Lord Foster of Bath Portrait

Lord Foster of Bath

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Became Member: 7th October 2015


Lord Foster of Bath is not a member of any APPGs
5 Former APPG memberships
Gambling Related Harm, Intellectual Property, Media, Publishing, Taiwan
Communications and Digital Committee
13th Oct 2021 - 31st Jan 2024
International Agreements Committee
30th Jun 2020 - 3rd Nov 2021
Gambling Industry Committee
13th Jun 2019 - 16th Jun 2020
Rural Economy Committee
17th May 2018 - 26th Mar 2019
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Oct 2016 - 16th Jun 2017
Licensing Act 2003 Committee
14th Jun 2016 - 4th Apr 2017
Comptroller (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government)
6th Sep 2012 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (also Shadow Deputy Prime Minister)
1st Jul 2003 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
1st Jun 2002 - 1st Jun 2003
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Transport and the Regions)
1st Jun 1999 - 1st Jun 2001
Education & Employment
15th Nov 1995 - 29th Mar 1999
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 1995 - 1st Jun 1997
Shadow Spokesperson (Education)
1st Jun 1992 - 1st Jun 1995


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Foster of Bath has voted in 486 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

16 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Foster of Bath voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 33 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 145 Noes - 179
View All Lord Foster of Bath Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(43 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(32 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Lord Foster of Bath's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Foster of Bath, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


5 Bills introduced by Lord Foster of Bath


A Bill to require an electrical safety certificate to be provided to a prospective purchaser of domestic premises in specified circumstances; and for connected purposes

Lords Completed

Last Event - 3rd Reading
Wednesday 1st February 2023
(Read Debate)

A bill to require the Secretary of State to ensure that domestic properties have a minimum energy performance rating of C on an Energy Performance Certificate; to make provision regarding performance and insulation of new heating systems in existing properties; and for connected purposes

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 7th February 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision to increase the energy performance of buildings; and for connected purposes

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 20th July 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for a national strategy for cost-effective and efficient use of energy; and for connected purposes.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Tuesday 14th June 2016

A Bill to give all football clubs the freedom to build, or maintain existing, safe standing sections in their stadia if they choose; to establish minimum safety criteria that must be met for standing sections in football stadia; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 7th December 2010

Lord Foster of Bath has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
26th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which energy efficiency measures are included in the "fabric-first approach to decarbonising buildings" set out in the Heat and Buildings Strategy (CP 388).

The Heat and Buildings Strategy is based on a 'fabric first' approach to decarbonising buildings by focusing on upgrading the building fabric before making changes to heating systems, to ensure the transition to low-caron heating is cost-effective and resilient.

Current schemes allow the installation of measures which improve the energy performance of a dwelling within the scope of the “Standard Assessment Procedure” (SAP) – which assesses the energy performance of dwellings. This can include measures such as solid wall insulation, cavity wall insulation, loft insulation, underfloor insulation, draught-proofing, air source heat pumps, ground source heat pumps, high heat retention storage heating, low energy lighting, solar PV, solar thermal and heating controls.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that membership of the Energy Efficiency Taskforce includes representation from all parts of the energy efficiency sector, particularly with regard to insulation.

As part of their work, the Taskforce has established four working groups. These have included insulation experts.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what organisations are members of the electricity Storage Health and Safety Governance Group; and when it last met.

The Electrical Storage Health and Safety Governance Group last met on 13th March 2023. Member organisations include: the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the National Physical Laboratory, the Health and Safety Executive, the Office for Product Safety and Standards, London Fire Brigade, Kent Fire and Rescue Services, the National Fire Chief’s Council, the Association For Renewable Energy and Clean Technology, the National Association of Professional Inspectors and Testers, the British Association of Electrotechnical Allied Manufacturers Association, the British Standards Institution, the University of Newcastle, the Institute for Engineering and Technology, the Energy Institute, and representatives from both the domestic and grid-scale energy storage industry as well as engineering consultancies.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risk of fires arising from solar photovoltaic panels.

Research funded by Government between 2015 and 2018 by the Building Research Establishment indicates the risk from solar PV fires is very low. Government continues to work with industry to make solar even safer and ensure best practice. In February 2023 RISCAuthority, the Microgeneration Certification Scheme and Solar Energy UK published an updated Joint Code of Practice on recommendations for fire risk prevention in UK solar systems.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government why the Offshore Transmission Network Review did not involve a comparative assessment of alternative brownfield sites closer to London for offshore wind power connections to the grid than sites in East Anglia.

The Offshore Transmission Network Review seeks address the uncoordinated growth of offshore transmission assets and develop a more coordinated approach to the design and delivery of transmission for offshore wind in Great Britain. For projects that already had firm connection contracts, limited changes could be made without breaking those commercial contracts, which is something the government has no power to do. For these projects, the Government has launched a £100m funding scheme to support developers to develop options for voluntary coordination. This could include reconsideration of some cable routes to reduce landing zones and use brownfield sites.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the planned fivefold increase in the target for offshore wind power production by 2030, what plans they have to amend the criteria for assessing the related cumulative impact.

Ensuring environmental protections are maintained is a key component of work being undertaken by Government to facilitate the acceleration of offshore wind. The Energy Bill makes provisions to deliver the Offshore Wind Environmental Improvement Package (OWEIP), which was announced in the British Energy Security Strategy.

The OWEIP will streamline Habitat Regulation Assessments, develop and implement Offshore Wind Environmental Standards, and create a Marine Recovery Fund to enable environmental compensation to be undertaken at a strategic level. This ensures developments are located where there are lower environmental sensitivities, and/or where impacts can be avoided, reduced, mitigated, or if required, compensated.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on (1) tourism, (2) tourism-related jobs, and (3) the environment, by (a) the planned building of Sizewell C, (b) offshore wind farms, and (c) the associated infrastructure in the Suffolk coastal area.

No individual pre-emptive assessments are made by the Government to avoid prejudicing planning decisions which are taken on the merits of each individual case.

All projects are consented after thorough consideration of all relevant information, including cumulative impacts. Environmental and socio-economic impacts are considered in line with policy in the National Policy Statements.

The rationale for the Secretary of State’s decision for development consent in relation to Sizewell C, consented offshore wind farms and associated infrastructure are set out in the published decision letters available on the relevant project pages of the Planning Inspectorate’s National Infrastructure Planning website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what factors prevent the establishment of the National Grid Future Systems Operator by 2023.

In the Government’s consultation response published in April 2022, we proposed the creation of a new, independent Future System Operator (FSO). Depending on a number of factors, including timings of legislation, updating licensing arrangements, amending industry codes, and discussing timelines with key parties, the FSO could be established by, or in, 2024.

The Primary Legislation required to establish the FSO is contained within the Energy Bill 2023, which is currently passing through Parliament. Subject to reaching Royal Assent, we aim to establish the FSO as soon as practicable, while maintaining the safety and stability of the energy systems and ensuring a smooth transition.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment has been made of the suitability of the use of Modular Offshore grids in the North Sea corridor to transport power closer to demand; and what assessment they have made of the implementation of Belgium’s offshore grid in this regard.

The Electricity System Operator has undertaken consideration of the best approach to coordinate offshore transmission infrastructure to deliver greater efficiencies, reductions in planned infrastructure and accelerate the offshore wind delivery. Belgium’s Modular Offshore Grid connects several wind farms via a single cable. The UK’s Holistic Network Design delivers a similar outcome at greater scale, covering 21GW of offshore generation in its first round and 23GW in its second. Our approach will utilise shared connection points for multiple generators and aims to use multipurpose interconnectors to transmit energy from generators to consumers; reducing costs and impacts for developers, communities, and bill-payers.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what research they have carried out in the last 12 months into (1) the propensity of (a) homeowners, (b) private residential landlords, or (c) social landlords, to carry out energy efficiency improvements to their properties, (2) the barriers to making such improvements, and (3) how any such barriers might be overcome; and what were the results of that research.

The Department continually gathers information on the propensity to install measures as it delivers energy efficiency policies. The potential issues these schemes address include financial barriers, information on what measures to install, concerns about the quality of installations and access to installers. Independent evaluation reports are published that summarise key lessons.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
15th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what information they have received from Fire and Rescue Services about the safety of (1) e-bikes, and (2) e-scooters; and the safety of the batteries of those vehicles.

All e-bikes and e-scooters must comply with product safety legislation including the batteries used to power them. The Government maintains regular contact with the Fire and Rescue Services and has discussed many issues including fire incidents relating to e-bikes and e-scooters. We encourage users to follow available guidance, including from Electrical Safety First and from the London Fire Brigade, alongside manufacturer instructions on safe use.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure public awareness of the availability of the Priority Services Register, including among owner occupiers; and what requirements they have placed on energy suppliers to ensure that households registered with a Priority Services Register have safe gas and electricity supplies in their homes.

Condition 26 of Ofgem’s gas and electricity supply licence conditions requires suppliers to identify consumers who are eligible for the Priority Service Register and offer to add any, or all, of the Minimum Details to the Priority Services Register during interactions. Condition 29 of Ofgem’s gas supply licence conditions requires suppliers to provide a gas safety check free of charge to vulnerable consumers. Further details on support available for those on the Priority Service Register can be found on the Ofgem website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage investment into technological solutions in the hazard prevention market.

Placing new or innovative products on the market requires the same product safety requirements to be met as is required for existing products. Guidance is available for businesses to help set what is required so that they have a clear route for getting their products to market.

Innovate UK, part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), acts as the prime channel through which Government incentivises business-led technology innovation. It funds innovation through the allocation of competitively awarded grants and funding is available to all businesses undertaking innovation, irrespective of the technology or sector in which they are working. The UKRI Gateway, available via UKRI’s website, provides data on all funded research and innovation projects.

Innovate UK also helps to connect innovative businesses with the right partners and expertise to help them bring their ideas to market, and grow and scale their companies, through the Knowledge Transfer Network and Innovate UK EDGE.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage routes-to-market for new fire and electrical safety technologies.

Placing new or innovative products on the market requires the same product safety requirements to be met as is required for existing products. Guidance is available for businesses to help set what is required so that they have a clear route for getting their products to market.

Innovate UK, part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), acts as the prime channel through which Government incentivises business-led technology innovation. It funds innovation through the allocation of competitively awarded grants and funding is available to all businesses undertaking innovation, irrespective of the technology or sector in which they are working. The UKRI Gateway, available via UKRI’s website, provides data on all funded research and innovation projects.

Innovate UK also helps to connect innovative businesses with the right partners and expertise to help them bring their ideas to market, and grow and scale their companies, through the Knowledge Transfer Network and Innovate UK EDGE.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information they collect regarding electrical appliances purchased online that are (1) counterfeit, (2) poor quality, or (3) faulty.

Businesses have a legal duty to notify market surveillance authorities where they have identified a safety issue with a product they have placed on the market, including online. To support the best use of this information, in 2019, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) launched the UK’s Product Safety Database. The database allows authorities to access and exchange data securely and effectively to ensure swift and appropriate action can be taken to protect consumers. If consumers have a concern about the safety of a product, or other consumer concerns relating to quality or faults, they can contact Citizens Advice in England and Wales, Advice Direct Scotland or Consumer Advice Service. They will refer suspected breaches of consumer law on to Trading Standards for enforcement action where appropriate.

In order to further support consumers, OPSS publishes alerts on GOV.UK about unsafe products and recalls using information from the database. This includes regular Product Safety Reports. These contain information about individual products, including electrical products, that have been investigated and found to present a risk to the health and safety of consumers. Reports include details about the product, photos of the product, the risks it presents (such as electrical shock), the details of distributor and/or manufacturer, whether it was sold on an online marketplace, details of non-compliance, and the corrective actions taken by businesses.

OPSS does not currently record information regarding electric shocks, or other injuries such as burns, caused by electrical items purchased online. However, OPSS is currently trialling information sharing with some NHS hospitals and continues to examine how we can make the best use of available data.

In relation to counterfeit goods, the Government works with industry and enforcement agencies on a range of initiatives. The Intellectual Property Office collects intelligence on counterfeit items and works in partnership with Trading Standards, law enforcement, and industry groups to reduce the sale of counterfeit goods on e-commerce stores and via links from social media channels such as Facebook and Instagram.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to recording of electric shocks, or other injuries such as burns, caused by electrical items purchased online.

Businesses have a legal duty to notify market surveillance authorities where they have identified a safety issue with a product they have placed on the market, including online. To support the best use of this information, in 2019, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) launched the UK’s Product Safety Database. The database allows authorities to access and exchange data securely and effectively to ensure swift and appropriate action can be taken to protect consumers. If consumers have a concern about the safety of a product, or other consumer concerns relating to quality or faults, they can contact Citizens Advice in England and Wales, Advice Direct Scotland or Consumer Advice Service. They will refer suspected breaches of consumer law on to Trading Standards for enforcement action where appropriate.

In order to further support consumers, OPSS publishes alerts on GOV.UK about unsafe products and recalls using information from the database. This includes regular Product Safety Reports. These contain information about individual products, including electrical products, that have been investigated and found to present a risk to the health and safety of consumers. Reports include details about the product, photos of the product, the risks it presents (such as electrical shock), the details of distributor and/or manufacturer, whether it was sold on an online marketplace, details of non-compliance, and the corrective actions taken by businesses.

OPSS does not currently record information regarding electric shocks, or other injuries such as burns, caused by electrical items purchased online. However, OPSS is currently trialling information sharing with some NHS hospitals and continues to examine how we can make the best use of available data.

In relation to counterfeit goods, the Government works with industry and enforcement agencies on a range of initiatives. The Intellectual Property Office collects intelligence on counterfeit items and works in partnership with Trading Standards, law enforcement, and industry groups to reduce the sale of counterfeit goods on e-commerce stores and via links from social media channels such as Facebook and Instagram.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of households that are supplied by district heating systems; what assessment they have made of the geographic distribution of those households; and what estimate they have made of the (1) number, and (2) proportion, of those households that experience fuel poverty.

The Experimental Statistics on Heat Networks published by the Government in 2018 showed that approximately 440,000 of all UK heat network customers are residential. The specific geographical distribution in terms of number of residential customers can be found in Figure 1 below.

Government Office Region

Number of customers

East Midlands

15,769

East of England

25,147

London

195,851

North East

16,418

North West

35,212

South East

39,107

South West

23,800

West Midlands

29,436

Yorkshire and The Humber

25,824

England

406,566

Wales

7,680

Scotland

23,779

Northern Ireland

1,524

UK

439,549

The latest 2020 Fuel Poverty Statistics published shows that only 3% (i.e. 92,000) of all fuel poor households in England has central heating systems that use ‘other’ fuels, which consist of propane, bulk LPG and community heating or heat networks. Therefore, the proportion of fuel poor households served by district heating systems are likely to be much smaller than 3%.

The Government’s Heat Network Consumer Survey published in 2017 estimated that the proportion of heat network customers living in more energy efficient buildings such as flats or social housing are significantly higher than the general England and Wales population. Given most flats or social housing tend to have energy efficiency ratings higher than EPC Band D, it therefore indicates heat network customers are much less likely to experience fuel poverty in comparison to the wider population.

The Government is aware of the steep increases that some consumers on communal networks are facing. For this reason, the government is taking action worth more than £9.1bn supporting households through initiatives such as the Energy Bills Rebate, the Household Support Fund, Warm Home Discount, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments. These measures are intended to cover heat network consumers and the government is engaging closely with industry and consumer groups to understand the specific impacts in the heat network sector and continue to assess whether further options are needed to help households through this challenging period.

I refer the noble Lord to the answers given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth to the Hon. Member for Battersea on 28 February to Questions 125466 and 125467. We need to ensure heat network consumers receive a fair price for their heating and that is why we are committed to legislating within this parliament to regulate the heat networks sector and in December 2021 we announced that Ofgem will take on the role of regulator. We will be giving Ofgem new powers to regulate prices in this sector as a matter of priority. This will enable equivalent protection for domestic heat network customers as well as ensuring heat network operators are securing good purchasing deals for their consumers. This will mean that consumers are charged a fair rate for heating whilst encouraging investment in heat networks.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to address the financial impact of rising energy prices on households with district heat systems that are not covered by the energy price cap; and what is their timetable for implementing those plans.

The Experimental Statistics on Heat Networks published by the Government in 2018 showed that approximately 440,000 of all UK heat network customers are residential. The specific geographical distribution in terms of number of residential customers can be found in Figure 1 below.

Government Office Region

Number of customers

East Midlands

15,769

East of England

25,147

London

195,851

North East

16,418

North West

35,212

South East

39,107

South West

23,800

West Midlands

29,436

Yorkshire and The Humber

25,824

England

406,566

Wales

7,680

Scotland

23,779

Northern Ireland

1,524

UK

439,549

The latest 2020 Fuel Poverty Statistics published shows that only 3% (i.e. 92,000) of all fuel poor households in England has central heating systems that use ‘other’ fuels, which consist of propane, bulk LPG and community heating or heat networks. Therefore, the proportion of fuel poor households served by district heating systems are likely to be much smaller than 3%.

The Government’s Heat Network Consumer Survey published in 2017 estimated that the proportion of heat network customers living in more energy efficient buildings such as flats or social housing are significantly higher than the general England and Wales population. Given most flats or social housing tend to have energy efficiency ratings higher than EPC Band D, it therefore indicates heat network customers are much less likely to experience fuel poverty in comparison to the wider population.

The Government is aware of the steep increases that some consumers on communal networks are facing. For this reason, the government is taking action worth more than £9.1bn supporting households through initiatives such as the Energy Bills Rebate, the Household Support Fund, Warm Home Discount, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments. These measures are intended to cover heat network consumers and the government is engaging closely with industry and consumer groups to understand the specific impacts in the heat network sector and continue to assess whether further options are needed to help households through this challenging period.

I refer the noble Lord to the answers given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth to the Hon. Member for Battersea on 28 February to Questions 125466 and 125467. We need to ensure heat network consumers receive a fair price for their heating and that is why we are committed to legislating within this parliament to regulate the heat networks sector and in December 2021 we announced that Ofgem will take on the role of regulator. We will be giving Ofgem new powers to regulate prices in this sector as a matter of priority. This will enable equivalent protection for domestic heat network customers as well as ensuring heat network operators are securing good purchasing deals for their consumers. This will mean that consumers are charged a fair rate for heating whilst encouraging investment in heat networks.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 1 November (HL3196), when they will make an announcement regarding the UK's future exhaustion of intellectual property rights regime.

The Government is currently assessing the options for the UK’s future exhaustion regime and will provide an update on this consultation in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of an international copyright exhaustion regime on author incomes; and what plans they have, if any, to publish this assessment.

The Government recently held a consultation on the UK’s future exhaustion of intellectual property rights regime. The potential impact of an international exhaustion regime on author incomes is likely to form part of the overall assessment, alongside the potential effect on other sectors of the economy. The Government will provide an update on this consultation in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) retail, and (2) industrial energy, consumers will contribute via a Regulated Asset Base model to the building of a new nuclear power station in the UK; and if so, how this will be calculated.

The Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill will require all GB-licenced suppliers to make contributions to a revenue collection counterparty under a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) model. We expect that suppliers’ contributions will be calculated based on their expected share of the energy market.

The Government will consult on draft regulations implementing the detailed requirements of RAB revenue arrangements before they are introduced.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the (1) lowest, and (2) highest, expected cost of power per kWh from Sizewell C, based on the assumptions in their impact assessment.

The Impact Assessment published alongside the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill sets out the illustrative costs of building and financing a generic new nuclear power plant using a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) model.

Negotiations on the Sizewell C project are ongoing. These will determine its overall cost and value for money. No decisions have yet been made, but discussions to date have been constructive.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of an international copyright exhaustion regime on the UK's book exports; and what plans they have, if any, to publish this assessment.

The Government recently held a consultation on the UK’s future exhaustion of intellectual property rights regime. The potential impact of an international exhaustion regime on the UK’s book exports is likely to form part of the overall assessment, alongside the potential effect on other sectors of the economy. The Government will provide an update on this consultation in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in relation to the building of Sizewell C nuclear power station in Suffolk, (1) what is the basis for the claim that using a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) financing model for its construction “will add at most a few pounds a year to typical household energy bills during the early stages of construction and on average less than £1 per month during the full construction phase of the project” as stated in the BEIS press release of 26 October, (2) what capital sum would be subject to RAB, (3) how many households would pay, and (4) what rate of return investors would receive.

The Government remains in active and constructive negotiations with EDF over the Sizewell C project. No decisions have yet been taken and the negotiations will be subject to reaching a deal that is value-for-money and achieving all relevant Government approvals.

BEIS has published an Impact Assessment (IA) to support the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill which illustrates the cost savings of funding a generic nuclear plant through a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) model versus a Contract for Difference. The IA contains estimates of the capital costs and a range of rates of return.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in relation to the building of Sizewell C nuclear power station in Suffolk, what plans they have, if any, to publish (1) details of the (a) process, and (b) outcomes, of the value for money assessments conducted to date, and (2) a schedule of future assessments.

The Government remains in active and constructive negotiations with EDF over the Sizewell C project. No decisions have yet been taken and the negotiations will be subject to reaching a value for money deal and relevant Government approvals. Value for money assessments will be carried out in line with guidance set out in the HM Treasury Green Book.

The Government is fully committed to transparency and is including measures in the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill to support this.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect the Final Investment Decision in relation to the building of Sizewell C nuclear power station to be taken.

In the 2020 Energy White Paper, the Government set out its objective to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project to a final investment decision (FID) by the end of this Parliament, subject to clear value for money and all relevant approvals. The Government announced £1.7 billion funding in the Spending Review to enable a final investment decision this Parliament. The Government remains in active and constructive negotiations with EDF over the Sizewell C project.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of any cost overruns in the construction of Sizewell C nuclear power station in Suffolk would be passed on to (1) consumers, and (2) taxpayers, under the Regulated Asset Base financing model.

The Government remains in active and constructive negotiations with EDF over the Sizewell C project. No decisions have yet been taken and the negotiations will be subject to reaching a value for money deal and relevant Government approvals.

A nuclear project would be subject to detailed value for money assessments before being approved for a Regulated Asset Base (RAB), or awarded a Government Support Package (GSP).

Under a RAB model, risks are shared between investors and consumers. This will facilitate private investment into new nuclear projects, thereby reducing the cost of capital, and ultimately costs to consumers. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State would take costs to consumers into account when modifying a licence for a nuclear company to insert a RAB, as well as considering our decarbonisation targets and the need to ensure future energy security. An economic regulatory regime will incentivise the project and its investors to manage costs and delivery effectively, to ensure the project is on time and to budget. The GSP would offer Government protection for investors and consumers from low probability but high impact events.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the latest cost assessments for the building of Sizewell C nuclear power station in Suffolk.

Constructive negotiations between the Government and EDF over the Sizewell C project are ongoing and subject to commercial sensitivities. As part of the negotiations, detailed assessment and diligence activities are underway to substantiate the basis of the project cost estimates. No decisions have been taken. The negotiations will be subject to Government approval and securing a deal that ensures value for money.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the reply by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 13 October (HL Deb, col. 1830) on intellectual property reform, (1) what representations they have made to the Intellectual Property Office regarding the impact on the creative industries and design sectors that a shift to an International Exhaustion Regime would have, and (2) what changes they are considering to the UK's design systems to address the lack of reciprocal recognition by the EU for unregistered design rights.

The Government has recently held a consultation on the UK’s future exhaustion of intellectual property rights regime. The Intellectual Property Office held constructive discussions with stakeholders across multiple business sectors, including representatives from the creative industries and design sectors. The Government is currently assessing the options and will make a decision in due course.

The UK sought an agreement with the EU on reciprocal disclosure for unregistered designs. This would have been beneficial to UK design businesses. However, the EU decided to pass up the opportunity to conclude such mutually beneficial text, which is disappointing. The Government recognises that this an important issue for UK designers and will consider it in future work on the UK designs system.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when their proposed Heat and Buildings Strategy will be published.

As my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State set out in the BEIS Select Committee on 20/07/21, the Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. The strategy will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings, as well as our approach to the key strategic decisions needed to achieve a mass transition to low-carbon heat.

In order to ensure that we remain on a credible path to net zero while retaining the option to pursue the optimal mix of technologies, we will grow the heat pump market to 600,000 per year by 2028; and undertake large-scale trials for hydrogen, to prove their safety case and build the market.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend the Energy Company Obligation to other measures in addition to space heating.

The targets for the current iteration of ECO are based on the Home Heating and Cost Reduction Obligation (HHCRO) powers set out in the Electricity Act 1989, Section 41B, and Gas Act 1986, Section 33BD. This allows Government to set a target for the promotion of measures for reducing the cost to individuals of heating their homes. Therefore, measures which do not result in space heating savings are not eligible.

Under the current scheme, ECO3, 44% of measures delivered were a form of insulation with the remainder being heating measures, such as replacement boilers, as of January 2021. ECO3 will end in March 2022, however, it was announced in February’s Sustainable Warmth Strategy that ECO4 will run from April 2022 through to 2026. The value of the scheme will also increase to £1bn per annum for ECO4. Further details about ECO4, including the scope of eligible measures, will be consulted on later this year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funds (1) have been, and (2) will be, allocated to local authorities to enable them to retrofit domestic premises to increase their energy efficiency.

The Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery (LAD) scheme, which supports energy efficiency and low carbon heat projects for low-income households, is being delivered in three phases:

  • Phase 1A; around £74 million was allocated to 55 projects in over 100 Local Authorities in October 2020, to be delivered by June 2021.
  • Phase 1B:  around £126 million has been allocated to 81 projects in over 200 Local Authorities, for delivery by September 2021.
  • Phase 2:  funding of £300 million has been allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs, who will work with Local Authorities in their region to deliver projects by December 2021.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to a £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) over a 10-year period, to improve the energy performance of social rented homes.

The Summer Economic Update announced the SHDF Demonstrator project, launched in 2020, which has awarded £62m of funding to social landlords across England and Scotland to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, seeing over 2300 social homes improved to at least EPC band C.

The Autumn 2020 Spending Review committed £60m of funding for the first wave of the £3.8bn manifesto commitment in financial year 21/22.

The Government has since committed an additional £300 million on green home upgrades through Local Authorities. This extension will be through an increase in funding to Local Authorities via LAD and the SHDF wave one, and whilst the schemes are currently being designed, the focus remains on upgrading the worst-performing homes with energy efficiency installations and low-carbon heating.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement in the Energy White Paper Powering our Net Zero Future, published in December 2020, that “all rented non-domestic buildings will be EPC Band B by 2030, where cost-effective”, whether they plan to introduce a similar requirement for domestic premises; and if not, why not.

In the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government set the aspiration that as many homes as possible to reach EPC C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable.

We recently consulted on raising the energy performance standards in the domestic private rented sector to EPC band C for new tenancies from 2025 and all tenancies by 2028. We are currently analysing the responses and will be publishing the Government response in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 18 March (HL13898), what assessment they have made of (1) clause 2(1), and (2) clause 2(2), of the Domestic Premises (Energy Performance) Bill [HL].

As set out in the answer I gave the noble Lord on 18 March to Question HL13898, our plan for supporting fuel poor households is set out in the recently published strategy, Sustainable Warmth – supporting vulnerable households in England. Our forthcoming Heat and Buildings Strategy will set out how we intend to meet our wider energy efficiency commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 18 March (HL13898), on what grounds they consider that the Domestic Premises (Energy Performance) Bill [HL] “would reduce flexibility in the way we approach greenhouse gas emission savings”.

The Government remains fully committed to the aspiration set out in the Clean Growth Strategy for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, affordable and cost-effective. This is reiterated in 2020 Energy White Paper and we are taking action to achieve this, as evidenced in recent consultations on improving the energy performance of privately rented homes in England and Wales, and on improving home energy performance through lenders.

However, new innovative approaches, including technologies and processes, may be developed over the next 14 years. The Bill’s proposal to introduce this aspiration onto statute could reduce flexibility in the way we approach greenhouse gas emission savings and potentially mean that more cost-effective savings receive less attention or support.

Our forthcoming Heat and Buildings Strategy will set out how we intend to meet our wider commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 26 January (HL12049), how they define the word 'ensure' in the context of their stated commitment "to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030".

In the context of this target, we use the word ‘ensure’ to mean that we will take steps to make sure that this target is delivered. We will make sure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 10 February (HL12638), what assessment they have made of clauses 2(1) and 2(2) of the Domestic Premises (Energy Performance) Bill [HL].

The Government believes supporting the Private Members Bill in question generally would reduce flexibility in the way we approach greenhouse gas emission savings and could potentially mean that more cost-effective approaches receive less attention or support. In addition, Government is committed to supporting low income and vulnerable households by meeting our statutory fuel poverty target, to improve as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable to a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C by 2030. The Government has recently published a strategy, Sustainable Warmth – supporting vulnerable households in England, which sets out our plans to support fuel poor households in detail.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 9 February (HL12590), whether they will clarify what is meant by “as many homes as possible”.

The Government remains committed to the Clean Growth Strategy aim for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

The updated Fuel Poverty Strategy, published February 2021, set out the road map to meeting our statutory fuel poverty target of improving as many fuel poor homes as reasonably practicable to energy efficiency rating Band C by the end of 2030, as well as our interim target of Band D by 2025.

There is no set number of homes to be achieved within those targets. However, the Heat & Buildings Strategy, which we plan to publish in due course, will set out how we intend to meet our commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 2 February (HL12282), what year they estimate net zero could be achieved by spending one per cent of the UK’s GDP.

In June 2019, following advice from the Climate Change Committee (CCC), the UK Government became the first major economy to set a legally binding target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. When publishing their recommendation for the level of the Sixth Carbon Budget in December 2020, the CCC made clear that Net Zero in 2050 remains the right target for the UK.

Ahead of COP26, we will set out ambitious plans across key sectors of the economy to meet our carbon budgets and net zero. We have already published the Energy White Paper and the first phase of our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, and will publish the Heat and Building Strategy in due course. We will also publish a comprehensive Net Zero Strategy, setting out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy, making the most of new growth and employment opportunities across the UK. These will raise ambition as we outline our path to hit our 2050 target.

We will build on the strong foundations we have established through our leading progress in decarbonising our economy; our ambitious manifesto commitments; and announcements from my Rt. Hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer of measures to cut emissions as we build back better in our economic recovery from COVID-19.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 28 January (HL12149), whether they will reconsider the recommendation made by the Policy Exchange in their report Efficient Energy Policy: How to encourage improvements in domestic energy efficiency, published on 2 March 2016, to link Stamp Duty Land Tax to the energy performance of a dwelling, in the light of their finding that it would result in 2,700,000 homes being upgraded over a ten year period and be revenue neutral.

As with all tax policy, Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is kept under review, but the Government does not currently have any plans to link SDLT on properties with their relative energy efficiency. As set out in the Energy White Paper, we will be consulting on regulatory options to improve the energy performance of owner occupier homes this year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 26 January (HL12049), how they define “as far as is reasonably practicable”; and what is their estimate of the number of homes that may be excluded from the fuel poverty target.

We see improving the energy efficiency of homes to be the best long term solution to tackling fuel poverty. However, there are limitations as to the energy efficiency measures that can be put in place, including the physical characteristics of the property and the preferences of the householders. For example, some listed buildings cannot make use of certain energy efficiency measures like solid wall insulation. There will also be cases where householders simply do not want energy efficiency measures carried out in their home. These circumstances may mean that it is not reasonably practicable to improve the energy efficiency of the home.

Over time, innovative new energy efficiency measures may help to overcome some of these challenges while also reducing the cost of insulating homes. BEIS is encouraging innovation through funding ‘Innovations in the Built Environment’, a collection of competitions and projects, many of which encompass energy efficiency. We remain committed to encouraging the wide take up of energy efficiency measures.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their target “of reaching as many existing homes as possible at EPC band C or above by 2035” in the Energy White Paper, published on 14 December 2020, what “as many existing homes as possible” means; and what estimate they have made of the number of homes that will not be included in that target.

The Government remains committed to the Clean Growth Strategy aim for as many homes as possible to be EPC Band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

In addition, for homes in fuel poverty, we remain committed to our statutory fuel poverty target of improving as many fuel poor homes as reasonably practicable to energy efficiency rating Band C by the end of 2030, as well as our interim target of Band D by 2025.

There is no set number of homes to be achieved within those targets. However, the Heat & Building Strategy and the updated Fuel Poverty Strategy, which we plan to publish in due course, will set out how we intend to meet our commitments and set us on a path to decarbonising homes and buildings by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer given by Lord Callanan on 25 January (HL11978), what estimate they have made of (1) the number of social houses that will be upgraded to EPC band C by the various schemes listed in that Answer, and (2) how many social houses will remain below EPC band C.

There are approximately 4.1 million social homes in England, with around 1.6 million homes currently rated below the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to a £3.8bn Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund over a 10-year period, to improve the energy performance of social rented homes. The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund will support the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to EPC band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable, and for all fuel poor homes to reach this target by 2030. The Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund will bring a significant amount of the social housing stock that is currently below EPC C up to that standard.

The following schemes are also targeting energy performance improvement in social housing:

The £500m Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme, which aims to improve the energy efficiency of around 50,000 homes rated EPC level D to G, where Social Housing Providers may work with Local Authorities to upgrade their housing stock;

The £50 million Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator, which has awarded funding to social landlords across England and Scotland to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, seeing around 2300 social homes improved to at least EPC band C.

The Green Homes Grant voucher scheme, which provides grants to help homeowners improve the energy efficiency of their homes, is open to social, as well as private, landlords.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Climate Change Committee Sixth Carbon Budget, published on 9 December 2020, what estimate they have made of the potential amount of greenhouse gas emissions which could be reduced by spending up to two per cent of GDP.

The Committee on Climate Change's (CCC) latest estimate puts the incremental costs of action to deliver net zero emissions by 2050 at below 1% of UK GDP throughout the next 30 years. The Government is considering the CCC’s advice on Carbon Budget 6, and our Impact Assessment on setting the level of Carbon Budget 6 will set out more detail on the costs and benefits associated with reducing emissions.

HM Treasury is conducting a review on how to achieve the net zero transition in a way that works for households, businesses and public finances, as well as ensuring that this is compatible with our plans for a thriving and competitive economy. Their interim report, published on 17 December 2020, set out the overall approach to the Review and analysis which will inform the final report due this Spring.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change Net Zero: The UK's contribution to stopping global warming, published on 19 May 2019, what steps they are taking to ensure that their commitment for net-zero greenhouse gases by 2050 is "comprehensive, achieved without use of international credits" and covers international aviation and shipping.

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy in the world to legislate to end its contribution to global warming by 2050. International aviation and shipping emissions are included within the scope of the 2050 net zero target, which was set on a whole economy basis. We fully intend to meet our net zero target through cutting our domestic carbon emissions.

International credits can play an important role in cost-effective global emissions reduction, while creating development co-benefits. We retain our ability to use international credits if necessary, to achieve our commitments as we have said previously when setting Carbon Budgets and legislating for net zero. However, our intention is to meet our Nationally Determined Contribution and net zero commitment through domestic action.

Ahead of COP26, we will set out ambitious plans across key sectors of the economy to meet our carbon budgets and net zero. We have already published the Energy White Paper and the first phase of our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, and will publish the Heat and Building Strategy in due course. We will also publish a comprehensive Net Zero Strategy, setting out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change The Sixth Carbon Budget: The UK’s path to Net Zero, published on 9 December 2020, what plans they have to ensure that all social homes achieve EPC band C by 2028.

The Government remains committed to the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.

At the Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer provided up to £50m for a UK-wide Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund (SHDF) Demonstrator, to support jobs, improve energy efficiency and reduce bills for social tenants whilst demonstrating the benefits of the Whole House Retrofit approach to reduce costs overall. At the recent spending review the chancellor announced £60 million in 2021/22 for the SHDF in England.

The Government has also recently published the Social Housing White Paper where we committed to review the Decent Homes Standard to consider how it can better support the decarbonisation and energy efficiency of social homes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Committee on Climate Change The Sixth Carbon Budget: The UK’s path to Net Zero, published on 9 December 2020, what plans they have to set a legally binding target to upgrade all buildings to EPC Band C by 2035.

The Government remains committed to the ambition set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) band C by 2035, where practical, cost-effective, and affordable.


We believe this still represents good value for money, and we are focussed on introducing a range of policies and proposals that deliver it. In 2020, alongside a significant package of public funding for building retrofit, we have:

  • Consulted on strengthening minimum energy performance standards for the domestic Private Rented Sector to at least EPC C by 2028;
  • Consulted on setting requirements for mortgage lenders to help homeowners improve the energy performance of the homes they lend to;
  • Committed to consult on energy performance requirements under the Decent Homes Standard for social housing;
  • Committed to consult in 2021 on regulatory measures for owner occupier homes.

The Heat and Building Strategy will set out further details on the actions we will take to reduce emissions from buildings.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what consideration they have given to the recommendations of the report by Policy Exchange Efficient Energy Policy: How to encourage improvements in domestic energy efficiency, published on 2 March 2016, and in particular the recommendation that Stamp Duty Land Tax should be linked to the energy performance of a dwelling.

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is kept under review, but the Government does not currently have any plans to link SDLT on properties with their relative energy efficiency, as suggested in the report by Policy Exchange.

The Government acknowledges that more needs to be done to improve the energy performance of owner-occupied homes. As such, we are currently consulting on how mortgage lenders can help householders in England and Wales to improve the energy performance of their homes. We have committed to consult in 2021 on regulatory measures for owner occupiers and will consider a range of options as part of that consultation.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to eradicate fuel poverty; and if so, how.

We see improving the energy efficiency of homes as the best long term solution to tackling fuel poverty, enabling warmer homes with reduced energy bills. The fuel poverty target is therefore to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating of Band C, by 2030. There are interim milestones for the target of a minimum Band E rating by 2020 and Band D by 2025. Good progress is being made and in 2018, our most recent statistics indicated there were around 900,000 fewer fuel poor households living in an E, F or G rated property compared to 2010. An updated Fuel Poverty Strategy for England will be published in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)