15. No funds for ALCAB have been included in expenditure plans for 2015-16.

ALCAB have made their final recommendations for A and AS level subject content in mathematics, further mathematics, modern languages, ancient languages, and geography. These new qualifications are designed to prepare young people to meet the demands of universities and employers. We will soon be publishing our response to ALCAB’s recommendations.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, through what mechanism sixth form colleges will apply for capital funding from 2015-16; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for Education announced the new Condition Improvement Fund (CIF) on 16 October 2014. Sixth form colleges can apply to the CIF for capital funding to improve the condition of their buildings and expand them. Details of the fund and the guidance surrounding applications are published online at:

www.gov.uk/condition-improvement-fund

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria she uses when deciding to withdraw funding for a free school or university technical school which has opened since 2010.

The terms and conditions under which free schools and University Technical Colleges (UTCs) are funded are set out in a funding agreement between the Secretary of State and the school’s trust. A school’s funding agreement gives the Secretary of State a range of powers to intervene, including moving to close a school, if failure is identified. All free school and UTC funding agreements are available on the Department for Education's performance table website at http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/performance/

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places were distributed in the initial allocations for initial teacher training trainees to School Direct and HE providers in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13, (c) 2013-14, (d) 2014-15 and (e) 2015-16; and what the target number of trainees estimated by the National College of Teaching and Leadership, the National College for School Leadership and the Teaching Agency was in each of those years.

The data for initial teacher training (ITT) allocations for School Direct and HE providers over the last 5 years is shown in the table below:

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

HE providers

28,669

28,841

26,790

23,095

22,224

School Direct

0

772

9,586

15,254

17,609

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many trainee teachers were recruited in the initial allocations to School Direct in each subject to (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in each of the last four years.

The academic year 2013/14 was the first time School Direct information was available in the Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Census.[1] The information is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/initial-teacher-training-trainee-number-census-2013-to-2014

Information from the 2013/14 ITT Census shows that 6,580 new entrants were recruited to School Direct initial teacher training places. Of these, 2,890 (44%) were recruited to primary places (i.e. primary schools) and the remaining 3,690 (56%) to secondary schools.

The 2014/15 Census will be published on 27 November 2014.

[1] There was a small number of School Direct providers in the academic year 2012-13; however the data was aggregated for publication.

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places from the initial allocation were relinquished by School Direct in the 2013-14 admissions year.

In the 2013/14 academic year we allocated extra School Direct requests, as well as allowing relinquishments. The School Direct initial allocations were 9,441 and the final allocations 9,586, meaning the net change for School Direct was an extra 145 places allocated throughout the year.

The initial and final allocations for the 2014/15 academic year are both published on the NCTL/Gov.uk website:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-allocations-for-academic-year-2013-to-2014-final

The Department for Education does not hold information on relinquishments in the format requested. The National College for Teaching and Leadership plans to publish updated management information by the end of December 2014. This will include line by line initial and final allocations by school (and provider) by subject and will enable the calculation of relinquishments.

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places were allocated to School Direct for recruitment in the 2014-15 acacemic year.

The initial allocations for School Direct for the academic year were 15,254.

The initial allocations for the 2014/15 academic year were published in October 2013 and are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-allocations-for-academic-year-2014-to-2015

26th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will review whether the recent guidance, keeping children safe in education, distinguishes between legislation which applies to further education colleges as opposed to sixth form colleges; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Education's ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education' guidance is clear that it applies to children under the age of 18 in both further education and sixth-form colleges.

We are currently considering requests for clarification to the guidance as part of our implementation review.

12th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 8 April 2014, Official Report, column 205W, on the London Academy of Excellence, whether the enrolment data for 2013-14 for the London Academy of Excellence is now available; and if he will publish that data.

The London Academy of Excellence reported 395 pupils on roll in their Individual Learner Record return (R10) for 2013/14.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2014, Official Report, column 356W, on London Academy of Excellence, whether the enrolment data for 2013-14 for the London Academy of Excellence is now available; and if he will publish that data.

The London Academy of Excellence is the only 16-19 free school that provides data on its pupil numbers through the individualised learner record; this is the equivalent to the school's census return for further education institutions.

The enrolment numbers requested are not yet available. We are expecting to have them by the end of April.

The pupil numbers and funding covering all open academies and free schools for the academic year 2014/15 will be published in October. This will include the London Academy of Excellence.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which academy schools have been granted a relaxation or variation of the School Admissions Code; and what the nature of each such relaxation or variation is.

All academy schools' funding agreements require them to comply with admissions legislation and the school admissions code. The Secretary of State for Education, can agree different arrangements (‘derogations') for individual academies and free schools but would only do so in limited circumstances where it would benefit local children.

Derogations are contained within the admission annex of the relevant funding agreements published at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/performance/

All free schools are able to allocate places outside of local authority co-ordination in their first year; while all academy schools opened since 2012 can prioritise admissions for pupils eligible for the pupil and service premiums. We would also permit those opening before 2012 to change their funding agreements in order to give priority to such pupils.

Specific derogations have also been agreed for individual schools. As stated on the Department's website, where parents have worked hard to create a free school, we will consider requests to allow a limited number of founder's children in that school to get priority in admissions. We have permitted a small number of free schools to give priority to founder's children. These are detailed in the schools' funding agreements. Specific derogations are also in place for three academy schools set up under the previous administration, in Belvedere Academy (Liverpool) for a transitional period until 2015 to allow pupils on the roll of an independent school that used to be part of Belvedere to be admitted to the academy; in Priory LSST (Lincoln), to permit it to select 10% of its students by technology and in Ormiston Academy (Birmingham) to allow it – as a regional centre for the arts – to select the majority of its pupils by aptitude for the performing arts.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2014, Official Report, column 633W, on university technical colleges, if he will publish the information he plans to publish in June 2014 immediately.

The information previously requested will be published in the statistical first release ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics: January 2014', in June 2014.

This is in accordance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) 14, (b) 15, (c) 16, (d) 17 and (e) 18 year olds enrolled at each university technical college in 2013-14.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 18 November 2013, Official Report column 750W, for the number of pupils enrolled in university technical colleges in autumn 2013.

Breakdowns by age will be published in the Statistical First Release, ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics: January 2014', in June 2014.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools and academies have (a) opened a new sixth form and (b) closed their sixth form in each year since 2005.

The Department for Education does not collect the data in the format requested.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the cohort achieved an A* to C grade in (a) GCSE mathematics, (b) GCSE English and (c) GCSE English literature at the end of (i) Year 11, (ii) Year 12 and (iii) Year 13 in each of the last 10 years.

The following tables show the proportion of 15, 16 and 17 year-olds (based on academic age) who had achieved A*-C grade in GCSE English and GCSE mathematics for the last 10 years. The figures cover young people who were in the state sector at academic age 15. Academic age refers to the age at the start of the academic year, so the majority of young people of academic age 15 will be in year 11. The data source used for this analysis does not differentiate between English Literature and English Language so may include those that have A*-C in either subject.

Tables that show key stage 4 results for English and English Literature are available here: http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/gcse-and-equivalent-results-in-england-2012-to-2013-revised

Proportion achieving A*-C grade in GCSE English by academic age and cohort

Academic age

Cohort academic age 15 in

15

16

17

2001/02

53%

55%

56%

2002/03

54%

56%

56%

2003/04

54%

56%

57%

2004/05

56%

58%

59%

2005/06

57%

59%

60%

2006/07

58%

60%

61%

2007/08

59%

62%

63%

2008/09

61%

64%

65%

2009/10

66%

68%

69%

2010/11

69%

70%

71%

Source: DfE Young Person's Matched Administrative Dataset.

Proportion achieving A*-C grade in GCSE mathematics by academic age and cohort

Academic age

Cohort academic age 15 in

15

16

17

2001/02

47%

48%

49%

2002/03

46%

48%

48%

2003/04

47%

49%

50%

2004/05

50%

52%

52%

2005/06

51%

54%

54%

2006/07

53%

56%

56%

2007/08

56%

58%

59%

2008/09

58%

61%

62%

2009/10

62%

64%

65%

2010/11

65%

67%

67%

Source: DfE Young Person's Matched Administrative Dataset.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Statement of 13 March 2014 by the Minister for Schools, Official Report, columns 927-29, how much of the £350 million announced for the fair funding proposals will be allocated from the Exchequer in addition to that already indicated in his Department's budget.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Cardiff West on 24 March, Official Report column 84W.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to improve consumer education on using compostable packaging.

The Government recognises that innovation into biodegradable and compostable packaging could help reduce the environmental impacts of packaging if it is disposed of in the right way. However, currently this is often not the case. If biodegradable packaging is put in the domestic waste bin, for example, it is likely to end up in landfill and can break down to release powerful greenhouse gases, such as methane. If biodegradable plastic is mistakenly recycled with other plastics, it has the potential to damage the quality of the new products made from the recycled plastic.

As a consequence of these concerns, the Government published a call for evidence in July 2019 to help consider the development of standards or certification criteria for all bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. As we develop our proposals to reform the packaging producer responsibility system we will consider the role of composting, informed by the outputs of this work.

Building on commitments in the Resources and Waste Strategy we launched a consultation earlier this year on reforming the packaging producer responsibility system, which proposed a mandatory UK-wide labelling system that provides clear information to help people to recycle. Defra officials are exploring how a mandatory labelling scheme can address consumer confusion about what to do with compostable packaging. We will take primary powers in the Environment Bill to enable us to implement a mandatory labelling scheme. The consultation closed on 13 May and the summary of responses and next steps can be found via the below link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/packaging-waste-changing-the-uk-producer-responsibility-system-for-packaging-waste

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 2 October 2019 to Question 290327 and to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 290324, if she will introduce the same policy as the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and switch to an electricity provider that supplies electricity solely from renewable resources within the next 12 months; and for what reason her Department has not already ensured its electricity is supplied solely from renewable resources.

In response to PQ290397 Defra Group already procures 88% of the energy used in 2018/19 from renewable sources. In the core Department this rises to 99.9%. The Core Department’s energy policy states it will purchase renewable electricity from the Crown Commercial Services Electricity Frameworks.

The only reason the Core Department utilises non-renewable electricity is where the landlord purchases the electricity for a leased site and then recharges the Core Department.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make it her policy to (a) introduce and (b) enforce of European standards for compostable packaging in the UK.

The Government recognises that innovation into biodegradable and compostable packaging could help reduce the environmental impacts of packaging if it is disposed of in the right way. However, currently this is often not the case. If biodegradable packaging is put in the domestic waste bin, for example, it is likely to end up in landfill and can break down to release powerful greenhouse gases, such as methane. If biodegradable plastic is mistakenly recycled with other plastics, it has the potential to damage the quality of the new products made from the recycled plastic.

As a consequence of these concerns, the Government published a call for evidence in July 2019 to help consider the development of standards or certification criteria for all bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. As we develop our proposals to reform the packaging producer responsibility system we will consider the role of composting, informed by the outputs of this work.

Building on commitments in the Resources and Waste Strategy we launched a consultation earlier this year on reforming the packaging producer responsibility system, which proposed a mandatory UK-wide labelling system that provides clear information to help people to recycle. Defra officials are exploring how a mandatory labelling scheme can address consumer confusion about what to do with compostable packaging. We will take primary powers in the Environment Bill to enable us to implement a mandatory labelling scheme. The consultation closed on 13 May and the summary of responses and next steps can be found via the below link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/packaging-waste-changing-the-uk-producer-responsibility-system-for-packaging-waste

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to reform the producer responsibility system for packaging to make composting recognised as a form of recycling.

The Government recognises that innovation into biodegradable and compostable packaging could help reduce the environmental impacts of packaging if it is disposed of in the right way. However, currently this is often not the case. If biodegradable packaging is put in the domestic waste bin, for example, it is likely to end up in landfill and can break down to release powerful greenhouse gases, such as methane. If biodegradable plastic is mistakenly recycled with other plastics, it has the potential to damage the quality of the new products made from the recycled plastic.

As a consequence of these concerns, the Government published a call for evidence in July 2019 to help consider the development of standards or certification criteria for all bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. As we develop our proposals to reform the packaging producer responsibility system we will consider the role of composting, informed by the outputs of this work.

Building on commitments in the Resources and Waste Strategy we launched a consultation earlier this year on reforming the packaging producer responsibility system, which proposed a mandatory UK-wide labelling system that provides clear information to help people to recycle. Defra officials are exploring how a mandatory labelling scheme can address consumer confusion about what to do with compostable packaging. We will take primary powers in the Environment Bill to enable us to implement a mandatory labelling scheme. The consultation closed on 13 May and the summary of responses and next steps can be found via the below link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/packaging-waste-changing-the-uk-producer-responsibility-system-for-packaging-waste

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits for (a) reducing littering and (b) increasing recycling rates by (i) banning food producers from using using the term biodegradable on food packaging and (ii) introducing a standard definition of the term with respect to the time-frame in which products must fully decompose.

The Resources and Waste Strategy analysed the challenges currently facing the recycling industry in this country, setting out how we would tackle these challenges. Building on commitments in the Strategy we launched a consultation earlier this year on reforming the packaging producer responsibility system, as part of that consultation the Government proposed a mandatory UK-wide labelling system that provides clear information to help people to recycle. Following strong support for the proposal from consultation respondents, the Government is minded to take forward a mandatory labelling scheme subject to further analysis and legal considerations. Defra officials are exploring how a mandatory labelling scheme can address consumer confusion about what to do with compostable packaging. The consultation closed on 13 May and the summary of responses and next steps can be found via the below link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/packaging-waste-changing-the-uk-producer-responsibility-system-for-packaging-waste

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable and biodegradable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastics if they are disposed of in the right way. However, this is often not the case. If these plastics are put in the domestic waste bin, for example, they are likely to end up in landfill and can break down to release powerful greenhouse gases, such as methane. If mistakenly recycled with other plastics, they have the potential to damage the quality of the new products made from the recycled plastic. Furthermore, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biodegradable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

As a consequence of these concerns, the Government published a call for evidence in July 2019 to help consider the development of standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. The call for evidence closed on the 14 October 2019 and we are currently analysing the responses received to inform future policy. We currently do not have plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the matter of requiring any form of plastic packaging to be compostable.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require that specific packaging items must be compostable; and whether she has any plans to do so.

The Resources and Waste Strategy analysed the challenges currently facing the recycling industry in this country, setting out how we would tackle these challenges. Building on commitments in the Strategy we launched a consultation earlier this year on reforming the packaging producer responsibility system, as part of that consultation the Government proposed a mandatory UK-wide labelling system that provides clear information to help people to recycle. Following strong support for the proposal from consultation respondents, the Government is minded to take forward a mandatory labelling scheme subject to further analysis and legal considerations. Defra officials are exploring how a mandatory labelling scheme can address consumer confusion about what to do with compostable packaging. The consultation closed on 13 May and the summary of responses and next steps can be found via the below link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/packaging-waste-changing-the-uk-producer-responsibility-system-for-packaging-waste

The Government recognises that innovation into compostable and biodegradable plastics could help reduce the environmental impacts of plastics if they are disposed of in the right way. However, this is often not the case. If these plastics are put in the domestic waste bin, for example, they are likely to end up in landfill and can break down to release powerful greenhouse gases, such as methane. If mistakenly recycled with other plastics, they have the potential to damage the quality of the new products made from the recycled plastic. Furthermore, concerns persist that plastics which are claimed to be biodegradable, if littered or otherwise released into the environment in an uncontrolled way, may not degrade quickly or at all, and they can only be composted if they meet relevant standards.

As a consequence of these concerns, the Government published a call for evidence in July 2019 to help consider the development of standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics as well as to better understand their effects on the environment and our current waste system. The call for evidence closed on the 14 October 2019 and we are currently analysing the responses received to inform future policy. We currently do not have plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the matter of requiring any form of plastic packaging to be compostable.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 22 May 2019 to Question 254811 on Electronic Training Aids, when the Government plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ban the use of electronic shock collars.

Defra continues to work up the necessary legislation needed to prohibit the use of remote controlled hand-held electronic training collars for dogs which will be laid before Parliament in due course.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate her Department has made of the number of invasive insect species in the UK as a result of the removal of compulsory tick treatment for pets at UK border; and whether there are any plans to reintroduce the tick treatment policy.

We do not hold the data requested for the number of invasive insect species in the UK as a result of the removal of compulsory tick treatment for pets at the UK border.

Tick surveillance has shown that tick distribution and abundance is changing throughout the UK for many reasons, including habitat and climate change. Small numbers of localised infestations with non-native tick species have been reported in recent years, and imported rescue dogs have been demonstrated to be a higher risk for carrying ticks or being infected with tick-borne diseases. For these reasons, Defra strongly encourages pet owners to treat their pets to safeguard their animals against ticks and tick transmitted diseases when travelling abroad. Further advice can be obtained from their local vet, and via the Public Health England (PHE) leaflet available on GOV.UK.

Whilst Defra has no immediate plans to amend the tick controls for pet animals entering the United Kingdom, we remain concerned about the threat of ticks and tick-borne disease. As such, a risk assessment is being planned to guide future policy and Defra continues to monitor the disease situation through the Tick Surveillance Scheme.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to (a) understand and (b) mitigate the risks to the food security of the UK population due to global climate change.

The second Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) published in 2017 identifies risks to domestic and international food production and trade as one of the UK’s top six risks from climate change. The second National Adaptation Programme (NAP) published in 2018, sets out a plan of actions across Government to address these risks (amongst others identified in the CCRA) over the following 5 years. Specifically the NAP includes actions to ensure a food supply chain which is resilient to the effects of a changing climate.

As part of the action referenced above, we are reviewing the UK Food Security Assessment, a comprehensive analysis of UK food security in a global context. It was last published as a whole document in 2010 although the underpinning statistics are updated and monitored on a regular basis. The Assessment has six themes: Global Food Security; Global Resource Sustainability; UK Availability and Access; UK Supply Chain Resilience; Household Food Security; Consumer Safety and Confidence.

The Government has also commissioned an independent review to develop recommendations to help shape a national food strategy. The National Food Strategy will carry out an integrated analysis of our food system, looking across the issues of food security, climate change and health to develop a series of recommendations for Government.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the biggest risk is to the UK's food security in the (a) short, (b) medium and (c) long-term.

Food is one of the 13 Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) Sectors in the UK. Defra and the Food Standards Agency (FSA) have joint responsibility for food as CNI. Defra is responsible for security of supply, and the FSA for food safety and food crime. Food supply is a devolved issue. Defra produces a Sector Security and Resilience Plan (SSRP) which is updated annually and a summary is publicly available.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786206/20190215_PublicSummaryOfSectorSecurityAndResiliencePlans2018.pdf

This document sets out the risk landscape through identifying the main risks to the sector as described in the National Security Risk Assessment (NSRA). and how these are managed. The UK food sector has a highly effective and resilient food supply chain, owing to the size, geographic diversity and competitive nature of the industry. While there are no individually critical food assets, the main risks arise from recognised dependencies on other critical services such as fuel, energy, transport and data communications.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential effect on (a) wheat and (b) dairy farmers of the UK leaving the EU without a deal; and what assessment she has made of the level of the UK's reliance on imported bioethanol.

We have been meeting regularly with the food and farming sectors across the UK to understand and anticipate the potential impacts of a no deal scenario on our agri-food industry. The UK is a net importer of dairy but there are specific products of which we are net exporters. These may face tariff and non-tariff barriers to future EU export, and this will have a larger impact on Northern Ireland where they are heavily reliant on the Irish market. For wheat, for the last few years the UK has been a net importer, but it’s likely that this harvest will see us becoming a net exporter. MFN tariffs on wheat into the EU are extremely high, however, there is an underutilised tariff rate quota.

We currently import around 2/3rds of our bioethanol, mainly from the EU. The UK alcohol industry, particularly gin and vodka, is reliant on EU bioethanol. Bioethanol is also a vital processing aid in the production of food flavourings and colourings, household and industrial cleaners, toiletries, cosmetics and medicinal agents. Ethanol is a globally traded commodity and we do not anticipate any shortages as a result of our exit from the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which provider supplies energy to her Department; how much CO2 was emitted through her Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria her Department uses to select an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps her Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

The Defra Group publishes its annual carbon footprint in its annual report and account. The latest version is published here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/818863/defra-annual-report-2018-2019-web.pdf

This report provides an overview of Defra group performance against the GGC targets.

Defra Group emitted 61,128 tonnes CO2e in 2018/19.

We are mandated to use Crown Commercial Services Frameworks when it comes to selecting our energy suppliers. These are EDF, British Gas Business for electricity and Corona for Gas.

We are unable to comment on the selection criteria used in awarding these supplier a place on these frameworks.

88% of the electricity Defra Group purchases comes from renewable sources from these suppliers.

We have reduced our carbon emissions by 48.8% since 2010, through investments in energy saving technology across the group by retrofitting:

  • LED lighting,
  • updated building management systems,
  • biomass boilers,
  • energy efficient boilers,
  • solar photovoltaics
  • and wind turbines.

We are looking to continue this investment through our SR19/SR20 bids in sustainable technology.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential effect on (a) wheat and (b) dairy farmers of the UK leaving the EU without a deal; and what assessment she has made of the UK's reliance on imported bioethanol.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2019 to Question 270365, for what reasons his Department has not signed the UK Steel Charter.

As a customer of this country’s steel sector, Defra is already taking action to level the playing field for UK steel producers when competing for central Government contracts. Our commercial activities comply with current Government policy on steel procurement as set out in Cabinet Office guidance, Procurement Policy Note 11/16.

We can confirm that Defra, like the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, is happy to commit to supporting the Charter where it is relevant to our commercial activities and where consistent with the relevant regulations.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will sign his Department up to the UK Steel charter.

Andrew Stephenson MP, Parliamentary Undersecretary of State at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, wrote to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 29 May to ask my Department to sign the Steel Charter.

27th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has had discussions with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the UK Steel charter.

Andrew Stephenson MP, Parliamentary Undersecretary of State at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, wrote to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 29 May to ask my Department to sign the Steel Charter.

15th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 13 May 2019 to Question 249947, whether the Government has plans to bring forward legislation to ban the use of electronic shock collars by mid-July.

The necessary legislation needed to prohibit the use of remote controlled hand-held electronic training collars for dogs, will be laid before Parliament in due course. Timings for this legislation will be announced in the normal way.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department plans to bring forward legislation to ban the use of electronic shock collars.

The Government will introduce the necessary legislation in due course.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 March 2019 to Question 226666 on Air Pollution: Scunthorpe, if he will provide that same information for Scunthorpe in the North Lincolnshire local authority area.

Scunthorpe is in North Lincolnshire local authority area. The Council reported in its 2018 Air Quality Annual Status Report (ASR) that their PM2.5 monitors did not record a breach of the statutory limit value, which is 25 micrograms per metre cubed. The council also stated that they are running campaigns to discourage waste burning and bonfires to address PM2.5, and carrying out environmental permit improvement programmes.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
27th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to protect outdoor workers from ambient air pollution in Scunthorpe; which locations have been found to have fine-particle air pollution levels that exceed the WHO limit of 10 micrograms per cubic metre in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Local authorities are required to work towards reducing emissions of PM2.5. North East Lincolnshire Council reported in its 2018 Air Quality Annual Status Report (ASR) that their PM2.5 monitors did not record a breach of the statutory limit value, which is 25 micrograms per metre cubed.

The council also stated that it is running campaigns to discourage waste burning and bonfires, and implementing environmental permit improvement programmes to address PM2.5. In 2018 Defra awarded North East Lincolnshire Council grant funding to help reduce emissions of PM2.5 resulting from the use of domestic wood burning stoves.

With specific regard to Scunthorpe, a recent report published on the Government’s UK Air website detailed the extensive measures undertaken to reduce the impacts from the steelworks in the area (particularly aimed at reducing concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene and the impact of PM2.5). The report can be found here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/bap-nickel-measures/bap_yorkshireandhumberside_UK0034_reportonmeasures_2016.pdf

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to support the UK beet sugar industry after the UK leaves the EU.

The Secretary of State recently met representatives of sugar beet growers. The Secretary of State and I have also both discussed the sector with Associated British Foods, of which British Sugar is a subsidiary. Over the next few months Defra Ministers will continue to visit the British countryside and working farms to hear the views of industry and the public first hand. We want to support farmers to grow more, sell more and export more great British food. We have a once in a generation opportunity to transform our food and farming policies and improve our environment and it is vital we are all part of this process.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with UK beet sugar farmers on the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the UK beet sugar industry.

The Secretary of State recently met representatives of sugar beet growers. The Secretary of State and I have also both discussed the sector with Associated British Foods, of which British Sugar is a subsidiary. Over the next few months Defra Ministers will continue to visit the British countryside and working farms to hear the views of industry and the public first hand. We want to support farmers to grow more, sell more and export more great British food. We have a once in a generation opportunity to transform our food and farming policies and improve our environment and it is vital we are all part of this process.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to support the interests of British food producers in the negotiations on the UK leaving the EU.

The Government is working with leaders from across the food chain to understand the best way to support British food producers in the ongoing negotiations. Engagement has been focused on listening to our stakeholders to get a clear understanding of the processes and systems they currently use, to understand their concerns and what they see as the opportunities arising from leaving the EU.

It is a key priority to ensure that the views of all industry are represented in the ongoing negotiations, and it is our intention to further this engagement as the negotiations continue.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the economic contribution of the British sugar beet industry to the East of England.

We have estimated that in 2016 the Eastern region produced sugar beet with a value of £100 million. This is based on regional farm statistics which are published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/agriculture-in-the-english-regions.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 9980, on iron and steel: procurement, what progress his Department has made on delivering greater UK steel content in line with the public procurement guidelines published by the Government in April 2016.

The amount of steel procured by the Department continues to be negligible as was advised in PQ 50636 (October 2016) and PQ 60074 (January 2017).

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health on the effect of the linear programming model used to develop the Eatwell Guide on the dairy and milk industry.

We meet regularly at Ministerial and official level with representatives of the industry to discuss key issues and opportunities for the UK dairy sector.

I am aware of concerns regarding recommendations on the consumption of dairy products in the Eatwell Guide produced by Public Health England (PHE) in March 2016. PHE has prepared a report detailing the approaches, methods and decisions made in developing the Eatwell Guide. The report “From Plate to Guide: What, why and how for the Eatwell model” is available on the PHE website.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations she has received on the Eatwell Guide since March 2016.

We meet regularly at Ministerial and official level with representatives of the industry to discuss key issues and opportunities for the UK dairy sector.

I am aware of concerns regarding recommendations on the consumption of dairy products in the Eatwell Guide produced by Public Health England (PHE) in March 2016. PHE has prepared a report detailing the approaches, methods and decisions made in developing the Eatwell Guide. The report “From Plate to Guide: What, why and how for the Eatwell model” is available on the PHE website.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effect of the Eatwell Guide, published in March 2016, on the milk and dairy industry.

We meet regularly at Ministerial and official level with representatives of the industry to discuss key issues and opportunities for the UK dairy sector.

I am aware of concerns regarding recommendations on the consumption of dairy products in the Eatwell Guide produced by Public Health England (PHE) in March 2016. PHE has prepared a report detailing the approaches, methods and decisions made in developing the Eatwell Guide. The report “From Plate to Guide: What, why and how for the Eatwell model” is available on the PHE website.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timetable is for publication of her Department's proposed consultation on Proposals to regulate generators with high NOx emissions; and if she will make a statement.

The consultation on reducing emissions from Medium Combustion Plants and Generators to improve air quality was published on 16 November this year and runs for 12 weeks. The proposals can be found on the GOV.UK web pages.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will estimate the proportion of Countryside Stewardship schemes that will be signed-off before the Autumn Statement.

The application deadline for Countryside Stewardship multi-annual agreements is 30 September. Natural England will be looking to make offers to all successful applicants before the Autumn Statement.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has for a further round of Countryside Stewardship schemes in (a) January 2018 and (b) other years.

On the 13 August, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that any agri-environment agreements signed or with funding agreements in place before the Autumn Statement will be fully funded, even when those agreements continue beyond the UK’s departure from the EU.

The Government will make a further announcement before the Autumn Statement about arrangements for assessing how guarantees could be given to projects that might be signed after the Autumn Statement, but while we remain a member of the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to improve air quality on streets near schools.

Since 2011 we have committed over £2 billion to increase the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles, green transport initiatives and supporting Local Authorities to take action. The UK air quality plan for reducing nitrogen dioxide emissions, published on 17 December last year, sets out a comprehensive approach that will reduce health impacts and meet our environmental and legal obligations.

Local Authorities are responsible for reviewing and assessing air quality under the Local Air Quality Management system. There are many schools located in local Air Quality Management Areas and Local Authorities are responsible for mitigation of pollution in these areas. Where new schools are planned in polluted areas, Local Authorities can require an assessment of pollutant levels and measures to be included to reduce the impact of pollution levels as planning conditions.

Local Authorities are key to achieving improvements in air quality and we are taking a number of steps to support them. Defra’s Air Quality Grant Programme, the Department for Transport’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund and the Clean Vehicle Technology Fund are some of the resources available to Local Authorities to take action.

24th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, which provider supplies energy to his Department; how much CO2 was emitted through his Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria his Department uses to selecting an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps his Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

DExEU is located across a number of buildings run by other government departments. We are not therefore responsible for the provision of energy to our buildings, or the tracking of the amount of energy used. DExEU continues to work with the Government Property Agency on the management of these arrangements, and in doing so ensuring that we play our part in working to the Government Greening Commitments.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that workers undertaking fixed-term work have their rights maintained following the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Once we leave the EU we will no longer be bound by EU law but will be able to raise employment standards where it is right for the UK. The EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 ensures that the rights and protections that workers in the UK currently enjoy will be retained when the UK leaves the EU. This applies to all workers, including fixed-term workers.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what progress he has made on ensuring reciprocal mobility agreements between the UK and the EU for people in the music industry that require short-term visas after the UK leaves the EU.

In the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal, UK nationals undertaking paid work, including in the music industry, in the EU should check with the Embassy of the countries they plan to travel to for what kind of visa or permit, if any, they will need. The FCO provides advice on their country-specific travel pages online. Information about entry requirements for those intending to work or provide a service in an EU Member State is listed on our advice pages for UK businesses on gov.uk.

The Political Declaration agreed between the UK and the EU acknowledges the importance of mobility for cultural cooperation. The UK has proposed reciprocal mobility arrangements with the EU that support businesses to provide services and move their talented people. We also want to discuss how to facilitate the temporary mobility of self-employed professionals and employees providing services. The detail of our reciprocal mobility arrangements will be discussed in the next phase of negotiations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment his department has made of (a) the implications for his policies of the WHO report entitled Global Tuberculosis Report 2019 and (b) the potential effect of a new TB vaccine on achieving the (i) SDG target of ending the TB epidemic by 2030 and (ii) WHO End TB Strategy of reducing TB deaths by 95% and cutting new cases of TB by 90% between 2015 and 2035.

The Global Tuberculosis Report 2019 provides important evidence on the challenge in tackling tuberculosis as an issue of global public health importance. We remain committed to the global effort and the World Health Organisation End Tuberculosis Strategy. We are proud to be at the forefront of work to prevent, detect and treat tuberculosis, including funding research to develop new treatments to tackle drug resistant tuberculosis. Our commitment to provide £1.4 billion to the latest replenishment of the Global Fund will help provide tuberculosis treatment and care for over 2 million people.

A new tuberculosis vaccine could potentially have a significant effect on reducing tuberculosis deaths, and there is cautious optimism about the results for one potential vaccine, although there is still a very high degree of uncertainty for this high-risk research. DFID carefully considers robust data on specific vaccines before taking a view on its role in tackling a disease, including its relative impact alongside other established interventions.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 290329 on Department for International Development: Energy Supply and to the Answer on 1 October 2019 to Question 290324 on Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Energy Supply, if he will introduce the same policy as the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and switch to an electricity provider that supplies electricity solely from renewable resources within the next 12 months; and for what reason his Department has not already ensured its electricity is supplied solely from renewable resources.

DFID’s UK estate comprises two joint-headquarters, 22 Whitehall in London and Abercrombie House in Glasgow. DFID’s current energy supplier for both offices are EDF Energy for electricity. DFID’s energy is contracted via the Cabinet Office’s Crown Commercial Service Framework. DFID intends to take advantage of renewable energy options under the new Crown Commercial Service Framework when putting in place new energy supply arrangements. As highlighted in DFID’s 2018-19 Annual Report and Accounts (link), DFID has a strong record of improving environmental performance and is working towards meeting the Greening Government Commitment targets (link) in the UK by end of financial year 2019-20.

24th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, which provider supplies energy to his Department; how much CO2 was emitted through his Department’s energy consumption in the latest period for which figures are available; whether the criteria his Department uses to selecting an energy supplier includes how environmentally friendly the supplier is; and what recent steps his Department has taken to reduce CO2 emissions from its energy use.

DFID’s UK estate comprises two joint-headquarters, 22 Whitehall in London and Abercrombie House in Glasgow. DFID’s current energy suppliers for both offices are EDF Energy for electricity and Corona for gas. DFID’s energy providers are selected through Crown Commercial Service (CCS) central Government frameworks, ensuring value for money and sustainability.

In 2018-19, DFID’s UK estate produced 1,396 tonnes CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) from energy consumption, as detailed in DFID’s 2018-19 Annual Report and Accounts. DFID’s greenhouse gas emissions in the UK estate have fallen by 63% since 2009-10. DFID is on track to exceed the Greening Government Commitment (GGC) target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by end of financial year 2019-20, compared to our 2009-10 baseline.

Reductions in energy consumption have been achieved through various initiatives including; introducing a green roof and biomass boiler in Abercrombie House, improving the insulation in Abercrombie House, installing Automated Meter Reading equipment to help identify energy saving opportunities and increasing staff awareness and engagement through campaigns. DFID participates in the Government’s mandatory CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme to offset greenhouse gas emissions produced by our UK estate.

DFID is committed to the Government’s 25 Year Environmental Plan. We continue to look for ways to improve our internal efficiencies in line with our wider commitments on climate change and our ambition to achieve the Global Goals by 2030.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if he will make it his Department's policy to sign up to the UK Steel Charter.

DFID provides technical assistance and commodities to meet humanitarian needs or extend basic services in developing countries. All DFID contracts are tendered in accordance with the EU Public Procurement Directive and the UK Public Procurement Regulations 2015, the focus of which is to ensure open and fair competition between bidders. This means our contracts are competitively tendered following a set of standard processes set out in the regulations These regulations establish what we can do as a public sector organisation and our processes also ensure that our due diligence of suppliers is comprehensive and rigorous.

This competitive approach helps ensure value for money in the delivery of UK aid. British companies have continued to be very successful in this competitive market with UK firms winning 80% of our contracts in 2018/19.

1st Jul 2019
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