Julie Elliott Portrait

Julie Elliott

Labour - Sunderland Central

First elected: 6th May 2010


Regulatory Reform
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
DCMS Sub-Committee on Disinformation
12th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Regulatory Reform
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
European Scrutiny Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
24th Oct 2011 - 4th Nov 2013


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Julie Elliott has voted in 660 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Julie Elliott Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(8 debate interactions)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
(8 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(12 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(9 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Julie Elliott's debates

Sunderland Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We would like the Government to ban all animal testing UK, including for the development of cosmetics, household products and medicines. Alternatives need to be actively funded. Many products that are tested on animals end up not being suitable for humans. Animal testing is outmoded and should end.

The Government must recognise the urgent need to use animal-free science and publish a clear and ambitious action plan with timetables and milestones to drive the phase-out of animal experiments. As well as preventing animal suffering, this will benefit public health and business.

Recognise the state of Palestine to help stop the conflict from Israel. Not recognising the Palestinian state allows Israel to continue their persecution of the Palestinians.

The Government should introduce sanctions against Israel, including blocking all trade, and in particular arms.

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.


Latest EDMs signed by Julie Elliott

11th March 2024
Julie Elliott signed this EDM on Wednesday 13th March 2024

Alleged comments by Frank Hester

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House expresses its shock regarding the alleged comments made by Frank Hester reported by The Guardian about the hon. Member for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and all Black women; believes these alleged comments to be both racist and violent in nature; notes that Mr Hester is a …
71 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 38
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Conservative: 1
Independent: 1
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
8th January 2024
Julie Elliott signed this EDM on Friday 26th January 2024

Pension restitution for women born in the 1950s

Tabled by: Kim Johnson (Labour - Liverpool, Riverside)
That this House welcomes the positive interventions from so many hon. Members from across the House on behalf of women born in the 1950s who have suffered pensions loss through the targeting of their pension rights; pays tribute to constituents and campaigners in their ongoing fight for justice; recalls that …
98 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 44
Scottish National Party: 31
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Independent: 6
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alba Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Conservative: 1
Workers Party of Britain: 1
View All Julie Elliott's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Julie Elliott, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Julie Elliott has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Julie Elliott has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Julie Elliott


A Bill to make provision about the funding of building societies and the assimilation of the law relating to companies and the law relating to building societies.

Commons - 80%

Last Event - Report Stage
Friday 19th April 2024

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2022 to Question 61995 on Ticketmaster, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of dynamic pricing on access to cultural events.

We are committed to supporting fair and transparent ticket pricing and tackling unacceptable behaviour in this market.

As set out in our reply to Question 61995, we believe that ticket pricing strategies are ultimately a matter for event organisers and ticketing platforms, providing they comply with relevant legislation, particularly regarding transparency with customers on how tickets are priced, in order to help consumers make a fair and informed decision.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2022 to Question 61995 on Ticketmaster, whether her Department plans to take steps to help protect customers from increasing prices as a result of dynamic pricing.

We are committed to supporting fair and transparent ticket pricing and tackling unacceptable behaviour in this market.

As set out in our reply to Question 61995, we believe that ticket pricing strategies are ultimately a matter for event organisers and ticketing platforms, providing they comply with relevant legislation, particularly regarding transparency with customers on how tickets are priced, in order to help consumers make a fair and informed decision.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether (a) charities and (b) other bodies were involved in the organisation of the Prime Minister's visit to Haughton Academy in Darlington on 29 January 2024.

As has been the practice under successive administrations, official visits by the Prime Minister are organised by his or her office - in this case, liaising directly with the Academy.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has (a) budgeted for and (b) spent on software updates to legacy computer systems in each of the last three years.

Most of the systems within Cabinet Office operate on the basis of updates being provided within the licence costs. As such there is no specific budget or spend for updates.

The Cabinet Office employs the Legacy IT Assessment Risk Framework, a standardised methodology designed by the Central Digital and Data Office, to assess the risks associated with legacy digital technology assets across His Majesty's Government. The highest category of risk within the framework is known as ‘red-rated’. This approach enables the Cabinet Office to generate a prioritised overview of our legacy technology, clearly highlighting assets that necessitate remediation plans and the allocation of suitable funding for implementation.

Where we have allocated funding to develop, sustain or migrate legacy systems of our Red Rated Systems we have:

  1. Budgeted £21,405,400 over the last three years and;

  2. Spending within that timeframe has been consistent with the budget.

In addition, the Cabinet Office is currently refining its approach to the definition and management of Legacy Systems.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's data on expenditure over £500 for September 2023, what the purpose of the hospitality event held at The Botanist, Sheffield on 14 September 2023 was; how much was spent on alcoholic beverages; and how many people attended that event.

The purpose of the event was to bring national government and local authority communication directors together to improve joint working, and complied with departmental hospitality guidance.

The event was booked for 24 people with a set menu that included a single complimentary drink. The venue was secured free of charge.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government Property Agency Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 14 July 2023, HC 1724, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the progress of the hub project entitled Birmingham 3; which Department the project relates to; and how many jobs will be relocated to Birmingham as part of that project.

The Government is committed to launching new Hubs across the UK including in Birmingham, and commercially sensitive discussions regarding prospective solutions for Birmingham 3 are ongoing. The Government has committed to relocate over 1,150 roles to Birmingham from London by March 2025 with over 850 roles already relocated.

Two Hubs are already in operation in Birmingham at 23 Stephenson Street, supporting 1,607 full time equivalent roles and 21 client departments, as well as 3 Arena Central, supporting 4,000 full time equivalent roles from HMRC, VOA and DWP.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government Property Agency Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23, published on 14 July 2023, HC 1724, whether he had discussions with relevant stakeholders prior to the termination of the Government Hub projects set out in that report.

No Government Hub projects have been cancelled. The GPA works with many stakeholders as part of its Government Hubs Programme, with a range of factors taken into account when making decisions on potential locations and solutions. These include demand, future need, economic benefits and funding. The Hubs Programme supports the Governments’ priorities of Levelling Up and Places for Growth.

Good progress is being made on the Hubs Programme with HMRC delivering fourteen Hubs under Phase 1. The GPA is leading Phase 2 and has opened three Hubs in Birmingham, Peterborough and London with four further Hubs in Bristol, Croydon, Darlington and Manchester in delivery. Market searches and commercial negotiations continue to source appropriate solutions for further locations. As these locations are agreed, further announcements will be made.



Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many leak inquiries the Cabinet Office undertook in the last year; and what the outcomes of those inquiries were.

It is government policy not to comment on the details of leak investigations.

28th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he will update the List of Ministerial Responsibilities.

A revised List of Ministerial Responsibilities will be published in due course. In the meantime, departments are updating their ministers' pages on GOV.UK which also include portfolio information.

7th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Secretary of State for Education who served from 5 to 7 July 2022 will be awarded the statutory resignation pay award of three months’ salary for her time served as Secretary of State.

The Ministerial and other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991 sets out the detail and circumstances under which former Ministers are eligible for a severance payment. Any Minister, regardless of the length of time they have served in post, who is below the age of 65 and who has not been otherwise reappointed to a Ministerial position within 3 weeks of their last day of service, is eligible for a severance payment of 25% of their annual claimed salary at the time at which they ceased to hold office.

The above position will apply to the former Secretary of State for Education as it would for any other Minister that has left office. Departments routinely publish the details of any loss of office payments made to former Ministers within their Annual Report & Accounts.

15th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of veterans who have died from suicide in the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Members to the answer given to PQ 88289 on 21 September 2020.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the adequacy of the energy support provided to the (a) sports and (b) leisure industries.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) provides a discount on the wholesale element of gas and electricity bills to ensure that eligible businesses, including sport or leisure facilities, who receive their energy from licensed suppliers, are protected from high energy costs over winter. The HMT-led review of the EBRS took into account the many contributions from the private sector, trade associations, the voluntary sector and other types of organisations. The review recognised that sport or leisure facilities may continue to experience high energy bills which is why the Government will continue to provide support to eligible non-domestic customers through the new Energy Bill Discount Scheme which will run from April until March 2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the impact of the rise in energy costs on (a) cultural, (b) sports and (c) leisure facilities.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) provides a discount on the wholesale element of gas and electricity bills to ensure that all eligible businesses, including cultural, sport or leisure facilities, who receive their energy from licensed suppliers, are protected from high energy costs over the winter period. We recognise that organisations such as cultural, sport or leisure facilities may continue to experience high energy bills which is why we will continue to provide support to eligible non-domestic customers through the new Energy Bill Discount Scheme which will run from April until March 2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made on the effectiveness of energy support available for industries with high energy intensity that do not qualify for the Energy and Trade Intensive Industries scheme.

The HMT-led review of the Energy Bill Relief Scheme took account of many contributions from the private sector, trade associations, the voluntary sector and other types of organisations. Trade and energy intensity assessments were based on ONS and BEIS data. These thresholds have been set at sectors falling above the 80th percentile for energy intensity, and 60th percentile for trade intensity, plus any sectors eligible for the existing energy compensation and exemption schemes. Industries with high energy intensity not on the list of eligible Standard Industrial Classification will continue to get support through the Energy Bill Discount Scheme that runs from April 2023 to March 2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will publish his Department’s assessments of (a) energy intensity and (b) trade intensity for all sectors on the Energy and Trade Intensive Industries scheme.

There are currently no plans to publish the assessments of energy and trade intensity of sectors. The assessment took place as part of the HMT review into the Energy Bill Relief Scheme and were based on ONS and BEIS data. All sectors that met the threshold of being above the 80th percentile for energy intensity, and 60th percentile for trade intensity, plus any sectors eligible for the existing energy compensation and exemption schemes, are eligible for the enhanced support under the Energy Bill Discount Scheme.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to her Department's press release entitled Huawei legal notices issued, published on 13 October 2022, what estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of that decision.

No public funding has been issued to telecoms operators to support the implementation of the legal notices issued in respect of Huawei.

The Impact Assessment published alongside the Telecommunications (Security) Bill estimated that the costs of monitoring compliance with the national security power, under which the legal notices were issued, would be between £7 million and £11.7 million over the period 2020-2029. This includes between £1.7 million and £2.8 million for the Department, and between £5.4 million and £8.9 million for Ofcom.

Last year, Ofcom was awarded £21m in additional funding to be spent over the subsequent three years (22/23, 23/24 and 24/25) to reflect its additional responsibilities under the Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021. The funding is ring-fenced for telecoms security. The majority of the funding is to support Ofcom’s compliance and enforcement of the Telecommunications (Security Measures) Regulations 2022 and Telecommunications Security Code of Practice 2022, but it also includes resources required to respond to any monitoring directions issued by DSIT in relation to designated vendor directions.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what her Department's policy is on the regulation of (a) artificial intelligence and (b) machine learning.

We published our AI Regulation White Paper on 29 March, which sets out five cross-cutting principles regulators should apply when considering the use of AI in their own sectors. The principles are: (i) safety, security and robustness, (ii) appropriate transparency and explainability, (iii) fairness, (iv) accountability and governance, (v) contestability and redress.

Our principles-based approach to AI regulation is focused on outcomes and is designed to manage risk and enhance trust while also allowing innovation to flourish. The proposals include the introduction of a statutory duty on regulators in time.

The white paper also proposes a range of new central functions, including a horizon scanning function intended to anticipate and assess emerging risks. This will complement the existing work undertaken by regulators and other government departments to identify and address risks arising from AI. The consultation closed on 21 June, and the Government will update on the proposals in its response.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on enhancing regulation of (a) commercial and (b) experimental technologies for (i) marine and (ii) outer space experiential excursions.

MARINE EXCURSIONS

The Government can only regulate vessels in UK waters, and UK-flagged vessels wherever they are in the world. There are no regulations covering deep-sea submersibles used in international waters, and there is only one submersible listed on the UK flag. No non-UK-flagged manned civilian submersibles operate in the UK.

The Government does not have plans to review the UK regulatory regime here.

OUTER SPACE EXCURSIONS

The Space Industry Act 2018 (the 2018 Act) and Space Industry Regulations 2021 (the 2021 Regulations) provides the legislative framework for the licensing of space activities, sub-orbital activities, and associated activities carried out in the UK, including sub-orbital missions involving human occupants.

However, the Government does not have plans at present to permit, and therefore has not commenced provisions in the 2018 Act for, the licensing of orbital spaceflight involving human occupants; or the licensing of spaceflight activities involving hypersonic (or any other experimental) transport from one point to another (A to B).

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent discussions she has had with external stakeholders on (a) Artificial Intelligence and (b) machine learning; and what plans she has for further discussions.

The Government recognises the importance of engaging a broad community of stakeholders in the development of policy on artificial intelligence and machine learning. In May this year, the Prime Minister and I met with leading global AI labs – Anthropic, Google Deepmind, and Open AI, as well as a number of UK-led firms, many of which are doing cutting edge research and development, including the foundation models that underpin popular services such as chatGPT. Engagement has continued since then, and I am pleased that Ministers met with businesses, academics and civil society during London Tech Week and TechNExt festival in Newcastle. Prior to this, in preparation for the AI Regulation White Paper published in March, my officials engaged with or received feedback from over 130 different stakeholders and we have since continued with significant engagement as the policy develops.

Throughout this all, such meetings help us to understand the wide range of views across the AI ecosystem and foster a responsible approach to governance and development that addresses risks while delivering innovation and growth.

20th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated under the ECO4 to (a) Sunderland Central constituency and (b) the North East in 2022.

The Government does not hold data on how much funding has been allocated through ECO by region but does publish data on the number of measures installed through the scheme. A breakdown by region and Parliamentary constituency can be found in tables 3.3 and 3.6 respectively in the latest Household Energy Efficiency release. Data on the number of measures installed under ECO4 will be published in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the (a) effectiveness and (b) adequacy of the process in place to transfer energy credit from liquidated energy suppliers to the customers' new supplier.

Protecting the credit balances of domestic customers when energy companies cease trading is a priority for both Government and Ofgem, who manage the service transfer under the Supplier of Last Resort process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding his Department has provided to mental health research and innovation programmes in the North East in each of the last two years.

The Department committed £1.81 million in 19-20 and £1.17 million in 20-21 to research projects related to mental health that took place in the North East of England. This includes research at Newcastle University which is looking at the effect of substance misuse by parents on children and research on the shift to home-based working in the pandemic, including its impact on mental health.

In addition, UKRI has recently made a £24 million investment into seven multidisciplinary and multi-institutional research programmes, across the UK, focussed on adolescent mental health. This includes research which will focus on the wellbeing of students at university where the rate of mental health conditions is rising. The project includes a co-investigator based at Newcastle University with some of the research taking place at the university.

19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to update copyright law in the music industry.

The Government has no specific plans to update copyright law in the music industry.

However, the Government is aware of the current debate around music streaming revenues and is following it closely. Any change in the law would need to be justified by robust evidence, so we welcome the DCMS Select Committee’s inquiry into this issue and look forward to its analysis and recommendations. Alongside this, the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) is working closely with industry on a research project to investigate the flow of money to music creators. This project is due to report in summer 2021 and will help improve our understanding of this important issue.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of clause 182D of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 on artists' incomes.

The Government has made no recent assessment of the effect of section 182D of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 on artists' incomes.

However, the Government is aware of the current debate around revenues for musicians and is following it closely. Robust evidence in this area is vital, so we welcome the DCMS Select Committee’s inquiry into the economics of music streaming and look forward to its analysis and recommendations. Alongside this, the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) is working closely with industry on a research project to investigate the flow of money to music creators. This project is due to report in summer 2021 and will help improve our understanding of this important issue.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendations made by the the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee in its report on the Mineworkers' Pension Scheme published on the 29 April 2021.

I am due to meet the Scheme Trustees next month to discuss the Committee’s report. I am keen to get their views and will respond formally to the Committee following that discussion.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2024 to Question 14282 on Football: Regulation, what her planned timescales are for establishing an independent regulator for football.

The Government is working at pace to establish a new independent regulator on a statutory footing as soon as parliamentary time allows. We are on the side of football fans and the local communities that football clubs serve. We have a clear plan to deliver a sustainable future for football, with fans at its heart.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of Multi-Sports Grassroots Facilities programme projects 2023-24 on the (a) engagement and (b) participation of women and girls in sport.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health and this government is committed to ensuring that everyone is able to play sport and be active, including women and girls.

As part of our more than £300 million investment in multi-sport grassroots facilities, our delivery partners assess all potential projects against their ability to deliver increased participation of under-represented groups - including women and girls, ethnic minority communities and people from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Any project receiving over £25,000 in England must also have an equal access women and girls plan in place.

The Government also recently announced £25 million for the Lionesses Futures Fund - topped up with £5 million additional investment from the FA - specifically to deliver up to 30 state of the art 3G artificial pitches across the country with gold-standard provision for women and girls. Reserved peak-time slots, women and girls only evenings and priority booking for women and girls’ teams will be used to drive up opportunities to get into sport. There will also be dedicated women’s changing rooms and shower facilities and accessible toilets.

We are conducting a programme wide impact evaluation. This will measure the extent to which the programme has delivered increases in participation among women and girls so that these interventions can be applied more widely if successful.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2024 to Question 10161 on Future of Women's Football Review, if she will list all future meeting dates of the implementation group.

The Secretary of State will chair the first meeting of the implementation group in March and future meetings will be chaired by either the Secretary of State or Minister for Sport.

The implementation group will include key decision-makers from the organisations with responsibility for taking forward the Review recommendations. These organisations are the FA, NewCo, Football Foundation, Sport England, the Sports Ground Safety Authority, the EFL, the Department for Education and the Premier League. The Secretary of State will be writing to senior representatives to formally invite them to the first meeting in March.

As set out in the Review, these representatives will be required to provide updates at the implementation group. DCMS will convene the group and will provide a secretariat function to make sure stakeholders are progressing with the recommendations, and we will monitor this accordingly.

We remain committed to hosting the initial implementation group meetings in March and July 2024. We will work collaboratively with stakeholders to assess the frequency of the future implementation group meetings.

We will continue to keep Ministers, Parliament and the Culture, Media and Sports Select Committee updated on progress.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2024 to Question 10161 on Future of Women's Football Review, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the (a) transparency and (b) accountability arrangements for the implementation group in the context of its reporting to (i) Ministers, (ii) Parliament and (iii) the Culture Media and Sports Select Committee.

The Secretary of State will chair the first meeting of the implementation group in March and future meetings will be chaired by either the Secretary of State or Minister for Sport.

The implementation group will include key decision-makers from the organisations with responsibility for taking forward the Review recommendations. These organisations are the FA, NewCo, Football Foundation, Sport England, the Sports Ground Safety Authority, the EFL, the Department for Education and the Premier League. The Secretary of State will be writing to senior representatives to formally invite them to the first meeting in March.

As set out in the Review, these representatives will be required to provide updates at the implementation group. DCMS will convene the group and will provide a secretariat function to make sure stakeholders are progressing with the recommendations, and we will monitor this accordingly.

We remain committed to hosting the initial implementation group meetings in March and July 2024. We will work collaboratively with stakeholders to assess the frequency of the future implementation group meetings.

We will continue to keep Ministers, Parliament and the Culture, Media and Sports Select Committee updated on progress.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2024 to Question 10161 on Future of Women's Football Review, if she will list who has (a) been invited and (b) accepted invitations to join the implementation group.

The Secretary of State will chair the first meeting of the implementation group in March and future meetings will be chaired by either the Secretary of State or Minister for Sport.

The implementation group will include key decision-makers from the organisations with responsibility for taking forward the Review recommendations. These organisations are the FA, NewCo, Football Foundation, Sport England, the Sports Ground Safety Authority, the EFL, the Department for Education and the Premier League. The Secretary of State will be writing to senior representatives to formally invite them to the first meeting in March.

As set out in the Review, these representatives will be required to provide updates at the implementation group. DCMS will convene the group and will provide a secretariat function to make sure stakeholders are progressing with the recommendations, and we will monitor this accordingly.

We remain committed to hosting the initial implementation group meetings in March and July 2024. We will work collaboratively with stakeholders to assess the frequency of the future implementation group meetings.

We will continue to keep Ministers, Parliament and the Culture, Media and Sports Select Committee updated on progress.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which listed places of worship in (a) the North East and (b) Sunderland received funding since 2019; and how much each received.

The Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme was established to provide grants towards VAT paid on repairs and maintenance to the nation's listed places or worship. Through this grant scheme, 829 awards have been issued to places of worship in the North East of England since 2019, amounting to a total of £3,532,709. In Sunderland, 39 awards have been issued to places of worship since 2019, amounting to a total of £663,885.

A dataset showing a full list of grant scheme recipients since August 2022 is available here on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/nearly-5000-churches-across-the-united-kingdom-benefit-from-42-million-conservation-fund.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what her Department's policy is on how the independent regulator of football will interact with the newly formed women’s elite football NewCo.

Karen Carney’s independent review into women’s football recommended that the women’s game should be given the opportunity to self-regulate rather than moving immediately to independent statutory regulation. The Government agrees with that recommendation, as set out in our response to the Review.

The independent regulator for English football will be focused on the top five tiers of the men’s game. Where appropriate, it will cooperate, coordinate and share information with the relevant industry bodies in the women’s game to help deliver the shared goal of a successful, sustainable English game.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government response to independent review: reframing the opportunity in women’s football, published on 4 December 2023, if she will list the names of the people who have (a) been invited to join (b) accepted a place on the implementation group.

The implementation group will include key-decision makers across industry with responsibility for taking forward the Reviews recommendations. We are working at pace with industry to confirm who will sit on the implementation group.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government response to independent review: reframing the opportunity in women’s football, published on 4 December 2023, what powers the implementation group of stakeholders announced in the Government’s response to the Carney Review will have to hold (a) the FA, (b) NewCo and (c) the Government to account; and how the implementation group will publish its findings.

The Government supports the recommendations set out in the Review of Women's Football, and believes that these must be acted on as a priority to ensure that we build on the unprecedented successes of recent years, and maximise the potential of the women’s game.

The implementation group will include key decision-makers from organisations with responsibility for taking forward the recommendations set out in the Review. Implementation group members will be mutually accountable for delivery of the recommendations, with members providing updates on how they are addressing the recommendations.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with domestic sporting authorities on steps to reduce the number of Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries among female athletes.

The Review of Women’s Football, published in July this year, examined the strategic priorities for the development of women's football and made recommendations on the future direction of the women's game. It highlighted the lack of sport exercise and scientific research which currently exists in women’s sport and that only 6% of sport exercise and science research involves only women. This lack of awareness means female athletes are often not being given the protection, expertise and support they need.

The Government has been speaking to the football authorities on all matters within the review, and is due to respond to the review in the autumn. We will address ACL injuries directly in that response, holding relevant stakeholders to account for action around player welfare.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2023 to Question 198058 on Football: Afghanistan, whether she plans to hold discussions with FIFA on the Afghanistan Women's National (a) Team and (b) Development Team.

We have no plans to hold discussions with FIFA on the Afghanistan Women’s National Team or Development Team. I was delighted to attend their training session and meet the inspirational players during my recent visit to Australia for the FIFA Women’s World Cup. However, international sports federations operate independently of governments, as reflected in their own governance and regulation, therefore I am unable to intervene.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has taken recent steps to determine the prevalence of reinforced autoclave aerated concrete (RAAC) in privately-owned sporting facilities.

Individual building owners and managers are responsible for health and safety, including responding to safety alerts such as RAAC.

On the 1st May 2019, the Standing Committee on Structural Safety issued a safety alert on the failure of RAAC planks. Following this, the Cabinet Office wrote to all government departments and NHS England wrote to NHS Trusts highlighting the latest developments and advice.

Since then, individual organisations have been surveying properties and, depending on the assessment of the RAAC, decided to either monitor it, prop it up, or replace it. This is in line with Institution of Structural Engineers guidance.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with her French counterparts on the safety of British supporters at sporting events in France in the context of the experience of (a) Liverpool fans at the Stade de France in 2022, and (b) Rugby fans in Marseille in 2023.

Following some spectators experiencing delays entering the Stade Velodrome in Marseille on 9 September, HM Government officials engaged with the French authorities and counterparts at the France 2023 Organising Committee and have received reassurance that improvements, including clearer signage, will be in place for future Rugby World Cup 2023 matches.

Improvements were in place for matches on Sunday 10 September and we continue to engage with the French authorities on security arrangements for the tournament.

The safety of all attendees at sporting events is of the highest importance to the government and the Secretary of State and I have engaged with counterparts regularly following the Champions League Final in Paris in 2022. We continue to consider and reflect on the lessons learned from the events witnessed in Paris in 2022 to inform planning for the UEFA Champions League Final in 2024 at Wembley, as well as our UK and Ireland EURO 2028 bid.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had recent discussions with FIFA on the Afghanistan Women's National Team.

I have not had discussions with FIFA on the Afghanistan Women’s National Team. However, I was delighted to attend their training session and to meet the players during my recent visit to Australia for the FIFA Women’s World Cup, in an event arranged by the Australian Government to highlight their situation.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Education on school (a) sporting and (b) leisure buildings that are affected by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete. .

Individual building owners and managers are responsible for health and safety, including responding to safety alerts such as RAAC.

On the 1st May 2019, the Standing Committee on Structural Safety issued a safety alert on the failure of RAAC planks. Following this, the Cabinet Office wrote to all Government Departments and NHS England wrote to NHS Trusts highlighting the latest developments and advice.

Since then, individual organisations have been surveying properties and, depending on the assessment of the RAAC, decided to either monitor it, prop it up, or replace it. This is in line with Institution of Structural Engineers guidance.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to identify (a) leisure, (b) recreation and (c) sporting facilities that are affected by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete.

Individual building owners and managers are responsible for health and safety, including responding to safety alerts such as RAAC.

On the 1st May 2019, the Standing Committee on Structural Safety issued a safety alert on the failure of RAAC planks. Following this, the Cabinet Office wrote to all Government Departments and NHS England wrote to NHS Trusts highlighting the latest developments and advice.

Since then, individual organisations have been surveying properties and, depending on the assessment of the RAAC, decided to either monitor it, prop it up, or replace it. This is in line with Institution of Structural Engineers guidance.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has made a recent assessment of the potential risk posed by reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete used in (a) leisure, (b) recreation and (c) sporting facilities.

Individual building owners and managers are responsible for health and safety, including responding to safety alerts such as RAAC.

On the 1st May 2019, the Standing Committee on Structural Safety issued a safety alert on the failure of RAAC planks. Following this, the Cabinet Office wrote to all Government Departments and NHS England wrote to NHS Trusts highlighting the latest developments and advice.

Since then, individual organisations have been surveying properties and, depending on the assessment of the RAAC, decided to either monitor it, prop it up, or replace it. This is in line with Institution of Structural Engineers guidance.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the planned Crown Works Studios in Sunderland on (a) Sunderland and (b) the North East.

I am aware of the Crown Works studio proposal in Sunderland and look forward to continuing my engagement with stakeholders to hear more about this project. I regularly engage with Cabinet colleagues on matters related to the creative industries.

The recently published Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out the Government’s ambition to maximise the potential of the creative industries. It details our plans to grow these industries by an extra £50bn and create a million extra jobs by 2030, and build a pipeline of talent and opportunity for young people through a Creative Careers Promise. The film and television industries play an important role in the wider creative industries.

My department continues to work closely with its Arm’s Length Body, the British Film Institute (BFI), to ensure a wide range of funding and initiatives are available to support the film industry. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. The BFI produces the Screen Business Report, which assesses the impact of the tax reliefs across all nations and regions of the UK.

The £28.4 million Create Growth Programme (CGP), is supporting creative businesses to attract private investment through a combination of capital, business support and investor capacity building. It currently covers six regions in England, including parts of the North East of England.

The British Film Institute also launched their skills clusters programme in April, committing £8.1m of National Lottery funding over 2023-26 to support the development of six regional skills clusters across the UK. The funding focuses on establishing localised support for skills development and training, building on existing production infrastructure, with the aim to develop local crew bases and create new opportunities for people from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue careers in the sector. Screen Yorkshire, Liverpool Film Office, Screen Manchester, and North East Screen have partnered together, under the name ‘Screen Alliance North’, to jointly lead the ‘North of England’ cluster - which has been awarded £2.3m for 2023-26.

28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of investment in the film and tv industry in Sunderland on (a) industry skills shortages, (b) local employment opportunities and (c) levels of private investment in (i) Sunderland and (ii) the North East.

I am aware of the Crown Works studio proposal in Sunderland and look forward to continuing my engagement with stakeholders to hear more about this project. I regularly engage with Cabinet colleagues on matters related to the creative industries.

The recently published Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out the Government’s ambition to maximise the potential of the creative industries. It details our plans to grow these industries by an extra £50bn and create a million extra jobs by 2030, and build a pipeline of talent and opportunity for young people through a Creative Careers Promise. The film and television industries play an important role in the wider creative industries.

My department continues to work closely with its Arm’s Length Body, the British Film Institute (BFI), to ensure a wide range of funding and initiatives are available to support the film industry. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. The BFI produces the Screen Business Report, which assesses the impact of the tax reliefs across all nations and regions of the UK.

The £28.4 million Create Growth Programme (CGP), is supporting creative businesses to attract private investment through a combination of capital, business support and investor capacity building. It currently covers six regions in England, including parts of the North East of England.

The British Film Institute also launched their skills clusters programme in April, committing £8.1m of National Lottery funding over 2023-26 to support the development of six regional skills clusters across the UK. The funding focuses on establishing localised support for skills development and training, building on existing production infrastructure, with the aim to develop local crew bases and create new opportunities for people from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue careers in the sector. Screen Yorkshire, Liverpool Film Office, Screen Manchester, and North East Screen have partnered together, under the name ‘Screen Alliance North’, to jointly lead the ‘North of England’ cluster - which has been awarded £2.3m for 2023-26.

28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the Crown Works Studios development in Sunderland.

I am aware of the Crown Works studio proposal in Sunderland and look forward to continuing my engagement with stakeholders to hear more about this project. I regularly engage with Cabinet colleagues on matters related to the creative industries.

The recently published Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out the Government’s ambition to maximise the potential of the creative industries. It details our plans to grow these industries by an extra £50bn and create a million extra jobs by 2030, and build a pipeline of talent and opportunity for young people through a Creative Careers Promise. The film and television industries play an important role in the wider creative industries.

My department continues to work closely with its Arm’s Length Body, the British Film Institute (BFI), to ensure a wide range of funding and initiatives are available to support the film industry. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. The BFI produces the Screen Business Report, which assesses the impact of the tax reliefs across all nations and regions of the UK.

The £28.4 million Create Growth Programme (CGP), is supporting creative businesses to attract private investment through a combination of capital, business support and investor capacity building. It currently covers six regions in England, including parts of the North East of England.

The British Film Institute also launched their skills clusters programme in April, committing £8.1m of National Lottery funding over 2023-26 to support the development of six regional skills clusters across the UK. The funding focuses on establishing localised support for skills development and training, building on existing production infrastructure, with the aim to develop local crew bases and create new opportunities for people from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue careers in the sector. Screen Yorkshire, Liverpool Film Office, Screen Manchester, and North East Screen have partnered together, under the name ‘Screen Alliance North’, to jointly lead the ‘North of England’ cluster - which has been awarded £2.3m for 2023-26.

28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of the (a) findings on crew shortages and associated issues and (b) recommendation on the strategic deployment of industry investment in the report by the British Film Institute entitled BFI Skills Review 2022, published on 29 June 2022.

The recently published Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out the Government’s ambition to maximise the potential of the creative industries. It details our plans to grow these industries by an extra £50bn and create a million extra jobs by 2030, and build a pipeline of talent and opportunity for young people through a Creative Careers Promise. The film and television industries play an important role in the wider creative industries.

We recognise how important it is for the film and television sector to have access to a pipeline of skilled workers. To better understand the skills needed in our Film and High-End TV sector, the Government commissioned the British Film Institute (BFI) to undertake the UK Film and High-End TV Skills Review, which the BFI published in June 2022.

We continue to work closely with the BFI and industry following the review. As set out in its National Lottery Funding Plan (2023-26), the BFI has committed £9 million of National Lottery funding to create Skills Clusters to support skills development and training at a local level across the UK, as recommended by the Review.

The BFI has also helped to elicit greater industry collaboration around training and workforce development, convening a new industry-led Skills Task Force to respond to the Review and develop a plan of action. I look forward to continued engagement with the BFI and the Task Force on their progress.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the (a) economic contribution of the film and television industries to each region and (b) potential economic benefit of increased investment in that industry in the North East.

The recently published Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out the Government’s ambition to maximise the potential of the creative industries. It details our plans to grow these industries by an extra £50bn and create a million extra jobs by 2030, and build a pipeline of talent and opportunity for young people through a Creative Careers Promise. The film and television industries play an important role in the wider creative industries.

My department continues to work closely with its Arm’s Length Body, the British Film Institute (BFI), to ensure a wide range of funding and initiatives are available to support the film industry. This is in addition to the UK-wide screen sector tax reliefs, and the UK Global Screen Fund which will invest £28 million in the international growth of independent screen companies across the UK. The BFI produces the Screen Business Report, which assesses the impact of the tax reliefs across all nations and regions of the UK.

The £28.4 million Create Growth Programme (CGP) is supporting creative businesses to attract private investment through a combination of capital, business support and investor capacity building. It currently covers six regions in England, including parts of the North East of England.

The British Film Institute also launched their skills clusters programme in April, committing £8.1m of National Lottery funding over 2023-26 to support the development of six regional skills clusters across the UK. The funding focuses on establishing localised support for skills development and training, building on existing production infrastructure, with the aim to develop local crew bases and create new opportunities for people from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue careers in the sector. Screen Yorkshire, Liverpool Film Office, Screen Manchester, and North East Screen have partnered together, under the name ‘Screen Alliance North’, to jointly lead the ‘North of England’ cluster - which has been awarded £2.3m for 2023-26.

I am aware of the Crown Works studio proposal in Sunderland and I look forward to continuing my engagement with stakeholders to hear more about this project.