David Morris Portrait

David Morris

Conservative - Morecambe and Lunesdale

First elected: 6th May 2010


Employment Relations (Flexible Working) Bill
30th Nov 2022 - 7th Dec 2022
Assistant Whip
8th Jul 2022 - 20th Sep 2022
Local Government (Disqualification) Bill
24th Nov 2021 - 1st Dec 2021
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
20th Jan 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
3rd Dec 2012 - 24th Nov 2014
Science and Technology Committee
3rd Dec 2012 - 24th Nov 2014
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
3rd Dec 2012 - 24th Nov 2014
Administration Committee
3rd Dec 2012 - 10th Mar 2014
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Feb 2012
Science and Technology Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Feb 2012
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Feb 2012


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Offshore Petroleum Licensing Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 279 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 226 Noes - 287
Speeches
Thursday 18th January 2024
Morecambe Town Council
The petitioners of Morecambe, on behalf of 3,919 responses, which is over a quarter of the households of Morecambe, request …
Written Answers
Monday 4th December 2023
Culture: Rural Areas
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what funding is available for arts and culture in …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Bay Medical Group
That this House congratulates the staff of Bay Medical Group for their hard work and dedication to patients during the …
Bills
Wednesday 16th October 2013
Gibraltar (Maritime Protection) Bill 2013-14
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
8. Miscellaneous
From 25 February 2020, a Member of the Conservative Party Board. This is an unpaid role.
EDM signed
Monday 16th October 2023
CancerCare 40th anniversary
That this House wishes CancerCare a very happy 40th anniversary year providing therapies, help and support free to people of …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 10th July 2018
Bathing Waters Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, David Morris has voted in 715 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

13 May 2020 - Remote Division result: New Clause 2 - View Vote Context
David Morris voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 326 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 328
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
David Morris voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
16 Jan 2023 - Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill - View Vote Context
David Morris voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and in line with the House
One of 299 Conservative No votes vs 18 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 49 Noes - 482
View All David Morris Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(13 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(5 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(12 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(6 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all David Morris's debates

Morecambe and Lunesdale Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Morecambe and Lunesdale signature proportion
Petitions with most Morecambe and Lunesdale signatures
David Morris has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Morris

16th October 2023
David Morris signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 16th October 2023

CancerCare 40th anniversary

Tabled by: Cat Smith (Labour - Lancaster and Fleetwood)
That this House wishes CancerCare a very happy 40th anniversary year providing therapies, help and support free to people of all ages affected by cancer throughout North Lancashire and South Cumbria; thanks them for their work from urban centres in Lancaster and Barrow to rural hamlets in the Lake District …
7 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 1
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Independent: 1
Alba Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
21st July 2021
David Morris signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Wednesday 21st July 2021

Morecambe Football Club and covid-19 vaccination

Tabled by: David Morris (Conservative - Morecambe and Lunesdale)
That this House notes the contribution Morecambe Football Club has made to the the covid-19 vaccination programme in Morecambe and Lunesdale by offering its stadium as a venue; further notes the dedication of Morecambe Football Club staff to help marshal at the venue and ensure that all of those attending …
2 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All David Morris's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Morris, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


David Morris has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by David Morris

Thursday 9th November 2023
Wednesday 10th February 2021

1 Bill introduced by David Morris


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to protect the seas around Gibraltar; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 16th October 2013

1 Bill co-sponsored by David Morris

Bathing Waters Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Scott Mann (Con)


29 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department plans to take steps to provide additional financial support to community swimming pools to help with the cost of energy.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) provides a discount on the wholesale element of gas and electricity bills to ensures eligible businesses, including sport or leisure facilities, which receive their energy from licensed suppliers, are protected from high energy costs. The Treasury-led review of the EBRS took account of many contributions from the private sector, trade associations, the voluntary sector and other organisations. It recognised that leisure facilities may continue to experience high energy bills, which is why we will continue to provide support to non-domestic customers through the new Energy Bill Discount Scheme, which will run from April until March 2024.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what is the planned timescale for the type approval of small modular reactors; and when he plans for the first site to be announced.

The Government intends to initiate a selection process in 2023, with the intention to enter negotiations with the most credible projects to enable a potential Government award of support as soon as possible.

The Government will also develop a new National Policy Statement, which will cover the siting and policy framework for nuclear electricity generating infrastructure, including SMRs, beyond 2025 and will consult on this in due course.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the level of growth in the space sector in the last 12 months.

The Government is committed to growing the UK space sector. Yesterday's inaugural meeting of the reformed National Space Council Inter-Ministerial Group was an important moment for taking forward the National Space Strategy and developing a single Government voice on space.

23rd Mar 2021
What progress the UK Atomic Energy Authority is making in the delivery of the STEP programme.

The STEP programme aims to develop and build a prototype fusion power plant in the UK by 2040. The UKAEA has made great progress and are on track to deliver a concept design by 2024, as planned.

The process to select a site for STEP is underway and there have been high levels of engagement from potential sites across the UK, including one in the constituency of my hon Friend.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what funding is available for arts and culture in rural areas.

As set out in the Levelling Up White Paper, HM Government is committed to ensuring that funding for arts and culture is more fairly distributed across the country. Arts Council England’s 2023–26 investment programme (the ‘National Portfolio’), worth over £444 million per year, has seen investment to cultural organisations in rural areas increase to £44.6 million, benefiting 110 organisations across the country.

In local authority areas identified as predominantly rural, there has been a 22% increase in investment in National Portfolio Organisations and Investment Principles Support Organisations. Urban areas with significant rural portions have seen an increase of 37%.

Cultural opportunities are also provided in rural areas by organisations based in neighbouring urban areas – for instance, through touring. Public library services in the Arts Council’s National Portfolio with a base in urban areas are also important to cultural opportunities in rural locations. The National Rural Touring Forum has also had its funding increased to help build capacity in this important part of the sector.

Arts Council England has also supported approximately 30 Cultural Compacts across England – including in rural and Levelling Up priority areas – and has provided these existing Compacts with further funding to build capacity and long-term cross-sector relationships. (Cultural Compacts are partnerships between the cultural and heritage sectors, Local Authorities, and wider local partners such as universities, health agencies, and the private sector, with the aim of enhancing creatives’ contribution to local development.)

Additionally, arts and cultural organisations in rural areas are able to access Arts Council England’s project grants, an open access programme for arts, libraries and museums projects. This supports thousands of individual artists and community and cultural organisations, with over £105 million of funding awarded in 2022/23.

Meanwhile, DCMS’s £86 million Museum Estate and Development Fund has supported several museums in rural areas, including The Food Museum in Stowmarket which presents the agricultural history of East Anglia, the industrial museums Papplewick Pumping Station and Coldharbour Mill, Shandy Hall, the rural home of the writer Laurence Sterne, and Ruddington Framework Knitters Museum.

20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that community groups in receipt of large grants from administrative charities are required to comply with the political independence provisions in the Charities Act 2011.

Grant-making charities must ensure that charitable funds are used to further their charitable purposes. The Charity Commission for England and Wales publishes guidance ("Campaigning and political activity guidance for charities (CC9)") on the extent to which charities can legitimately engage in non-party political activity as part of furthering their charitable purposes.

Any concerns that charitable funds are being used inappropriately, for example for party-political activities or purposes, should be raised with the Charity Commission for England and Wales, which can investigate and if appropriate take action. There are currently no plans to bring forward legislative proposals on this subject.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to increase the number of students taking STEM subjects.

The government is investing £3.8 billion more in further education (FE) and skills over this Parliament to ensure people can access high-quality training and education that addresses skills gaps and boosts productivity. We are working with industry to shape our training offers, creating more routes into skilled employment in key science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) sectors, such as engineering, digital, clean energy, and manufacturing.

The department is investing in Institutes of Technology, which are leaders in the provision of high-quality, higher level technical education and training across a range of STEM occupations and industries.

We have worked with employers to develop over 350 apprenticeship standards in STEM. These same employer-led standards have shaped the design of T Levels, new Level 3 qualifications for 16-19 year olds that reflect modern industrial practice and include a 45 day industry placement. Fourteen of the 24 T Levels being rolled out are in STEM subjects, from Science to Digital Business Services, Engineering Design and Development to Onsite Construction.

We are delivering supply and demand side reforms to reverse the decline in uptake of high-quality higher technical education. We’ve announced approximately £70 million to date in funding to prime FE and higher education higher technical provision across the country. Central to our reforms is the introduction of Higher Technical Qualifications (HTQs). These are current (and new) level 4-5 qualifications, approved and quality marked by the Institute for Apprenticeships & Technical Education (IfATE) as providing the skills demanded in the workplace by employers. HTQ rollout is on track. They began teaching from September 2022, starting with Digital HTQs, and all occupational routes are due to be rolled out by 2025, where relevant occupational standards are available. To date, 106 qualifications have been approved as HTQs across Digital, Construction, and Health & Science routes, for teaching this year or next. Over 70 providers were able to deliver HTQs from September 2022, with the majority being FE colleges. We have introduced an HTQ brand and are improving communication, advice, and guidance. From 2023/24, HTQ student finance will be on a par with degrees.

The department is investing to widen participation in STEM education in schools and increase the number and quality of STEM teachers. Since autumn 2022, early career teachers have been able to claim a levelling up premium (£3,000 tax free per year for up to three years) for teaching mathematics, physics, chemistry or computing in state-funded secondary schools that have been identified as having a high need for teachers. The department is funding tailored maths support for students and teachers through the Advanced Mathematics Support Programme, investing £84 million into National Centre for Computing education to drive increased participation in computer science and funding research programmes on how to tackle gender balance in STEM subjects.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she plans to increase the level of the national funding rate for early years pupil premium in the financial year 2023-24; and if she will make a statement.

The early years pupil premium currently provides 60 pence per hour additional funding to support better outcomes for disadvantaged three and four-year-olds. This is equivalent to up to £342 per eligible child per year.

On 16 December, the department published the 2023/24 hourly funding rates for local authorities for early years. We also announced in a written ministerial statement that the early years pupil premium for 2023/24 will be increased to 62 pence per hour. This is equivalent to up to £353 per eligible child per year.

The full ministerial statement is available at: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2022-12-16/hlws447.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that Education Health and Care assessments are carried out in Early Years Education.

On 2 March 2023, the department published the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, which sets out the next steps we will take to deliver a more positive experience for children, young people and families.

The department will establish a single national system that delivers for every child and young person with SEND so that they enjoy their childhood, achieve good outcomes, and are well prepared for adulthood and employment. For those children and young people with SEND who do require an education, health, and care (EHC) assessment, we have set out our vision for a reformed and consistent EHC plan process which will include early years education. This will ensure that children and young people with SEND get prompt access to the support they need, and that parents don’t face an adversarial system to secure this.

The department recognises the important role of the early years sector in the early identification of needs and in building up effective working relationships with parents about their child’s needs.

Early intervention is crucial, which is why, as part of the £180 million early years recovery programme, we are funding up to 5,000 early years staff to gain an accredited level 3 Special Education Needs Coordinator qualification to support the early years sector, help identify children who need support, and provide expert advice.

High needs funding will also be at £10.1 billion in 2023/24 which is an increase of over 50% from the 2019/20 allocations.

Local authorities will be able to use this funding to support children and young people with SEND in mainstream schools and elsewhere, including those in early years and requiring an EHC plan or assessment.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to take steps to encourage students to pursue a career in electric technology.

The government is investing £3.8 billion more in further education and skills over this Parliament to ensure people can access high-quality training and education that addresses skills gaps and boosts productivity. We are working with industry to shape our training offers, creating more routes into skilled employment in key science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) sectors, such as engineering, digital, clean energy, and manufacturing.

The department is investing in Institutes of Technology, which are leaders in the provision of high-quality, higher level technical education and training across a range of STEM occupations and industries.

We have worked with employers to develop over 350 apprenticeship standards in STEM. There are apprenticeship opportunities available relating to careers in electric technology, for example the electrical or electronic technical support engineer apprenticeship. These same employer-led standards have shaped the design of T Levels, new Level 3 qualifications for 16-19 year olds that reflect modern industrial practice and include a 45 day industry placement. 14 of the 24 T Levels being rolled out are in STEM subjects, from Science to Digital Business Services, Engineering Design and Development to Onsite Construction.

The department is delivering supply and demand side reforms to reverse the decline in uptake of high-quality higher technical education. We’ve announced approximately £70 million to date in funding to prime further education (FE) and higher education higher technical provision across the country.

Central to our reforms is the introduction of Higher Technical Qualifications (HTQs). These are current (and new) level 4-5 qualifications, approved and quality marked by the Institute for Apprenticeships & Technical Education (IfATE) as providing the skills demanded in the workplace by employers. HTQ rollout is on track. They began teaching from September 2022, starting with Digital HTQs, and all occupational routes are due to be rolled out by 2025, where relevant occupational standards are available. To date, 106 qualifications have been approved as HTQs across Digital, Construction, and Health & Science routes, for teaching this year or next. Over 70 providers were able to deliver HTQs from September 2022, with the majority being FE colleges. We have introduced an HTQ brand and are improving communication, advice, and guidance. From 2023/24, HTQ student finance will be on a par with degrees.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
16th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department takes to monitor the education of young people who have been moved from in-school to at-home education.

It is the responsibility of Local Authorities to ensure that all children receive a suitable education, including those who are electively home educated. The Government’s view is that existing powers, if used in the way set out in the Government’s guidance, are enough for a Local Authority to determine whether the provision at home is suitable.

19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to stop political visits to schools during general elections.

Following the announcement of the recent election, updated guidance was issued and circulated to schools on their responsibilities during the pre-election period here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pre-election-guidance-for-schools-and-multi-academy-trusts/pre-election-guidance-for-schools-and-multi-academy-trusts.

Any school visits conducted by parliamentary candidates are arranged through their constituency offices rather than via the Department for Education. Decisions on the use of schools or other educational/public sector property must be taken by those legally responsible for the premises concerned – for example, for schools, the Governors or the Local Education Authority or Trust Board.

Although the ultimate decision is for those legally responsible for the premises to take, they are expected to treat the candidates of all parties in an even-handed way, and ensure that there should be no disruption to services.

I look forward to visiting a school in my hon. Friend, the member for Morecambe and Lunesdale's constituency, should a suitable opportunity arise.

16th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the statutory guidance entitled GL43: licence to release common pheasants or red-legged partridges on certain European sites or within 500m of their boundary published on 31 May 2023, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of that statutory guidance on (a) gamekeepers' jobs, (b) the rural economy and (c) conservation.

The Government supports gamebird shooting for all the benefits it brings to individuals, the environment and the rural economy. The Government wants to see a vibrant working countryside that is enhanced by a biodiverse environment. We recognise the valuable role gamekeepers play in protecting and enhancing biodiversity through habitat management and predation control and we support the valuable role shooting provides to the rural economy. We monitor the impacts of many different rural businesses have on the rural economy and factor that into decision making whenever possible. We recognise the challenges that avian influenza presents and are considering how we can mitigate the impact on the shooting interests and the wider community.

16th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she has made a recent assessment of the potential impact of withdrawing GL43 licences from special protection areas on the finances of rural businesses; and whether she plans to provide compensation to estates that (a) do not receive and (b) are delayed in receiving a licence.

The Government supports gamebird shooting for all the benefits it brings to individuals, the environment and the rural economy and will work with the industry to try to mitigate any potential impact.

16th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she made an assessment of the potential merits of consulting on the withdrawal of GL43 licences from special protection areas prior to implementing that policy.

The Defra minister responsible has taken this decision following initial advice from the statutory nature conservation body, Natural England to reduce the risk of impact of avian influenza on rare and protected wild bird populations. We informed stakeholders on 10 May, based on their feedback we sought further advice from Defra’s Chief Scientific Officer prior to issuing final decision on 31 May.

16th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an estimate of the average number of days taken for individual licences to be granted by Natural England for shoots in or near Special Protection Areas in the most recent period for which data is available.

The Defra Minister responsible has assumed responsibility for the decision making of individual licence applications for SPAs following the changes to General Licence 43 (GL43). Natural England is responsible for processing the applications and providing recommendations to Defra ministers. As at 19 June, Natural England has recommended issuing 3 individual licences which would authorise the release of a specified number of gamebirds at the specified site in the licence. The Minister has considered these applications and granted the individual licences.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate she has made of the number of shoots that are likely to be affected by the decision to remove special protection areas from General Licence GL43.

As of 14 June 2023 we have received 58 applications, we have sent out 119 application packs and have had 456 hits on the website regarding this. We are working closely with those affected and will support them through the licencing process.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether Leighton Hall Estate has been granted an individual licence to shoot.

The Defra minister responsible is working with Natural England to ensure applications are processed promptly and within the 30-working-day customer service standard. We cannot comment on individual licence decisions.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to her decision to withdraw GL43 licences from special protection areas, what steps she is taking to protect common pheasants and red-legged partridges (a) in Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency and (b) generally.

Whilst birds are under the control of an individual whether on a permanent or temporary basis (including common pheasants and red-legged partridge), they are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006.


We are unable to comment on individual constituencies.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cases of Avian Influenza have been found on the Leighton Hall Estate in my Constituency in the past 100 years.

The UK is currently in the largest ever outbreak of avian influenza. Outbreaks of avian influenza in both kept and wild birds have occurred at an unprecedented scale across Europe and the UK with cases continuing to be confirmed into year two of the outbreak for the first time.

We do not comment on individual premises nor hold a full dataset on cases of avian influenza for the past 100 years, however, based on the available information, there have been no outbreaks of notifiable avian influenza confirmed in the Morecambe and Lunesdale Constituency (Since 2006).

In terms of wild bird findings, since 2017, there has been a wild bird finding in a tufted duck near Carnforth in 2017, a finding in a mallard near Carnforth in 2021, a finding in a mute swan near Whittington in 2021, and a finding in a common buzzard near Carnforth in 2022. These have all been in the Morecambe and Lunesdale Constituency. Findings of Avian Influenza in wild birds are published online and can be found on Gov.uk.

Epidemiological reports setting out our investigations into previous outbreaks of avian influenza in Great Britain have been published and are available on Gov.uk.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th May 2020
What steps he is taking to support the dairy industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

Dairy farmers are crucial in ensuring that food supplies remain resilient during this difficult period. In addition to the various HM Treasury COVID-19 support packages, Defra has introduced specific measures to support the dairy industry during the COVID-19 outbreak, particularly those impacted by the loss of the food service sector. These include a dairy support scheme, easements to competition law, support for an AHDB milk promotion campaign and the opening of various intervention and storage aid schemes.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what factors are assessed when deciding the fee level a local authority will pay per funded care home place; and whether he has plans to raise fee levels.

Under the Care Act 2014, local authorities have a duty to manage local care markets. The Care Act guidance states that local authorities should assure and have evidence that fee levels are appropriate to provide the agreed quality of care and enable providers to effectively support care users and invest in staff development, innovation and improvement.

We are committing £1.36 billion to the Market Sustainability and Fair Cost of Care Fund over the next three years. On 24 March 2022, we published guidance which provides advice to local authorities for completing and returning cost of care exercises to the Department and templates which local authorities must use as part of an acceptable submission. These state a standard list of cost lines to assess care home providers. Where average fee rates are below the fair cost of care, we expect local authorities to use the Fund to begin to move towards paying providers a fair cost of care and to set out in the Market Sustainability Plans how this will be achieved.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust has submitted plans for a new single site hospital to his Department.

The Department has provided both the Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust with £3.7 million to develop plans for improving facilities at each Trust. The Trust has not submitted any formal plans for a single site hospital to the Department.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the level compliance with the prohibition on the sale of menthol cigarettes under the EU Revised Tobacco Products Directive.

No assessment has been made. We expect the tobacco industry to comply with the requirements of The Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016, and this includes the recent ban on the sale of menthol flavoured cigarettes. A breach of the regulations could result in enforcement action being taken.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to exempt care homes from paying VAT on works carried out to their premises.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the 20 per cent standard rate applies to the vast majority of goods and services. While there are exceptions to the standard rate, these have always been strictly limited by both legal and fiscal considerations.

One such exception is a reduced rate of VAT at 5 per cent, subject to certain conditions, for residential renovations, such as building services and materials. This includes conversions of buildings from one residential use to another, conversions from commercial to residential use, and the renovation of properties that have been empty for two years or more prior to the renovation work.

Another exception is applied to the installation in residential accommodation, including housing association accommodation and care homes, of various energy saving materials (ESMs), such as insulation and draught stripping. At Spring Statement 2022, the Chancellor announced that installations of ESMs will now be zero rated from 1 April 2022 to 31 March 2027 in Great Britain. He also announced the removal of complex qualifying criteria. Further information can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/changes-to-the-vat-treatment-of-the-installation-of-energy-saving-materials-in-in-great-britain/the-value-added-tax-installation-of-energy-saving-materials-order-2022.

Expanding the reliefs further would come at a significant cost to the public finances. For example, introducing a reduced rate of VAT on all renovations and repairs to residential properties would cost around £3.75 billion per year. Such costs would have to be balanced by increased taxes elsewhere, increased borrowing or reductions in Government spending. However, the Government keeps all taxes under review.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of the 1.5 per cent increase in employer national insurance contributions on care home operators; and whether he has plans to exempt the care sector from that increase.

The increase to Employer National Insurance contributions by 1.25 percentage points is expected to raise £975 million per year from employers carrying out health and social care activities. The Government cannot break this down to show the cost to care home operators.

The Government has made the tough but responsible choice to increase taxes to fund a significant increase in permanent spending on the NHS and social care. There are no plans to exempt the care sector from the National Insurance increase.

On the 7 September the Government announced that we would be investing an additional £5.4 billion over the next three years using the funds raised by the levy to begin a comprehensive programme of reform for adult social care. Additionally, local authorities can make use of over £1 billion of additional resource specifically for social care in 2022-23. This includes £636 million more into the Social Care Grant, including funding for equalisation against the 1 per cent Adult Social Care (ASC) precept, an inflationary uplift to the improved Better Care Fund to support integrated working with the NHS, and a 1 per cent ASC precept and deferred flexibilities from last year's settlement.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending the exemption in the Renters Reform Bill to allow fixed term tenancies for purpose built student accommodation to include all student accommodation.

The Department is carefully considering the impact of our reforms on the student housing market. We recognise there is a general annual lettings cycle and are considering solutions, such as a ground for possession that enables landlords to guarantee vacant possession for next year's tenants. Any solution needs to balance the needs of both students and landlords, and we will continue to engage with the sector. I am happy to discuss this matter further with my Hon. Friend.