Baroness Burt of Solihull Portrait

Baroness Burt of Solihull

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Draft Domestic Abuse Bill (Joint)
6th Mar 2019 - 14th Jun 2019
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Equalities)
28th Oct 2016 - 12th Oct 2017
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Business, Innovation and Skills)
10th Nov 2015 - 28th Oct 2016
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
4th Nov 2014 - 8th May 2015
Draft Voting Eligibility (Prisoners) Bill
4th Mar 2013 - 16th Dec 2013
Chair of the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Party
25th Oct 2007 - 1st Nov 2012
Regulatory Reform
2nd May 2006 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Spokesperson (Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform)
3rd Aug 2006 - 20th Dec 2007
Opposition Whip (Commons)
10th May 2005 - 3rd Aug 2006
Shadow Spokesperson (Northern Ireland)
10th May 2005 - 3rd Aug 2006
Treasury Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 24th Apr 2006


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Tuesday 12th July 2022
International Development Strategy: Volunteering
My Lords, we all acknowledge the benefits of international volunteering to our country in terms of soft power, to the …
Written Answers
Monday 4th April 2022
National Probation Service for England and Wales
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many progression panels have been established in each National Probation Service division in each …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 14th June 2022
Education (Non-religious Philosophical Convictions) Bill [HL] 2022-23
A Bill to make provision to include non-religious philosophical convictions within the school curriculum; to require that persons who hold …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Burt of Solihull has voted in 282 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Burt of Solihull Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(32 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(70 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(28 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Baroness Burt of Solihull's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Burt of Solihull, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Burt of Solihull has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Burt of Solihull has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

5 Bills introduced by Baroness Burt of Solihull


A Bill to amend the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 to make provision regarding assemblies at state schools without a designated religious character in England; to repeal the requirement for those schools to hold collective worship; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision to include non-religious philosophical convictions within the school curriculum; to require that persons who hold non-religious philosophical convictions must be represented at standing advisory councils on religious education and at agreed syllabus conferences; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 14th June 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to introduce an entitlement to assemblies that further the spiritual, moral, social and cultural education of all pupils, regardless of religion or belief, at state schools without a designated religious character in England; to repeal the requirement for these schools to hold collective worship; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading
Thursday 23rd January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for the support of the United Kingdom’s business sector; and the development of an industrial and retail strategy.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Tuesday 14th June 2016

A Bill to ensure that ancillary pricing terms in personal financial services contracts can be assessed for fairness; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 30th June 2010

Baroness Burt of Solihull has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


24 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to put in place statutory paid leave for employees who are experiencing domestic abuse.

On 14 January 2021, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy published the report from its review into how victims of domestic abuse can be supported in the workplace. This report finds that, with the right support, employers can play a key role in helping to lift the lid on domestic abuse.

Throughout this review, we heard about the value of employers having a policy in place to support victims in their workforce. We encourage all employers to do this, and wherever possible, offer victims flexibility and leave should they need it to access support.

The report sets out the next steps for government, including a consultation on making flexible working the default, further consultation on the steps which can be taken for victims of domestic abuse, for example, how to exercise existing rights more effectively, and establishing a working group to develop practical solutions and encourage good practice across all employers.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to extend their financial support for businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic to small businesses that do not have their own premises.

A discretionary fund has been set up to accommodate eligible small businesses previously outside the scope of the business grant funds scheme. The Business Secretary and Minister for Regional Growth and Local Government spoke to local authorities in England on 1 May to set out that up to £617 million would be made available. This is in addition to the £12.33 billion funding previously announced for the Small Business Grants Fund (SBGF) and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund (RHLGF), meaning an amount of up to £617 million.

Government has introduced legislation helping tenants who are facing difficulties paying rent by implementing a pause on commercial forfeitures and we will review this. Government is urgently investigating what other support may be provided to commercial property owners as they seek to recover from the current crisis.

We have been working quickly to support the UK’s businesses and commercial real estate sector through the crisis. This has included support through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Coronavirus Corporate Financing Facility - support which is available to both tenants and landlords. The Small Business Grant Fund is designed for eligible small businesses with relatively high fixed costs and experiencing reduced trade as a result of social distancing and closures policies.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that pregnant employees do not suffer detriment at work, including dismissal or less favourable treatment, as a result of following public health guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Government is determined to ensure that pregnant women do not suffer detriment at work in any circumstances, including where they have followed public heath guidance.

The Coronavirus outbreak has not changed the law on pregnancy and maternity discrimination. There is no place for it under any circumstances. If a pregnant woman is dismissed or made redundant on the grounds of her pregnancy, this is automatically unfair dismissal.

Under Health and Safety legislation, it remains the employer’s responsibility to put in place arrangements to control health and safety risks. There are already specific requirements in place for pregnant workers and guidance from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) sets out the expectations around risk assessments, finding alternative work and medical suspension, where necessary.

In terms of new specific coronavirus interventions, HSE will consider taking a range of actions to improve control of workplace risks where it is clear an employer is not following Public Health England guidance properly (eg not taking appropriate action on social distancing or ensuring workers in the shielded category can follow advice to self-isolate). Government guidance on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme also makes it clear that pregnant women can be furloughed if they and their employer agree, and provided they meet the normal eligibility requirements.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that the excepted status for church charities will end in March 2031.

DCMS officials will work with the Charity Commission and representatives of the excepted church charities to develop a comprehensive plan to phase the excepted church charities onto the register of charities in a manageable way over the extension period, which will end in March 2031.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to removing the advancement of religion as a charitable purpose.

To be registered as a charity, institutions, including religious organisations in England and Wales, must meet the legal test for charitable status set out in the Charities Act 2011. This requires the institution to have a wholly charitable purpose for the benefit of the public. The advancement of religion has long been recognised as a charitable purpose.

The requirement for public benefit has to be demonstrated with evidence. Any benefits that the charity provides must be weighed against any detriment and harm. An example of activity by an organisation which would be considered as detrimental or harmful includes encouraging or promoting violence or hatred towards others, or unlawfully restricting a person’s freedom. An organisation’s public benefit will be affected where there is evidence of significant detriment or harm from what the organisation proposes to do, or practises, which outweigh the benefits of the organisation carrying out its aims.

The Charity Commission, as the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, is responsible for assessing if an institution meets the legal test for charitable status. The Charity Commission takes a robust approach to registration, demonstrated by the fact that it registered on average 60% of applications received in 2020-2021.

There are currently no plans to change the legal test for charitable status.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they intend to prevent religious organisations that promote misogyny from becoming registered charities.

To be registered as a charity, institutions, including religious organisations in England and Wales, must meet the legal test for charitable status set out in the Charities Act 2011. This requires the institution to have a wholly charitable purpose for the benefit of the public. The advancement of religion has long been recognised as a charitable purpose.

The requirement for public benefit has to be demonstrated with evidence. Any benefits that the charity provides must be weighed against any detriment and harm. An example of activity by an organisation which would be considered as detrimental or harmful includes encouraging or promoting violence or hatred towards others, or unlawfully restricting a person’s freedom. An organisation’s public benefit will be affected where there is evidence of significant detriment or harm from what the organisation proposes to do, or practises, which outweigh the benefits of the organisation carrying out its aims.

The Charity Commission, as the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, is responsible for assessing if an institution meets the legal test for charitable status. The Charity Commission takes a robust approach to registration, demonstrated by the fact that it registered on average 60% of applications received in 2020-2021.

There are currently no plans to change the legal test for charitable status.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to prevent religious organisations that promote intolerance and harmful messages from becoming registered charities.

To be registered as a charity, institutions, including religious organisations in England and Wales, must meet the legal test for charitable status set out in the Charities Act 2011. This requires the institution to have a wholly charitable purpose for the benefit of the public. The advancement of religion has long been recognised as a charitable purpose.

The requirement for public benefit has to be demonstrated with evidence. Any benefits that the charity provides must be weighed against any detriment and harm. An example of activity by an organisation which would be considered as detrimental or harmful includes encouraging or promoting violence or hatred towards others, or unlawfully restricting a person’s freedom. An organisation’s public benefit will be affected where there is evidence of significant detriment or harm from what the organisation proposes to do, or practises, which outweigh the benefits of the organisation carrying out its aims.

The Charity Commission, as the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, is responsible for assessing if an institution meets the legal test for charitable status. The Charity Commission takes a robust approach to registration, demonstrated by the fact that it registered on average 60% of applications received in 2020-2021.

There are currently no plans to change the legal test for charitable status.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish the outcome of the review of the School Admissions Code.

In 2020 the Government consulted on changes to the School Admissions Code (the Code) to improve the in year admission process for all children, including those fleeing domestic abuse, and to improve Fair Access Protocols, which act as a safety net for the most vulnerable children. The new Code and associated regulations were laid before Parliament on 13 May and, subject to Parliamentary procedure, they will come into force 1 September. On the same day, the Government published the response to the consultation which is available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-school-admissions-code--4.

The new Code ensures that unplaced children who are living in a refuge or other relevant accommodation will be eligible to be considered by a Fair Access Protocol, which exists to ensure that unplaced and vulnerable children are allocated a school place as quickly as possible. Relevant accommodation, for the purposes of the Code, means a safe place to stay for victims and their children fleeing domestic abuse. This can include, but is not limited to, refuges, specialist safe accommodation, sanctuary schemes and second stage accommodation.

24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take to ensure that the Fair Access Protocol under the School Admissions Code includes all children escaping domestic abuse, not only those in refuges.

In 2020 the Government consulted on changes to the School Admissions Code (the Code) to improve the in year admission process for all children, including those fleeing domestic abuse, and to improve Fair Access Protocols, which act as a safety net for the most vulnerable children. The new Code and associated regulations were laid before Parliament on 13 May and, subject to Parliamentary procedure, they will come into force 1 September. On the same day, the Government published the response to the consultation which is available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/changes-to-the-school-admissions-code--4.

The new Code ensures that unplaced children who are living in a refuge or other relevant accommodation will be eligible to be considered by a Fair Access Protocol, which exists to ensure that unplaced and vulnerable children are allocated a school place as quickly as possible. Relevant accommodation, for the purposes of the Code, means a safe place to stay for victims and their children fleeing domestic abuse. This can include, but is not limited to, refuges, specialist safe accommodation, sanctuary schemes and second stage accommodation.

15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential benefits of the Birmingham Airport Connectivity Scheme for the levelling up agenda.

This Government is committed to ensuring that transport and infrastructure investment levels up economies across the country. In examining the case for the Birmingham Airport Connectivity, as with all rail projects, it will be necessary to assess its contribution to the Government’s strategic priorities as part of the consideration of the business case for this proposal.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect a decision will be made on the Birmingham Airport Connectivity scheme, as part of the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline process.

The Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) for the North and Midlands is considering how best to deliver schemes such as HS2 Phase 2b, Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) and Midlands Engine Rail in the North and Midlands.

Birmingham Airport Connectivity project is part of the Midlands Engine Rail proposals and it will be appropriate to consider the case for this scheme when the Integrated Rail Plan concludes. We intend to publish the IRP this Spring.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the NHS England Domestic Abuse Action Plan will advise clinicians that they can request that previous NHS waiting times are taken into consideration when making referrals for (1) physical, and (2) mental, healthcare for children fleeing domestic abuse.

Existing NHS policy is clear that access to NHS treatment is based on clinical need. Clinicians are expected to consider trauma, such as domestic abuse. The individual circumstances of children and young people seeking help will form part of local clinical judgement.

Alongside this the Government is focused on addressing the pressures caused by the pandemic as a priority and we are working with the National Health Service to tackle long waiting lists and bear down on waiting times. At the Spending Review (SR) we invested £1 billion to kickstart elective recovery throughout 2021-22, incentivising providers to address backlogs and tackle long waiting lists.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether employees who cannot practically work because they are shielding themselves in line with the current public health guidance, or because of childcare commitments, can be furloughed. [T]

To be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, employees must have been on their employer’s PAYE payroll on or before 19 March 2020 and HMRC must have received an RTI submission notifying payment in respect of that employee on or before 19 March 2020. Employees who cannot work due to shielding or because of childcare commitments should speak to their employer about whether they plan to place staff on furlough. The grant will start on the day they were placed on furlough, and this can be backdated to 1 March 2020.

The Government recognises it is a challenge for parents to balance paid work and childcare while schools and nurseries are closed. Schools remain open for children of critical workers and the most vulnerable children, and the Government has put in place a national voucher scheme to provide free school meals for children while at home. Families who see a fall in earnings may become eligible for support through the welfare system, in particular Universal Credit (UC).

For shielding employees, if a firm chooses not to furlough shielding staff, they are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay as a statutory minimum, although many employers will pay more than that in occupational sick pay.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to providing ‘top up’ income support for employees who are unable to work their full hours due to childcare commitments arising from school and nursery closures.

The Government recognises it is a challenge for parents to balance paid work and childcare while schools and nurseries are closed. Schools remain open for children of key workers and the most vulnerable children, and the Government has put in place a national voucher scheme to provide free school meals for children while at home.

Families who see a fall in earnings may become eligible for support through the welfare system, including through Universal Credit (UC). Existing UC claimants are likely to receive a higher award as a result of a fall in earnings. For employed claimants this will be updated automatically using information from the PAYE system. In response to the crisis, the Government has strengthened the welfare system, including by increasing the UC standard allowance and the Working Tax Credit basic element by £20 per week. In addition, to protect people’s jobs and incomes as far as possible during the crisis, the Government has announced a Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and a Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential economic benefit of parents being allowed to undertake reduced hours on full pay rather than being furloughed whilst balancing work and care commitments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is designed to help those who otherwise would have been made unemployed and to provide support to businesses as quickly as possible. Allowing employers to move staff to part-time and claim the difference would have substantially increased the risk of fraud. However, there is flexibility in the scheme as employers can decide how many staff to furlough, and staff can be furloughed multiple times while the scheme is in operation, provided they are furloughed for a minimum of three weeks.

The Government recognises that it is challenging for parents to balance paid work and childcare while schools and nurseries are closed. Schools remain open for children of key workers and the most vulnerable children, and the Government has put in place a national voucher scheme to provide free school meals for children while at home. Families who see a fall in earnings may become eligible for support through the welfare system, including through Universal Credit (UC).

1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) places of worship were registered for solemnising opposite-sex marriages, and (2) denominations those registered places of worship belonged to, in each of the years from 2013 to present.

A total of 1311 Places of Worship were registered for solemnising opposite-sex marriages since 2013.

Further details can be found in the attached table in relation to the numbers and denominations in each year. None in 2020.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many progression panels have been established in each National Probation Service division in each year since June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

The Public Protection Casework Section in HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) HQ has implemented active case management, which is directed towards ensuring that probation and prison staff comply with directions from Parole Board Panels in a timely fashion.

Best practice ideals, based on an initiative that started in prisons in the East of England Region, were developed and rolled out for use in a number of prisons prior to the pandemic. The roll out was then unavoidably disrupted by the exceptional delivery models which had to be implemented on the grounds of public health. Progress of the best practice ideals will be reviewed as part of the wider action plan following consideration of the Justice Select Committee’s report and recommendations.

Offenders subject to IPP sentences are eligible for electronic monitoring following release on licence, where considered necessary and proportionate by the Parole Board. The additional investment of £183m in the expansion of electronic monitoring will also increase the availability of electronic monitoring for IPP offenders. Those whose risk is linked to alcohol are eligible for alcohol monitoring on licence, which was introduced in Wales in November and will be rolled out to England this summer. IPP releases will also be eligible for a project targeting high-risk domestic abuse perpetrators, where they will have their whereabouts monitored using GPS tags to protect victims, and potential future victims, from further trauma. The project will begin in 2023 and we expect to tag around 3,500 offenders.

HM Prison and Probation Service has developed a dataset and data dashboard, which is shared on a quarterly basis with Probation Regions and Prison Groups to support them in their efforts to monitor and manage their IPP populations, both in prisons and the community. The dashboard is still evolving and kept under review, as we identify new ways to capture additional key management information and present it in such a way as to be the most helpful to the operational line.

The following table shows the number of progression panels (lifers and IPPs) that have taken place in each Probation region by year since June 2019*: During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work.

Probation Region

The number of progression panels held (Lifers and IPPs)

01/06/2019 to 31/12/2019

2020

2021

01/01/2022 to 22/03/2022

Total

East Midlands Region

114

466

241

23

844

East of England

224

715

554

107

1,600

Greater Manchester

294

472

291

36

1,093

Kent Surrey Sussex Region

129

529

426

79

1,163

London

236

551

629

134

1,550

National Security Division

-

*

4

*

9

North East Region

117

423

196

33

769

North West Region

298

710

447

85

1,540

South Central

156

271

328

79

834

South West

111

469

197

137

914

Wales

174

197

150

16

537

West Midlands Region

304

868

522

126

1,820

Yorkshire and The Humber

170

635

422

72

1,299

Unknown Region

3

*

-

*

16

Total

2,330

6,322

4,407

929

13,988

*Notes:

1. Panels without a recorded outcome (from the point that an outcome was required to be recorded) were assumed to not have taken place.

2. Due to probation restructures in 2020 and 2021, a small number of panels could not be assigned to a region. These are recorded as 'Unknown Region'.

3. Disclosure control. An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of one or two. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

4. Data sources and quality. The figures in these tables have been drawn from the Probation Case Management System, National Delius administrative, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress the National Probation Service has made in delivering improvements to the operational oversight of prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, further to the Joint IPP Action Plan published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

The Public Protection Casework Section in HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) HQ has implemented active case management, which is directed towards ensuring that probation and prison staff comply with directions from Parole Board Panels in a timely fashion.

Best practice ideals, based on an initiative that started in prisons in the East of England Region, were developed and rolled out for use in a number of prisons prior to the pandemic. The roll out was then unavoidably disrupted by the exceptional delivery models which had to be implemented on the grounds of public health. Progress of the best practice ideals will be reviewed as part of the wider action plan following consideration of the Justice Select Committee’s report and recommendations.

Offenders subject to IPP sentences are eligible for electronic monitoring following release on licence, where considered necessary and proportionate by the Parole Board. The additional investment of £183m in the expansion of electronic monitoring will also increase the availability of electronic monitoring for IPP offenders. Those whose risk is linked to alcohol are eligible for alcohol monitoring on licence, which was introduced in Wales in November and will be rolled out to England this summer. IPP releases will also be eligible for a project targeting high-risk domestic abuse perpetrators, where they will have their whereabouts monitored using GPS tags to protect victims, and potential future victims, from further trauma. The project will begin in 2023 and we expect to tag around 3,500 offenders.

HM Prison and Probation Service has developed a dataset and data dashboard, which is shared on a quarterly basis with Probation Regions and Prison Groups to support them in their efforts to monitor and manage their IPP populations, both in prisons and the community. The dashboard is still evolving and kept under review, as we identify new ways to capture additional key management information and present it in such a way as to be the most helpful to the operational line.

The following table shows the number of progression panels (lifers and IPPs) that have taken place in each Probation region by year since June 2019*: During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work.

Probation Region

The number of IPP progression panels held (lifers and IPPs)

01/06/2019 to 31/12/2019

2020

2021

01/01/2022 to 22/03/2022

Total

East Midlands Region

114

466

241

23

844

East of England

224

715

554

107

1,600

Greater Manchester

294

472

291

36

1,093

Kent Surrey Sussex Region

129

529

426

79

1,163

London

236

551

629

134

1,550

National Security Division

-

*

4

*

9

North East Region

117

423

196

33

769

North West Region

298

710

447

85

1,540

South Central

156

271

328

79

834

South West

111

469

197

137

914

Wales

174

197

150

16

537

West Midlands Region

304

868

522

126

1,820

Yorkshire and The Humber

170

635

422

72

1,299

Unknown Region

3

*

-

*

16

Total

2,330

6,322

4,407

929

13,988

*Notes:

1. Panels without a recorded outcome (from the point that an outcome was required to be recorded) were assumed to not have taken place.

2. Due to probation restructures in 2020 and 2021, a small number of panels could not be assigned to a region. These are recorded as 'Unknown Region'.

3. Disclosure control. An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of one or two. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

4. Data sources and quality. The figures in these tables have been drawn from the Probation Case Management System, National Delius administrative, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in increasing access to electronic monitoring for the release of prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, further to the Joint IPP Action Plan published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

The Public Protection Casework Section in HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) HQ has implemented active case management, which is directed towards ensuring that probation and prison staff comply with directions from Parole Board Panels in a timely fashion.

Best practice ideals, based on an initiative that started in prisons in the East of England Region, were developed and rolled out for use in a number of prisons prior to the pandemic. The roll out was then unavoidably disrupted by the exceptional delivery models which had to be implemented on the grounds of public health. Progress of the best practice ideals will be reviewed as part of the wider action plan following consideration of the Justice Select Committee’s report and recommendations.

Offenders subject to IPP sentences are eligible for electronic monitoring following release on licence, where considered necessary and proportionate by the Parole Board. The additional investment of £183m in the expansion of electronic monitoring will also increase the availability of electronic monitoring for IPP offenders. Those whose risk is linked to alcohol are eligible for alcohol monitoring on licence, which was introduced in Wales in November and will be rolled out to England this summer. IPP releases will also be eligible for a project targeting high-risk domestic abuse perpetrators, where they will have their whereabouts monitored using GPS tags to protect victims, and potential future victims, from further trauma. The project will begin in 2023 and we expect to tag around 3,500 offenders.

HM Prison and Probation Service has developed a dataset and data dashboard, which is shared on a quarterly basis with Probation Regions and Prison Groups to support them in their efforts to monitor and manage their IPP populations, both in prisons and the community. The dashboard is still evolving and kept under review, as we identify new ways to capture additional key management information and present it in such a way as to be the most helpful to the operational line.

The following table shows the number of progression panels (lifers and IPPs) that have taken place in each Probation region by year since June 2019*: During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work.

Probation Region

The number of progression panels held (Lifers and IPPs)

01/06/2019 to 31/12/2019

2020

2021

01/01/2022 to 22/03/2022

Total

East Midlands Region

114

466

241

23

844

East of England

224

715

554

107

1,600

Greater Manchester

294

472

291

36

1,093

Kent Surrey Sussex Region

129

529

426

79

1,163

London

236

551

629

134

1,550

National Security Division

-

*

4

*

9

North East Region

117

423

196

33

769

North West Region

298

710

447

85

1,540

South Central

156

271

328

79

834

South West

111

469

197

137

914

Wales

174

197

150

16

537

West Midlands Region

304

868

522

126

1,820

Yorkshire and The Humber

170

635

422

72

1,299

Unknown Region

3

*

-

*

16

Total

2,330

6,322

4,407

929

13,988

*Notes:

1. Panels without a recorded outcome (from the point that an outcome was required to be recorded) were assumed to not have taken place.

2. Due to probation restructures in 2020 and 2021, a small number of panels could not be assigned to a region. These are recorded as 'Unknown Region'.

3. Disclosure control. An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of one or two. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

4. Data sources and quality. The figures in these tables have been drawn from the Probation Case Management System, National Delius administrative, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in establishing (1) an estate-wide set of non-mandatory best practice standards in prisons in England and Wales, and (2) best practice probation standards, further to the Joint IPP Action Plan published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

The Public Protection Casework Section in HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) HQ has implemented active case management, which is directed towards ensuring that probation and prison staff comply with directions from Parole Board Panels in a timely fashion.

Best practice ideals, based on an initiative that started in prisons in the East of England Region, were developed and rolled out for use in a number of prisons prior to the pandemic. The roll out was then unavoidably disrupted by the exceptional delivery models which had to be implemented on the grounds of public health. Progress of the best practice ideals will be reviewed as part of the wider action plan following consideration of the Justice Select Committee’s report and recommendations.

Offenders subject to IPP sentences are eligible for electronic monitoring following release on licence, where considered necessary and proportionate by the Parole Board. The additional investment of £183m in the expansion of electronic monitoring will also increase the availability of electronic monitoring for IPP offenders. Those whose risk is linked to alcohol are eligible for alcohol monitoring on licence, which was introduced in Wales in November and will be rolled out to England this summer. IPP releases will also be eligible for a project targeting high-risk domestic abuse perpetrators, where they will have their whereabouts monitored using GPS tags to protect victims, and potential future victims, from further trauma. The project will begin in 2023 and we expect to tag around 3,500 offenders.

HM Prison and Probation Service has developed a dataset and data dashboard, which is shared on a quarterly basis with Probation Regions and Prison Groups to support them in their efforts to monitor and manage their IPP populations, both in prisons and the community. The dashboard is still evolving and kept under review, as we identify new ways to capture additional key management information and present it in such a way as to be the most helpful to the operational line.

The following table shows the number of progression panels (lifers and IPPs) that have taken place in each Probation region by year since June 2019*: During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work.

Probation Region

The number of progression panels held (Lifers and IPPs)

01/06/2019 to 31/12/2019

2020

2021

01/01/2022 to 22/03/2022

Total

East Midlands Region

114

466

241

23

844

East of England

224

715

554

107

1,600

Greater Manchester

294

472

291

36

1,093

Kent Surrey Sussex Region

129

529

426

79

1,163

London

236

551

629

134

1,550

National Security Division

-

*

4

*

9

North East Region

117

423

196

33

769

North West Region

298

710

447

85

1,540

South Central

156

271

328

79

834

South West

111

469

197

137

914

Wales

174

197

150

16

537

West Midlands Region

304

868

522

126

1,820

Yorkshire and The Humber

170

635

422

72

1,299

Unknown Region

3

*

-

*

16

Total

2,330

6,322

4,407

929

13,988

*Notes:

1. Panels without a recorded outcome (from the point that an outcome was required to be recorded) were assumed to not have taken place.

2. Due to probation restructures in 2020 and 2021, a small number of panels could not be assigned to a region. These are recorded as 'Unknown Region'.

3. Disclosure control. An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of one or two. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

4. Data sources and quality. The figures in these tables have been drawn from the Probation Case Management System, National Delius administrative, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

21st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to publish the East of England developed standards for working with prisoners subject to Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences that are referenced in the Joint IPP Action Plan published by Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service and Parole Board in June 2019.

The IPP Action Plan is regularly reviewed to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of those serving IPP sentences, whether in prison or in the community. A large number of IPP prisoners have been released each year since the IPP Action Plan was first introduced in 2016, and the Plan will be refreshed, reviewed and republished after careful consideration of the forthcoming Justice Select Committee’s Report and recommendations.

The Public Protection Casework Section in HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) HQ has implemented active case management, which is directed towards ensuring that probation and prison staff comply with directions from Parole Board Panels in a timely fashion.

Best practice ideals, based on an initiative that started in prisons in the East of England Region, were developed and rolled out for use in a number of prisons prior to the pandemic. The roll out was then unavoidably disrupted by the exceptional delivery models which had to be implemented on the grounds of public health. Progress of the best practice ideals will be reviewed as part of the wider action plan following consideration of the Justice Select Committee’s report and recommendations.

Offenders subject to IPP sentences are eligible for electronic monitoring following release on licence, where considered necessary and proportionate by the Parole Board. The additional investment of £183m in the expansion of electronic monitoring will also increase the availability of electronic monitoring for IPP offenders. Those whose risk is linked to alcohol are eligible for alcohol monitoring on licence, which was introduced in Wales in November and will be rolled out to England this summer. IPP releases will also be eligible for a project targeting high-risk domestic abuse perpetrators, where they will have their whereabouts monitored using GPS tags to protect victims, and potential future victims, from further trauma. The project will begin in 2023 and we expect to tag around 3,500 offenders.

HM Prison and Probation Service has developed a dataset and data dashboard, which is shared on a quarterly basis with Probation Regions and Prison Groups to support them in their efforts to monitor and manage their IPP populations, both in prisons and the community. The dashboard is still evolving and kept under review, as we identify new ways to capture additional key management information and present it in such a way as to be the most helpful to the operational line.

The following table shows the number of progression panels (lifers and IPPs) that have taken place in each Probation region by year since June 2019*: During the COVID-19 pandemic, and in accordance with measures mandated in the interests of public health, HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) implemented exceptional delivery models which inevitably had some impact on all operational work.

Probation Region

The number of progression panels held (Lifers and IPPs)

01/06/2019 to 31/12/2019

2020

2021

01/01/2022 to 22/03/2022

Total

East Midlands Region

114

466

241

23

844

East of England

224

715

554

107

1,600

Greater Manchester

294

472

291

36

1,093

Kent Surrey Sussex Region

129

529

426

79

1,163

London

236

551

629

134

1,550

National Security Division

-

*

4

*

9

North East Region

117

423

196

33

769

North West Region

298

710

447

85

1,540

South Central

156

271

328

79

834

South West

111

469

197

137

914

Wales

174

197

150

16

537

West Midlands Region

304

868

522

126

1,820

Yorkshire and The Humber

170

635

422

72

1,299

Unknown Region

3

*

-

*

16

Total

2,330

6,322

4,407

929

13,988

*Notes:

1. Panels without a recorded outcome (from the point that an outcome was required to be recorded) were assumed to not have taken place.

2. Due to probation restructures in 2020 and 2021, a small number of panels could not be assigned to a region. These are recorded as 'Unknown Region'.

3. Disclosure control. An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of one or two. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

4. Data sources and quality. The figures in these tables have been drawn from the Probation Case Management System, National Delius administrative, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

5th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the safeguards which would be required for commercial independent celebrants to perform legally recognised marriages.

The Government announced in June 2019 that the Law Commission will conduct a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations including considering how independent celebrants could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend legal recognition to humanist marriages.

The Government announced in June 2019 that the Law Commission will conduct a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations about how marriage by humanist and other non-religious belief organisations could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent. The Government will decide on provision on the basis of the Law Commission's recommendations.

The Law Commission has now published a consultation paper as part of its review and will welcome responses from all.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)