Tania Mathias

Conservative - Former Member for Twickenham

First elected: 7th May 2015

Left House: 3rd May 2017 (Defeated)


Tania Mathias is not a member of any APPGs
2 Former APPG memberships
Guantanamo Bay, Heathrow and the Wider Economy
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

Tania Mathias has voted in 430 divisions, and 9 times against the majority of their Party.

13 Mar 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 287
7 Mar 2017 - Children and Social Work Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 287
8 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 317 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 332
13 Dec 2016 - Neighbourhood Planning Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 265 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 161 Noes - 274
19 Oct 2016 - Rights of EU Nationals - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 287 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 250 Noes - 293
25 Apr 2016 - Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 276
3 Nov 2015 - Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill (Money) - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 281 Noes - 227
23 Oct 2015 - Defence Expenditure (NATO Target) Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 15 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 16 Noes - 1
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Tania Mathias voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Conservative Aye votes vs 210 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
View All Tania Mathias Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Hayes (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
Chris Grayling (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Jeremy Hunt (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(35 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(32 debate contributions)
Home Office
(27 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Tania Mathias's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Tania Mathias

25th April 2017
Tania Mathias signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 25th April 2017

CROSSRAIL 2

Tabled by: Joan Ryan (The Independent Group for Change - Enfield North)
That this House recognises that the Crossrail 2 project is crucial to the growth and prosperity of London and the rest of the country; notes that Crossrail 2 will provide a £150 billion boost to the national economy, supporting 200,000 new jobs; further notes that Crossrail 2 will relieve intolerable …
11 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 5
Independent: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Conservative: 1
7th December 2016
Tania Mathias signed this EDM on Tuesday 24th January 2017

CONNAUGHT FUND

Tabled by: Kirsten Oswald (Scottish National Party - East Renfrewshire)
That this House welcomes the findings of the Complaints Commissioner following complaints lodged by George Patellis and Adam Nettleship regarding the loss of over £100 million by investors in the Connaught Income Series 1 Fund; notes that Mr Patellis was Chief Executive of Tiuta PLC, a firm at the heart …
38 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 25
Conservative: 5
Independent: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Labour: 1
Ulster Unionist Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Tania Mathias's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tania Mathias, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Tania Mathias has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Tania Mathias

Friday 11th September 2015

1 Bill introduced by Tania Mathias


A Bill to amend Part 3 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 to make noise caused by aircraft a statutory nuisance; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 29th November 2016
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
4th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the rationale is for setting the interest rate on the repayment of student loans under the new system at three per cent.


Interest rates on student loans vary according to a number of factors, including a borrower's level of earnings, and whether they remain in contact with the Student Loans Company to ensure they are repaying when they are eligible to do so.


The maximum interest rate for the post-2012 system is the Retail Price Index (RPI) figure plus 3%. The maximum rate applies whilst the borrower is studying; is the maximum interest rate for those borrowers earning £41,000 and over; and is the default interest rate for those borrowers who fail to keep in touch with the Student Loans Company.


Once a borrower is due to repay, a variable rate of interest will be charged, which is dependent upon income. Borrowers with an income of £21,000 or less will accrue interest at RPI. For a borrower with income greater than £21,000, a real rate of interest will be tapered in, reaching a maximum of RPI plus 3% at an income of £41,000 or more.

17th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether the agreement signed with China to fund Hinckley Point C nuclear reactor includes funding from China for (a) decommissioning costs and (b) emergency clean-up costs.

The basis on which Chinese companies will invest in the Hinkley Point C project is set out in the strategic investor agreement agreed between EDF and CGN in October. The terms of this agreement are a matter for EDF.


Operators of new nuclear power stations are required to have a Funded Decommissioning Programme (FDP) approved by the Secretary of State before nuclear related construction can begin. The FDP sets out how a new nuclear operator will make secure financial provision for decommissioning their power station and managing and disposing of its waste without recourse to the taxpayer.


Operators of nuclear power stations are also required to put in place insurance or other financial security to meet their nuclear third party liabilities.



Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2015
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking to prevent discrimination against single people.

Certain provisions in the Equality Act 2010 – for example permitted exceptions from the age discrimination requirements for retail concessions to students and pensioners – are likely to be of particular benefit to single people.

Single status is not a protected characteristic in the Equality Act 2010. In the provision of goods and services we believe there is a balance to be struck between the interests of single people and the commercial considerations of business. The government, therefore, has no plans to change the Equality Act 2010.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps his Department is taking to help people to stop receiving unsolicited mail.

The Government appreciates that some people find unsolicited mail a real nuisance. This is why we have made sure that there are preference services in place to help those people stop receiving unwanted mail.

By registering with both preference services offered by the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) and Royal Mail’s door-to-door opt-out service, the vast majority of unsolicited mail can be stopped. Registration is quick and free.

More information about these services can be found on the DMA’s Mailing Preference Service website (www.mpsonline.org.uk).

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what progress she has made on the rollout of smart meters.

Good progress has been made. The industry is making extensive preparations in the areas of meter procurement; in building and testing their systems, and in staff recruitment and training. Consumers are already benefiting from the roll-out – around 1.5 million meters are operating under the Programme – putting consumers in control of their energy use, bringing an end to estimated bills, and helping people to save energy and money.

17th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of a fundraising preference service on the work of the charity sector.

The Fundraising Preference Service, recommended by the Etherington reviewinto fundraising, will re-balancepower back to individuals and help them to press the 'reset' button on their relationship with fundraisers, giving them control over the fundraisingcommunications they receive from charities. It will stop people being inundated withrequests which they do not wish to receive and it will stop charities wasting resources oncommunicating with people that do not wish to hear from them. It also seeks to underwritepublic trust and confidence in charities which is vital to the sector’s work.

A working group involving charities is being established to develop the detailed plans for theimplementation of the service.

17th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to protect the personal details of those registered with the Government Gateway service from hacking; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to the Hon. Member for Sheffield, Heeley on 2 November 2015 to UIN: 13799.


3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will give direction to HM Revenue and Customs not to pursue care providers for back-dated tax which predates the guidance issued on the national minimum wage and sleep-in payments.

I currently have no plans to issue a direction requiring HM Revenue and Customs not to pursue social care providers for arrears of pay or penalties relating to periods that pre-date amended Government guidance.

20th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for what reason Companies House publishes the month and year of birth of company directors.

The Government considers that the date of birth of company directors is an important identifier for those searching the public companies register as it allows searchers to distinguish between individuals with the same, or similar, names.

Following feedback from company directors about the availability of their full date of birth on the public register, section 96 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 requires the Registrar of Companies to suppress the “day” element of a director’s date of birth.

This strikes an appropriate balance between ensuring that the information on the public register is of real practical use and reducing the risk that the information becomes a tool for abuse by exposing individuals to the risk of identity theft or fraud.

6th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for what reason Companies House publishes the month and year of birth of company directors.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

29th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, with reference to the report entitled, Self-employment review - An independent report by Julie Deane, published in February 2016, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending entitlement to statutory adoption pay to self-employed people.

The Government is considering all the recommendations made in Julie Deane’s independent review of self-employment and will respond in due course.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how his Department monitors the use of UK-manufactured arms by those countries to which they are sold.

All export licence applications are carefully assessed on a case by case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria, taking into account all relevant factors at the time of application. We draw on all available information, including checks using both open and classified sources, reports from non-government organisations and our overseas network, involving Desk and Post in the Foreign Office, when considering licence applications.

Foreign Office posts and departments in London monitor conditions in the respective countries – including human rights, regional tensions and the risk of exports being diverted to unintended end use – and advise on developments that might affect licensing policy.


8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to prepare for the potential effect of the use of artificial intelligence on the workplace.

In November 2016 the Government Office for Science published a report “Artificial intelligence: opportunities and implications for the future of decision making” which gives an overview of ways in which AI could change the nature of some areas of work. We have recently asked Jérôme Pesenti and Professor Dame Wendy Hall to undertake a review on artificial intelligence, to contribute to the development of the Government’s Industrial Strategy. As set out in the Industrial Strategy​ green paper, published January 2017 and the Digital Strategy, published March 2017, Government recognises that the rapid pace of technological change means digital techniques and technologies will change quickly so we are looking at ways to support people throughout their working lives.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what further legislative proposals she plans to bring forward to tackle nuisance telephone calls.

We are taking forward a range of legislative measures to tackle nuisance calls, which will increase consumer protection and choice by strengthening the Information Commissioner's Office's (ICO) ability to take enforcement action against organisations that break the law. Specific actions include; strengthening the ICO's direct marketing guidance by giving it statutory status; a proposal to extend the ICO’s powers of compulsory audit to more of the organisations that generate nuisance calls; and exploring the options for enabling the ICO to hold company directors to account for breaches of the direct marketing rules.

7th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department plans to commence the Triennial Review of Sales and Prizes.

As previously stated in the House of Commons, Government is reviewing the situation and I hope to announce details of a review in due course.

30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department plans formally to respond to the consultation on Implementing the English Baccalaureate which closed on 29 January 2016.

We will publish the Government response to the consultation on the implementation of the English Baccalaureate in due course.

17th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make it her policy to require Ofsted to make regular visits within three months to all schools that have been placed in special measures regardless of whether they have not changed their governance structure.

The Secretary of State has a duty to make an academy order for all local authority maintained schools that are judged by Ofsted to be inadequate. If an academy is judged to be inadequate, the Secretary of State has the power to transfer it to a stronger academy trust. In both cases, these academies will generally be inspected as new schools in their third year of operation.

We believe it is right in these cases to allow the new academy trust the opportunity to turnaround what was a previously failing school before it is inspected by Ofsted.

However, Ofsted will inspect schools at any time where information that they hold or receive causes sufficient concern.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether students who have not achieved at least a C grade in English and mathematics GCSE will be required to resit those exams as many times as it takes them to achieve that grade.

Departmental funding rules require full time students with prior attainment of a D to work towards achieving a C grade or higher in GCSE English and maths. Students who achieve lower than a D grade at 16 may study other qualifications such as Functional Skills as a ‘stepping stone’ towards GCSE.

For those opting to retake their GCSE(s) or being required to do so due to having previously attained a grade D, there is no requirement for them to repeatedly re-sit the GCSE exam. Schools and colleges have the freedom to determine when a student is ready to re-sit their GCSE. This is because our 16-19 English and maths requirements relates to enrolments rather than exam entries. This provides a school or college the flexibility to determine when best for a student to be entered for and sit an exam. For some students that might be the following November, while other students may require

a year, or two years study and tuition before they are ready to re-sit the exam.

If students resit their GCSE part way through their programme and fail to gain a grade C then they are expected to continue studying for the GCSE.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what additional resources are being provided for post-16 students who are required to resit English and mathematics GCSEs.

Funding for the study of English and maths, including GCSE resits, is provided through the 16-19 national funding formula. The formula incorporates disadvantage funding for providers including a funding uplift of up to £960 per full time student per year to provide for the additional costs incurred for teaching students who have low prior attainment, as indicated by not achieving English and/or maths GCSEs at grade C or above by the end of year 11 (typically age 16). This additional funding is not intended to solely fund maths and English qualifications, but to fund support for students to achieve their learning goals, including maths and English.

For the past three years the Government has also invested in programmes to support improvements in the teaching of maths and English in Further Education (FE) settings. This year, funding will provide up to 13,000 training opportunities for FE practitioners to improve their subject knowledge and confidence in their teaching of maths or English, fund bursaries for 300 graduates to train to become maths or English teachers in FE settings and further build evidence on evidence of what constitutes effective delivery and teaching of English and maths for students aged 16 to 18 that have not yet achieved level 2 English and maths.

15th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that funding is in place to implement its policy of 30 hours free childcare.

We are committed to providing the high-quality, affordable childcare that working families need.

To enable the successful implementation of 30 hours of free childcare, we are investing £1billion of additional funding per year, including £300million per year to increase our national average funding rates.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to restrict the amount spent by local authorities on legal support and advice in special educational needs and disability tribunals.

It is up to local authorities to decide how best to spend their Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) budgets, based on an analysis of local need. The reforms in the Children and Families Act 2014 were designed to make the SEND system less adversarial for parents and young people, as well as for local authorities. The process of Education, Health and Care (EHC) needs assessment and plan development is designed to be collaborative, meaning that most disagreements should be resolved early on. Where disagreements persist, we have introduced a requirement to consider mediation, which has often proved effective in reducing the need to make an appeal to the SEND Tribunal. For example, in 2015, 75% of disagreements over EHC plans for which mediation sessions were held did not result in a Tribunal appeal in that year.

The SEND Tribunal aims to be facilitative and accessible, so that it should not be necessary for either parents or local authorities to employ legal support when making or defending an appeal. No additional weight is given to evidence because it is presented by a lawyer and many parents and local authorities successfully pursue their case without legal representation.

The Department is currently conducting a Review of Disagreement Resolution Arrangements, as required by the 2014 Act, which will report to Parliament by 31st March 2017. The Review is looking at how the system of disagreement resolution is working for children, young people and their families, which includes enquiring about the costs incurred by both families and local authorities.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to increase awareness of the problems caused by illegal drugs in schools among (a) pupils and (b) parents.

Effective drug education is essential in supporting prevention, and in addressing the problem of drug misuse. Education plays an important role in helping to ensure that young people have the information they need to make informed, healthy decisions and to keep themselves safe.

Drug education is part of national curriculum science at key stage 2 and key stage 3. Provision in this area can be built on through personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education.

High quality PSHE can also play a vital role in developing the skills and attributes young people need to identify and manage risk and to stay safe. We believe that teachers are best placed to understand the needs of their pupils and our approach is for schools to develop their own local PSHE programme to reflect the needs of their pupils, drawing on the resources and evidence provided by experts.

We want to ensure that all schools are drawing on the best evidence available to deliver their PSHE. In March 2015, the Department published a ‘Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: a review of impact and best practice’, which included the best evidence on what works in drugs education. This can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pshe-education-a-review-of-impact-and-effective-practice.

It is good practice for schools to involve parents when developing their PSHE policy and schools are encouraged to publish their curriculum online. There are also useful resources available to support parents in increasing their knowledge about the risks that pupils face, including those problems caused by illegal drugs.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what threshold for (a) individual and (b) household earnings she plans to introduce to determine eligibility for the Government's 30 hours free childcare scheme.

The new entitlement to 30 hours free childcare is intended to support working parents with the cost of childcare and enable them, where they want, to return to work or to work additional hours.

To meet the principle of designing a system that is simple for parents, the Government’s intention is that eligibility for 30 hours free childcare should broadly align with Tax-Free Childcare. In particular both parents, or the single parent in such households, will need to work the equivalent of 8 hours per week at the national minimum wage. Further detail on eligibility will be provided during passage of the Childcare Bill.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the effect of the proposed third runway at Heathrow Airport on air quality; and what steps her Department is taking to incorporate its assessment of the air quality effect of a third runway in its revised air quality plan.

The Secretary of State has regular discussions with Ministerial colleagues on a range of issues, including on air quality.

Our air quality plans have always followed the best available evidence. We are currently working on the next steps needed to revise the national air quality plan for nitrogen dioxide. We will set out further measures in 2017.

2nd Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 2 December 2016 to Question 55351, for what reason she does not plan to bring forward proposals to amend part 3 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 to make medically unsafe levels of noise from aircraft a statutory nuisance.

The Government has no plans to amend the Environmental Protection Act as suggested because it considers that aircraft noise is best managed through aviation policy.

2nd Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to encourage businesses to reduce waste by using appropriately-sized packaging for their products.

Under the Packaging (Essential Requirements) Regulations, businesses are required to ensure that all packaging shall not exceed what is needed to make sure that the products are safe, hygienic and acceptable for both the packed product and for the consumer. These Regulations apply to those responsible for packing or filling products into packaging and those importing packed or filled packaging into the UK from elsewhere.

29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will bring forward proposals to amend part 3 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 to make medically unsafe levels of noise from aircraft a statutory nuisance.
20th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what research her Department is (a) carrying out and (b) encouraging into extending the use of materials that biodegrade more quickly.

In October 2014, Defra commissioned the Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) project on biodegradable plastic carrier bags – solutions through innovation. The project is contracted to the plastic packing manufacturer Aquapak Polymers Ltd, and is due to report in December this year. The project is testing the biodegradability of a hydrophilic polymer under simulated composting and anaerobic digestion conditions, and in experiments simulating natural conditions, and testing the impact on aquatic life.

7th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of employing nationals of other EU member states in his Department.

There has been no change to the rights and status of EU nationals in the UK, or of British citizens in the EU, as a result of the referendum. The Department for Exiting the European Union is assessing the skills needed for the department, the right security protocols, and relative merits of potential employees in line with usual practice.

8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department is taking steps to ensure that UK aid spent in Africa supports small-scale organic farmers.

DFID’s Agricultural Policy Framework, published last year, sets out the approach and steps DFID will take to support agriculture. Depending on context and need, this is expected to include support to small scale organic, or smallholder, farmers in Africa. Our priorities include helping smallholder farmers to increase their productivity, and to better link them to markets to sell their produce so as to increase their incomes, improve their livelihoods and contribute to economic growth and poverty reduction.

For example we are providing support to the International Fund Agriculture Development’s Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme. This will help smallholder farmers in Africa cope with the impacts of climate change by providing extension services to farmers, improving irrigation and infrastructure, and helping farmers to increase their harvests through improved seeds and better soil and land management practices.

17th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to support refugees from Iran; and what recent assessment she has made of the safety of Iranian refuges in Iraq.

Since 2011, the UK has provided £163 million of core funding to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to deliver protection and assistance to refugees globally. The UK works with the Government of Iraq, Kurdish Regional Government, the UN and the international community to support the rights of all minorities and to ensure our aid reaches those in greatest need.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, to which countries of concern on human rights the Government has authorised arms sales in the last year.

From January 2015 – March 2016 licences have been granted for military goods to the following countries of human rights concern:

Afghanistan; Bahrain; Bangladesh; Burundi; Central African Republic; China; Colombia; Democratic Republic of Congo; Egypt; Iraq; Israel and The Occupied Palestinian Territories; Maldives; Pakistan; Russia; Saudi Arabia; Somalia; South Sudan; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Syria; Turkmenistan; Venezuela; Yemen and Zimbabwe.

Further details on all licences granted for export are publically available as Official Statistics at www.gov.uk.

All export licences are issued in strict accordance with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria and any sanctions or embargoes that may be in place at the time an application is submitted for consideration.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many attendees there have been at each of the public consultation events his Department has held on the draft Airports National Policy Statement.

The Department held 20 public consultation events around Heathrow Airport between 13 February and 15 March in support of the consultation on the draft Airports National Policy Statement. The table below holds the figures for how many members of the public were recorded as attending each event:

Event

Number of attendees

Southall

76

Uxbridge

137

Kingston

206

Bracknell

223

Wimbledon

176

Ealing

224

Staines-upon-Thames

297

Twickenham

354

Putney

257

Hounslow

198

Stanwell Moor

123

Kensington

131

Windsor

167

West Drayton

281

Hammersmith

303

Maidenhead

206

Richmond

429

Gerrard’s Cross

156

Slough

167

Isleworth

229

Although these are the recorded attendance figures, there may be a small margin of error resulting from a manual count.

29th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what measures he has put in place for members of the public to raise concerns about the (a) process and (b) content of the nationwide consultation events his Department is running on the Airport National Policy Statement.

There are a number of ways for members of the public to raise concerns about both the process and content of the consultation events the Department is running on the draft Airports National Policy Statement:

a) Through discussion with officials at the local consultation events;

b) Calling the Department’s consultation enquiry helpline where queries can be logged and directed to the relevant area (0800 689 4968)

c) Emailing RunwayConsultation.admin@dft.gsi.gov.uk

d) By contacting Sir Jeremy Sullivan, the Independent Consultation Adviser at independentadviser@runwayconsultation.gsi.gov.uk

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential road safety implications of aircraft flying low over and alongside the M4 motorway in the event that a third runway is built at Heathrow Airport.

Safety and security are of paramount importance, these issues were considered by the Airports Commission and will be given due regard again at appropriate points in the process in light of established procedures and standards that apply to all airports.

Flightpaths for an expanded Heathrow have not been formulated and will be subject to consultation as part of the airspace change process.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timetable is for the publication of draft flight paths to and from an expanded Heathrow Airport.

We cannot be certain about the timing of the publication of draft flight paths for an expanded Heathrow Airport, because the airport operator will be leading the application for the airspace changes needed for new flight paths associated with a new runway. They will need to follow the Civil Aviation Authority’s airspace change process. It is through this process that communities will see and have the opportunity to comment on detailed proposals for any new flight paths. This process covers all aspects of the proposal including safety and environmental impacts, and a requirement to consult the communities that may be affected by the proposal.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the draft National Policy Statement on the expansion of Heathrow Airport.

I refer the Hon. Member to the oral statement on airport capacity on 25 October 2016: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/airport-capacity. In that statement my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State set out how the announcement fits within the planning process, and the opportunities members of this House have to contribute.

He stated that in the New Year, we will bring forward a draft ‘National policy statement’, which includes the details of the proposed scheme.

As required under legislation, this will be subject to a full and extensive public consultation, followed by a period of Parliamentary scrutiny.

Only once members have voted on the final National Policy Statement and it has been designated will the airport be able to bring forward a detailed planning application.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the potential (a) economic benefits and (b) level of new jobs resulting from the third runway at Heathrow Airport by region of the UK.

The economic benefits of a new runway at Heathrow have been assessed at a national level. It is estimated that a new runway will deliver up to £61 billion of benefits to passengers and the wider UK economy.

The local jobs created at and around the airport have also been assessed, with Heathrow expansion expected to deliver up to 77,000 additional local jobs by 2030. While it is not possible to precisely quantify the impacts on regional jobs and GDP, expanding airport capacity in the South East will support economic growth in the UK’s regions.

14th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has had discussions with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on waiving stamp duty for private residents choosing to relocate away from Heathrow Airport after the construction of a third runway.

The Secretary of State for Transport has not had discussion with the Chancellor about waiving stamp duty. These costs will not fall to local residents as Heathrow Airport Ltd has committed to pay the stamp duty costs for residents in both the compulsory and voluntary purchase zones.

1st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the proportion of potential capacity at Heathrow Airport which will be unfilled when a new third runway is operational.

A third runway at Heathrow is expected to become operational in 2026 subject to the Government’s consultation on a draft National Policy Statement and the planning process. In its Strategic Fit: Forecasts report, the Airports Commission (AC) published its assessment of how much capacity at the expanded Heathrow could be used.

Capacity is dependent on the level of future aviation demand. The AC therefore considered five alternate demand scenarios. Across these scenarios, Heathrow could reach full capacity by 2035, but in the lowest demand scenario, capacity may not be fully used until 2042.

31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 28 October 2016 to Question 50202, on Heathrow Airport: night flying, what (a) flexibility and (b) penalties for violation the Government plans to put in place in respect of the six-and-a-half hour ban on night flights from an expanded Heathrow Airport.

The Government is seeking a legally binding ban on scheduled night flights of six and a half hours at an expanded Heathrow. This would provide an extra hour and a half free from noise compared to today’s operation. The rules around the operation of night flight restrictions would be determined through consultation in line with the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s Balanced Approach to noise management. Furthermore, it is also expected that new binding noise targets and runway alternation arrangements would be consulted on with local communities as part of the planning process.

31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 28 October 2016 to Question 50200, on Heathrow Airport: air routes, what legal mechanisms the Government plans to use to protect existing domestic routes and provide additional connectivity across the UK with new routes from Scotland, Northern Ireland and the South West and North East of England.

The Government is committed to ensuring that expansion at Heathrow benefits the whole of the UK and strengthens regional connectivity. The Government will set out mechanisms to protect and strengthen domestic services when it publishes a draft National Policy Statement in the New Year.

27th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral statement on Airport Capacity of 25 October 2016, Official Report, column 163, on what evidential basis the figure of £61 billion was calculated for the economic benefit to the UK of expanding that airport; and what the reasons are for the difference between that figure and the £211 billion estimated by the Airports Commission.

The estimate of £61 billion includes the benefits to passengers and the wider economy of a new northwest runway at Heathrow, and was derived using established government appraisal techniques. The Airports Commission’s equivalent figure for the Heathrow Northwest runway scheme was £69 billion. The difference between the Commission’s and the DfT’s estimates reflects the DfT’s further consideration of wider economic impacts included in these figures.

Additionally, the Airports Commission used innovative modelling to estimate how airport expansion could impact on the growth in UK annual gross domestic product (GDP). The £211 billion figure represents the Commission’s estimate of the GDP impact in one of their five scenarios (“global growth”), which assumed higher global GDP growth than their central scenario. GDP and economic benefit measures are not comparable in their approach or purpose.

25th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will put in place a legal ban on the construction of a fourth runway at Heathrow Airport.

The Government agrees with the Airports Commission’s recommendation that a fourth runway at Heathrow Airport should be ruled out, and intends to take this forward as part of a draft National Policy Statement.

25th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which body will finance changes to the M25 resulting from the decision to expand Heathrow Airport.

The Government have been clear that the promoter, Heathrow Airport Limited, will meet the cost of the surface access improvements necessary to allow expansion of the airport, including the costs of re-aligning the M25 motorway.

25th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the proposed six and a half hour ban on night flights to and from Heathrow Airport will be given legal force.

The Government requires that a legally binding ban on night flights of six and a half hours at an expanded Heathrow. Consideration of any ban will also be subject to the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s Balanced Approach to noise management, including specific consultation with local communities and other interested parties.

25th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much financial support the Government will contribute towards the cost of surface access to Heathrow Airport in the event that a new third runway goes ahead.

The Government has been clear that the promoter, Heathrow Airport Limited, will meet the costs of the surface access improvements necessary to allow expansion of the airport.

The Government’s 2013 Aviation Policy Framework makes clear that developers will pay the costs of upgrading or enhancing road, rail or other transport networks or services where there is a need to cope with additional passengers travelling to and from expanded or growing airports. Where the scheme has a wider range of beneficiaries, and are not specific to the addition of a new runway, the Government will consider, along with other relevant stakeholders, the need for public funding on a case-by-case basis.