Alison Thewliss Portrait

Alison Thewliss

Scottish National Party - Glasgow Central

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Treasury)

(since June 2017)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Treasury Committee
10th Jun 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill (Joint)
19th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Procedure Committee
20th Nov 2017 - 24th Jun 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Cities)
20th May 2015 - 1st Jul 2018
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Department Event
Wednesday 27th October 2021
HM Treasury
Financial Statement - Main Chamber
Budget statement
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
11:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021
1 Nov 2021, 11 a.m.
At 11.05am: Oral evidence
Richard Hughes - Chairman at Office for Budget Responsibility
Professor Sir Charlie Bean - Member of Budget Responsibility Committee at Office for Budget Responsibility
Andy King - Member of Budget Responsibility Committee at Office for Budget Responsibility
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Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
15:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021
1 Nov 2021, 3 p.m.
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Rishi Sunak MP - Chancellor of the Exchequer at HM Treasury
Dan York-Smith - Director of Strategy, Planning and Budget at HM Treasury
Conrad Smewing - Director of Public Spending at HM Treasury
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Department Event
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 Nov 2021, 11:30 a.m.
HM Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 7th December 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 37 Scottish National Party No votes vs 0 Scottish National Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Budget: Pre-announcement of Provisions

I do not know whether to congratulate the Minister on his promotion, as he has come here to give us …

Written Answers
Thursday 21st October 2021
Companies: Scotland
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the value was of fines levied against …
Early Day Motions
Monday 25th October 2021
Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett
That this House extends its congratulations to Great Britain’s most successful ever tennis doubles partnership Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett, …
Bills
Wednesday 14th March 2018
Supervised Drug Consumption Facilities Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
Tweets
Wednesday 27th October 2021
15:34
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th October 2020
8. Miscellaneous
From 13 August 2020, Honorary Vice President, Energy Action Scotland. This is an unpaid post. (Registered 15 October 2020)
EDM signed
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Death and recognition of Walter Smith OBE
That this House expresses its deep sorrow at the death of Rangers Football Club legend, and one of the great …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 3rd March 2020
School Toilets (Access During Lessons) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish guidance for state-funded schools on allowing pupil access to toilets …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Alison Thewliss has voted in 251 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alison Thewliss Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jesse Norman (Conservative)
(43 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(40 debate interactions)
Pat McFadden (Labour)
Shadow Economic Secretary (Treasury)
(29 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(315 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(43 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(18 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Alison Thewliss's debates

Glasgow Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Glasgow Central signature proportion
Petitions with most Glasgow Central signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Every year more and more people, animals and wildlife get hurt by fireworks. It’s time something was fine to stop this. There are enough organised firework groups around for us to still enjoy fireworks safely so please help me stop the needless sale of them to the public!

In light of the recent outbreak and lock down, those on maternity leave should be given 3 extra months paid leave, at least. This time is for bonding and social engaging with other parents and babies through baby groups which are vital for development and now everything has been cancelled.


Latest EDMs signed by Alison Thewliss

26th October 2021
Alison Thewliss signed this EDM on Tuesday 26th October 2021

Death and recognition of Walter Smith OBE

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House expresses its deep sorrow at the death of Rangers Football Club legend, and one of the great modern day football managers, Walter Smith OBE; recognises Walter's extraordinary contribution to Scottish football, both as a manager and as a player, beginning his playing career at Dundee United in …
39 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 31
Labour: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
Independent: 1
25th October 2021
Alison Thewliss signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Monday 25th October 2021

Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett

Tabled by: Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party - Glasgow Central)
That this House extends its congratulations to Great Britain’s most successful ever tennis doubles partnership Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett, from Alexandria and Cantley, for becoming the first ever wheelchair tennis pair to complete the calendar Grand Slam in men’s doubles; acknowledges how Reid and Hewett’s commitment, athleticism and teamwork …
7 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Alison Thewliss's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alison Thewliss, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by Alison Thewliss

Monday 26th April 2021

Alison Thewliss has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Alison Thewliss


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about supervised drug consumption facilities; to make it lawful to take controlled substances within such facilities in specified circumstances; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 14th March 2018
(Read Debate)

A Bill to control the advertising and promotion of feeding products for babies and children; to establish arrangements to set standards for the efficacy of products and to measure claims against those standards; to make provision about penalties for advertisers and promoters who do not meet the standards; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 16th November 2016
(Read Debate)

207 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
11th Feb 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he is taking to engage with the residents of Glasgow Central in preparation of the COP26.

Glasgow businesses and residents play a crucial role in the delivery and overall success of an event such as COP26. The Government is working with Glasgow City Council to engage local people around COP26 through local activations. We launched a Host City Volunteering programme in January to recruit volunteers at COP26, who will play a key role in representing Glasgow and the UK to delegates from around the world.

Through the ‘Get Ready Glasgow’ public information campaign, Glasgow City Council have developed an integrated and tailored programme of sustained and timely communication and engagement activities with local residents and businesses. This will inform them about the impacts on city operations and daily lives, and the opportunities presenting themselves to residents and local businesses by being the host city.

Through the 'Together for our Planet' campaign, the Government will continue engaging the whole country in the conversation around climate change leading up to COP26. The campaign will celebrate people across the UK already taking action and inspire more to join them.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
13th Jan 2021
What recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on supporting older people in accessing pension credit.

The Government wants to ensure that all eligible pensioners are able to claim Pension Credit. In May 2020, DWP launched a new online claim service. This offers an additional channel through which pensioners can be supported to make a claim with the help of family, friends and organisations.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
26th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what emergency childcare provision is available to staff working in 10 Downing Street.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of the Cabinet Office. All Civil Servants that work at the Cabinet Office are able to access parental support policies, such as Parental Leave and Flexible Working.

With due consideration to COVID-19, Civil Servants are able to manage childcare arrangements with the support of paid special leave and flexible working, where alternative provisions cannot be found.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to his Written Statement of 20 December 2019, Official Report HCWS15, to which specific programmes and for which specific purposes he plans to allocate that cash advance from the Contingencies Fund.

The cash advance of £107.134 million will be noted in the Supplementary Estimate 2019-20. The Supplementary Estimate will be published in February 2020 and will detail each element of funding and its purpose.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the value was of fines levied against Scottish Limited Partnerships for failing to register people with significant control in each of the last three years.

One fine has been levied against a Scottish Limited Partnership for failing to register people with significant control in the current 2021/2022 Financial Year.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many fines have been levied against Scottish Limited Partnerships for failing to register people with significant control in each of the last three years.

One fine has been levied against a Scottish Limited Partnership for failing to register people with significant control in the current 2021/2022 Financial Year.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to require large private and public companies to produce a scenario analysis on the impacts that climate change will have on their business model and strategy.

The UK Government recently published a consultation on mandatory climate-related financial disclosures by publicly quoted companies, large private companies and LLPs. This covered our proposals on scenario analysis. This consultation closed on 5 May. We are carefully considering all of the responses to the consultation, and will publish a response by the end of the year.

In November 2020, the Government announced its intention to make Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures-aligned disclosures mandatory across the economy by 2025, and our Roadmap towards mandatory climate related disclosures will help ensure that the right information on climate-related risks and opportunities is available across the investment chain.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish a Heat and Building Strategy.

As my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State set out in the BEIS Select Committee on 20th July 2021, the Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. The strategy will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings, as well as our approach to the key strategic decisions needed to achieve a mass transition to low-carbon heat.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department intends to require large (a) private and (b) public companies to make disclosures on Scope 3 emissions.

The Government supports the role of corporate transparency as an important part of delivering net zero. Indeed, the UK has led global efforts in introducing measures to increase corporate transparency, and in 2013 was the first country to make it compulsory for quoted companies to include global emissions data for their entire organisation in their annual reports; and in April 2019, these reporting requirements have been extended with the introduction of the Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting Regulations, increasing tenfold the number of businesses required to publicly disclose their direct energy use and carbon emissions in annual reports.

Many businesses already measure and report their indirect/Scope 3 carbon emissions information under a range of voluntary schemes, and as part of the recently published consultation on Mandatory Climate-related Financial Disclosures, we sought views on whether Scope 3 emissions reporting should remain voluntary. The consultation closed on 5 May, and we are now considering carefully all of the responses to the consultation and a response will be published by the end of the year.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received from investors on the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on UK shareholder’s voting rights in EU registered companies.

We have not had any representations from stakeholders on UK shareholder’s voting rights in EU registered companies.

UK investors and business owners should be aware that there may be changes to their ability to own, manage or direct a company registered in the EU from 1 January 2021. UK citizens that own or run business operations in an EU country may need to comply with different requirements (those which currently apply to other businesses from non-EU countries) in the country they are operating in. More information on this can be found on GOV.UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received from energy providers based overseas on the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on their investment plans in the UK.

The UK is one of the most open environments for investment across the world. According to the OECD, the UK is the third least restrictive nation amongst the G20. The UK-EU agreement will provide certainty and transparency to EU investors operating in the UK, and vice-versa.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to seek a future agreement with the EU on energy markets.

The free trade agreement with the EU provides for cooperation on a range of energy matters in order to support and strengthen the UK and EU’s shared energy objectives. The UK and the EU are committed to cooperating closely on efficient trading, energy markets and access to networks. Other matters for cooperation include security of supply, future energy systems and the prevention of market abuse.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to amend employment law in response to the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

As an independent, sovereign nation we are now ideally placed to capitalise on the wealth of opportunities available to us.

Commitments made in this trade agreement recognise our existing regulatory high standards. We have committed to maintain our high labour standards, whilst retaining flexibility for us to tailor our approach to what works for the UK. We want to go further than ever before to uphold workers’ rights, support UK businesses and ultimately boost productivity in the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the appropriateness of the eight week notice period mothers on maternity leave must give employers before returning to work and being placed on the Job Retention Scheme.

Maternity Leave is provided to enable employed pregnant women and new mothers to prepare for and recover from birth and bond with their child.

The eight week notice period for women returning to work before the end of Maternity Leave enables employers to plan around a woman’s return to work. This may include consideration of whether the individual should be placed on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), depending on the employer’s circumstances. The decision to furlough an employee is something that needs to be agreed between the employer and employee.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether mothers returning from maternity leave before the 31 Oct 2020 and were made redundant due to the original end date of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will be eligible to be rehired over winter 2020-21.

Employees that are made redundant or stopped working for an employer on or after 23 September 2020 can rehired and put back on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), provided that the employee was employed on 23 September 2020 and a PAYE RTI submission was made to HMRC between 20 March 2020 and October 2020.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the implications of the accrual of annual leave by mothers on maternity leave for women who have been furloughed through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The Government has been clear that employment rights remain unchanged under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). Therefore, workers who are both on maternity leave and on furlough will continue to accrue annual leave as they would if they were not on furlough.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2020 to Question 1357, what the current status is of The Office for Product Safety and Standards fact-based evidence base on the key issues that have been raised on fireworks.

The Government does not have plans to bring forward additional legislative proposals on fireworks. There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place.

We are taking action to promote the safe and considerate use of fireworks, including a public awareness campaign on fireworks for this season involving safety charities, animal welfare organisations and retail bodies.

Product safety and liability are reserved matters. The regulation of fireworks for these purposes is covered by the Fireworks Regulations 2004 and the Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015. The misuse and discharge of fireworks is a devolved matter to Scotland. Northern Ireland has its own fireworks regulatory framework. We continue to work closely with the Devolved Administrations to ensure the safety of the public across the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to devolve legislation regarding fireworks.

The Government does not have plans to bring forward additional legislative proposals on fireworks. There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place.

We are taking action to promote the safe and considerate use of fireworks, including a public awareness campaign on fireworks for this season involving safety charities, animal welfare organisations and retail bodies.

Product safety and liability are reserved matters. The regulation of fireworks for these purposes is covered by the Fireworks Regulations 2004 and the Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015. The misuse and discharge of fireworks is a devolved matter to Scotland. Northern Ireland has its own fireworks regulatory framework. We continue to work closely with the Devolved Administrations to ensure the safety of the public across the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals on fireworks in the 2019-21 session of Parliament.

The Government does not have plans to bring forward additional legislative proposals on fireworks. There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place.

We are taking action to promote the safe and considerate use of fireworks, including a public awareness campaign on fireworks for this season involving safety charities, animal welfare organisations and retail bodies.

Product safety and liability are reserved matters. The regulation of fireworks for these purposes is covered by the Fireworks Regulations 2004 and the Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015. The misuse and discharge of fireworks is a devolved matter to Scotland. Northern Ireland has its own fireworks regulatory framework. We continue to work closely with the Devolved Administrations to ensure the safety of the public across the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Scottish Limited Partnerships have failed to register a Person of Significant Control in each of the last three years.

Companies House considers 10,800 of the Scottish Limited Partnerships (‘SLPs’) on the register to be active. Of these, 948 SLPs have not filed PSC information as at 31st January 2020.1 This compares to 2,019 in January 2019 and 7,078 in January 2018.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many fines have been levied against Scottish Limited Partnerships for failing to register a Person of Significant Control in each of the last three years.

No Scottish Limited Partnerships (SLPs) have been fined since the People with Significant Control register came into force. Compliance is Companies House’s primary aim, rather than prosecution. It is taking action to ensure that all SLPs report their PSC information. Companies House is actively engaged with SLPs and their representatives to make them aware of their responsibilities. Failure to comply with the requirement to report PSC information does not incur a civil penalty but it is an offence and may lead to a fine or imprisonment upon prosecution. Companies House is not a prosecuting body and will refer cases to a relevant prosecutor when all other avenues have been exhausted and an SLP has not complied with their obligations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Scottish Limited Partnerships are qualifying under the terms of the Scottish Partnerships (Register of People with Significant Control) Regulations 2017 and the Companies and Partnerships (Accounts and Audit) Regulations 2013.

All registered Scottish Limited Partnerships (SLPs) are required to comply with the Scottish Partnerships (Register of People with Significant Control) Regulations 2017. As of 31 January 2020, there were 34,245 live1 Scottish limited partnerships (“SLPs”) on the register. Of these, Companies House considers around 10,800 of these SLPs to be active. These regulations also require a Scottish qualifying partnership (SQP) to register with Companies House and deliver information concerning its People with Significant Control (PSC). A SQP is a general partnership constituted under the law of Scotland that is a qualifying partnership under the Partnership (Accounts) Regulations 2008. As at the end of January 2020, there were 330 Scottish Qualified Partnerships bodies that declared as being eligible as SQPs.

  1. Live Scottish Limited Partnerships refers to Scottish Limited Partnerships that are not dissolved/closed. Under current legislation, Scottish Limited Partnerships are unable to dissolve/close or be removed from the register. Therefore, this will include on the register a significant volume that have not carried out any activity.
Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the value was of fines levied against Scottish Limited Partnerships for failing to register a Person of Significant Control in each of the last three years.

No such fines have been levied against Scottish Limited Partnerships. Compliance is Companies House’s primary aim, rather than prosecution. It is taking action to ensure that all SLPs report their PSC information. Companies House is actively engaged with SLPs and their representatives to make them aware of their responsibilities. Failure to comply with the requirement to report PSC information does not incur a civil penalty but it is an offence and may lead to a fine or imprisonment upon prosecution. Companies House is not a prosecuting body and will refer cases to a relevant prosecutor when all other avenues have been exhausted and an SLP has not complied with their obligations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people have been prosecuted for filing false information to Companies House in each of the last three years.

The knowing or reckless filing of false information at Companies House is a criminal offence under section 1112 of the Companies Act 2006. According to its internal case management system, the Insolvency Service – which has lead responsibility for bringing prosecutions for this offence in England and Wales - has prosecuted five separate individuals under section 1112 of the Companies Act 2006 in the last three years.

The Enforcement Team at Companies House is unaware of any such prosecutions having been brought in Scotland or Northern Ireland during this period.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress her Department has made in its assessment of the use of fireworks in the UK.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is developing a fact-based evidence base on the key issues that have been raised around fireworks. This includes looking at data on noise and disturbance, anti-social behaviour, non-compliance, environmental impact, and the impact on humans and animals. This will build a fuller picture of the data around fireworks in order to identify whether further action is appropriate.

The work to develop a full evidence base is an ongoing exercise which is not time limited and we will report in due course.

8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to her Written Statement of 7 January 2020, Official Report HCWS20, whether an equality impact assessment was carried out when setting those national minimum wage rates.

This April, the Government will be increasing the National Living Wage by 6.2% to £8.72, meeting the Government’s target of reaching 60% of median earnings by 2020. Younger workers and apprentices will also see inflation beating increases in the NMW rates of between 4.6% and 6.5%. The Low Pay Commission estimates that these increases to the NMW and NLW will directly benefit over 2.8 million workers.

An equality impact assessment was carried out when setting these minimum wage rates. The evidence suggests that there will be disproportionate positive wage impacts on protected groups as a result of the proposed increase in the minimum wage rates. As in previous years, the equality impact assessment will be published within the Government’s full impact assessment in due course.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to introduce transition funding to support touring musicians.

The UK’s creative industries are the finest in the world and this government is determined to support them.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are working with the creative and cultural sectors to help them get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

As the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency, and have provided much greater clarity about the current position, including through the DCMS-led working group. The group has discussed the issues faced by the sector, has worked to provide clarity regarding the practical steps that need to be taken by touring professionals when touring the EU, and has explored further steps as to how these sectors can be supported to work and tour in the EU with confidence. This includes looking closely at proposals for an Export Office that could provide further practical help.

Through bilateral engagement with EU Member States, we have established that at least 17 out of 27 Member States, including France and Germany, allow some visa and permit free touring. We are now engaging with those Member States that do not have any visa or permit free touring to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach in line with the UK’s own rules, which allow creative professionals to tour easily here.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what financial support he plans to provide to the English language teaching sector in 2021 in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The International Education Strategy recognises the crucial contribution of the English language to the UK's global potential and the important role of the English language training sector. Our update to this strategy, published on 6 February 2021, outlines the government’s support for the education sector, including English language training, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak as well as work across government aimed at improving the ability of the English language training sector to export their services and expertise.

English language schools are privately run businesses who teach fee-paying students in the UK and as such, are not in receipt of any funding from the department for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) provision. The department provides ESOL provision for people already resident within the UK through the Adult Education Budget.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether vets, veterinary nurses and people in related professions are key workers under the covid-19 guidance.

The designation of key workers is a devolved matter and the Scottish Government has published guidance covering Scotland.

The Scottish Government has defined categories of workers as a guide for Local Authorities to use when designating key workers. This approach means there may be slight differences in each community in Scotland to address local priorities.

The relevant section of the Government covid-19 guidance, Food and other necessary goods, states that the key worker status includes those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery, as well as those essential to the provision of other key goods (for example hygienic and veterinary medicines).

For more information relating to key worker status for vets please refer to the guidance found at:

www.rcvs.org.uk/news-and-views/news/coronavirus-rcvs-and-bva-issue-joint-guidance-on-key-worker.

For more information on key workers in general please refer to the GOV.UK website at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when the arms export licences to the United States were last reviewed.

I refer the honourable member to the answer I provided on 8th June.

All countries are under continual review, in line with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (‘Consolidated Criteria’), and my Department is able to review licences – and suspend or revoke as necessary – when circumstances require.

Providing the names of companies licensed to export crowd controlled ammunition and tear gas would disclose commercially sensitive information.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which companies are licensed to export (a) rubber bullets and (b) tear gas; and to which countries those items are exported.

I refer the honourable member to the answer I provided on 8th June.

All countries are under continual review, in line with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (‘Consolidated Criteria’), and my Department is able to review licences – and suspend or revoke as necessary – when circumstances require.

Providing the names of companies licensed to export crowd controlled ammunition and tear gas would disclose commercially sensitive information.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will suspend export of (a) rubber bullets and (b) tear gas to the US.

My Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade and I have been sorry to see the violence that has taken place in the United States of America.

All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (‘Consolidated Criteria’). In reaching a decision, the Department for International Trade receives advice from a number of Departments including the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Together, we draw on all available information, including reports from NGOs and our diplomatic missions. The Consolidated Criteria provides a thorough risk assessment framework and requires us to think hard about the impact of exporting any equipment. These are not decisions my Department takes lightly, and we will not license the export of items where to do so would be inconsistent with the Consolidated Criteria.

Any licence granted by my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade may be subject to conditions. In addition, in line with the Consolidated Criteria, my Department is able to review licences – and suspend or revoke as necessary – when circumstances require. There are currently eight extant licences that may be linked to law enforcement agencies. Six are Open Individual Export Licences (‘OIELs’), which have potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. Two are Standard Individual Export Licences (‘SIELs’), which have numerous potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. There are also 15 Open General Licences (‘OGLs’) for which businesses can register that cover the export of anti-riot gear.

Much information is in the public domain already. We publish information on all export licences issued, refused and revoked on a quarterly and annual basis as official statistics on GOV.UK – at: gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data – and whilst data on actual exports is not required to be centrally held, the licences issued until the end of December 2019 are available.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will suspend export of (a) rubber bullets and (b) tear gas to the US.

My Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade and I have been sorry to see the violence that has taken place in the United States of America.

All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (‘Consolidated Criteria’). In reaching a decision, the Department for International Trade receives advice from a number of Departments including the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Together, we draw on all available information, including reports from NGOs and our diplomatic missions. The Consolidated Criteria provides a thorough risk assessment framework and requires us to think hard about the impact of exporting any equipment. These are not decisions my Department takes lightly, and we will not license the export of items where to do so would be inconsistent with the Consolidated Criteria.

Any licence granted by my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade may be subject to conditions. In addition, in line with the Consolidated Criteria, my Department is able to review licences – and suspend or revoke as necessary – when circumstances require. There are currently eight extant licences that may be linked to law enforcement agencies. Six are Open Individual Export Licences (‘OIELs’), which have potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. Two are Standard Individual Export Licences (‘SIELs’), which have numerous potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. There are also 15 Open General Licences (‘OGLs’) for which businesses can register that cover the export of anti-riot gear.

Much information is in the public domain already. We publish information on all export licences issued, refused and revoked on a quarterly and annual basis as official statistics on GOV.UK – at: gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data – and whilst data on actual exports is not required to be centrally held, the licences issued until the end of December 2019 are available.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to mitigate delays in processing the medical approvals that permit PCV drivers to return to work.

The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. Ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union, along with fewer operational staff on site to allow for social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements and an increased demand for its services has led to delays in dealing with paper applications. The DVLA has leased an additional building to accommodate more operational staff.

Currently, driving licence applications made on paper are likely to take six to ten weeks to process. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example, if medical investigations are needed.

The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found here.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process applications as quickly as possible. The DVLA has accelerated the development of additional online services to reduce the number of paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign. Further digital service enhancements are underway.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to mitigate delays in issuing provisional PCV licences.

The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. Ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union, along with fewer operational staff on site to allow for social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements and an increased demand for its services has led to delays in dealing with paper applications. The DVLA has leased an additional building to accommodate more operational staff.

Currently, driving licence applications made on paper are likely to take six to ten weeks to process. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example, if medical investigations are needed.

The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found here.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process applications as quickly as possible. The DVLA has accelerated the development of additional online services to reduce the number of paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign. Further digital service enhancements are underway.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the (a) adequacy of the size of and (b) challenges faced by the PCV driver workforce.

No formal assessment has been carried out. However, the Department engages regularly with operators through representative groups such as the Confederation for Passenger Transport and the Association of Local Bus Managers to understand the challenges that the sector is facing, including workforce related issues.

The PCV driver workforce plays a vital role in delivering essential public services and has faced a number of challenges over the pandemic. My officials have been working with the representative groups to ensure that where issues have emerged they are addressed as effectively as possible, including in areas such as testing and licensing.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to reduce the transmission of covid-19 on ferries.

The Department continues to engage at all levels across the sector to understand the operational issues facing maritime businesses. As part of this, we continue to work closely with Public Health England and DHSC to ensure ferry operators have access to guidance. This guidance contains pragmatic advice and additional clarity for operators on steps to reduce the risk for staff whilst ensuring services keep running https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-shipping-and-sea-ports-guidance

23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether motor factors and independent garages are key workers who are required to keep working under the covid-19 guidance.

As set out in “Guidance: Closing certain businesses and venues” issued by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, garages are among the exceptions to businesses which must close, and may remain open. All non-essential retail must close, including those retailers selling car parts and accessories. However online retailers, including those supplying car parts may remain open.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) work coaches and (b) Disability Employment Advisors by (i) full time equivalent and (ii) headcount her Department has employed in Glasgow in each year since 2010.

The Department for Work and Pensions has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Disability Employment Advisors by (a) full time equivalent and (b) headcount have been employed by her Department in each year since that role was introduced.

The Department for Work and Pensions has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many work coaches by (a) full time equivalent and (b) headcount were employed by her Department in each year since 2010.

The Department for Work and Pensions has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has provided (a) financial and (b) other support to the No Falls Foundation to help the uptake of a no falls charter for those operating in working at height sectors.

To date there has been no discussion between the No Falls Foundation and the Health and Safety Executive about the production of a no falls charter, nor has any financial or other support been provided.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has had recent discussions with the No Falls Foundation on the production of a no falls charter.

To date there has been no discussion between the No Falls Foundation and the Health and Safety Executive about the production of a no falls charter, nor has any financial or other support been provided.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many jobs have been created in third sector organisations through the Kickstart scheme in (a) Glasgow, (b) Scotland and (c) the UK as at 2 September 2021.

I refer the honourable member to the answer given for PQ 36791 for Kickstart statistics on sectors and geographical areas. We are currently not able to publish a breakdown below the regional and national level although expect to be able to do so in due course.

We do not currently hold details of the number of charitable or voluntary sector organisations participating in Kickstart, but this something we plan to investigate as part of the evaluation for scheme. The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have secured employment through the Kickstart scheme to date.

The aim of the Kickstart Scheme is to fund the direct creation of additional jobs for young people at risk of long-term unemployment. Kickstart provides young people with an opportunity to build their skills and confidence in the work place and gain experience that will improve their chances of finding long-term, sustainable work.

As of the 27 May 2021, over 29,000 young people have started jobs created by the Kickstart Scheme.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Kickstart scheme.

I refer the honourable member to the answer given for PQ 2273.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many young people in Glasgow Central have (a) been offered and (b) begun a place under the Kickstart scheme.

Delivering the Kickstart Scheme at pace has meant an initial concentration on the production of a limited data set. We are continuing to develop our data, and we aim to be able to publish more localised data (including by Parliamentary constituency) in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employers in Glasgow Central constituency have been signed up to the Kickstart scheme as at 27 May 2021.

Delivering the Kickstart Scheme at pace has meant an initial concentration on the production of a limited data set. We are continuing to develop our data, and we aim to be able to publish more localised data (including by Parliamentary constituency) in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the equality impact assessment relating to the Kickstart scheme.

The Department for Work and Pensions plans to publish the Equality Impact Assessment on the Kickstart Scheme in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make it her policy to have a target for a proportion of the proposed additional job coach roles to be held by people with disabilities.

DWP is a disability confident, inclusive employer welcoming applications from all candidates through a fair and open approach to recruitment. The department operates a guaranteed interview scheme for candidates who have a disability, provided they can demonstrate that they meet the minimum criteria defined for the job. It is also committed to making reasonable adjustments for disabled candidates throughout the selection process.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who made a claim under the non-consensual sex exemption to the two child limit for (a) child tax credits and (b) universal credit have subsequently had that entitlement removed.

There are no circumstances in which a claimant would be refused an exception where they meet the conditions and have provided relevant information to support their request. This includes contacting a suitable third party professional who can confirm that the claimant’s circumstances, as described by them, are consistent with the criteria for the non-consensual conception exception.

The Department recognises the value that third-party professionals, including health care professionals, registered social workers, and relevant specialist charities can provide to claimants experiencing distressing events.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who have had a claim under the non-consensual sex exemption to the two child limit have had their claim for (a) child tax credits and (b) universal credit rejected.

There are no circumstances in which a claimant would be refused an exception where they meet the conditions and have provided relevant information to support their request. This includes contacting a suitable third party professional who can confirm that the claimant’s circumstances, as described by them, are consistent with the criteria for the non-consensual conception exception.

The Department recognises the value that third-party professionals, including health care professionals, registered social workers, and relevant specialist charities can provide to claimants experiencing distressing events.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the appeals process is for rejected claims under the non-consensual sex exemption to the two child limit for (a) child tax credits and (b) universal credit.

There are no circumstances in which a claimant would be refused an exception where they meet the conditions and have provided relevant information to support their request. This includes contacting a suitable third party professional who can confirm that the claimant’s circumstances, as described by them, are consistent with the criteria for the non-consensual conception exception.

The Department recognises the value that third-party professionals, including health care professionals, registered social workers, and relevant specialist charities can provide to claimants experiencing distressing events.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what conditions will be placed on employers participating in the Kickstart jobs scheme to protect the employment conditions of workers aged 25 and over.

The Kickstart scheme will protect the employment conditions of workers aged 25 and over. Jobs available to young people, aged 16-24, will be new jobs - with the funding conditional on the employer demonstrating these jobs are additional. Further details about the Kickstart Scheme will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether young people not in receipt of universal credit will be eligible to apply to the Kickstart jobs scheme.

The £2 billion Kickstart Scheme is aimed at young people 16-24 on Universal Credit with the highest risk of long-term unemployment. We will not limit our ambitions about the scope for the Kickstart Scheme, and we are open to expand depending on the number of jobs of the right quality that organisations are able to create.

The Government has announced a comprehensive package of support for all young people. Alongside the Kickstart Scheme, we are tripling the number of traineeships for those aged 19 to 24 and doubling the number for those aged 16 to 18, increasing the funding for new apprenticeships for young people and will increase the number of people taking part in sector based work academies.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Jobcentre Plus staff will be recruited in Glasgow in response to the Chancellor’s statement of 8 July 2020; and at which Jobcentres will they be located.

It is too soon in the recruitment process to be able to identify how many of the new work coaches will be allocated to each city or location. However, Scotland plans to recruit c450 new work coaches between now and the end of October in the first wave of recruitment. Further planned recruitment later in the year will grow these numbers. Recruitment will be targeted based on local demand, plus current available and emerging estate space and Job Centre operating model changes.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether young people in receipt of universal credit will be sanctioned if they do not take up a place on the Kickstart jobs scheme.

A personalised, tailored claimant commitment is agreed between the work coach and the claimant. They will only set reasonable requirements, based on the claimant’s circumstances and the local/national public health guidelines. Further details about the Kickstart Scheme will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether young people who are medically shielding from covid-19 will be required to take up a place on the Kickstart jobs scheme.

Those who have declared a health condition that restricts their ability to work, including those who are shielding and clinically extremely vulnerable, will not be required to be available for work. Further details about the Kickstart Scheme will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of trends in the level of provision of support for a maximum of two children through the benefits system following the covid-10 outbreak.

The Government has committed to annual statistics releases related to the operation of the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children. Statistics related to the period up to April 2019 are available on GOV.UK. Further statistics related to the period up to April 2020 will be published this summer.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 19 May 2020 to Question 46706, on Social Security Benefits: Children, if she will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the operation of the exception to the two-child limit for children born as a result of non-consensual conception.

The Government has committed to annual statistics releases and the next of these will be published in the summer. These publications include details of the number of exceptions to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children, including in cases of non-consensual conception. The latest available release can be found on GOV.UK.

The Department fully recognises that this is a difficult and sensitive issue, and has set up procedures that are mindful of the sensitivities involved following public consultation. We believe this strikes the right balance, making sure people get the support they need without the need for unnecessarily intrusive processes, whilst at the same time providing the right assurance that the additional support is going to those for whom it is intended.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many families and children are affected by the two-child limit on child benefit in Glasgow Central; and what assessment she has made of trends in the level of families and children affected in that constituency since that policy was introduced.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to make an assessment of the effectiveness of the operation of the exception to the two-child limit for children born as a result of non-consensual conception.

The Government has committed to annual statistics releases related to the operation of the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children. Statistics related to the period up to April 2019 are available on GOV.UK. Statistics related to the period up to April 2020 will be published in the summer.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to raise awareness of the non-consensual conception exception among people affected by the two-child limit on child benefit.

Information regarding the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children and its exceptions, including the non-consensual conception exception, can be found on GOV.UK.

When a Universal Credit claimant(s) declares that they have a child or children, they are automatically made aware of the exceptions, including for non-consensual conception, and asked to declare if any of the children are likely to meet any of these criteria.

For those claiming Child Tax Credit, information regarding the policy and its exceptions is provided in annual claim renewal packs and at in-year finalisation, when customers move over to Universal Credit.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 24 March 2020 to Question 32160, what assessment she has made of the extent to which accessibility of IT and language support resources may prevent claimants applying for universal credit; and if she will make it her policy to allow agencies to support claimants for that benefit without the need for explicit consent.

The Department is working collaboratively with stakeholders to better understand any issues with the current process of explicit consent and to explore options for improving this process. The system of explicit consent does not prohibit claimants from seeking assistance and consent can be given by a claimant, either through their online account or by telephone. This helps to ensure the security of Universal Credit, including deterring fraudsters who may seek to exploit some of our most vulnerable claimants.

Universal Credit is designed to be a 'digital-first' service, ensuring we make best use of technology to deliver a modern and effective working-age welfare system, allowing our staff to concentrate on those people who require additional support. Although the Department offers comprehensive support for claimants to use our digital service, there will be occasions when people are unable to make their claim online, so telephone applications are accepted.

Where needed, Foreign Language and British Sign Language (BSL) support will be offered to claimants who need extra support. The service for BSL can be delivered by Video Relay Service and for foreign language interpreting help is available in writing and by telephone.

Additionally, claimants can also access free telephony and web support through the Citizen's Advice Help to Claim service.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will take steps to remove the requirement for explicit consent for enquiries to her Department during the covid-10 outbreak.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that no one should be penalised for doing the right thing. These are rapidly developing circumstances, we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

The Universal Credit system is structured around an online personal account which contains all the information relevant to the claim. This includes claimant’s bank account details, savings, capital, medical history, family relationships and address information, which means that we have a responsibility to ensure that a high level of security and protection is in place, and that we take all reasonable steps to protect the position of claimants and their data which includes ensuring that consent is explicitly given to share it.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will take steps to (a) uprate and (b) relax the eligibility requirements for carers allowance during the covid-19 outbreak to help carers that may be required to cease paid employment.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19 and we have been clear in our intention that no one should be penalised for doing the right thing. These are rapidly developing circumstances, we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she plans to take to ensure that pregnant women that are required to self-isolate do not lose out on maternity entitlements.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that no one should be penalised for doing the right thing. These are rapidly developing circumstances, we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the two child limit for (a) child tax credits and (b) universal credit on low income families.

DWP and HMRC produce a joint report with statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children, the latest of which was published in July 2019 and can be found online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-tax-credit-and-universal-credit-claimants-statistics-related-to-the-policy-to-provide-support-for-a-maximum-of-2-children-april-2019

Providing support for a maximum of two children, or qualifying young persons in Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit, ensures fairness between claimants and those taxpayers who support themselves solely through work.

We recognise that some claimants are not able to make the same choices about the number of children in their family, which is why exceptions have been put in place to protect certain groups. On migration to Universal Credit, families’ existing entitlement will be protected.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to regulate commercial for profit human milk banks.

There are currently no plans to introduce regulation of commercial for profit human milk banks. The Government will continue to closely monitor this emerging industry.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people without immigration status will be able to access covid-19 vaccination.

Vaccination against COVID-19 is offered to every eligible adult living in the United Kingdom free of charge, regardless of immigration status.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people no immigration status are able to access covid-19 vaccinations.

Vaccination against COVID-19 is offered to every eligible adult living in the United Kingdom free of charge, regardless of immigration status.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the barriers to covid-19 vaccination as a result of immigration status.

Vaccination against COVID-19 is offered to every eligible adult living in the United Kingdom free of charge, regardless of immigration status. Entitlement to free National Health Service treatment is generally based on ordinary residence in the UK. A person who can show they have taken up ordinary residence in the UK can access all NHS services immediately, including COVID-19 vaccinations, based on clinical need. No immigration checks are needed to receive these services and the NHS is not required to report undocumented migrants to the Home Office.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Government's preparedness for infant feeding provision in emergencies.

The Department has made no such assessment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to fully implement the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes.

There is strict legislation currently in place through the overarching Food for Specific Groups legislation (Retained Regulation No 609/2013) and specifically Retained Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2016/127. These regulate, labelling and marketing of infant formulae and follow-on formulae so as not to discourage breastfeeding. The legislation gives effect to the principles and aims of the 1981 World Health Organization Code on the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes by restricting the labelling, presentation and advertising of infant formula so as not to discourage breastfeeding.

These are enforced by the Food for Specific Groups (Food for Special Medical Purposes for Infants, Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula) (Information and Compositional Requirements) (Amendment etc.) (England) Regulations 2020. Similar legislation applies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond the e-mail of 30 September 2020 from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central on behalf of Allan Gordon, reference number ZA21117.

We replied to the hon. Member’s email on 14 December 2020.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government's official advice is on covid-19 vaccination for people who are (a) pregnant and (b) lactating.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) consists of independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccine the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level.

In line with the recommendations of the JCVI, the vaccine will initially be rolled out to these priority groups, including care home residents and staff, people over 80 years old, and health and care workers. The vaccine will then be prioritised amongst the rest of the population in order of age and risk, including those who are clinically extremely vulnerable, and all individuals aged 16-64 years old with underlying health conditions

The JCVI favours a precautionary approach and therefore does not currently advise COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy. Those eligible for vaccination who are also breastfeeding should discuss with their clinician.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on the uprating of Healthy Start vouchers.

The Government announced on 8 November 2020 that the Healthy Start voucher value will increase from £3.10 to £4.25 in England from April 2021. This will provide additional support to pregnant women and families on lower incomes to make healthy food choices.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will increase the value of healthy start vouchers.

The Government announced on 8 November 2020 that the Healthy Start voucher value will increase from £3.10 to £4.25 in England from April 2021. This will provide additional support to pregnant women and families on lower incomes to make healthy food choices.

The Scottish Government has its own devolved Best Start Food Scheme which was launched on 12 August 2019 to replace Healthy Start for people living in Scotland. The devolution and transition to the Scottish Best Start Foods Scheme was completed on the 31 March 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the uptake of healthy start vouchers.

The Department is currently developing a digital approach to Healthy Start, to make it easier for families to apply for and use the scheme. We are developing and testing an online application form for Healthy Start, to replace the current paper form, and a payment card to replace paper vouchers.

All eligible beneficiaries receive a letter inviting them to apply for Healthy Start, together with a pre-populated application form. The scheme is also promoted through the Healthy Start and Start4Life websites.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional support he is providing to human milk bank services during the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for St Albans (Daisy Cooper MP) on 13 May 2020 to Question 37944.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date breastfeeding support groups will be permitted to restart as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Breastfeeding support groups have continued to operate virtually throughout the restrictions. Premises such as community centres can reopen and should follow COVID-19 Secure guidelines. It is important to maintain social distancing and good hand hygiene in these circumstances.

In addition, breastfeeding support provided by Public Health England online and over the phone has continued to run throughout the pandemic and is accessible to families, including the National Breastfeeding Helpline and Alexa’s Breastfeeding Friend. Start4Life provides information for families specifically about COVID-19 and breastfeeding. This can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.nhs.uk/start4life/baby/coronavirus-covid19-advice-for-parents/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2020 to Question 53466 on Coronavirus: Ethnic Groups, when he plans to publish the (a) evidence submitted to and b) recommendations of the Covid 19 Review of Disparities in Risks and Outcomes.

No representations were sought or received by Public Health England for their epidemiological report entitled Covid-19: review of disparities in risks and outcomes, published on 2 June 2020.

Alongside the epidemiological review, Professor Fenton undertook a rapid evidence review and external stakeholder engagement with a significant number of individuals and organisations within black, Asian and ethnic minority communities, to hear their views, concerns and ideas about the impact of COVID-19 on their communities. The results of that work have now been published and will inform the government’s next steps being taken forward by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Equalities (Kemi Badenoch MP).

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timeframe is for the publication of the Public Health England report on the impact of covid-19 on the BAME community.

Public Health England led a rapid review to better understand how different factors can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. This includes analysis of ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity, where data was available. The review’s findings have now been published and can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-review-of-disparities-in-risks-and-outcomes

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the paper by Alisa Fox et al. titled Evidence of a significant secretory-IgA-dominant SARS-CoV-2 immune response in human milk following recovery from COVID-19, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of applying the findings of the study of antibodies in human breast milk to the treatment of covid-19.

The importance of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is recognised in the search for effective treatments for COVID-19 infection. At present there are a range of clinical trial initiatives in the United Kingdom in which treatments are being carefully evaluated, including. Some known sources of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. The REMAP-CAP clinical trial involves two sites at which plasma from patients who are convalescing after COVID-19 infection are being clinically evaluated. Plasma is collected at least 28 days after recovery so that antibody levels have increased significantly.

Other initiatives are bringing forward candidate treatments that, although promising, cannot be immediately deployed as they will require further research before they can be safely evaluated in human trials. Alternative sources of antibodies, such as the source described in this publication, may be in scope for consideration if other approaches fail.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure the maintenance of the supply of infant formula during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department is aware of some recent local food stockpiling issues and is in discussion with industry to ensure a continued supply of infant formula. Additionally, the British Specialist Nutrition Association Ltd who represent manufacturers of formula, have put out a note of reassurance to parents on both their website and via Twitter to allay concerns and to ask people to be considerate in the way they shop to ensure an adequate supply of formula remains available to all. This dialogue with the formula industry will remain active and we will continue to monitor the situation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of drugs policy in reducing the rate of infection from blood borne viruses.

There is good evidence that a combined approach of harm reduction programmes such as needle and syringe programmes (NSP), opioid substitution treatment and abstinence-based treatment is the most effective way to tackle public health harms, including the spread of blood borne viruses (BBVs). Vaccination, testing and treatment of infection are also effective in the control of BBVs.

Public Health England monitors drug treatment data and anonymous testing of blood samples from people using drug treatment services or NSP. The data show that these interventions have been effective in reducing BBVs in people who inject drugs (PWID). For example, the proportion of PWID who have ever been infected with hepatitis B in England, Wales and Northern Ireland has declined over the past 10 years, falling from 18% in 2008 to 9% in 2018. In addition, HIV infection is uncommon among PWID in the United Kingdom, and HIV prevalence in this risk group is low compared to many other European countries. Overall, there were 95 new HIV diagnoses in the UK during 2018 which were likely to have been acquired through injecting drug use, down from 170 in 2008.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what specific assistance his Department is providing to Nepal in response to the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK Government is one of the leading donors to Covax, committing £548m to the scheme, which will provide more than a billion vaccines to developing countries including doses for almost a fifth of Nepal's population. The UK has funded a new £180,000 duplex oxygen generation plant at the Nepal Police Hospital in Kathmandu to help address oxygen shortages to treat COVID19 patients. On 19 and 20 May Lord Ahmad held meetings with Foreign Minister Gyawali and the Nepalese Ambassador to discuss what further support the UK could offer.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of cross-jurisdictional consistency when the Government implements the UK’s sustainability disclosure requirements.

The Chancellor used his 2021 Mansion House speech to announce economy-wide Sustainability Disclosure Requirements for businesses and investment products to report on their impact on climate and the environment – and the risks and opportunities these pose to their business.

Cross-jurisdictional consistency and adopting international standards will form a key component of these requirements, which will streamline and build on existing sustainability reporting requirements such as our commitment to mandatory economy-wide disclosures aligned with the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, where the UK is already a world-leader. The regime will also incorporate considerations around adopting the global corporate reporting standard for sustainability being developed by the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) Foundation.

The Government intends to legislate to deliver this and will publish a Roadmap setting out its approach to green finance regulation ahead of COP26.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish further detail on the UK sustainable fund disclosure framework, announced in his Mansion House Speech on 1 July 2021.

The Chancellor used his 2021 Mansion House speech to announce economy-wide Sustainability Disclosure Requirements for businesses and investment products to report on their impact on climate and the environment – and the risks and opportunities these pose to their business.

Cross-jurisdictional consistency and adopting international standards will form a key component of these requirements, which will streamline and build on existing sustainability reporting requirements such as our commitment to mandatory economy-wide disclosures aligned with the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, where the UK is already a world-leader. The regime will also incorporate considerations around adopting the global corporate reporting standard for sustainability being developed by the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) Foundation.

The Government intends to legislate to deliver this and will publish a Roadmap setting out its approach to green finance regulation ahead of COP26.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to increase the number of banks participating in the Business Banking Resolution service.

The Government welcomes the recent launch of Business Banking Resolution Service (BBRS), a free and independent service designed to settle unresolved complaints from SMEs about their bank.

The Government has set out high level guidance regarding what the BBRS should look to achieve. In 2018, the then Chancellor wrote to the BBRS signalling that for the scheme to bring closure it is vital that it considers as many complaints as possible, but also that it is right the scheme focuses on providing resolution to SMEs who have not had anywhere independent to take their complaint. Beyond this high-level guidance, it is not for the Government to comment on specific details about the eligibility of a voluntary, non-governmental service.

On increasing the number of banks participating in the BBRS, the service launched with 7 founding banks who make up the majority of the UK banking sector, and it is understood that the BBRS hopes additional lenders will join over time. It is not for Government to mandate participation in an industry-led, independent organisation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to expand the eligibility criteria for the Business Banking Resolution Service.

The Government welcomes the recent launch of Business Banking Resolution Service (BBRS), a free and independent service designed to settle unresolved complaints from SMEs about their bank.

The Government has set out high level guidance regarding what the BBRS should look to achieve. In 2018, the then Chancellor wrote to the BBRS signalling that for the scheme to bring closure it is vital that it considers as many complaints as possible, but also that it is right the scheme focuses on providing resolution to SMEs who have not had anywhere independent to take their complaint. Beyond this high-level guidance, it is not for the Government to comment on specific details about the eligibility of a voluntary, non-governmental service.

On increasing the number of banks participating in the BBRS, the service launched with 7 founding banks who make up the majority of the UK banking sector, and it is understood that the BBRS hopes additional lenders will join over time. It is not for Government to mandate participation in an industry-led, independent organisation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HMRC employees were located in Scotland (a) in March 2011 and (b) at the most recent date on which his Department has collated that information.

Based on the HMRC organisational structure for March 2011 and May 2021, the numbers of employees located in Scotland were:

Headcount, March 2011 = 9,918

Headcount, May 2021 = 7,817

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will list the organisations that have benefited from social investment tax relief in each of the last five years.

The requirement to maintain taxpayer confidentiality means it is not possible to disclose which specific businesses have used the Social Investment Tax Relief (SITR) to raise investment.

The registered locations of enterprises benefitting from SITR in this period are as follows:

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

East Midlands

Fewer than 5

0

5

Fewer than 5

0

East of England

0

0

0

5

5

London

0

5

5

Fewer than 5

5

North East

Fewer than 5

0

0

0

0

North West

Fewer than 5

5

5

Fewer than 5

5

Scotland

0

10

Fewer than 5

5

5

South East

Fewer than 5

0

Fewer than 5

5

20

South West

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

10

5

10

Wales

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

0

Fewer than 5

West Midlands

0

5

10

5

20

Yorkshire & Humber

0

0

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

0

Total

5

25

35

25

75

Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. Individual locations may not sum up to the total due to rounding. In order to maintain taxpayer confidentiality, any location with fewer than five organisations has been defined as ‘fewer than 5’.

Information on the other requested characteristics of social enterprises using SITR is not readily available and cannot be provided within the time available.

In order to qualify for SITR, enterprises must have fewer than 250 employees and less than £15 million gross assets at the time investment is received.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March to Question 164514, what the Barnett Consequentials are for (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland of his Budget 2021 announcement on funding for the Thalidomide Health Grant Renewal.

Further to my previous answer, at spending reviews the Barnett formula is generally applied to the overall change in each department’s funding, rather than being applied at programme level.

It is not therefore possible to specify the Barnett consequentials generated by the funding for the Thalidomide Health Grant Renewal at the 2020 Spending Review. However, I can confirm that the 2020 Spending Review provided the devolved administrations with a combined additional £4.7 billion for 2021-22 through the Barnett formula.

Funding for 2022-23 onwards will be determined at the upcoming spending review.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what representations he received from former Prime Minister David Cameron on Government support to Greensill Capital; what responses were given; and when those responses were recorded.

Ministers routinely meet with a range of private sector stakeholders. Transparency releases are published on a quarterly basis and are currently publicly available for Ministerial meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with (a) Cabinet and (b) devolved administration colleagues on the effect of (i) increased inflation and (ii) normalisation of the Government bond yield on public borrowing costs.

The Chancellor has regular discussions on macroeconomic policy with European and G7 counterparts. They all recognise the significant challenges ahead of us in the months to come. The G7 has an important role to play in steering the global economy, and as Chair of the G7 Finance Track, the Chancellor has discussed with colleagues how best to shape and respond to the phases of the global recovery from Covid-19. This includes the short- and medium-term economic challenges relating to both fiscal and monetary policy. The Chancellor will continue to work with colleagues over the coming months to learn from each other’s policy interventions, to recognise and manage spillover effects, and to support continued coordination on policy responses.

As highlighted in the Budget, while borrowing costs are affordable now, interest rates and inflation may not stay low forever. A sustained 1 percentage point increase in both interest rates and inflation would increase debt interest spending by £27.8bn in 2025-26.

It is important to take action as the economy durably recovers to limit the UK’s exposure to this risk and to build fiscal resilience. The Office for Budget Responsibility’s March 2021 forecast shows that the medium-term outlook for the public finances has returned to a more sustainable path, supported by the fiscal repair measures set out in the recent Budget.

Treasury Ministers have regular discussions with counterparts in the devolved administrations on matters of mutual interest.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of (a) increased inflation and (b) normalisation of the Government bond yield on public borrowing costs.

The Chancellor has regular discussions on macroeconomic policy with European and G7 counterparts. They all recognise the significant challenges ahead of us in the months to come. The G7 has an important role to play in steering the global economy, and as Chair of the G7 Finance Track, the Chancellor has discussed with colleagues how best to shape and respond to the phases of the global recovery from Covid-19. This includes the short- and medium-term economic challenges relating to both fiscal and monetary policy. The Chancellor will continue to work with colleagues over the coming months to learn from each other’s policy interventions, to recognise and manage spillover effects, and to support continued coordination on policy responses.

As highlighted in the Budget, while borrowing costs are affordable now, interest rates and inflation may not stay low forever. A sustained 1 percentage point increase in both interest rates and inflation would increase debt interest spending by £27.8bn in 2025-26.

It is important to take action as the economy durably recovers to limit the UK’s exposure to this risk and to build fiscal resilience. The Office for Budget Responsibility’s March 2021 forecast shows that the medium-term outlook for the public finances has returned to a more sustainable path, supported by the fiscal repair measures set out in the recent Budget.

Treasury Ministers have regular discussions with counterparts in the devolved administrations on matters of mutual interest.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with (a) European and (b) G7 counterparts of 2021 and 2022 inflation on government borrowing costs.

The Chancellor has regular discussions on macroeconomic policy with European and G7 counterparts. They all recognise the significant challenges ahead of us in the months to come. The G7 has an important role to play in steering the global economy, and as Chair of the G7 Finance Track, the Chancellor has discussed with colleagues how best to shape and respond to the phases of the global recovery from Covid-19. This includes the short- and medium-term economic challenges relating to both fiscal and monetary policy. The Chancellor will continue to work with colleagues over the coming months to learn from each other’s policy interventions, to recognise and manage spillover effects, and to support continued coordination on policy responses.

As highlighted in the Budget, while borrowing costs are affordable now, interest rates and inflation may not stay low forever. A sustained 1 percentage point increase in both interest rates and inflation would increase debt interest spending by £27.8bn in 2025-26.

It is important to take action as the economy durably recovers to limit the UK’s exposure to this risk and to build fiscal resilience. The Office for Budget Responsibility’s March 2021 forecast shows that the medium-term outlook for the public finances has returned to a more sustainable path, supported by the fiscal repair measures set out in the recent Budget.

Treasury Ministers have regular discussions with counterparts in the devolved administrations on matters of mutual interest.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether it is his policy to maintain the planned (a) NHS, (b) Department for Work and Pensions and (c) Scottish Government allocations in real terms over the OBR forecast periods irrespective of inflation levels.

As set out at Budget 2021, the government has maintained the Budget 2020 assumption of 2.1% real terms increases per year for core resource DEL spending after 2021-22, reflecting the latest OBR deflators. For capital DEL spending, the government has maintained the Budget 2020 assumption consistent with delivering over £600 billion in gross public sector investment over the next five years, the highest sustained levels of public sector net investment (PSNI) as a proportion of GDP since the late 1970s.

Specific allocations beyond 2021-22 are a matter for the Spending Review later this year, where the government will set future departmental resource DEL and capital DEL budgets as well as devolved administrations’ block grants. However, the government has already committed to a historic long-term settlement for the NHS with a cash increase of £33.9 billion a year by 2023-24. Further details on the Spending Review will be set out in due course.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the Barnett Consquentials are for (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland of his Budget 2021 announcement on funding for the Thalidomide Health Grant Renewal.

At Budget 2021 a lifetime commitment was announced to continue the Thalidomide Health Grant in England once the existing funding commitment expires in 2023-24.

The devolved administrations have already received Barnett consequentials in the usual way for any funding provided to the Department of Health and Social Care at previous fiscal events and spending reviews up to 2021-22.

For 2022-23 onwards, the devolved administrations will receive funding through the Barnett formula at the upcoming spending review and future fiscal events. The government is committed to engaging closely with them to ensure all recipients benefit from this funding.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, further to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government's announcement on 10 February 2021, whether the tax to be levied on the residential property development sector will apply in Scotland.

The Secretary of State for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government made an oral statement to the House of Commons on building safety on 10 February 2021.

That statement announced plans to introduce a new tax for the UK residential property development sector in 2022, to ensure the largest developers make a fair contribution to cladding remediation costs. The tax will apply on a UK-wide basis and the government will consult with industry on further policy design considerations in due course, to ensure the tax is proportionate and reflects developers’ ability to pay.

The tax will help fund a large spending package, and the devolved administrations will receive additional funding through the Barnett formula at future fiscal events and spending reviews, except where new departmental spending is funded by an England-only levy.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, further to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government's statement of 10 February 2021 on unsafe cladding, whether those funds will be subject to Barnett consequentials.

The Secretary of State for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government made an oral statement to the House of Commons on building safety on 10 February 2021.

As set out in my answer of 22 February, the devolved administrations will receive additional funding through the Barnett formula at future fiscal events and spending reviews, except where new departmental spending is funded by an England-only levy. The devolved administrations can implement their own levies should they choose to do so.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will amend the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme to take into account periods of maternity leave.

The Government has amended the eligibility conditions of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) to extend eligibility to self-employed parents who were ineligible for the SEISS because they did not submit a tax return for 2018-19, or whose trading profits in 2018-19 were less than their other income because they were pregnant or taking time out of their trade to care for their new-born or newly adopted child.

These individuals were able to claim the past three SEISS grants using either their 2017-18 self-assessment return or an average of their 2016-17 and 2017-18 returns as the basis for their eligibility. They also needed to meet the other standard eligibility criteria for support under the SEISS.

This was not a fundamental change to the SEISS, but an amendment to bring these individuals into eligibility for the scheme. It did not affect the grant calculation for those who submitted a 2018/19 return and were already eligible.

For those already eligible, the calculation for the SEISS grants uses an average of the self-employed individual’s trading profits, which evens out fluctuations in earnings which self-employed people may experience for any number of reasons.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will reduce VAT to 5 per cent for the hair and beauty industry.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July to support the cash flow and viability of over 150,000 businesses and protect 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors, and is due to run until 31 March 2021.

This policy will cost over £2 billion and is a temporary measure. The Government keeps all taxes under review, and all stakeholder views are carefully considered. Any future decisions on tax policy will be made at Budget.

The Government has announced a significant support package to help businesses from a range of sectors through the winter months, which includes an extension of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, an extension of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme grant, and an extension of the application window for the Government-backed loan schemes.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether people who have submitted tax returns for 2019-20 will be eligible to apply for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme from 31 January 2021.

The Government will continue to look for ways to improve the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). It continues to consider the matter carefully and work closely with stakeholders to explore how best to support different groups. The Government will set out further details on the fourth SEISS grant in due course.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a comprehensive package of support for the self-employed. Those ineligible for the SEISS may still be eligible for other elements of the support available. The Universal Credit standard allowance has been temporarily increased for 2020-21 and the Minimum Income Floor relaxed for the duration of the crisis, so that where self-employed claimants' earnings have fallen significantly, their Universal Credit award will have increased to reflect their lower earnings. In addition to this, they may also have access to other elements of the package, including Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, self-isolation support payments and other business support grants.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to exempt people affected by dangerous cladding from Insurance Premium Tax.

Insurance Premium Tax is a tax paid by insurers on all general insurance premiums. Insurance pricing is a decision which is affected by a wide range of factors, and the taxes that insurers pay are just one part of this. It is hard to predict the impact of an exemption on insurance pricing for those affected by unsafe cladding, as this largely depends on how the insurers would react. In addition, any loss in tax revenue would have to be balanced by a reduction in public spending, increased borrowing or increased taxation elsewhere.

While there is no current plan to introduce an exemption on insurance pricing for those affected by unsafe cladding, all taxes are kept under review and the views expressed to us are carefully considered as part of the annual Budget process.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether (a) post-natal pads and (b) all non-medical incontinence products and (c) breast pads are included in the zero rate announced on sanitary products on 1 January 2021.

The zero rate of VAT for women’s sanitary products was introduced on 1 January 2021. The zero rate applies to products which would have previously attracted the reduced rate and can be described as products which are designed and marketed solely for the absorption or collection of menstrual flow or lochia (discharge from the womb following childbirth). Examples include sanitary pads, tampons and maternity pads for the collection of lochia.

Further information on what is covered can be found in VAT Notice 701/18 on women’s sanitary products on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/vat-on-womens-sanitary-products-notice-70118.

Retail sales of incontinence products are zero-rated, under a long-standing separate relief. Further information on this can be found in VAT Notice 701/7 on reliefs for disabled and older people on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/vat-relief-on-certain-goods-if-you-have-a-disability.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on (a) jobs, (b) investment and (c) profitability in the financial services sector.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement gives legal certainty for financial services firms, with commitments on market access and fair treatment. The Agreement supports firms providing cross-border financial services. Beneficial provisions ensure UK service suppliers travelling to the EU for short trips do not face undue barriers like work permits, and UK business visitors are permitted to stay in the EU for 90 days in any 180-day period. We have also agreed commitments on visa facilitation for professionals engaged in cross-border trade.

It is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quotas, which will provide benefits for jobs, investment and profitability in the financial services sector. The Agreement also establishes a stable foundation for us to develop a constructive and engaged relationship with the EU on financial services, as sovereign equals. Importantly we have also agreed with the EU that we will establish an MoU setting out the parameters for our regulatory cooperation.

The government has also taken further action which complements the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement and will facilitate the retention of jobs, investment in, and profitability of the financial services sector. To promote openness and provide clarity and stability for industry, the Government announced multiple equivalence decisions for EEA Member States where it made sense for the UK to do so.

The UK has long been a global hub, leader and pioneer in financial services and the Government has an ambitious strategy to strengthen our world-leading financial centre now that we have left the EU. This is centred upon building long-lasting financial partnerships around the world, maintaining the high regulatory standards that make the UK an attractive place to do business, and being at the forefront of innovation so we can create and seize opportunities in the markets of the future.

On 9 November, the Chancellor also set out plans to bolster the dynamism, openness and competitiveness of the sector – including issuing the UK’s first ever Sovereign Green Bond, becoming the first country in the world to make TCFD-aligned disclosures mandatory, reviewing the UK’s listings regime to attract the most innovative firms, and leading the global conversation on new technologies like stablecoins and Central Bank Digital Currencies. The announcements have been praised by industry for being supportive, pragmatic and positive.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to seek a future agreement with the EU on financial services.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the European Union gives legal certainty for financial services firms in line with recent EU precedent and provides a stable foundation for us to develop a constructive and engaged relationship with the EU on financial services, as sovereign equals. Alongside the Agreement, the UK and EU made a joint declaration that we will establish structured regulatory cooperation for financial services and agree by March 2021 a Memorandum of Understanding to provide a framework for this cooperation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he had with Cabinet colleagues on including financial services in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement includes provisions on financial services, with important commitments on market access and fair treatment in line with recent EU precedent. The Government was clear throughout the negotiations that the Agreement should promote financial stability, market integrity, and investor and consumer protection for financial services, providing a predictable, transparent, and business-friendly environment for cross-border financial services business.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
Pay
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on (a) UK wages and (b) trends in the National Living Wage.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quotas. It is an excellent outcome for families and businesses in every part of the UK. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU. From financial services through to automotive manufacturing, the deal protects high quality jobs and investment right across the UK. People will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The Government remains committed to its longer-term target for the National Living Wage to reach two thirds of median earnings by 2024, provided economic conditions allow.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the announcement of 10 December 2020 of a £400m funding package to Northern Ireland, what the Barnett consequentials from that package will be for (a) Scotland and (b) Wales.

The ‘New Deal for Northern Ireland’ addresses the unique circumstances resulting from the Northern Ireland Protocol. The funding provided by the UK government either supports the whole of the UK, notably in relation to trade between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, or relates to issues specific to Northern Ireland that do not exist in Scotland and Wales.

Providing additional funding to Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland for nation-specific issues on top of Barnett-based funding is fully consistent with the Statement of Funding Policy.

Scotland and Wales will similarly continue to receive direct investment from the UK Government on top of their Barnett-based funding to support growth and address nation-specific issues, including through the City and Regional Growth deals.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to enable employers to reclaim 100 per cent of the cost of a maternity suspension on full pay of a woman (a) who is 28 weeks pregnant or beyond and (b) pregnant and clinically extremely vulnerable or otherwise medically advised to shield.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) is available to all employers and employees providing they meet the eligibility criteria, and this includes the clinically extremely vulnerable.

In those cases where appropriate control measures or working from home cannot be put in place for pregnant employees, and so they are placed on a maternity suspension due to their personal health and safety risk, the employer should continue to pay the employees their full pay. It is up to employers to decide whether to furlough those employees who are at the highest risk of severe illness from coronavirus, and if they do, employers can use the CJRS grant to cover 80% of furloughed employees’ salaries, up to £2,500 per month.

Throughout the pandemic the Government’s economic priority has been to protect jobs and livelihoods. Since March, the Government has provided support for people, businesses and public services totalling an estimated £280 billion. In particular, businesses have received billions in loans, tax deferrals, business rate reliefs, and general and sector-specific grants. This support can be used by businesses to top up the CJRS grant, ensuring that they can suspend pregnant employees on full pay.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what dates he met with representatives of (a) Excluded U.K., (b) Forgotten Ltd, (c) Forgotten PAYE, (d) Maternity Petition, (e) APPG Gaps in Support, (f) Annual PAYE, (g) New Starter Justice and (h) Refused Furlough.

Treasury ministers and officials have had meetings with a wide variety of organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, including MPs, businesses, professional representative bodies, and the unions, throughout the development of the COVID-19 support package including both the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

This proactive engagement has been widely praised, and the Institute for Government has said: “The Government’s approach to consultation compensated for some of the difficulties of accelerated policy development, because it gave it fast access to information, and an early sense of whether the measures would work and how they would be received by businesses and workers. This contributed to both positive reception on announcement and successful roll-out.”

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel.

12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many supervised company formation agents HMRC visited from (a) 1 Jan 2018 to 31 Dec 2018 and (b) 1 Jan 2019 to 31 Dec 2019.

HMRC supervises businesses in nine sectors under the Money Laundering Regulations (MLRs), including those Trust or Company Service Providers (TCSPs) not supervised by other bodies. HMRC does not publish information relating to targeting of supervisory visits in particular sectors. Such information could be used by criminals to aid their efforts to attempt to launder money or finance terrorism.

HM Treasury publishes aggregate details of HMRC’s supervision activity in its annual “Anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance supervision report”.

Since 8 May 2019, HMRC has not identified any company formation agents who should be but are not registered with HMRC.

HMRC’s Anti Money Laundering Supervision team employs 16 full time equivalent staff to identify businesses that should be registered with HMRC under the MLRs but are not. These ‘policing the perimeter’ staff are not designated to specific sectors.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of company formation agents that should be registered for supervision but are not have been identified by HMRC since 8 May 2019.

HMRC supervises businesses in nine sectors under the Money Laundering Regulations (MLRs), including those Trust or Company Service Providers (TCSPs) not supervised by other bodies. HMRC does not publish information relating to targeting of supervisory visits in particular sectors. Such information could be used by criminals to aid their efforts to attempt to launder money or finance terrorism.

HM Treasury publishes aggregate details of HMRC’s supervision activity in its annual “Anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance supervision report”.

Since 8 May 2019, HMRC has not identified any company formation agents who should be but are not registered with HMRC.

HMRC’s Anti Money Laundering Supervision team employs 16 full time equivalent staff to identify businesses that should be registered with HMRC under the MLRs but are not. These ‘policing the perimeter’ staff are not designated to specific sectors.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HMRC full time equivalent staff are tasked with identifying company formation agents that should be registered for supervision but are not.

HMRC supervises businesses in nine sectors under the Money Laundering Regulations (MLRs), including those Trust or Company Service Providers (TCSPs) not supervised by other bodies. HMRC does not publish information relating to targeting of supervisory visits in particular sectors. Such information could be used by criminals to aid their efforts to attempt to launder money or finance terrorism.

HM Treasury publishes aggregate details of HMRC’s supervision activity in its annual “Anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance supervision report”.

Since 8 May 2019, HMRC has not identified any company formation agents who should be but are not registered with HMRC.

HMRC’s Anti Money Laundering Supervision team employs 16 full time equivalent staff to identify businesses that should be registered with HMRC under the MLRs but are not. These ‘policing the perimeter’ staff are not designated to specific sectors.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which media outlets were given embargoed sight of his Statement on the Future of Financial Services, of 9 November 2020; and at what time it was released to them.

Checked against delivery versions of Chancellor statements are given to the media once they have been made in the House of Commons.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which media were given embargoed sight of his statement of 5 November 2020; and at what time that statement was released to those media.

Checked against delivery versions of Chancellor statements are given to the media once they have been made in the House of Commons.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which media were given embargoed sight of his statement of 22 October 2020; and at what time that statement was released to those media.

Checked against delivery versions of Chancellor statements are given to the media once they have been made in the House of Commons.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which media outlets were given embargoed sight of his Statement on the economy of 24 September 2020; and at what time it was released to them.

Checked against delivery versions of Chancellor statements are given to the media once they have been made in the House of Commons.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central, dated 4 August 2002 on the furlough claim lodged by Sub Club.

HM Treasury has received unprecedented amounts of correspondence since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, and apologises for the delay in responding to the hon. Member. The hon. Member’s correspondence is receiving attention and will be replied to as soon as possible.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to Question 884 of the evidence given to the Treasury Committee on 15 July 2020, what the median figure is for the income of self-employed people.

Information on the median income for the self-employed earning above £50,000 will be published in due course.

25th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with his OECD counterparts on an international digital services tax.

Developing a multilateral solution to the tax challenges arising from the digitisation of the economy is an important objective for the Government.

The UK continues to play a prominent and active role in OECD-led discussions, with a view to achieving that objective and ensuring a fairer and more sustainable corporation tax system in the future.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will include (a) period pants and (b) other reusable menstrual products within the VAT reduction covering menstrual products.

At Spring Budget on 11 March 2020, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that a zero rate of VAT will apply to women’s sanitary products from 1 January 2021, at the end of the transition period. This will apply to those products which are currently subject to the reduced rate of 5%, for example, tampons and pads, and to reusable menstrual products, such as keepers.

10th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 9 July 2020 to Question 69593 on Members: Correspondence, when he plans to provide a substantive response to the matters raised in the letter from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central of 6 May 2020 in relation to the covid-19 outbreak on food and drink wholesalers.

The Treasury responded to the Member’s letter on 21 June. The reply outlined the support available to food and drink wholesalers. However, given recent announcements which have enabled the reopening of the hospitality sector, I have asked officials to review your letter of 6 May and provide another updated reply shortly.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to reply to the letter dated 6 May 2020 from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central on the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on food and drink wholesalers.

The Treasury responded to the Member’s letter on 21 June.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister of 10 June 2020, Official Report column 285, what estimate he has made of the Barnett consequentials arising from the additional £63 million of funding for local welfare assistance.

The £63 million of local welfare assistance in England announced by the Prime Minister on 10 June 2020 is expected to be funded from existing UK Government departmental budgets. However, any new funding will be subject to the Barnett formula in the usual way.

We have so far announced £7.4 billion of additional funding to the devolved administrations to support people, business and public services in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. This means £3.8 billion for the Scottish Government, £2.3 billion for the Welsh Government and £1.3 billion for the Northern Ireland Executive.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
13th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses in Glasgow Central constituency have accessed the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20 April. By close on 11 May, 935,000 employers had submitted claims to HMRC, representing 7.5m furloughed employments and £10.1bn.

This is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

13th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many companies have accessed the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, by constituency.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20 April. By close on 11 May, 935,000 employers had submitted claims to HMRC, representing 7.5m furloughed employments and £10.1bn.

This is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

20th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the business rates relief scheme to English Language Teaching centres for the duration of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has set out a package of measures to support businesses through this period of disruption caused by COVID-19, including those businesses not eligible for the small business rate relief or the relief for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses.

This support for business includes the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan scheme for small and medium-sized businesses, a statutory sick pay relief package, the HMRC Time To Pay Scheme, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment, and a new lending facility from the Bank of England for larger firms.

These measures provide a comprehensive, coordinated and coherent response to what is a serious and evolving economic situation. As the wider economic picture becomes clearer, the Government will do whatever it takes to get the nation through the impacts of COVID-19 and the Government stands ready to announce further action wherever necessary.

11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the equality impact assessment on the repurposing of Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre.

Hassockfield immigration removal centre (IRC) will open as an IRC for women by the autumn. Yarl’s Wood is expected to begin operating as a predominantly male IRC, at a similar time. To ensure that decisions about the development of both sites have due regard to eliminating discrimination and inequality, equality impact assessments (EIAs) will remain ongoing as plans progress to completion. The Home Office will publish both completed EIAs in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the equality impact assessment on the opening of the Immigration Removal Centre at the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham.

Hassockfield immigration removal centre (IRC) will open as an IRC for women by the autumn. Yarl’s Wood is expected to begin operating as a predominantly male IRC, at a similar time. To ensure that decisions about the development of both sites have due regard to eliminating discrimination and inequality, equality impact assessments (EIAs) will remain ongoing as plans progress to completion. The Home Office will publish both completed EIAs in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been subject to immigration removal action in Glasgow Central constituency in each month of the last three years.

The only available statistics are ones published on a quarterly basis at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-statistics

Anyone with no right to be in the UK may be subject to removal or deportation action as appropriate.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many payments have been made to victims of modern slavery each year since 2009.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) does not publish payments made to victims of modern slavery and this does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics.

All victims who consent to receiving support will receive this via the Modern Slavery Victim Care Contract (MSVCC) in England and Wales which is delivered by The Salvation Army. Details of the MSVC Contract can be found in a redacted version of the contract requirements here: Modern Slavery: Statutory Guidance for England and Wales (under s49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015) and Non-Statutory Guidance for Scotland and Northern Ireland (publishing.service.gov.uk)

All victims who consented to support under the previous Victim Care Contract were also eligible for financial support under the same policy and a redacted version of the previous contract requirements can be found here (https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/e03ceb15-27ad-4bad-b8ae-43dbc1e9481e).

As of September 2019, following a CG decision, financial support needs for those in support are considered in a Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) as part of a holistic assessment of recovery need, as per the published RNA policy.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has for providing residents at Penally Barracks with alternative accommodation when it is returned to the Ministry of Defence on 21 March 2021.

Following the announcement on 16 March 2021 of the closure of Penally, the Home Office has been working closely with its accommodation provider Clearsprings Ready Homes (CRH) to ensure all people leaving Penally had safe, suitable, fit for purpose and correctly equipped accommodation to move to on transfer from Penally prior to closure.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken following deaths in detention at Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre to (a) provide detainees who remain at that centre with counselling and other forms of bereavement support and (b) complete ad-hoc assessments and formal reviews of Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork files.

On 19 February 2021 a man who was detained at Morton Hall immigration removal centre sadly died; the first death in the immigration removal estate since 2019.

The published Home Office Detention Services Order 08/2014 “Death in immigration detention” provides guidance as to the actions that Home Office and contracted supplier staff must take in the event of a death in detention. These actions include notification of the death to appropriate bodies, identifying potential witnesses to the death and supporting the individuals who are in detention. Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. All relevant bodies were informed on 19 February.

In accordance with the guidance, the individual’s family has been informed and a family liaison officer has been assigned. Our thoughts and condolences are with the individual’s family and friends. In parallel, a community notice was issued at Morton Hall to inform residents of the death, the independent investigation and where to access support. In addition to this, ad-hoc assessments were undertaken of all individuals with open, or recently closed, Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) plans and formal assessments undertaken of those considered particularly vulnerable to the news.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether detainees at Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre have been provided with written notice of any deaths of detainees; and if she will place a copy of any such notice in the Library.

On 19 February 2021 a man who was detained at Morton Hall immigration removal centre sadly died; the first death in the immigration removal estate since 2019.

The published Home Office Detention Services Order 08/2014 “Death in immigration detention” provides guidance as to the actions that Home Office and contracted supplier staff must take in the event of a death in detention. These actions include notification of the death to appropriate bodies, identifying potential witnesses to the death and supporting the individuals who are in detention. Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. All relevant bodies were informed on 19 February.

In accordance with the guidance, the individual’s family has been informed and a family liaison officer has been assigned. Our thoughts and condolences are with the individual’s family and friends. In parallel, a community notice was issued at Morton Hall to inform residents of the death, the independent investigation and where to access support. In addition to this, ad-hoc assessments were undertaken of all individuals with open, or recently closed, Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) plans and formal assessments undertaken of those considered particularly vulnerable to the news.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to inform (a) the police and (b) the Prison and Probation Ombudsman of deaths at Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre to ensure a prompt and thorough investigation.

On 19 February 2021 a man who was detained at Morton Hall immigration removal centre sadly died; the first death in the immigration removal estate since 2019.

The published Home Office Detention Services Order 08/2014 “Death in immigration detention” provides guidance as to the actions that Home Office and contracted supplier staff must take in the event of a death in detention. These actions include notification of the death to appropriate bodies, identifying potential witnesses to the death and supporting the individuals who are in detention. Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. All relevant bodies were informed on 19 February.

In accordance with the guidance, the individual’s family has been informed and a family liaison officer has been assigned. Our thoughts and condolences are with the individual’s family and friends. In parallel, a community notice was issued at Morton Hall to inform residents of the death, the independent investigation and where to access support. In addition to this, ad-hoc assessments were undertaken of all individuals with open, or recently closed, Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) plans and formal assessments undertaken of those considered particularly vulnerable to the news.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken to inform relevant next of kin of detainees who have died at Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre.

On 19 February 2021 a man who was detained at Morton Hall immigration removal centre sadly died; the first death in the immigration removal estate since 2019.

The published Home Office Detention Services Order 08/2014 “Death in immigration detention” provides guidance as to the actions that Home Office and contracted supplier staff must take in the event of a death in detention. These actions include notification of the death to appropriate bodies, identifying potential witnesses to the death and supporting the individuals who are in detention. Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. All relevant bodies were informed on 19 February.

In accordance with the guidance, the individual’s family has been informed and a family liaison officer has been assigned. Our thoughts and condolences are with the individual’s family and friends. In parallel, a community notice was issued at Morton Hall to inform residents of the death, the independent investigation and where to access support. In addition to this, ad-hoc assessments were undertaken of all individuals with open, or recently closed, Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) plans and formal assessments undertaken of those considered particularly vulnerable to the news.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many deaths of detainees occurred at Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre during the period 15 February to 22 February 2021.

On 19 February 2021 a man who was detained at Morton Hall immigration removal centre sadly died; the first death in the immigration removal estate since 2019.

The published Home Office Detention Services Order 08/2014 “Death in immigration detention” provides guidance as to the actions that Home Office and contracted supplier staff must take in the event of a death in detention. These actions include notification of the death to appropriate bodies, identifying potential witnesses to the death and supporting the individuals who are in detention. Each death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. All relevant bodies were informed on 19 February.

In accordance with the guidance, the individual’s family has been informed and a family liaison officer has been assigned. Our thoughts and condolences are with the individual’s family and friends. In parallel, a community notice was issued at Morton Hall to inform residents of the death, the independent investigation and where to access support. In addition to this, ad-hoc assessments were undertaken of all individuals with open, or recently closed, Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) plans and formal assessments undertaken of those considered particularly vulnerable to the news.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions Mears had with the Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership before opening the mother and baby unit at 100 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow.

The mother and baby unit is a new dedicated facility in Glasgow to support mothers and babies, providing accommodation, along with access to healthcare and other support services, that is purpose designed to best meet their needs.

Mears liaised with Glasgow City Council Health and Social Care Partnership and the local Asylum Health Bridging Team on the development and implementation of the unit, who are fully supportive of this proposal. This was considered via the Glasgow Partnership Board and the Regional Delivery and Procurement Group, which were established for such joint working and communication purposes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which organisations were consulted and what the consultation process was in advance of opening the mother and baby unit at 100 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow.

The mother and baby unit is a new dedicated facility in Glasgow to support mothers and babies, providing accommodation, along with access to healthcare and other support services, that is purpose designed to best meet their needs.

Mears liaised with Glasgow City Council Health and Social Care Partnership and the local Asylum Health Bridging Team on the development and implementation of the unit, who are fully supportive of this proposal. This was considered via the Glasgow Partnership Board and the Regional Delivery and Procurement Group, which were established for such joint working and communication purposes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the consultation process was for opening the mother and baby unit at 100 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow.

The mother and baby unit is a new dedicated facility in Glasgow to support mothers and babies, providing accommodation, along with access to healthcare and other support services, that is purpose designed to best meet their needs.

Mears liaised with Glasgow City Council Health and Social Care Partnership and the local Asylum Health Bridging Team on the development and implementation of the unit, who are fully supportive of this proposal. This was considered via the Glasgow Partnership Board and the Regional Delivery and Procurement Group, which were established for such joint working and communication purposes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many temporary worker and equivalent visas have been issued but not taken up in each month of each of the last 10 years.

Home Office Migration Statistics do not capture the number of visas not taken up or used within the time limit as to capture these numbers would require a manual trawl of data, incurring disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does though publish data on the total number of decisions made on visitor visas, spousal visas, family visas and temporary worker visas. These can be found in our published statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2020/how-many-people-come-to-the-uk-each-year-including-visitors

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many family visas have been issued but not taken up in each month of each of the last 10 years.

Home Office Migration Statistics do not capture the number of visas not taken up or used within the time limit as to capture these numbers would require a manual trawl of data, incurring disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does though publish data on the total number of decisions made on visitor visas, spousal visas, family visas and temporary worker visas. These can be found in our published statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2020/how-many-people-come-to-the-uk-each-year-including-visitors

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many spousal visas have been issued, but not taken up, in each month in each of the last 10 years.

Home Office Migration Statistics do not capture the number of visas not taken up or used within the time limit as to capture these numbers would require a manual trawl of data, incurring disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does though publish data on the total number of decisions made on visitor visas, spousal visas, family visas and temporary worker visas. These can be found in our published statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2020/how-many-people-come-to-the-uk-each-year-including-visitors

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many visitor visas have been granted but not used within the time limit in each month of each of the last 10 years.

Home Office Migration Statistics do not capture the number of visas not taken up or used within the time limit as to capture these numbers would require a manual trawl of data, incurring disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does though publish data on the total number of decisions made on visitor visas, spousal visas, family visas and temporary worker visas. These can be found in our published statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2020/how-many-people-come-to-the-uk-each-year-including-visitors

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many visitor visas are not taken up because of a death of (a) the applicant or (b) the sponsor.

Home Office Migration Statistics do not capture the number of visas not taken up or used within the time limit as to capture these numbers would require a manual trawl of data, incurring disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does though publish data on the total number of decisions made on visitor visas, spousal visas, family visas and temporary worker visas. These can be found in our published statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2020/how-many-people-come-to-the-uk-each-year-including-visitors

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to reintroduce premium priority visa services.

Priority and Super Priority Visa services are already available in some locations overseas. If available, customers are able to purchase these services when booking an appointment at a visa application centre.

Priority and Super Priority Visas services have been reinstated in the UK for most in-country work and study routes, including applications for Indefinite Leave to Remain. It is anticipated Priority and Super Priority Visa services for Marriage and Settlement routes will be open by the end of March 2021.

All other in-country immigration application routes will continue to offer a standard service at this time.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the assessment criteria is for transferring mothers and children to the Mears operated mother and baby unit at 100 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow.

The mother and baby unit is a new dedicated facility in Glasgow to support mothers and babies, providing accommodation, along with access to healthcare and other support services, that is purpose designed to best meet their needs.

The facility can accommodate 38 young mothers, though currently it is operating at half capacity. The building is used to accommodate new service users where appropriate, or where there are referrals from social workers, the health team or the third sector.

The current residents were moved on the basis that they would have improved privacy and wrap around support as mothers and children. Consideration for transfer included a safeguarding assessment and appraisal of the suitability of their previous accommodation.

There is a dedicated Resident Welfare Manager on site, and they are in close contact with each resident. If the Welfare Manager considers a move out of the dedicated centre is appropriate a move to alternative accommodation can be arranged.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her Department's correspondence, reference CTS B2731/11 advising that applications are being processed in date order, how many different queues UKVI is operating; what the length was of each of those queues as of 19 February 2021; and on what date the applications that have been outstanding the longest were submitted.

The Home Office is committed to ensuring that all applications are considered without unnecessary delay. Information on our immigration routes with service standards and whether they have been processed against these standards is available as part of our transparency data, at: Migration transparency data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

If an application is deemed complex and expected to take longer than the standard processing timescale, UKVI will write to the customer within the standard processing time and explain what will happen next. The published information on processing times for complex/ non straightforward visa applications is published as part of the Migration Transparency data, available at Migration transparency data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

All asylum claims are carefully considered on their individual merits on the evidence available to the decision maker. We are committed to ensuring that asylum claims are considered without unnecessary delay, so that those who need protection are granted as soon as possible. Although we concentrate on oldest cases there may be reasons where some applications may be prioritised due to a number of factors such as vulnerability. Delays may also occur where we require further information/investigations before a decision can be made on the application.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the letters of 30 July and 24 August 2020 from the all-party Parliamentary group on immigration detention.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the letters of 30 July and 24 August 2020, the responses to which have now been sent.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many detainees and staff at (a) Dungavel Immigration Removal Centre and (b) Brook House Immigration Removal Centre have tested positive for covid-19 in the last 60 days.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 tests have been administered to Immigration Removal Centre staff in the last 60 days.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the tests for covid-19 carried out in Immigration Removal Centres (IRCs) in the last 60 days have been positive; and at what IRCs those positive results have occurred.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many transfers of people (a) from a prison to an Immigration Removal Centre and (b) from one Immigration Removal Centre to another have taken place in the last 60 days.

The Government published statistics relating to COVID-19 and the immigration system at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020 on gov.uk on 28 May and the latest Immigration Statistics publication includes the numbers of individuals detained under immigration powers in prisons. Statistics on people in immigration detention during the second quarter of 2020 (April to June) was published in August in the immigration statistics quarterly release https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-june-2020

Management information indicates that in the period from 1 September to 1 November 2020, 397 people have entered the immigration estate from the HM Prison Estate. This number includes those placed in the immigration estate temporarily prior to voluntary removal. All entrants to the immigration estate are placed in reverse cohort units in line with Public Health England guidance and those with particular health vulnerabilities offered the opportunity to ‘shield’.

During this period there have also been 665 moves between immigration removal centres, with most of these internal moves within the Heathrow centres (Harmondsworth and Colnbrook) and the Gatwick centres (Tinsley House & Brook House).

The safety and health of people in the detention estate are of the utmost importance. We are following all Public Health England guidance and have robust contingency plans in place. As of 2 November 2020, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in immigration removal centres.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps are taken to protect (a) detainees, (b) staff, and (c) people who are vulnerable when a positive covid-19 test occurs at an Immigration Removal Centre.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many covid-19 tests have been administered to detainees in Immigration Removal Centres in the last 60 days.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have (a) entered immigration detention and (b) been released from immigration detention in the last 60 days.

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering and leaving detention in each quarter, and the number of people in detention on the last day of each quarter in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people entering and leaving detention under immigration powers, are published in Table Det_01 of the ‘Summary tables’ and of those in detention, by location in Table Det_03a. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Further breakdowns can be found in the Immigration detention detailed datasets.

Figures on people in detention in Q3 2020 will be published on 26 November 2020.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people are in immigration detention in (a) Immigration Removal Centres and (b) prisons.

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering and leaving detention in each quarter, and the number of people in detention on the last day of each quarter in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people entering and leaving detention under immigration powers, are published in Table Det_01 of the ‘Summary tables’ and of those in detention, by location in Table Det_03a. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Further breakdowns can be found in the Immigration detention detailed datasets.

Figures on people in detention in Q3 2020 will be published on 26 November 2020.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people held in immigration detention in (a) prisons and (b) Immigration Removal Centres (i) have been advised to shield in their cells and (ii) are shielding.

The Government takes the welfare of staff and detained individuals in its care very seriously. Earlier this year, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and COVID-19 was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place. Guidance regarding the principles for managing the detention estate during the COVID-19 pandemic is published on GOV.UK and can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921491/detention-and-escorting-services-guidance-during-covid-19_v3.0.pdf

Further preventative measures in place include full ‘reverse cohorting’ staffed by dedicated teams, single occupancy rooms and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Additionally, in response to an increasing rate of infection in the community, as of 21 October, all staff and visitors to IRCs and Short-Term Holding Facilities are required to wear a face mask at all times when in the main centre(s).

For the week commencing 26 October, management information shows that there were 45 individuals detained in an IRC who were considered to be at heightened risk from COVID-19 and had been offered protective isolation (shielding) measures. Individuals can decline the offer of protective isolation measures and change their minds at any subsequent point. The protective isolation or shielding of those detained under immigration powers in prisons is managed by the Ministry of Justice.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. As per the guidance published by Public Health England, any individual with symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in protective isolation for 7 days. Those individuals who are severely unwell will be transferred to appropriate healthcare facilities with usual escorts and following advice on safe transfers. Appropriate PPE equipment is available to contractor and healthcare staff when interacting with detained individuals being held in isolation.

Since Thursday 3 September to date, management information indicates that 35 individuals in detention have been tested for COVID-19 due to their circumstances (such as being symptomatic). In the same time period, there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in an individual who was detained in a Residential Short-Term Holding Facility. The individual was in medical isolation and did not require hospital treatment.

As of 2 November, there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals in the immigration detention estate. There have been no deaths in immigration removal centres or short-term holding facilities as a result of COVID-19.

Numbers of staff being tested for COVID-19 is recorded on a weekly basis. Since the week commencing 30 August, 152 members of staff working in the immigration detention estate (supplier staff and healthcare providers) have been tested for COVID-19. Since 3 September, there have been a total of 17 positive COVID-19 tests of Home Office and supplier staff (including healthcare providers) working in the immigration detention estate.

To supplement the preventative measures already in place, the Home Office have begun a program of voluntary COVID-19 testing on induction for individuals arriving at an IRC. Induction testing began at the Heathrow and Gatwick estates from 26 October (those tested on induction are not included in the figures provided above). The induction testing program will be rolled out to other centres in coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to provide a substantive written response in respect of (a) correspondence to her Department of (a) 11 June 2020, (b) 20 August 2020 and (c) weekly phone calls from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central on behalf of Mssrs Abdul and Habib Safi.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the Hon. Member’s correspondence. The Minister for Immigration Compliance and the Courts replied on 23 October 2020

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans provide a substantive response to the correspondence of hon. Member for Glasgow Central of 15 July 2020 regarding constituent Mr Azizi.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon. Member’s correspondence. A reply was sent on 1 October 2020.

The hon. Member for Glasgow Central wrote on 15 July 2020 on behalf of her constituent, Mr Nihaz Azizi (known to UKVI as Mr Nihat Azizi), who claimed asylum in the UK on 3 April 2019. The hon. Member requested a progress update on the asylum claim.

Routine fingerprint checks indicated that Mr Azizi had previously claimed asylum in Germany in January 2016, and consideration was therefore given to returning him to Germany in accordance with the Dublin Regulations. However, it was subsequently decided to process his asylum claim in the UK.

UKVI cannot give an indication as to when Mr Azizi’s asylum claim is likely to be concluded as this will depend on the nature and extent of any enquiries that may need to be carried out before it can make a decision.

UKVI will contact Mr Azizi in writing via his legal representatives, Latta & Co Solicitors, once a decision is made on his asylum claim or if any further information or evidence is required.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many pieces of external medical evidence on adults at risk in immigration detention received by her Department since January 2017 have been found to be produced solely for the purpose of release rather than for highlighting vulnerability by (a) month, (b) immigration removal centre, and (c) document type.

Medical evidence received from external sources is not centrally recorded on Home Office systems and the number of pieces of evidence received cannot be obtained without reviewing individual case files, which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

All medical evidence received is considered in line with the Adults at Risk Policy and any decisions in relation to continued detention will be made having reviewed any evidence received. Release reasons are recorded but do not consider the assumed intention behind the submissions of such evidence.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many pieces of medical evidence her Department has received since January 2017 under the Adults at Risk in Immigration Detention policy by (a) month and (b) immigration removal centre.

The Home Office can receive medical evidence from a variety of sources including individual’s own accounts, reports from individual General Practitioners and medical advisors, other privately sourced medical advisors, as well as via medical practitioners based within Immigration Removal Centres under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules. Regardless of the source, all evidence received is considered by immigration case workers.

The number of reports that are provided by medical practitioners based in Immigration Removal Centres under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules are published quarterly as part of Immigration Enforcement transparency data. The latest publication can be found on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-february-2020

Medical evidence received from other sources are not centrally recorded and the amount received cannot be obtained without reviewing individual case files, which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people in Glasgow Central are designated as having no recourse to public funds.

The information you have requested is not held by the department.

The department has written to the UKSA with regard to the matter of data on no recourse to public funds. Please see the link below: https://www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/correspondence/response-from-daniel-shaw-to-ed-humpherson-parliamentary-question-response/.

There is no requirement for migrants with valid leave to enter or remain in the UK to maintain contact with the Home Office during their stay, or to provide updates to their address details. This information would be required to undertake any area-based assessment.

We are continuing to investigate whether the administrative data held by the department can provide any meaningful data in future and will provide an update in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in what circumstances (a) rubber bullets and (b) tear gas are authorised for use in the UK.

Rubber bullets and tear gas are not authorised for use by police forces in the United Kingdom.

Guidance on the use of equipment such as Attenuating Energy Projectiles and the use of irritant sprays is set out in the College of Policing Authorised Professional Practice here: https://www.app.college.police.uk.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the monthly cost is of running each immigration removal centre.

The Costs of individual Removal centres are commercially sensitive. The department publishes data setting out the average daily cost of all removal centres, which are calculated as below. For the most recent period published, the total average monthly cost of all centres was £9.16m (monthly cost per bed multiplied by the number of bed spaces)

The costs are derived at by dividing the Total Resource Costs of running Detention Centres (Contracts, staff, Rent, Rates, Utilities and Depreciation) by the average number of bed spaces (currently 3185).

The average cost to detain an individual in immigration detention is provided on a per day basis. The current daily cost per detainee is £94.56, which corresponds to an annual cost of £34,514 (£94.56 multiplied by 365 days) and monthly £2876 (£34,514 divided by 12 months). Data can be found at the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-february-2020

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of to Question 45288 and with reference to the Government's announcement on the Immigration Health Surcharge, whether people working in health and social care who have already paid that surcharge will be refunded on backdated basis.

The Prime Minister has asked the Home Secretary and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care to work together to exempt overseas NHS and care staff from the Immigration Health Surcharge.

Home Office and Department of Health and Social Care officials are currently working on how to implement this and further details will be announced in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will remove the Immigration Health Surcharge for people working in the health and social care sector.

We welcome the vital contribution NHS staff from across the globe make to our healthcare system.

The Government has recently announced a series of measures for key health workers on the frontline fighting coronavirus. Visas will be automatically extended for 12 months free of charge and there will be no Immigration Health Surcharge for the extension. These measures apply to NHS doctors, nurses and paramedics, and we have recently expanded this offer to cover more key NHS frontline health workers, including those working in eligible occupations in the independent health and care sector. This will also apply to their family members. The automatic extension offer will be for those whose visas expire between 31 March and 1 October. We estimate around 3,000 healthcare professionals, plus their families, will benefit.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether asylum seekers in accommodation in hotels in Glasgow will be reinstated back into self-contained flats after covid-19 lockdown measures are eased.

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of asylum seekers in accommodation in hotels in Glasgow are supported under (a) Section 98 and (b) Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 and of those supported under Section 4 how many were granted that support due to the covid-19 lockdown.

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for the publication of the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration's Adults at Risk in Detention report.

The Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration’s report into Adults at Risk in Immigration Detention will be published as soon as possible.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the letter of 27 March 2020 from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central on the effect of Covid-19 on people in immigration detention.

I can confirm that a response was dispatched on 30 April 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make changes to the system of registering biometrics during the period of the covid-19 outbreak.

Changes have already been made to the system – UKVI Service and Support Centres (SSCs) and Visas & Citizenship Application Services (VCAS) suspended customer facing services on 24 March 2020 and 27 March 2020 respectively as part of the response to Covid-19.

From 20 April 2020 we began offering reduced biometric enrolment service only to those customers where it is absolutely necessary. All other customers have been deferred from having to provide their biometrics after the lockdown period is over.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the requirement in certain categories of visa to leave the UK before being allowed to apply will be suspended during the period of the Coronavirus outbreak.

We continue to monitor the Covid-19 virus situation closely and will make appropriate and pragmatic adjustments to requirements and processes where necessary.

Given the restrictions on travel due to the current pandemic a number of restrictions on what is termed in country route switching have been relaxed.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will relax the requirements of the minimum income threshold in spousal visas during the period of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the covid-19 outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation closely and may make adjustments to requirements where necessary and appropriate.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will suspend the requirement for people to report to the Home Office during the period of the covid-19 outbreak.

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement on 16 March, and Public Health England (PHE) advice in relation to COVID-19, Home Office Immigration Enforcement are reviewing the frequency with which people need to report. While this goes ahead, we have temporarily deferred reporting. We will continue to contact all those who report via SMS text message with details of their future reporting dates. We will keep this under constant review in light of the ongoing situation.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will introduce alternatives to the requirement for people to travel to Croydon to submit an asylum application for the duration of the covid-19 outbreak.

We continue to monitor the Covid-19 virus situation closely and we will make appropriate adjustments to requirements and processes where necessary and appropriate.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will automatically extend visas due to expire during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are taking a pragmatic approach to visa extensions due to the coronavirus outbreak.

We continue to monitor the situation closely in all countries and are keeping this under constant review. Individuals who are following official advice will not be penalised as a result of issues arising from the covid-19 pandemic which are beyond their control.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether UK Visas and Immigration plans to apply the automatic three month visa extension offered to Chinese nationals will be offered to all nationalities affected by covid-19.

We are taking a pragmatic approach to visa extensions due to the coronavirus outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation in all countries, and we are keeping this under constant review.

A dedicated coronavirus immigration helpline https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-immigration-guidance-if-youre-unable-to-return-to-china-from-the-uk#helpline has been set up for those who wish to discuss their circumstances. The freephone number is 0800 678 1767 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) she and (b) Ministers of her Department have visited a medically supervised drug consumption room in the last six months.

Home Office Ministers have not visited a medically supervised drug consumption room in the last six months.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to Questions 1762 and 1763 on Immigration: EU Nationals tabled on 9 January 2020.

The response was given to UIN 1762 and 1763 on the 1st May 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many biometric residence permits were produced in (a) 2017, (b) 2018 and (c) 2019.

Based on production figures provided by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency, who carry out Biometric Resident Permit (BRP) production on behalf of UKVI, the following volumes of BRPs were produced in each calendar year.

BRPs Produced

2017

823,925

2018

950,842

2019

1,005,091

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints her Department received on biometric residence permits being produced with an incorrect (a) name, (b) date of birth, and (c) place of birth in each of the last three years.

The Biometric Immigration Document Management Unit (BIDMU) is responsible for correcting biographic errors on Biometric Residence Permits (BRP). From locally held records it has received the following number of complaints relating to (a) name, (b) date of birth, and (c) place of birth in each of the last three years.

Name

Date of Birth

Place of Birth

2017

1203

111

616

2018

2276

177

944

2019

3991

292

1168

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the terms of the contract for the physical production of biometric residence permits are on (a) who produces the permits, (b) where they are produced, (c) when the contract is due for renewal, (d) whether the contract includes a break clause and (e) what circumstances would trigger any break clause.

The production of biometric residence permits is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) in Swansea under a Memorandum of Understanding.

This is reviewed yearly on the anniversary of the agreement and should either party wish to terminate they must give 12 months’ notice.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Home Affairs Committee's Twelfth Special Report of Session 2017-19, Asylum accommodation: replacing COMPASS: Government Response to the Committee’s Thirteenth Report of Session 2017-19, HC 2016, what work her Department has undertaken with (a) the Home Office and (b) relevant local authorities in pursuit of that Government's response that it had agreed a combined Local authority/Home office review into the costs, pressures and social impact of asylum dispersal in the U.K.

The Home Office has established the Home Office/Local Government Chief Executive group (HOLGCEX) to enable partnership working with Local Government.

The Memorandum of Understanding agreed within this group includes reference to a review of funding and equitable dispersal.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for the publication of the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration's Adults at Risk in Detention report.

The Home Secretary is considering the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration’s report on Adults at Risk in Detention Policy, and it will be laid in Parliament in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) women and (b) men have been granted pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

It is not a mandatory requirement for an EU Settlement Scheme applicant to disclose their gender in their application.

The latest edition of the monthly statistical series on the operation of the EU Settlement Scheme was published on 16 April 2020, providing high-level figures on applications received and outcomes made up to 31 March 2020. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-march-2020

The EU Settlement Scheme Quarterly Statistics provide detailed statistics on applications made to the EUSS. We are continuously considering the content of the future releases and will be taking into account views and feedback from statistics users.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) woman and (b) men have been granted settled status under the EU Settled Status Scheme.

It is not a mandatory requirement for an EU Settlement Scheme applicant to disclose their gender in their application.

The latest edition of the monthly statistical series on the operation of the EU Settlement Scheme was published on 16 April 2020, providing high-level figures on applications received and outcomes made up to 31 March 2020. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-march-2020

The EU Settlement Scheme Quarterly Statistics provide detailed statistics on applications made to the EUSS. We are continuously considering the content of the future releases and will be taking into account views and feedback from statistics users.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to make provision for a supervised drug consumption facility in Glasgow.

There are no plans to change the law on drug consumption rooms. Nevertheless, the UK Government continues to support a range of evidence-based approaches to reduce the health-related harms of drug misuse.

The UK Government will continue to work together with the Scottish Government to tackle the problem of drug misuse and drug-related harm, notwithstanding that funding decisions with regards to treatment and rehabilitation are entirely the decision of the Scottish Government.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she next plans to attend a drugs task force meeting in Glasgow.

The Minister for Crime, Policing and the Fire Services recently announced that he was convening a UK drugs summit to be held in Glasgow.

Due to the General Election this was delayed our officials are now working on holding the summit in the first quarter of this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will refund child citizenship fees in light of the decision of the High Court that they are unlawful.

The judgment was handed down on 19 December, and we are carefully considering its implications, and next steps.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many units of living accommodation for MOD staff and families are currently unoccupied.

As of 6 September 2021, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) currently has 9,700 vacant Service Family accommodation (SFA) properties in the UK.

This figure represents a snapshot in time as the occupancy rate varies on a daily basis. It includes SFA required to manage expected service personnel moves, properties awaiting modernisation and properties required for disposal.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Oct 2020
What recent discussions has he had with his counterpart in the Scottish Government on cladding.

My Department is in regular contact with the devolved administrations on the subject of Building Safety. The devolved administrations are routinely invited to and regularly attend meetings of the Building Regulation Advisory Committee where matters relating to the Building Regulations in England and the United Kingdom are discussed.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when his Department plans to respond to the letter of 18 December 2019 from the hon. Member for Glasgow Central to the Minister for Housing in relation to cladding.

A response will be issued very shortly.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what childcare provision is available for people called for jury service.

There are no child-minding facilities at court. If jurors need to make specific childcare arrangements whilst on jury service they may be able to claim this through expenses as a financial loss.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service recognise that sometimes it may be inconvenient for some people to serve on the date originally summoned, for reasons which could include the needs of a child. Jurors are given the opportunity when responding to their summons to apply for a deferral to a more suitable date within the next twelve months. Those that believe they cannot serve as a juror at any time during the next 12 months can apply to be excused from their jury service.

Deferral and excusal applications are considered by summoning officers at the Jury Central Summoning Bureau (JCSB). Each application is carefully considered on its own merits and in light of individual circumstances.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to introduce an exemption from jury service to people breastfeeding.

Currently all jurors, including breastfeeding women, can apply to change the date of their jury service, (to a maximum of 12 months after the original date) if the original date is inconvenient for any good reason. If a juror believes they cannot serve at any time within the next 12 months, they can apply for an excusal. Deferral and excusal applications are considered by summoning officers at the Jury Central Summoning Bureau (JCSB). This is done on individual merit and is done carefully, sympathetically and with regard to individual circumstances.

While it is vital juries represent a cross-section of society, we are urgently reviewing our guidance to make it clearer that new mothers should be able to serve at a time that is right for them.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Leader of the House, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of (a) restrictions on travel and (b) reductions in availability of public transport during the covid-19 outbreak on the ability of hon. Members to participate in debates; and if he will make a statement.

The Government guidance is clear that you should continue to travel for work where it is not possible to do so from home. It is the Government’s strong view that Parliament best serves the UK public when MPs are present in Westminster, carrying out their essential functions. We have ensured that Members who cannot be here for a range of reasons can vote by proxy and participate in interrogative proceedings. Members’ travel arrangements and public transport do not fall under the Leader of the House’s portfolio of responsibilities but all Members must wear face coverings where mandated on public transport and I would encourage all to follow the Government’s guidance on this and other measures such as social distancing.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Leader of the House, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of reintroducing virtual parliamentary proceedings during the autumn 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

I refer the hon. Member to the response I gave to an urgent question on Monday 16 November 2020, available at: https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2020-11-16/debates/5A282C48-FAE0-4214-8B3E-EE545E2C6DF7/ParticipationInDebates

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons