Chris Green Portrait

Chris Green

Conservative - Bolton West

First elected: 7th May 2015


Backbench Business Committee
15th Mar 2022 - 26th Oct 2023
Pension Dashboards (Prohibition of Indemnification) Bill
19th Oct 2022 - 26th Oct 2022
Commercial Rent (Coronavirus) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 14th Dec 2021
Home Affairs Committee
26th Nov 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Work and Pensions Committee
16th Oct 2017 - 20th Feb 2018
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Department Event
Monday 26th February 2024
18:00
Department for Business and Trade
Second Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
26 Feb 2024, 6 p.m.
The draft Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of Company Law) Regulations 2024
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Department Event
Monday 26th February 2024
18:00
Department for Business and Trade
Second Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
26 Feb 2024, 6 p.m.
The draft Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of Company Law) Regulations 2024
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Department Event
Tuesday 27th February 2024
09:25
Department for Business and Trade
Third Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
27 Feb 2024, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Paternity Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2024
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Department Event
Tuesday 27th February 2024
09:25
Department for Business and Trade
Third Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
27 Feb 2024, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Paternity Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2024
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Department Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
11:30
Department of Health and Social Care
Oral questions - Main Chamber
5 Mar 2024, 11:30 a.m.
Health and Social Care (including Topical Questions)
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Department Event
Thursday 7th March 2024
09:30
Department for Business and Trade
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Mar 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Business and Trade (including Topical Questions)
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Department Event
Tuesday 23rd April 2024
11:30
Department of Health and Social Care
Oral questions - Main Chamber
23 Apr 2024, 11:30 a.m.
Health and Social Care (including Topical Questions)
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Department Event
Thursday 2nd May 2024
09:30
Department for Business and Trade
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 May 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Business and Trade (including Topical Questions)
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Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) (Reform)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 51 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 81
Speeches
Tuesday 23rd January 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
The single biggest concern my constituents raise about healthcare is access to GPs, especially in Blackrod and Westhoughton. What more …
Written Answers
Tuesday 30th January 2024
Social Work: Staff
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to tackle social …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 8th March 2018
Forensic Science Regulator Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
2. (b) Any other support not included in Category 2(a)
Name of donor: Northern Campaign Group
Address of donor: King George Chambers, St James Square, Bacup, OL13 9AA
Amount of …
EDM signed
Wednesday 21st February 2024
No confidence in the Speaker
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 9th March 2022
Pets (Microchips) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Chris Green has voted in 861 divisions, and 23 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
21 Oct 2020 - Additional Covid-19 Restrictions: Fair Economic Support - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 339 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 340
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
22 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 269 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 246
30 Nov 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 268 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 434 Noes - 23
30 Nov 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 259 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 36
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 271 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 441 Noes - 41
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
28 Jun 2023 - Education - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Conservative No votes vs 237 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 373 Noes - 28
4 Dec 2023 - Business without Debate - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 217 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 381 Noes - 37
13 Dec 2023 - Retained EU Law Reform - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 464 Noes - 11
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Green voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
View All Chris Green Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Chris Green's debates

Bolton West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

As Parliament considers the Bill of Rights, the Government must reconsider including abortion rights in this Bill. Rights to abortion must be specifically protected in this legislation, especially as the Government has refused to rule out leaving the European Convention on Human Rights.

We want the Government to commit to not rolling out any e-vaccination status/immunity passport to the British public. Such passports could be used to restrict the rights of people who have refused a Covid-19 vaccine, which would be unacceptable.

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.


Latest EDMs signed by Chris Green

21st February 2024
Chris Green signed this EDM on Wednesday 21st February 2024

No confidence in the Speaker

Tabled by: William Wragg (Conservative - Hazel Grove)
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
70 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 40
Scottish National Party: 29
Independent: 1
11th April 2019
Chris Green signed this EDM on Tuesday 23rd April 2019

Exiting the European Union

Tabled by: William Cash (Conservative - Stone)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (Exit Day) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2019 (S.I., 2019, No. 859), dated 11 April 2019, a copy of which was laid before this House on 11 April 2019, be annulled.
82 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Apr 2019)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 70
Democratic Unionist Party: 7
Independent: 4
Non-affiliated: 1
View All Chris Green's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Green, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Chris Green has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Chris Green

2 Bills introduced by Chris Green


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the appointment of the Forensic Science Regulator; to make provision about the Regulator and about the regulation of forensic science; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Thursday 8th March 2018

A Bill to require those on the electoral register to produce proof of identity at polling stations before voting; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 23rd November 2016
(Read Debate)

327 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
20th Apr 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what progress he made at COP26 on reducing the use of coal.

At COP26, all parties agreed to phase down the use of coal, the first ever direct reference to coal in UN climate decision text.

The Global Coal to Clean Power Transition Statement gained 77 signatures from countries, subnationals, and organisations, and the Powering Past Coal Alliance grew to 165 members.

And there were significant financial commitments, with international partners agreeing to mobilise over $20 billion to support developing countries in the transition from coal to clean energy.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
1st Oct 2020
What plans his Department has to introduce a national identity card.

The Government has no plans to introduce national identity cards.

17th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died (a) with covid-19 symptoms and (b) from covid-19 to date.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the (a) average age and (b) median age is of people who have been reported of dying as a result of covid-19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

18th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to support garden centres.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced a package of changes to business rates worth £13.6bn over the next 5 years in lower bills. This includes a freeze to the multiplier, scrapping the downward revaluation cap and extending and increasing the generosity of the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Relief from 50% to 75% in 2023-24.

This is in addition to the Energy Bills Discount Scheme; the increased Employment Allowance of £5,000 and setting the Annual Investment Allowance at £1 million permanently. This is a comprehensive package of support which will help protect businesses such as garden centres.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending incentives for communities to host onshore wind projects to (a) nuclear and (b) other low-carbon generation projects.

The Government wants all communities to benefit from hosting energy technologies in their local areas. However, Government does not have a formal role with regards to community benefits for low-carbon energy projects. These are best agreed at a local level between the operators and the local community.

Many low-carbon energy developers already offer a range of community benefit schemes, including providing funding for environmental enhancements, job schemes, energy discounts, and investment in local infrastructure.

The Government will seek alignment and consistency between energy technologies where appropriate, but believes it is important that the approach to community benefits for each technology reflects their unique impacts.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to roll out new nuclear projects.

HMG is backing new Nuclear with £1.2bn committed to support Sizewell C, completed the SMR competition initial down-selection, thanks to the newly established Great British Nuclear, and investing up to £75m in our Nuclear Fuel fund, in addition to the £385m already provided through our Advanced Nuclear Fund.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to the document entitled Life Sciences Competitiveness Indicators 2023, published on 13 July 2023, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her policies of the reduction in (a) inward life sciences foreign direct investment and (b) equity finance raised by life sciences companies in 2022.

The reduction in the estimated value of inward life sciences foreign direct investment and in equity finance raised in 2022 was not unique to the UK. Other global business environments, such as the USA, also saw falls in investment and equity raised. This was in large part due to changes in the life sciences investment environment following the COVID-19 pandemic and broader economic factors. Regardless, the department is acting in the face of fierce global competition. DSIT, DHSC and the Treasury announced a package of measures in May 2023, backed by over £650 million in funding, to reverse this decline.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she has made an assessment of potential links between the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access and levels of foreign direct investment in life sciences.

The Government has considered in broad terms the link between volume-based rebate payments in our medicine pricing schemes and various kinds of investment in our Impact Assessment of updates to the Statutory Scheme for branded medicines pricing, which operates alongside voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access (VPAS). The Government’s 2023 Impact Assessment of updates to the Statutory Scheme can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-the-scheme-to-control-the-cost-of-branded-health-service-medicines.

We are in close discussions with the Department of Health and Social Care and Department for Business and Trade about the business environment for life sciences and its impact on investment.

8th Jun 2023
What steps her Department is taking to advance the UK's role in the science and technology sector.

In March,the Government published the Science and Technology Framework. This details our strategic vision for how to make the UK a science and technology superpower by 2030.

The Framework sets out the steps required to attract investment, grow UK companies, innovate successfully and safely, and deploy our world class science and technology research base for good.

We have already announced investment of £900million in exascale computing, £2.5billion over 10 years in quantum technologies and a £1billion semiconductor strategy.

9th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how much revenue was raised for the Exchequer by the sale of the Vaccines Manufacturing Innovation Centre; and whether those funds will be reinvested into life sciences manufacturing capabilities in the UK.

The Vaccine Taskforce granted funding to VMIC Ltd to support development of the Vaccine Manufacturing and Innovation Centre, a vaccine research and manufacturing facility in Harwell.

In late 2021, VMIC UK Ltd's Board of Directors made the decision to sell the facility through a competitive process. In April 2022, the facility was sold to Catalent. VMIC Ltd subsequently entered a voluntary liquidation.

The courts appointed liquidators to act on behalf of creditors and this process is under way. It is not possible to comment on the question of revenue raised while the liquidation process is ongoing.

9th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how much and what proportion of the £354m funding allocated to life sciences manufacturing has been allocated to life sciences manufacturing projects; and which projects have received this funding.

This Government recognises the valuable role that life sciences manufacturing plays in the UK economy, as outlined in the Life Sciences Vision published in 2021. Last March, we launched the £60 million Life Sciences Innovative Manufacturing Fund to encourage manufacturing investment in the UK. The fund has received a large number of high-quality applications and we expect to announce the grant recipients shortly. In addition, the UK has supported several other life sciences manufacturing investments including through a grant of up to £15.9m to chemical producer Croda to increase the UK’s capacity to manufacture lipid nanoparticles for mRNA vaccines at their site in Leek, and up to £12.3m to support Smith&Nephew’s new Advanced Wound Management manufacturing and R&D site near Hull. The Government continues to work with the life sciences industry to support manufacturing investments in the UK.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on improving the UK's standing as a global life sciences hub and the use of the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing Access.

As the accountable Secretaries of State for the Life Sciences Vision, the Government and life sciences sector’s blueprint for ensuring the UK becomes a world leading science superpower and global life sciences leader, my Rt. Hon. Friends the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care are regularly engaged in discussions on how we can deliver on the ambitions of the Vision for the economy and for NHS patients.

This was the subject of discussion at the most recent Life Sciences Council on the 28th of November, where the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing Access was also discussed.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to open the Government Office for Technology Transfer; and whether he will include in that Office's remit an objective of promoting closer collaboration between academia and industry to enhance the UK's translation capabilities in life sciences.

The Government Office for Technology Transfer (GOTT) will formally launch in Autumn 2022. GOTT will support central government departments and arm’s length bodies to deliver a step change in the management of the social, economic, and financial value of their knowledge assets for the benefit of the UK economy and the UK taxpayer. Sector agnostic, GOTT will serve as an advisor, leader and convener and act as a focal point for those that can enable the asset to reach its potential, including private sector investors, academia and industry.

6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the ambition in the Life Sciences Vision to develop a highly skilled workforce, what steps he is taking to develop (a) translational research and (b) broader life sciences research talent in the UK.

The Government is committed to developing Life Sciences research talent as part of its vision to make the UK the leading global hub for Life Sciences.

The Medical Research Council (MRC) directs around £85 million each year towards developing research careers, supporting around 1,600 PhD students.

Translational research is supported by MRC’s successful translational funding strategy, which seeks to progress innovative discovery science towards clinical utility.

In addition, Innovate UK supports the development of translation research skills through the Biomedical Catalyst Accelerator programme, which focusses on priority areas highlighted in the Life Sciences Vision, such as oncology and neurodegeneration.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Global Britain Investment Fund will open for investment for new medicines manufacturing; and what steps he is taking to ensure that the fund supports innovative, smaller biotechnology companies.

The Life Sciences Innovative Manufacturing Fund (LSIMF) was announced on 2 March 2022. This £60 million capital grant scheme welcomes applications from SMEs with innovative proposals, including biotechnology companies.

The UK has one of the strongest life sciences industries globally. In 2020, the value of life sciences inward FDI totalled £900m, ranking second only to the US in the number of projects. The UK also performs well in R&D spend, securing £4.8bn by UK pharmaceuticals in 2019 and 18% of our total industrial R&D spend. The new £1.4bn Global Britain Investment Fund (GBIF) will build on the strengthens of this sector by providing £354 million in grant support for UK life sciences manufacturing. This will ensure internationally mobile companies invest in cutting edge, innovative manufacturing projects right here in the UK.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect of the UK's regulatory framework on the number of life sciences companies that deem it necessary to conduct clinical trials outside of the UK; and whether he has plans to make exceptions under the existing framework to enable more UK-based life science companies to conduct trials within the UK.

There has been no change to the number of applications to the MHRA for clinical trials over the past 5 years. We are committed to developing a world-leading regulatory system for clinical trials that allows us to collaborate effectively globally and maintains and enhances the attractiveness of the UK as a site for clinical trials. The MHRA are planning to launch a public consultation shortly on a set of proposals to improve and strengthen the UK clinical trials legislation (the Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations 2004 as amended), to help us make the UK the best place to research and develop safe and innovative medicines. We have the opportunity to improve our regulation to support clinical trials in the best interests of patients, in line with the ambitions of the Life Sciences Vision to make the UK the leading global centre for innovative research design and delivery, across all types and phases of trials. Through the legislative proposals outlined in the consultation, we aim to streamline clinical trials approvals, enable innovation, enhance clinical trials transparency, enable greater risk proportionality, and promote patient and public involvement in clinical trials.

20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the proposals for change to NICE methods and processes in the context of the Life Sciences Vision published in July 2021.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) plays a crucial role in sustaining the UK’s position as a life sciences superpower and will continue to play a pivotal role in delivering the ambitions set out in the Life Sciences Vision, which was co-developed by Government and the sector.

NICE is continuing to deliver its Methods Review which will ensure NICE retains its global leadership in the evaluation and appraisal of new medicines and technologies. As an independent body, NICE is responsible for its own methods and processes.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will continue to work closely with the wide range of public and private sector bodies and stakeholders across the sector, including NICE, to deliver the Life Sciences Vision.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to encourage R&D investment in highly-skilled pharmaceutical manufacturing in the UK.

The UK Government will invest £14.9 billion in R&D this year, bringing investment to its highest level in four decades. This is a major step towards our commitment to increase total public and private R&D investment to 2.4 per cent of GDP by 2027.

Through the Manufacturing Made Smarter Challenge, the government will invest £147 million (matched by a minimum of £147 million from industry) to transform the UK’s manufacturing capabilities through the development and adoption of industrial digital technologies. The Challenge will support businesses to implement new tech to boost their manufacturing productivity, helping them reach new customers, create thousands of new highly skilled jobs, slash carbon emissions and reduce prices for customers.

The Government has also recently launched the Medicines and Diagnostics Manufacturing Transformation Fund (MDMTF), a £20 million fund offering capital grants to businesses, incentivising them to place internationally mobile high value manufacturing investments in the UK. The MDMTF will increase the production of medicines and diagnostic equipment in the UK. In doing so, it seeks also to support companies in adopting new technologies which boost productivity, drive down costs and which have less impact on the environment.

The Government will also publish a Life Sciences Vision later this year which will set out our ambition for supporting growth of the life sciences sector, including in manufacturing.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

To date, no financial or other resources have been allocated from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s (BEIS) budget to investigate potential future uses by the department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The corporate functions of the Department do not have access to the NHS Test and Trace database system. The Department therefore does not currently plan to use it.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the Targeted Charging Review proposals on the UK steel sector.

Network charging is a matter for Ofgem, as the independent regulator, and decisions on its Targeted Charging Review (TCR) are for it to make. Through the TCR, Ofgem is seeking to ensure all parties connected to the electricity network make a fair contribution to its fixed costs. This is consistent with Government’s views on the importance of an energy system that ensures a fair distribution of costs, with solutions rewarded where they contribute to reduced system costs.

Ofgem has published an analysis of the expected impacts of the TCR reforms at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/electricity/transmission-networks/charging/targeted-charging-review-significant-code-review . Ofgem is working to implement the reforms by April 2022 through code changes, with the final aspects of those code changes being consulted on shortly.

The Government continues to engage with Ofgem to inform our understanding of the reforms’ policy implications, and we will also give careful consideration to the related recommendations of the recent UK Steel report “Closing the Gap”.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of Ofgem’s proposed reforms under the Targeting Charging Review on costs for steel companies; and what plans Ofgem has to review those proposals.

Network charging is a matter for Ofgem, as the independent regulator, and decisions on its Targeted Charging Review (TCR) are for it to make. Through the TCR, Ofgem is seeking to ensure all parties connected to the electricity network make a fair contribution to its fixed costs. This is consistent with Government’s views on the importance of an energy system that ensures a fair distribution of costs, with solutions rewarded where they contribute to reduced system costs.

Ofgem has published an analysis of the expected impacts of the TCR reforms at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/electricity/transmission-networks/charging/targeted-charging-review-significant-code-review . Ofgem is working to implement the reforms by April 2022 through code changes, with the final aspects of those code changes being consulted on shortly.

The Government continues to engage with Ofgem to inform our understanding of the reforms’ policy implications, and we will also give careful consideration to the related recommendations of the recent UK Steel report “Closing the Gap”.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) competitiveness of electricity prices in the UK and (b) effect of those prices on the UK steel sector’s ability to compete internationally.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses to ensure our economy remains strong and competitive. The ability for our industries to be able to compete across Europe and globally is a priority for this Government.

The Government has put moving to a cleaner, greener economy at the heart of its Industrial Strategy, especially with our commitment to Net Zero. Our aim is to work with the steel sector and help them to reduce carbon emissions. We will continue to support the steel sector in achieving these aims through the various funds available such as the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund and Clean Steel Fund.

We estimate that reduction in the various renewable costs for eligible energy intensive industries, including steel, will save them around £400m a year in electricity costs. We have also extended the schemes to compensate certain energy intensive industries for indirect emission cost to the end of the next financial year in order to minimise disruption to existing recipients whilst we conduct a review. Between 2013 and 2019, total compensation paid to the steel sector was over £480m.

We welcome the recent report by UK Steel - “Closing the Gap” - regarding electricity prices and will give its recommendations careful consideration.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the recommendations made by UK Steel in its February 2021 report, Closing the Gap, on reducing the disparity between the UK and the German and French industrial electricity prices.

We welcome this report and will give its recommendations careful consideration.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking in addition to Budget 2020 measures to support science funding and R&D tax credits by increasing the incentives for advanced medicines manufacturing in the UK.

The UK has world leading science and research capabilities and we have already committed to utilising these to address the COVID-19 challenges, in close collaboration with the research and business communities in the advanced manufacturing sector.

In April we announced a £1.25 billion package to help ensure innovative firms in some of the most dynamic sectors of the UK economy – including life sciences – are protected through the COVID-19 crisis so they can continue to develop innovative new products. As part of this Innovate UK, part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), are investing £750 million to support innovation in the country’s most research-intensive businesses during and post the coronavirus pandemic, and to support new ways of dealing with global disruption. The package will include grants, loans, and expanded business advisory support. This package builds on the government’s existing support for innovative, high-growth firms including the £2.5 billion British Patient Capital fund, the upcoming £200 million Life Sciences Investment Programme, internationally competitive R&D tax reliefs and our major commitments to increase public R&D spending to £22 billion by 2024-25.

Currently over £36 million is awarded through UKRI to projects directly related to tackling Covid-19.? This includes £24.6 million awarded across 27 projects, including for testing a vaccine, developing therapies and improving understanding of how to treat COVID-19, awarded through a Rapid Response call (now closed) run jointly with the?National Institute for Health Research .

We are also supporting the development of a coronavirus vaccine, working to ensure the UK has the manufacturing capability to produce these at the levels the UK needs. This is at the early stages but progressing rapidly. A new cross government vaccines taskforce has been set up, reporting to the Secretaries of State for BEIS and DHSC as well as Sir Patrick Vallance. It brings together government, industry, academics, funding agencies and other partners to make rapid decisions in order to accelerate vaccine development in the UK, working closely with the BioIndustry Association.

This taskforce is reviewing a number of options, including looking at delivering the Vaccines Manufacturing Innovation Centre (VMIC) earlier than the 2022 opening date originally planned. The VMIC was asked to develop a plan for its dramatic acceleration and expansion. As a result the initial phase of the build has now started which is approximately three months ahead of schedule. Further acceleration and expansion options will be presented by the VMIC to the government in due course, and definitive estimates of further time savings will be available at that time.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will extend social investment tax relief to grassroots music venues.

Social Investment Tax Relief (SITR) was introduced in the Finance Bill in 2014. It aims to incentivise individuals to invest in organisations (‘social enterprises’) whose trading activities seek to generate profit and bring social or community benefit.

Eligibility criteria and guidance on how to apply for the relief scheme can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/venture-capital-schemes-apply-to-use-social-investment-tax-relief#trades.

Most profit seeking commercial trades qualify for the relief, and the criteria do not explicitly rule out grassroots music venues from receiving it. However, if your trade includes things like including property development or leasing activities, your enterprise may not qualify for SITR on the basis certain trades are often asset backed or have predictable or guaranteed revenue streams, making them lower risk. In turn, this could divert capital away from higher-risk enterprises that genuinely struggle to raise finance.

The Government keeps SITR under review in order to ensure it continues to meet its policy objectives in a way that is fair and effective.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to (a) support new and emerging talent performing at grassroots music venues and (b) improve funding opportunities.

The Government is committed to supporting emerging musical talent and our grassroots music venues, which are the lifeblood of our world-leading music sector.

The Government is supporting grassroots music through Arts Council England’s (ACE’s) Supporting Grassroots Live Music (SGLM) ring fenced fund of £1.5m. The fund is designed for organisations - including venues and promoters - with little or no prior experience of public funding applications.

DCMS supported culture, including grassroots music, during Covid-19 through the unprecedented £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund (CRF). In England, the CRF provided immediate assistance to prevent 136 of our most loved and enduring grassroots music venues closing their doors for good.

In addition, the Energy Bill Relief Scheme has provided support to all businesses across Great Britain and Northern Ireland, including grassroots music venues, protecting all non-domestic consumers from soaring energy costs, cutting the cost of power bills and providing them with the certainty they needed to plan through the acute crisis this winter. We will continue to do so through the Energy Bills Discount Scheme until Spring 2024.

The Government also supports new and emerging talent through a range of export support programmes, including the successful Music Export Growth Scheme and the International Showcase Fund.

DCMS and the Department for Education jointly published the National Plan for Music Education in June 2022, which sets out the Government’s vision to enable all children and young people in England to have the opportunity to progress their musical interests and talents, including professionally.

Finally, DCMS is also developing a Creative Industries Sector Vision that will set out this Government’s ambitions, shared with industry, to support this high-growth sector to 2030.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has received correspondence from the Gambling Commission on a national register of gamblers.

In October 2019, the Gambling Commission issued a challenge to the gambling industry to develop a workable ‘Single Customer View’ solution. The Single Customer View aims to facilitate data sharing between operators so that harm prevention efforts can be improved by measures which prevent disordered gamblers moving to another operator when one intervenes. As set out in its statement of 7 October, the Commission has no plans to mandate a particular single customer view solution at this stage. The next step is for industry to develop and test potential options.

The Gambling Commission has worked closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office to understand how a single customer view can be delivered in compliance with all relevant data protection requirements. The Information Commissioner’s Office recently published a report confirming it should be possible under data protection law for data to be shared safely and securely between online operators to help prevent gambling related harm. However, the report does not comment on how any single customer view should work in practice. We expect the industry to proceed to trial its planned single customer view solution and will continue to monitor developments closely.

The government is reviewing the Gambling Act 2005 to make sure it is fit for the digital age. Our call for evidence included questions on how the consumer data collected by operators could be better deployed and used to support the government’s objectives. We are considering the evidence carefully and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the (a) risk to personal data and (b) implications for privacy of the establishment of a national register of gamblers.

In October 2019, the Gambling Commission issued a challenge to the gambling industry to develop a workable ‘Single Customer View’ solution. The Single Customer View aims to facilitate data sharing between operators so that harm prevention efforts can be improved by measures which prevent disordered gamblers moving to another operator when one intervenes. As set out in its statement of 7 October, the Commission has no plans to mandate a particular single customer view solution at this stage. The next step is for industry to develop and test potential options.

The Gambling Commission has worked closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office to understand how a single customer view can be delivered in compliance with all relevant data protection requirements. The Information Commissioner’s Office recently published a report confirming it should be possible under data protection law for data to be shared safely and securely between online operators to help prevent gambling related harm. However, the report does not comment on how any single customer view should work in practice. We expect the industry to proceed to trial its planned single customer view solution and will continue to monitor developments closely.

The government is reviewing the Gambling Act 2005 to make sure it is fit for the digital age. Our call for evidence included questions on how the consumer data collected by operators could be better deployed and used to support the government’s objectives. We are considering the evidence carefully and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of whether the introduction of a national register of gamblers is a proportionate response to the level of problem gambling.

In October 2019, the Gambling Commission issued a challenge to the gambling industry to develop a workable ‘Single Customer View’ solution. The Single Customer View aims to facilitate data sharing between operators so that harm prevention efforts can be improved by measures which prevent disordered gamblers moving to another operator when one intervenes. As set out in its statement of 7 October, the Commission has no plans to mandate a particular single customer view solution at this stage. The next step is for industry to develop and test potential options.

The Gambling Commission has worked closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office to understand how a single customer view can be delivered in compliance with all relevant data protection requirements. The Information Commissioner’s Office recently published a report confirming it should be possible under data protection law for data to be shared safely and securely between online operators to help prevent gambling related harm. However, the report does not comment on how any single customer view should work in practice. We expect the industry to proceed to trial its planned single customer view solution and will continue to monitor developments closely.

The government is reviewing the Gambling Act 2005 to make sure it is fit for the digital age. Our call for evidence included questions on how the consumer data collected by operators could be better deployed and used to support the government’s objectives. We are considering the evidence carefully and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Gambling Commission is planning to create a national register of gamblers.

In October 2019, the Gambling Commission issued a challenge to the gambling industry to develop a workable ‘Single Customer View’ solution. The Single Customer View aims to facilitate data sharing between operators so that harm prevention efforts can be improved by measures which prevent disordered gamblers moving to another operator when one intervenes. As set out in its statement of 7 October, the Commission has no plans to mandate a particular single customer view solution at this stage. The next step is for industry to develop and test potential options.

The Gambling Commission has worked closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office to understand how a single customer view can be delivered in compliance with all relevant data protection requirements. The Information Commissioner’s Office recently published a report confirming it should be possible under data protection law for data to be shared safely and securely between online operators to help prevent gambling related harm. However, the report does not comment on how any single customer view should work in practice. We expect the industry to proceed to trial its planned single customer view solution and will continue to monitor developments closely.

The government is reviewing the Gambling Act 2005 to make sure it is fit for the digital age. Our call for evidence included questions on how the consumer data collected by operators could be better deployed and used to support the government’s objectives. We are considering the evidence carefully and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend the Data Protection Act 2018.

The UK now controls its own data protection laws and regulations, in line with our interests, after the end of the transition period. We will continue to operate a high-quality data regime that promotes growth and innovation, and underpins the trustworthy use of data.

We want our data protection law to remain fit for purpose, and to support the future objectives of the UK. We will shortly publish the Government Response to the National Data Strategy Consultation, which will provide further details on the action the Government is taking to unlock the power of data.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place. No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place. No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place. No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will bring forward proposals to classify sporting and cultural venues as vital national infrastructure under schedule 22 of the Coronavirus Act 2020.

The Government has no current plans to revise the list of sectors designated as critical national infrastructure.

Schedule 22 of the Coronavirus Act 2020 confers powers to the Secretary of State to prohibit or restrict events or gatherings in England. This includes imposing restrictions on the persons entering or remaining on the premises.These regulations are not applicable to any changes in the list of sectors designated as critical national infrastructure.

The government has worked to protect cultural and sporting venues during the lockdown to save sports facilities, theatres, concert halls and live music performance venues for future generations. In July 2020, MHCLG announced changes to the planning system to protect buildings that are an intrinsic part of our cultural heritage. This move was announced alongside the £1.57 billion investment to protect Britain’s cultural, arts and heritage sector and provide extra security to businesses as they plan to reopen their premises when it is safe to do so.

The government has also provided £1.8 billion of public support to the sport sector in response to the pandemic to ensure facilities are able to reopen when it is safe for them to do so.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the planned hosting of (a) the semi-final and final of the UEFA Euro 2020 football tournament and (b) other major football tournaments, whether (i) Wembley stadium and (ii) other football stadiums will be designated as vital national infrastructure under covid-19 legislation.

Public safety is our main priority and decisions will be guided by a Science Board of relevant experts including senior PHE representation, who will take into account the latest public health data. Matters concerning the national infrastructure are for the Cabinet Office.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the rate of covid-19 transmission within bowling centres.

Since 2 December, as set out in the COVID Winter Plan, we have returned to a tiered approach to COVID-19 restrictions in England. Relevant venues in the entertainment, leisure and tourism sectors - including bowling alleys - will be permitted to reopen in tiers 1 and 2, subject to curfew restrictions and in line with COVID-19 Secure guidance. In tier 3 areas, indoor venues and attractions - including bowling alleys - must close.

We worked closely with a range of visitor economy stakeholders to develop our guidance for leisure and hospitality venues. We continue to engage with bowling stakeholders, such as the Ten-Pin Bowling Proprietor’s Association, to update and review our guidance. Further specific guidance on bowling alleys has been published within UKHospitality’s ‘COVID-19 Secure Guidelines for Hospitality Businesses.’

Our decisions have been and will continue to be based on scientific evidence and public health assessments.

Bowling centre operators can continue to access the Government’s comprehensive support package - including the extended furlough and self-employed support schemes, new grant schemes, as well as various government-backed loans. We have also provided business rates relief and grants for many in the retail, leisure and hospitality sector.

We are listening to stakeholders’ concerns, and will continue to closely monitor the ongoing impact of Government restrictions on bowling alleys.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to support operators of bowling centres during their extended period of closure during the covid-19 outbreak.

Since 2 December, as set out in the COVID Winter Plan, we have returned to a tiered approach to COVID-19 restrictions in England. Relevant venues in the entertainment, leisure and tourism sectors - including bowling alleys - will be permitted to reopen in tiers 1 and 2, subject to curfew restrictions and in line with COVID-19 Secure guidance. In tier 3 areas, indoor venues and attractions - including bowling alleys - must close.

We worked closely with a range of visitor economy stakeholders to develop our guidance for leisure and hospitality venues. We continue to engage with bowling stakeholders, such as the Ten-Pin Bowling Proprietor’s Association, to update and review our guidance. Further specific guidance on bowling alleys has been published within UKHospitality’s ‘COVID-19 Secure Guidelines for Hospitality Businesses.’

Our decisions have been and will continue to be based on scientific evidence and public health assessments.

Bowling centre operators can continue to access the Government’s comprehensive support package - including the extended furlough and self-employed support schemes, new grant schemes, as well as various government-backed loans. We have also provided business rates relief and grants for many in the retail, leisure and hospitality sector.

We are listening to stakeholders’ concerns, and will continue to closely monitor the ongoing impact of Government restrictions on bowling alleys.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the economic benefit of the contribution made by church buildings used for community purposes.

Many places of worship do accommodate additional uses, including those for community purposes, alongside worship. These buildings provide economic and social positive externalities to the country as a whole, and at a local level, they provide a thriving community asset. Places of worship forge social capital by strengthening community cohesion and belonging, alongside providing significant social benefits in times of need. Social action at places of worship is equally prevalent and valuable, such as food banks, blood donation centres and night shelters.

The Government has set out its vision and strategy to protect the historic environment, including England’s places of worship, in the 2017 Heritage Statement. The DCMS-funded Taylor Review Pilot, and its subsequent evaluation, published in October 2020, underlines the importance of a strategic approach, based on understanding the gaps in local community provision, when considering additional uses of places of worship.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to allocate funding to churches for the maintenance of church buildings as a result of their contribution to the provision of public services.

Many places of worship do accommodate additional uses, including those for community purposes, alongside worship. These buildings provide economic and social positive externalities to the country as a whole, and at a local level, they provide a thriving community asset. Places of worship forge social capital by strengthening community cohesion and belonging alongside providing significant social benefits in times of need. Social action at places of worship is equally prevalent and valuable, such as food banks, blood donation centres and night shelters.

The Government has set out its vision and strategy to protect the historic environment, including England’s places of worship, in the 2017 Heritage Statement. The DCMS-funded Taylor Review Pilot and its subsequent evaluation, published in October 2020, underlines the importance of a strategic approach, based on understanding the gaps in local community provision, when considering additional uses of places of worship.

The Government has supported the maintenance of historic churches throughout the UK since 2001 through the Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme. The Scheme, which is currently funded until the end of March 2021, provides grants towards VAT paid on repairs and maintenance. It presently handles around 7000 claims per annum, is open to all faiths and denominations and is delivered UK wide.

In addition, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Government has announced significant cross-sector support. This includes a £1.57 billion Cultural Recovery Fund announced earlier this summer, aimed at helping key cultural organisations, including places of worship, through the pandemic. The fund represents the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture, complementing the Covid-19 support schemes launched earlier in the year by Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Any extension to the existing funding is subject to the Spending Review, which is due to conclude later this month.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) economic and (b) social effect of using church buildings for cultural and entertainment purposes.

Many places of worship do accommodate additional uses, including those for social support, cultural and entertainment purposes, alongside worship. These buildings provide economic and social positive externalities to the country as a whole, and at a local level, they provide a thriving community asset. Places of worship forge social capital by strengthening community cohesion and belonging alongside providing significant social benefits in times of need. Social action at places of worship is equally prevalent and valuable, such as food banks, blood donation centres and night shelters.

The Government has set out its vision and strategy to protect the historic environment, including England’s places of worship, in the 2017 Heritage Statement. The DCMS-funded Taylor Review Pilot and its subsequent evaluation underlines the importance of a strategic approach, based on understanding the gaps in local community provision, when considering additional uses of places of worship.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of schools that have not resumed delivery of a full extra-curricular offering compared to before the covid-19 outbreak.

It is up to schools to decide what extra-curricular activities to offer to pupils. This can change and the department does not ask them to provide regular data.

However, the department included questions in both the School Snapshot Panel Survey and the Pupil and Parent Panel Surveys to understand provision and take up of extra-curricular activity, including the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The information collected does not indicate how many schools have returned to the same level of provision as before the Covid-19 pandemic. However, parents and pupils have reported that the uptake of extra-curricular activities increased in the 2021/22 academic year, compared to 2020/21, as schools looked to rebuild their offer to pupils.

The data can be found at:

We expect to publish further survey results in due course.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

NHS Test and Trace data is used by the Department for Education to routinely monitor and report to Ministers on the take-up of COVID-19 testing in schools and colleges, and to support operational delivery. For example, the Department has used the data to proactively identify schools that required additional support to report test results for their setting during the initial on-site testing phase of the programme.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

NHS Test and Trace data is used by the Department for Education to routinely monitor and report to Ministers on the take-up of COVID-19 testing in schools and colleges, and to support operational delivery. For example, the Department has used the data to proactively identify schools that required additional support to report test results for their setting during the initial on-site testing phase of the programme.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has allocated (a) financial and (b) other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace system.

NHS Test and Trace data is used by the Department for Education to routinely monitor and report to Ministers on the take-up of COVID-19 testing in schools and colleges, and to support operational delivery. For example, the Department has used the data to proactively identify schools that required additional support to report test results for their setting during the initial on-site testing phase of the programme.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many times on average pupils in (a) Bolton, (b) Wigan, (c) the county of Cornwall and (d) Greater London were sent home from school due to covid-19 in (i) September, (ii) October and (iii) November 2020.

The Department collects data on the number of schools that have indicated they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment on a daily basis, as well as the total number of pupils in attendance and the number of pupils asked to isolate due to potential contact with COVID-19. This data is published from this collection at both national and local authority levels as part of the official statistics series. The publication can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Data is published from 9 September 2020, but prior to 12 October 2020 information on pupils isolating was not collected. This data is collected at school level, not pupil level. Therefore, we cannot estimate the average number of times a pupil has been asked to isolate.

The Department is constantly reviewing the content of its publications. Announcements about future content will be made through the official statistics release page: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the impact of zoos on support for conservation science.

Zoos are required to carry out conservation work as part of their licensing conditions, and we are in the process of updating these. Defra has recently held a targeted consultation on a set of new Standards of Modern Zoo Practice for Great Britain. The draft standards propose a set of new conservation requirements that, subject to the approval by parliament of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill, zoos licensed under the Zoo Licensing Act 1981 will be required to meet. The new conservation requirements are designed to ensure that all licensed zoos in Great Britain provide meaningful contributions to conservation. Defra and the Zoos Expert Committee are currently considering responses to the consultation, which closed on 21st June.

Scott Mann
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent representations she has made to the Palestinian Authority on reports that three schools are named after Nazi collaborators.

We have raised our concerns about school naming at senior levels within the Palestinian Authority (PA) and will continue to do so. Our partnership with the PA includes a commitment from the Palestinian leadership to adhere to the principle of non-violence and to tackle language and actions that could incite violence or hatred. We continue to assess that the PA’s commitment to peace is in line with our Partnership Principles.

UK support to the PA contributes to the salaries of carefully vetted teachers and education workers in the West Bank through the Palestinian-European Socio-Economic Management Assistance mechanism, which screens recipients against international sanctions lists.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what level of tariff will be introduced by the UK Global Tariff regime on medical products such as adhesive removal sprays and the medical devices which require their use in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

Our ambition is to ensure there are no tariffs, fees, charges or quantitative restrictions on trade in goods between the UK and the European Union (EU) at the end of the transition period through a Free Trade Agreement (FTA). We are currently in an intense phase of negotiations with the EU, and we are working hard to achieve that. We therefore do not expect the UK Global Tariff (UKGT) to apply to EU imports.

The UKGT will apply to UK imports from countries the UK does not have trading arrangements in place with. The Government has assessed all available evidence submitted as a part of the public consultation in depth, and in addition, conducted its own assessment to ensure the UKGT is robust and supportive of the UK’s economy. Government will publish more analysis in the Tax Information and Impact Note (TIIN) alongside the legislation, as is standard practice.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect on charges to patients of the introduction of tariffs on medical products such as adhesive removal sprays and the medical devices which require their use in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal; which other essential products will potentially be subject to such tariffs; and if she will make a statement.

Our ambition is to ensure there are no tariffs, fees, charges or quantitative restrictions on trade in goods between the UK and the European Union (EU) at the end of the transition period through a Free Trade Agreement (FTA). We are currently in an intense phase of negotiations with the EU, and we are working hard to achieve that. We therefore do not expect the UK Global Tariff (UKGT) to apply to EU imports.

The UKGT will apply to UK imports from countries the UK does not have trading arrangements in place with. The Government has assessed all available evidence submitted as a part of the public consultation in depth, and in addition, conducted its own assessment to ensure the UKGT is robust and supportive of the UK’s economy. Government will publish more analysis in the Tax Information and Impact Note (TIIN) alongside the legislation, as is standard practice.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
12th May 2020
What steps her Department is taking to protect the global supply chains of UK businesses.

The Department is working to reduce market access barriers, including through Free Trade Agreements. This will open up more opportunities for business to build further resilience into their supply chains for the future. Alongside this, the United Kingdom will tirelessly fight protectionism and unfair trade practices, including through the G20 and in the WTO.

The United Kingdom has strong, collaborative relationships with other countries on this international endeavour, and will continue to make progress to facilitate free flowing trade. This will continue to be vital throughout the COVID-19 crisis, and for the recovery that will follow.

8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's planned timetable is for the publication of new statutory guidance on the preparation of local transport plans.

The Department for Transport is considering next steps on this matter in the light of the Prime Minister’s Network North announcement, which represents a significant change in the Government’s funding of local transport schemes, and will make an announcement in due course.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what data his Department holds on the number of Taxi and Private Hire Licences (a) refused and (b) revoked by (i) Bolton and (ii) Wigan Council.

The Department gathers data on the number of private hire vehicle operator licences that have been refused and revoked. This information is published on GOV.UK in the taxis, private hire vehicles and their drivers (TAXI) data set. Information about private hire vehicle operator licences can be found in the TAXI0111 table. Neither Bolton or Wigan Metropolitan Borough Councils refused or revoked a private hire vehicle operator licence between 1 April 2021 and 31 March 2022.

The Department does not gather or hold data on the number of private hire or taxi vehicle licences that have been refused or revoked.

The Department holds data on the number of refusals and revocations of taxi and private hire vehicle driver licences which have been recorded on the National Register for Revocations, Refusals and Suspensions (NR3S):

Refusals recorded on the NR3S database (April 2021-March 2022)

Revocations recorded on the NR3S database (April 2021-March 2022)

Bolton Metropolitan Borough Council

3

6

Wigan Metropolitan Borough Council

28

0

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the National Register of Taxi and Private Hire Licence Revocations and Refusals (NR3), which local authorities with large numbers of registered taxi and private hire drivers made the least use of NR3 searches in 2022; and how many NR3 searches and entries were submitted by those authorities in 2022.

Use of the National Register for Refusals and Revocations (NR3) is recommended in the Department’s Statutory Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Standards which was published in 2020. The Department is monitoring usage of the NR3 and communicates with local authorities on this matter regularly.

Five largest licensing authorities that make infrequent/no use of NR3:

Licensing Authority

Drivers Licensed (31 March 2022)

NR3 Searches (Jan-Dec 2022)

NR3 Entries (Jan-Dec 2022)

Birmingham City Council

6,280

1

0

Manchester City Council

5,789

0

0

Sefton Council

5,701

0

0

Newcastle City Council

4,576

0

0

Liverpool City Council

3,360

0

0

For context, Manchester City Council activated its NR3 account in August 2022 whereas other authorities had activated accounts from the start of the year.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Department fully supports the NHS Test and Trace system and has been investigating ways that the system can be used on the transport network to play its part in tackling Covid-19. We have been working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care to understand how best the system can be used going forward. Some areas across the Departmental Group have already introduced using QR codes within their public only areas. Currently, the Department has not needed to allocate any financial resource from its budget. However, as policy and the technology develops, this will be kept under review. It is also worth noting that Test and Trace data will only be used to tackle Covid and won’t be used for other purposes.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Department fully supports the NHS Test and Trace system and has been investigating ways that the system can be used on the transport network to play its part in tackling Covid-19. We have been working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care to understand how best the system can be used going forward. Some areas across the Departmental Group have already introduced using QR codes within their public only areas. Currently, the Department has not needed to allocate any financial resource from its budget. However, as policy and the technology develops, this will be kept under review. It is also worth noting that Test and Trace data will only be used to tackle Covid and won’t be used for other purposes.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of covid-19 passports on the ability of people who identify as (a) Black-Caribbean, (b) Black-African and (c) South Asian to travel internationally.

Work on developing vaccine certification for international travel continues. We will continue to work across government to consider any potential effects as the policy progresses.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to work with the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if any financial or other resource allocation has been made to investigate the possibility of how her Department can make use of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment the Commissioners have made of the effect of churches on community health and wellbeing through their provision of food banks, youth services, mental health services, addiction support services and other community services during the covid-19 outbreak and associated lockdowns.

The parish church is a key source of community support and I commend the work of clergy and volunteers across the country during this very challenging time.

Recent research published by Theos and the Church Urban Fund https://www.theosthinktank.co.uk/cmsfiles/GRACE-CUF-v10-combined.pdf and separately by the National Churches Trust https://www.houseofgood.nationalchurchestrust.org/ has shown the substantial social and economic contribution parishes, and cathedrals make to their local communities.

Across the dioceses of the Church of England churches are operating 35,000 based projects which serve the needs of their communities, I am pleased to say that many of these have continued to operate during the pandemic within the guidelines set out by Government on Covid-19, providing crisis support such as foodbanks, bereavement counselling, night shelters, debt relief advice, as well as project work to combat modern slavery and support victim of domestic abuse.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to tackle social work workforce (a) shortages and (b) recruitment.

We recognise and value the vital contribution of regulated professions, including social workers in adult social care, and are committed to developing the skills of the workforce. That is why we announced a new fund on 10 January 2024 to support recruitment of social work apprentices into adult social care over the next three years.

The new funding will allow local authorities to apply for a contribution towards the costs of training and supervising new social work apprenticeships. Details on what the funding can be used for, how to access the funding, and employer eligibility will be set out in guidance to be published on GOV.UK shortly.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report entitled The Impact of Care Act Easements published by the University of Manchester and the NIHR Older People and Frailty Policy Research Unit in November 2022, what steps her Department is taking to support local authorities in identifying hidden older carers within their communities.

Under the Care Act 2014, local authorities are required to undertake a Carer’s Assessment for any unpaid carer who appears to have need for support, and to meet their eligible needs upon request from the carer.

On 24 October 2023, the adult social care’s Innovation and Improvement Unit launched the Accelerating Reform Fund which provides a total of £42.6 million over 2023/24 and 2024/25 to support innovation and scaling in adult social care, and to kick start a change in services to support unpaid carers. The list of priorities for innovation and scaling includes focussing on identifying unpaid carers in local areas, encouraging people to recognise themselves as carers, and promoting access to carer services.

The adult social care reform white paper, People at the Heart of Care, published on 1 December 2021, highlighted the potential to increase the voluntary use of unpaid carer markers in National Health Service electronic health records. In 2022, NHS England wrote to all general practices about the importance of identifying carers and advising how caring status should be recorded on patient records.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 20 October 2023 to Question 202779 on Rare Diseases: Drugs, how many single technology appraisals of medicines conducted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for non-orphan medicines resulted in (a) a positive recommendation, (b) an optimised recommendation, (c) a recommendation for managed access, (d) a negative recommendation and (e) termination in each financial year since 2018-19.

The information requested is provided in the attached table.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has made an assessment of the potential merits of undertaking modular updates on topics relevant to rare diseases since the publication of its updated process and methods for health technology evaluation on 31 January 2022.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has no current plans to undertake a modular update of its methods and processes related specifically to rare diseases. NICE specifically considered treatments for rare diseases during its methods review, and many of the changes introduced in NICE’s updated health technology evaluation manual in January 2022 will benefit treatments for rare diseases. These include the severity modifier, flexibility in uncertainty considerations and the emphasis on a comprehensive evidence base including real-world, qualitative, surrogate, and expert evidence. These updates mitigate the barriers faced by rare disease technologies while maintaining an evidence-based, robust, and proportionate evaluation approach.

16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many highly specialised technology evaluations of medicines for very rare diseases conducted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence resulted in (a) a positive recommendation, (b) an optimised recommendation, (c) a recommendation for managed access, (d) a negative recommendation and (e) termination in each financial year since 2018-19.

The following table shows a breakdown of technologies appraised through the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s highly specialised technology process by financial year from 2018/19:

Financial Year

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Total

Recommended

1

4

2

4

4

15

Optimised

0

0

0

0

1

1

Not recommended

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

1

4

2

4

5

16

Terminated

0

0

0

0

0

0

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's document entitled Final impact assessment: statutory scheme to control costs of branded health service medicines, published in March 2020, whether his Department plans to update that impact assessment using data from the Life Sciences Competitiveness Indicators 2023.

The Government publishes new impact assessments each time the statutory scheme is updated. Further impact assessments were published in respect of updates made to the statutory scheme in 2022 and 2023.

The Government is currently consulting on updates to the statutory scheme to make sure that the scheme can continue to meet its objectives from 2024 onwards. A consultation stage impact assessment of the proposed updates has been published, and is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1179564/impact-assessment-review-scheme-cost-branded-medicines-updated-21-august-2023.pdf

An updated impact assessment will be published alongside the response to the consultation and will include the updated Competitiveness Indicators in the evidence base.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 July 2023 to Question 192548 on Gene Therapies, how many of the advanced therapeutic medicinal products evaluated by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence that have been recommended for use were gene therapies appraised through the Single Technology Appraisal pathway.

As of 5 September 2023, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has made positive recommendations on eight out of the nine gene therapy medicinal products it has evaluated using its single technology appraisal process.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to ask the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation to update the baseline modelling and assumptions it uses to make decisions on the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating specific age cohorts against seasonal influenza.

For the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation to formally revisit the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating specific age cohorts against seasonal influenza, an up-to-date impact and cost effectiveness analysis would be required, and the UK Health Security Agency is in the process of updating the influenza model using more recent data, including accounting for changes due to the pandemic.

There is currently uncertainty on any longer-term changes because of the pandemic to social contact patterns and the activity of flu in the population for a fully robust update to cost effectiveness analysis in the short term.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department makes an estimate of the timescale for manufacturing influenza vaccines to (a) inform its decision on eligibility for the annual NHS influenza immunisation programme and (b) ensure the adequacy of supply of those vaccines across the country.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation regularly discuss with the vaccine manufacturing industry issues such as the availability of new and existing vaccines, and manufacturing lead in times. Their advice about which flu vaccines are to be used for the coming season is informed by these discussions. An effective programme depends on a reliable supply of vaccine. It takes approximately five to six months for the first supplies of approved vaccine to become available once a new strain of influenza virus is identified and isolated.

National Health Service providers determine how many seasonal flu vaccines to buy for eligible cohorts each year based on their local populations, as outlined in the annual flu system letter. The letter, published on 25 May 2023, is based on the advice of the JCVI, which reviews the latest evidence on flu vaccines and advises on the type of vaccine to be offered to different age groups and on which vaccines should be prioritised for various at-risk groups.

General practitioners and community pharmacists are responsible for ordering their own flu vaccines for the adult population from suppliers. These are then used to deliver the national flu vaccination programme, with deliveries phased through the season to help mitigate against risks of wastage, cold chain failure and to adequately cover the peaks and flows of local demand.

NHS England encourages their contractors to purchase vaccines from more than one manufacturer to mitigate against the risk of supply issues. Regional NHS England commissioners, in partnership with their local systems, also make assessments of the amount of vaccine available in their area to ensure there is enough supply to meet public demand.

The UK Health Security Agency secures and supplies a sufficient volume of flu vaccines used in the children’s flu programme to ensure that eligible children aged less than 18 years old who present for vaccination can be offered an appropriate vaccine.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential effect of NHS England’s Budget Impact Test on single-dose gene therapies.

No assessment has been made.

The Budget Impact Test is an integral part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) evaluation process for new interventions, including gene therapies. It assesses the financial implications of introducing a new therapy by considering factors such as patient eligibility, treatment costs, and the impact on National Health Service resources. NICE undertakes a Budget Impact Test for each individual single-dose gene therapy as part of standard NICE process.

5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s Single Technology Appraisal pathway is compatible with emerging innovations including gene therapies.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) evaluates gene therapies through both its technology appraisal programme and its highly specialised technologies programmes as appropriate. NICE’s processes have been proven to be suitable for the evaluation of advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs) where companies are willing to price their products in a way that represents value to the taxpayer. NICE has recommended 80% of the ATMPs it has evaluated for use by the National Health Service and they are now available for the treatment of NHS patients, including through the Cancer Drugs Fund and managed access agreements negotiated between the NHS and the manufacturer.

Most recently, in April 2023, NICE recommended eladocagene exuparvovec, the first and currently only gene therapy for children with an ultra-rare genetic disorder, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency, enabling its use on the NHS in England.

5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to implement the commitment in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s methods and processes review to accept a greater degree of uncertainty in the evaluation of innovative new health technologies, including emerging cell and gene therapies.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is responsible for the methods and processes that it uses in the development of its guidance. NICE made a number of changes to its health technology evaluation manual in January 2022 following a comprehensive review of its methods and processes, including to clarify its committees’ additional flexibility in considering uncertainty when evidence generation is difficult. NICE’s technology appraisal and highly specialised technology committees are now using the updated health technology evaluation manual for all new evaluations which began after 1 February 2022, including evaluations of cell and gene therapies.

5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of reviewing Section 3(D) of the Abortion Act 1967 in the context of potential risks presented to the health and safety of women.

No assessment has been made of the implications for policies on the provision of abortion pills to a woman beyond the legal time limit for abortion.

The law on abortion and required standards of medical care are clear. The Department continues to work closely with NHS England, the Care Quality Commission and abortion providers to ensure that abortions in England are performed in accordance with the Abortion Act 1967.

There are no plans to review Section 3(D) of the Abortion Act 1967. Parliament decided the circumstances under which abortion can legally be undertaken. It would be for Parliament to decide whether to make any changes to the law on abortion. As with other matters of conscience, abortion is an issue on which the Government adopts a neutral stance and allows hon. Members to vote according to their moral, ethical or religious beliefs.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of provision of abortion pills to a woman beyond the legal limit for abortion by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service.

No assessment has been made of the implications for policies on the provision of abortion pills to a woman beyond the legal time limit for abortion.

The law on abortion and required standards of medical care are clear. The Department continues to work closely with NHS England, the Care Quality Commission and abortion providers to ensure that abortions in England are performed in accordance with the Abortion Act 1967.

There are no plans to review Section 3(D) of the Abortion Act 1967. Parliament decided the circumstances under which abortion can legally be undertaken. It would be for Parliament to decide whether to make any changes to the law on abortion. As with other matters of conscience, abortion is an issue on which the Government adopts a neutral stance and allows hon. Members to vote according to their moral, ethical or religious beliefs.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many participants were recruited to industry-sponsored clinical trials in each of the National Institute for Health and Care Research's Local Clinical Research Networks in 2022-23.

A total of 32,328 participants were recruited into industry sponsored clinical trials in England in 2022/23 which were supported by the National Institute for Health Research and Clinical Research Network (CRN). The following table shows a breakdown of the number by Local CRN.

Local CRN

2022/23

East Midlands

1716

East of England

2,579

Eastern

0

Greater Manchester

3,449

Kent, Surrey and Sussex

847

North East and North Cumbria

2,571

North Thames

2,723

North West Coast

1,840

North West London

3,216

South London

2,255

South West Peninsula

1,807

Thames Valley and South Midlands

1,432

Wessex

1,692

West Midlands

2,507

West of England

1,262

Yorkshire and Humber

2,432

Total

32,328

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Delivery plan for recovering access to primary care, published on 9 May 2023, what steps his Department is taking to improve IT connectivity between community pharmacies and other parts of the NHS.

The Delivery plan commits to significantly improving the digital infrastructure between general practice and community pharmacy by introducing interoperable digital solutions to support secure communications between general practice and community pharmacies. Community pharmacists will be able to access patients’ records, view previous interventions and results, and populate those records with standardised messages related to the services provided in community pharmacy and referrals will be enabled from general practice to community pharmacies and between pharmacies.

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential impact of (a) automated dispensing technology, (b) digital consultations and (c) other digital technologies on levels of efficiency in the pharmacy sector.

Between 16 March and 8 June 2022, the Government ran a consultation on proposals to enable all pharmacies to be able to access external hub dispensing services facilitating greater use of automation. An impact assessment which takes into consideration the role of automated dispensing technology in the hub and spoke model was completed as part of this work. The impact assessment is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1057447/hub-and-spoke-dispensing-impact-assessment.pdf

There will be synergistic efficiencies gained by using hub and spoke dispensing and original pack dispensing (OPD) supporting the highly automated processes that hubs are likely to employ. Between 1 November and 13 December 2021, the Government consulted on proposals to enable OPD. The consultation response is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/original-pack-dispensing-and-supply-of-medicines-containing-sodium-valproate/outcome/original-pack-dispensing-and-medicines-containing-sodium-valproate-consultation-response

The Delivery plan for recovering access to primary care, published on 9 May, commits to significantly improving the digital infrastructure between general practice and community pharmacy by introducing interoperable digital solutions to support secure communications between general practice and community pharmacies. There are no plans to make an assessment of the potential impact of digital consultations and other digital technologies on levels of efficiency.

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Delivery plan for recovering access to primary care, published on 9 May 2023, what assessment his Department has made of the potential role of the pharmacy sector in helping patients to monitor (a) high blood pressure and (b) other long-term conditions at home.

On 9 May, as part of the Delivery plan for recovering access to primary care, we announced a further investment of up to £645 million over two years to expand the role of community pharmacy including the expansion of existing blood pressure services. This service offers a blood pressure cuff check, as well as ambulatory monitoring where appropriate. General practitioners can also refer their patients directly to the community pharmacy for ambulatory blood pressure measurements, supporting care closer to home and self-care. Pharmacists are experts on medicines and any prescription which is dispensed by a community pharmacist requires the pharmacy to provide to the patient information and advice including how to use the medicines safely. This includes products patients require to monitor their long-term conditions, for example blood glucose testing strips for diabetic patients and peak flow monitors for patients with asthma.

13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the answer of 30 January 2023 to Question 129959 on Drugs: Prices, how many of the 24 commercial agreements that resulted in non-uniform pricing since 2020 were agreed through (a) The Cancer Drugs Fund, (b) routine commissioning and (c) the Innovative Medicines Fund.

Of the 24 commercial agreements that resulted in non-uniform pricing since 2020, 11 were agreed through the Cancer Drugs Fund and 13 were agreed through routine commissioning. NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSE&I) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) will lead a public engagement exercise on proposals for the Innovative Medicine Fund in due course. NHSE&I and NICE will continue to work collaboratively in line with NHSE&I’s published commercial framework to negotiate deals with industry that enable patients to access the most innovative and effective new medicines and ensure the National Health Service gets the best value.

9th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the rebate rates under the (a) voluntary and (b) statutory scheme for branded medicines on (i) the placement of clinical trials in the UK, (ii) the prioritisation of the UK as a launch market for new medicines and (iii) patient outcomes in the next five years.

The Government has assessed the link between volume-based rebate payments in our medicine pricing schemes and various kinds of investment in our impact assessment of recent updates to the statutory scheme for branded medicines pricing, which operates alongside the voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access (VPAS).

The Government’s 2023 impact assessment of updates to the statutory scheme is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/proposed-update-to-the-2023-statutory-scheme-to-control-the-costs-of-branded-health-service-medicines

The Government is working to better understand the impacts the operation of the current VPAS on the United Kingdom life sciences industry. We are in direct conversations with pharmaceutical companies, including in the recent pre-negotiation workshops, as well as the Department for Science Innovation and Technology, and the Department for Business and Trade about the business environment for life sciences.

Controlling medicine spend is a key aim for both current and future schemes to improve patient outcomes by simplifying, streamlining and improving access, pricing, and uptake arrangements for cost effective medicines, and deliver faster adoption of the most clinically and cost-effective medicines.

With regard to the impact of price regulation on the placement of clinical trials in the UK and access to new medicines, the Government’s assessment is that price control schemes in general are more likely to impact decisions about the location of late-stage than early-stage trials, as the location of late-stage trials may be more influenced by commercial considerations about where to launch a new medicine. However, VPAS includes strong commercial incentives to launch new products in the form of freedom of list pricing and exemptions from payments for innovative medicines containing a new active substance. These incentives have contributed to VPAS driving significant improvements in patient access to clinically and cost-effective medicines, whilst ensuring sustainable and predictable spend growth for the National Health Service and industry during a period of economic uncertainty.

9th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology on the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry proposals for a new Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Growth, including the proposals for (a) an investment facility, (b) to build a data recruitment centre and (c) a fund for a Medicines Equity Partnership.

The Department carefully considers all evidence in the public domain on matters relating to the growth and competitiveness of the United Kingdom life science sector, including the recent report by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry.

The Department of Health and Social Care is in close discussions with Ministers from the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology and the Department for Business and Trade about the business environment for life sciences and its impact on investment.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what percentage of cancer therapies assessed by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have been for combination therapies rather than monotherapies in each year since 2017; and what percentage of terminated NICE appraisals for cancer therapies have been for combination therapies rather than monotherapies in each year since 2017.

Between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2022, 27% of cancer appraisal recommendations made by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence related to combination therapies and 38% of terminated cancer drug appraisals related to combination therapies.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department will publish a specification for an electronic prescribing system for homecare medicines services.

The National Homecare Medicines Committee’s (NHMC) standardisation programme includes an NHS Digital strategy project. Within the NHMC there is a digital sub-group working closely with NHS Digital on the output-based specification for e-prescribing for homecare medicines services to use an Electronic Prescribing System. This work is at an advanced stage in preparation for consultation with NHMC during 2023.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of concerns raised by the British Society for Rheumatology with the National Homecare Medicines Committee, Care Quality Commission and General Pharmaceutical Council on the safety and performance of homecare medicines services across England.

The Department is aware of the British Society for Rheumatology’s (BSR) concerns. Providers of Homecare Medicine services to National Health Service patients do so under framework agreements which may be held at national with NHS England and regional at NHS procurement hubs or local at hospital trust level. This requires a high degree of centralised co-ordination for which the National Homecare Medicines Committee (NHMC) supports and advises the NHS on matters relating to homecare medicines services. The committee liaises with homecare providers through their trade association the National Clinical Homecare Association (NCHA) to support and co-ordinate development of the homecare market and discuss any system wide issues.

When the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) indicate that the services levels of a provider on a national NHS England framework or NHS regional framework or contract are not to the standard expected, the NHMC which is managed by and includes representation from NHS England enacts an escalation process which involves meetings with individual providers to discuss safety and performance issues. If necessary, the regulators the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPC) are also informed.

The NCHA and NHMC have met with the British Society for Rheumatology to discuss their concerns. Proposals are currently being discussed between the parties to establish a formal, ongoing dialogue which may also include representation from other medical specialties.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will work with the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence to establish or adapt frameworks which support combination therapies to be assessed and accessed more readily in the UK, as part of NICE's iterative approach.

The Department wants patients to benefit from access to effective new treatments at a price that represents value and is fair to all parties. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has been able to recommend over 95% of the combination therapies on which it published technology appraisal guidance between 2017 and 2022. NICE is developing a modular approach to its methods and process updates and potential topics will be considered by NICE taking into account all relevant factors.

NHS England’s Commercial Framework for New Medicines recognises that realising the full potential health benefits from combination drug therapies can be challenging given the requirement for commercial confidentiality and the need to maintain competition.

Alongside NICE, NHS England has been supporting the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) efforts to find solutions to enable companies to engage with one another where health-improving combination therapies face challenges coming to market.

In the United Kingdom, the Competition and Markets Authority represents the sole competent authority, and the commercial aspects of bringing combination therapies to the market must be compliant with relevant legislation.

There are currently no plans to establish a task and finish group.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to establish an independently-led task and finish group to consult on and suggest innovative solutions for overcoming pricing, cost effectiveness and legal challenges around patient access to combination therapy treatments in oncology.

The Department wants patients to benefit from access to effective new treatments at a price that represents value and is fair to all parties. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has been able to recommend over 95% of the combination therapies on which it published technology appraisal guidance between 2017 and 2022. NICE is developing a modular approach to its methods and process updates and potential topics will be considered by NICE taking into account all relevant factors.

NHS England’s Commercial Framework for New Medicines recognises that realising the full potential health benefits from combination drug therapies can be challenging given the requirement for commercial confidentiality and the need to maintain competition.

Alongside NICE, NHS England has been supporting the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) efforts to find solutions to enable companies to engage with one another where health-improving combination therapies face challenges coming to market.

In the United Kingdom, the Competition and Markets Authority represents the sole competent authority, and the commercial aspects of bringing combination therapies to the market must be compliant with relevant legislation.

There are currently no plans to establish a task and finish group.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it is his policy to work with (a) patient groups, (b) industry stakeholders and (c) other relevant parties on finding solutions to the challenges of patient access to combination therapy treatments, including (i) a lack of framework for multi-indication pricing, (ii) rigid cost-effectiveness frameworks and (iii) legal barriers.

The Department wants patients to benefit from access to effective new treatments at a price that represents value and is fair to all parties. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has been able to recommend over 95% of the combination therapies on which it published technology appraisal guidance between 2017 and 2022. NICE is developing a modular approach to its methods and process updates and potential topics will be considered by NICE taking into account all relevant factors.

NHS England’s Commercial Framework for New Medicines recognises that realising the full potential health benefits from combination drug therapies can be challenging given the requirement for commercial confidentiality and the need to maintain competition.

Alongside NICE, NHS England has been supporting the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) efforts to find solutions to enable companies to engage with one another where health-improving combination therapies face challenges coming to market.

In the United Kingdom, the Competition and Markets Authority represents the sole competent authority, and the commercial aspects of bringing combination therapies to the market must be compliant with relevant legislation.

There are currently no plans to establish a task and finish group.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has had discussions with relevant stakeholders on trends in the number of (a) nurse and (b) pharmaceutical staff vacancies within the (i) quality assurance and (ii) governance disclipines of homecare medicines services.

NHS England’s Commercial Medicines Unit, which manages the national framework agreements for the provision of homecare medicines services, holds regular engagement meetings with providers on the framework and when appropriate will discuss recruitment and retention of staff. The National Homecare Medicines Committee also holds discussions regarding recruitment, retention and vacancies during engagement meetings with providers when appropriate to do so.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many commercial agreements NHS England has agreed with manufacturers of medicines that allow, support or result in non-uniform pricing by medicine.

Since 2020 NHS England has agreed 24 commercial agreements that have resulted in non-uniform pricing by medicine, via either the Cancer Drugs Fund or through bespoke commercial deals to support routine commissioning.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the impact of the NHS continuing to adopt uniform pricing by medicine on patient access to innovative medicines.

No assessment has been made. NHS England set out their commercial approach to new medicines in the Commercial Framework published in February 2021. The framework sets out, in line with commitments made under the Voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access (VPAS), that the National Health Service can reach complex confidential commercial arrangements with companies that bring new medicines to the market which offer greater levels of health gain relative to cost. The commercial framework allows the flexibility to create different commercial approaches where the importance of the medicine warrants it.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether policies to improve patient access to combination therapies will be considered by his Department in upcoming negotiations for the 2024 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access.

The Department is considering how a successor to the voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access should operate from 2024 onwards and will work with industry to agree a mutually beneficial successor that that supports better patient outcomes, ensuring the sustainability of National Health Service spend on branded medicines and enables a strong United Kingdom life sciences industry.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of medicines appraised by NICE since 1 January 2017 were medicines that have already been appraised by NICE for another indication.

Between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2022, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published technology appraisal guidance on 156 new active substances in their first indication and 120 on extensions to marketing authorisations that added a significant new therapeutic indication.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of health technology appraisals conducted by NICE for follow-on indications have resulted in (a) termination, (b) a negative recommendation, (c) an optimised recommendation, (d) a positive recommendation and (e) a recommendation for use within the (i) Cancer Drugs Fund and (ii) and Innovative Medicines Fund.

Between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2022 31% of appraisals of licence extensions by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) were terminated due to the company not making an evidence submission to NICE. Of the licence extensions appraised by NICE 10% were not recommended, 37% were recommended for routine commissioning, 34% were optimised recommendations and 20% were recommended or optimised for use within the Cancer Drugs Fund. No applications were recommended for the Innovative Medicines fund.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what percentage of health technology appraisals conducted by NICE for therapies in combination have resulted in (a) termination, (b) a negative recommendation, (c) an optimised recommendation, (d) a positive recommendation or (e) a recommendation for use within the Cancer Drugs Fund or Innovative Medicines Fund.

Between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2022, 20% of appraisals of combination therapies undertaken by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) were terminated due to the company not making an evidence submission to NICE.

Of the technologies appraised by NICE, 4% were not recommended, 31% were recommended for routine commissioning, 52% were optimised recommendations and 12% were recommended or optimised for use within the Cancer Drugs Fund.

No applications were recommended for the Innovative Medicines fund.

16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with NHS England on the 10-year plan for dementia.

The Department continues to work closely with NHS England on plans for dementia in England and further information will be available in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his 10-year plan for dementia will include provisions to recover the dementia diagnosis rate to pre-pandemic levels.

Timely diagnosis of dementia is vital to ensure that a person with dementia can access the advice, information, care and support that can help them to live well with the condition and remain independent for as long as possible.

In December 2022, the recovery of the dementia diagnosis rate to the national ambition of 66.7% was included in the National Health Service priorities and operational planning guidance as part of the refined mental health objectives for 2023/24. This reinforces the importance of dementia as a key priority for NHS England and provides a clear direction for integrated care boards to ensure support for delivery of timely diagnoses within systems, enabling access to appropriate post-diagnostic support.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to undertake an assessment of the impact of the NHS Framework Agreement on Direct Oral Anticoagulants to treat atrial fibrillation, implemented from January 2022.

Information on the number of new patients detected with atrial fibrillation is not collected in the format requested. As of October 2022, 126,000 patients on general practitioner practice atrial fibrillation registers who were eligible for anticoagulation received treatment. The proportion of patients treated with anticoagulation increased by 3% from April to October 2022.

An annual evaluation of the National Health Service commissioning guidance and framework agreement for anticoagulation will be made in the first quarter of 2023/24 when the relevant prescribing and performance data is finalised.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many new patients have been (a) detected with atrial fibrillation and (b) treated with an appropriate NICE recommended treatment, since the introduction of the NHS Framework Agreement on Direct Oral Anticoagulants in January 2022.

Information on the number of new patients detected with atrial fibrillation is not collected in the format requested. As of October 2022, 126,000 patients on general practitioner practice atrial fibrillation registers who were eligible for anticoagulation received treatment. The proportion of patients treated with anticoagulation increased by 3% from April to October 2022.

An annual evaluation of the National Health Service commissioning guidance and framework agreement for anticoagulation will be made in the first quarter of 2023/24 when the relevant prescribing and performance data is finalised.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent progress his Department has made towards delivering the NHS Long Term Plan ambition to help prevent up to 150,000 heart attacks, strokes and dementia cases by 2029.

Progress on delivering this ambition has been affected by the pandemic. The Department is working with NHS England and local government to recover cardiovascular disease prevention services to deliver the NHS Long Term Plan ambition.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his timescale is for the implementation of the Federated Data Platform.

NHS England is currently undertaking the final stages of approvals to proceed with the procurement of the Federated Data Platform and the contract notice will be issued in due course. A contract award is anticipated in summer 2023.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of the Federated Data Platform on urgent and emergency care.

The primary focus of the federated data platform will be the five national use cases as identified and stated within the Prior Information Notice: population health management, care coordination including discharges, elective recovery, vaccinations and immunisations and supply chain. Although these do not directly include urgent or emergency care, the improved flow of patients though hospitals will result from the implementation and will directly impact urgent and emergency care services.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to promote the use of digital technology in the pharmacy sector including (a) automated dispensing technology and (b) interoperability between GP and pharmacy systems.

Approximately 90% of prescriptions are submitted through the Electronic Prescription Service and all pharmacies have access to Summary Care Records, which is a summary of patient information created from general practitioner (GP) medical records. GP and pharmacy IT systems are integrating to support patient pathways, including the Community Pharmacists Consultation Service, where GPs can refer patients with a minor illness to a community pharmacist. Pharmacies are also receiving access to the full patient record and actions taken by community pharmacy will be recorded. Individual pharmacy contractors make decisions on the adoption of automated dispensing technology.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to implement the recommendations of the Fuller Stocktake report including through expanding the role of the pharmacy sector in the delivery of primary care services; and if he will make a statement.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework 2019-24 sets out how community pharmacy will become further integrated in the National Health Service, delivering more clinical services and provide treatment and advice for minor illnesses. Since 2019, several services have been introduced and expanded in community pharmacy to use the skills of pharmacy teams and relieve pressures in primary care.

In September 2022, we announced that community pharmacists will manage and initiate contraception and provide additional support to patients newly prescribed antidepressants. In addition, urgent emergency care settings will refer patients to a community pharmacist for a minor illness consultation or an urgent medicine supply.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department expects to publish a response to its consultation on entitled Hub and Spoke Dispensing; and if he will make a statement.

The consultation closed on 8 June 2022 and we are currently reviewing the responses received. Further information will be available in due course.

27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is taking steps to seek early access to the forthcoming update of the Cochrane review on physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses to help ensure thatpolicy recommendations for this winter are informed by that review.

We have no plans to do so. All guidance is kept under regular review to ensure it remains appropriate to reduce the risks posed by respiratory pathogens in the community, in care and other settings.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people affected by dementia are consulted during the development of the ten-year plan for dementia.

We are reviewing plans for dementia in England and further information will be available in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the ten-year plan for dementia will include a strategy for increasing diagnosis rates.

We are reviewing plans for dementia in England and further information will be available in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps NHS England is taking to help ensure standardised approaches to developing radioligand therapy services across England.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Nottingham North (Alex Norris MP) on 6 July 2022 to Question 23788.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on introducing a genetically modified organisms derogation to enable clinical trials for advanced therapies.

We have had no specific discussions.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the future projected need for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Technologies; and what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the proposed NHS England/NICE Innovative Medicines Fund to meet that need.

No specific estimate has been made. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended several advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs) which are now routinely funded for National Health Service patients.

The Innovative Medicines Fund was recently launched to allow patients to benefit from early access to the most promising medicines where NICE is unable to recommend routine funding due to clinical uncertainty. This will support the rapid introduction of effective new medicines, including ATMPs.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the suitability of the NICE highly specialised technologies evaluation process for advanced therapy medicinal products used to treat a range of rare and ultra-rare diseases.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has recommended all of the advanced therapy medicinal products it has evaluated through its highly specialised technologies programme, which are now available to National Health Service patients.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the levels of regional variation in the provision of radioligand therapy across England.

No specific assessment has been made.

Where treatments, such as radioligand, are approved via the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s technology appraisals, NHS England seek to ensure appropriate access for patients within the license of the treatment. NHS England is appointing a new National Specialty Advisor for Nuclear Medicine to ensure the opportunities for approved radioligand therapies are realised.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to conduct a review of the potential merits of introducing alternative sources of financing for healthcare infrastructure.

We have no current plans to do so.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to announce a funding envelope for the New Hospitals Programme that will increase in line with inflation.

At the Spending Review in 2020, the Government confirmed an initial £3.7 billion for the first four years of the programme. Further details on funding beyond 2024/25 will be set out at future Spending Reviews. The latest inflation forecasts have been factored into the programme’s plans.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the condition of key equipment in acute, primary and secondary care settings; and if he will make it his policy to fund a rolling programme of equipment upgrades across each integrated care system.

Individual National Health Service organisations are responsible for utilising existing equipment effectively and for maintaining and replacing these assets. The Government has provided operational capital for NHS trusts and primary care which is prioritised locally by integrated care systems (ICSs). In addition, we are also providing £1.5 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25 to support elective recovery through investment in equipment.

ICSs are aiming to eliminate the backlog of diagnostic equipment currently over 10 years old by 2024/25. In addition to replacing aged equipment, all imaging networks should develop capital investment plans which identify funding for the replacement, upgrades or optimisation of existing assets necessary to meet the forecasted growth in capacity.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to devolve estate and property management functions to each of the 42 integrated care systems areas in England.

The Strategic Infrastructure Board, an advisory Board of national partners with a policy or delivery responsibility for the National Health Service estate, is sponsoring a programme to support integrated care systems (ICSs) to take responsibility for local strategic infrastructure planning. NHS England is working with ICS leaders and others through the development of this programme.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) health and (b) infrastructure requirements of each of the integrated care systems in England.

The Strategic Infrastructure Board is sponsoring a programme to support integrated care boards as these bodies assume the role for strategic infrastructure planning in local areas. NHS England is working with system leaders throughout the development of this programme.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans for a nationwide platform for patient data in health and social care settings.

While there are no specific plans, NHS England intends to procure a Federated Data Platform, which will be a system of connected platforms placed in individual National Health Service organisations. This aims to provide each trust and integrated care system with a platform for operational planning, care coordination and population health management. These platforms will adhere to the principles and requirements of Secure Data Environments, which provide approved users with access to analyse data. Organisations can control the data which users can access, the functionalities available to conduct analysis and the information which users can remove.

In ‘Data saves lives: reshaping health and social care with data’ published in June 2022, we committed to implementing Secure Data Environments as the default way to access NHS health and social care data for research and analysis.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will amend the rules on building utilisation to maximise use of modern, fit-for-purpose primary care estate, including that which was delivered under the NHS Local Improvement Finance Trust programme.

There are no specific rules on the utilisation of buildings. A specific lease may limit the use of estate, such as the sharing of services. These leases are locally determined and as independent contractors, general practitioner partnerships negotiate the specific terms.

NHS England has provided an online toolkit to support Primary Care Networks to develop estates requirements. In addition, NHS England will shortly ask all integrated care systems to undertake an Estates Infrastructure Strategy informed by local population health needs. These will include maximising utilisation of the current estate to ensure primary care is provided in fit-for-purpose premises, such as Local Improvement Finance Trust programme sites. This will develop of capital investment plans for local systems to deliver a model of care determined by Population Health Management and informed by ‘Next steps for integrating primary care: Fuller stocktake report’.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the UK's medical translational research capabilities; and what steps he is taking to improve those capabilities.

No specific assessment has been made as the United Kingdom’s capability to deliver medical research is dependent on a variety of organisations, including funders, regulators, and research organisations.

The majority of the Government’s investment in medical research is made through the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR). In 2016, the NIHR reviewed its performance in health research in the previous 10 years and identified areas to improve the UK’s research capabilities. In 2019, the MRC reviewed its support for translational research over the past 10 years and how this could be enhanced.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of (a) the adequacy of GP premises in England, including alternative models of partnership owning, and (b) the cost needed to modernise such premises.

In 2019, NHS England conducted a general practitioner (GP) premises policy review, which sought to identify potential needs and proposals for GP premises. NHS England is also currently undertaking a formal assessment of all primary care surgery premises under a primary care data collection programme. This will provide local and national oversight of the current capacity, suitability and ownership of all premises.

The data collection programme is expected to be completed by March 2023, with infrastructure strategies completed by December 2024. This will provide an evidence-based assessment of the national cost to modernise GP premises.

15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency intends to publish guidance on a hybrid regulatory pathway for non-biological complex drugs.

All medicines are licenced in accordance with The Human Medicines Regulations 2012. The European Union’s guidance adopted by the United Kingdom’s medicines legislation remains applicable and addresses aspects relevant to types of non-biological complex drugs.

Due to the potential range of these products, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is not currently developing general guidance for complex non-biological products. Data requirements vary on a case-by-case basis and bespoke regulatory and scientific advice is available through the MHRA’s innovation office or its scientific advice meetings. The MHRA also facilitates development and access to innovative medicines for specific public health needs via the Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what published data his Department is using to make an assessment of the effectiveness of the NHS in utilising the independent health sector to reduce the elective care backlog.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource in England. National Health Service systems continue to work with independent providers to secure the capacity for delivering the NHS Elective Recovery Plan.

The Department’s published Consultant-led Referral to Treatment Waiting Times data shows the number of episodes of treatment and care delivered by the independent sector. Between March 2020 and March 2022, the independent sector provided the NHS with surgical capacity, access to additional private hospital staff, equipment, facilities and diagnostics, delivering approximately four million treatments and diagnostic tests.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure the NHS maximises use of the independent sector capacity to reduce NHS waiting lists as set out in the recent NHS Elective Recovery Plan.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource in England. National Health Service systems continue to work with independent providers to secure the capacity for delivering the NHS Elective Recovery Plan.

The Department’s published Consultant-led Referral to Treatment Waiting Times data shows the number of episodes of treatment and care delivered by the independent sector. Between March 2020 and March 2022, the independent sector provided the NHS with surgical capacity, access to additional private hospital staff, equipment, facilities and diagnostics, delivering approximately four million treatments and diagnostic tests.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will request updated atrial fibrillation prevalence estimates, which were last published in April 2020.

The National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network intends to review the methodology for estimates of atrial fibrillation in 2022/23.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department uses in informing decision-making around the selected themes as part of the MedTech funding mandate.

The Government supports the continuation of the MedTech Funding Mandate (MTFM) policy beyond the next cohort from April 2023 to 2024/2025. The Accelerated Access Collaborative (AAC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) monitor the pipeline of technologies receiving the relevant NICE guidance which meet the MTFM criteria. The AAC can modify the policy eligibility criteria to ensure that the policy continues to achieve its objectives. There are no current plans for the Medical Technologies (MedTech) strategy to reassess the role of the MTFM.

The MTFM’s current policy criteria states that technologies must be effective, as demonstrated through positive NICE Medical Technology Guidance or Diagnostic Guidance. Technologies must also be cost saving, with NICE’s modelling demonstrating a net saving within three years and affordable to the National Health Service, with the gross cost impact not exceeding £20 million. While groups and themes may then be identified from the technologies which meet these criteria, they are not a pre-requisite. The selection currently supports only those technologies applicable in secondary care based on the NHS Standard Contract and the National Tariff Payment System. The AAC also consults additional experts on the clinical utility and benefits of potential technologies.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what themes or groupings of technologies are being considered for the subsequent MedTech Funding mandate cohorts.

The Government supports the continuation of the MedTech Funding Mandate (MTFM) policy beyond the next cohort from April 2023 to 2024/2025. The Accelerated Access Collaborative (AAC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) monitor the pipeline of technologies receiving the relevant NICE guidance which meet the MTFM criteria. The AAC can modify the policy eligibility criteria to ensure that the policy continues to achieve its objectives. There are no current plans for the Medical Technologies (MedTech) strategy to reassess the role of the MTFM.

The MTFM’s current policy criteria states that technologies must be effective, as demonstrated through positive NICE Medical Technology Guidance or Diagnostic Guidance. Technologies must also be cost saving, with NICE’s modelling demonstrating a net saving within three years and affordable to the National Health Service, with the gross cost impact not exceeding £20 million. While groups and themes may then be identified from the technologies which meet these criteria, they are not a pre-requisite. The selection currently supports only those technologies applicable in secondary care based on the NHS Standard Contract and the National Tariff Payment System. The AAC also consults additional experts on the clinical utility and benefits of potential technologies.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the MedTech strategy will reassess the role of the MedTech funding mandate.

The Government supports the continuation of the MedTech Funding Mandate (MTFM) policy beyond the next cohort from April 2023 to 2024/2025. The Accelerated Access Collaborative (AAC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) monitor the pipeline of technologies receiving the relevant NICE guidance which meet the MTFM criteria. The AAC can modify the policy eligibility criteria to ensure that the policy continues to achieve its objectives. There are no current plans for the Medical Technologies (MedTech) strategy to reassess the role of the MTFM.

The MTFM’s current policy criteria states that technologies must be effective, as demonstrated through positive NICE Medical Technology Guidance or Diagnostic Guidance. Technologies must also be cost saving, with NICE’s modelling demonstrating a net saving within three years and affordable to the National Health Service, with the gross cost impact not exceeding £20 million. While groups and themes may then be identified from the technologies which meet these criteria, they are not a pre-requisite. The selection currently supports only those technologies applicable in secondary care based on the NHS Standard Contract and the National Tariff Payment System. The AAC also consults additional experts on the clinical utility and benefits of potential technologies.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his policy is on the continuation of the MedTech funding mandate beyond the next cohort, which is expected to be authorised for use from April 2023 into 2024-25.

The Government supports the continuation of the MedTech Funding Mandate (MTFM) policy beyond the next cohort from April 2023 to 2024/2025. The Accelerated Access Collaborative (AAC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) monitor the pipeline of technologies receiving the relevant NICE guidance which meet the MTFM criteria. The AAC can modify the policy eligibility criteria to ensure that the policy continues to achieve its objectives. There are no current plans for the Medical Technologies (MedTech) strategy to reassess the role of the MTFM.

The MTFM’s current policy criteria states that technologies must be effective, as demonstrated through positive NICE Medical Technology Guidance or Diagnostic Guidance. Technologies must also be cost saving, with NICE’s modelling demonstrating a net saving within three years and affordable to the National Health Service, with the gross cost impact not exceeding £20 million. While groups and themes may then be identified from the technologies which meet these criteria, they are not a pre-requisite. The selection currently supports only those technologies applicable in secondary care based on the NHS Standard Contract and the National Tariff Payment System. The AAC also consults additional experts on the clinical utility and benefits of potential technologies.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to recommendation 1g of the 2021 Renal Medicine GIRFT Programme National Specialty Report, what steps his Department is taking to minimise (a) regional and (b) local variation in uptake of treatments for renal disease, particularly among ethnic minorities.

We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement to implement the recommendations in the report through the Renal Services Transformation Programme. The programme aims to ensure equity of access to services, by understanding and addressing health inequalities.

NHS Blood and Transplant is currently developing a strategy for the next decade and has committed to improving equity of access across barriers of social deprivation and ethnicity for treatments involving transplants. NHS England and NHS Improvement and the renal professional societies have established the Kidney Quality Improvement Partnership to identify and reduce unwarranted variation in care at a local, regional and national level.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2022 to Question 135527, on Kidney Diseases: Health Services, what assessment his Department has made of the ability for NHS England and NHS Improvement’s Healthcare Inequalities Improvement Programme to facilitate coordination between regions to reduce health inequalities in chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.

No specific assessment has been made.

NHS England’s annual statutory performance assessment reviews how it has fulfilled its legal duty to have regard to the need to reduce health inequalities in access to, outcomes from and experience of NHS services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government's ambition of delivering five extra healthy, independent years of life by 2035, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Integrated Care Systems prioritise improvements to the lower quality of life experienced by heart failure and chronic kidney disease patients.

NHS England is resourcing cardiovascular leadership roles in each integrated care system to prioritise improvements to the quality of life of heart failure patients. In addition, NHS England is supporting patients in the community through the NHS@home scheme on managing heart failure. This scheme aims to support people living with heart failure through patient education and remote monitoring. Over 220,000 blood pressure monitors have been allocated across England to enable patients to measure their blood pressure remotely and share the results with their general practitioner practice, reducing the need for appointments and travel


The Renal Services Transformation Programme is developing pathways, tools and resources to support better healthcare outcomes for patients undergoing dialysis treatment. It will also provide ICSs with a whole-patient pathway approach to commissioning renal services


Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the MHRA’s Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (ILAP) procedure meets the needs of small and medium sized companies.

The Innovation Passport application is the initial stage of the Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (ILAP), which open to developers at an early stages. This aims to be attractive to small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) where the clinical trial stage has not yet been reached. Since 2021, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has engaged with SMEs with expertise and platform discussions from the ILAP partners at the Target Development Profile. The MHRA continues to monitor the proportion of applications received from SMEs to ensure that ILAP remains attractive and relevant to all developers of innovative medicines.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS beds have been occupied by immunocompromised patients (a) who are of working age and (b) in total and who were admitted for covid-19 in 2022.

The information requested is not held centrally.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many immunocompromised individuals of (a) working age and (b) all ages have been (i) hospitalised with and (ii) died of covid-19 in 2022.

The information requested is not held centrally.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many immunocompromised patients of (a) working age and (b) all ages did not receive their ordered antiviral courses within five days of first experiencing symptoms from covid-19, as recommended by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

To date, 21,405 individuals in England have been prescribed an antiviral-based COVID-19 treatment under the clinical access policy for non-hospitalised patients at highest risk from infection due to a compromised immune response. Of these, 1,079 people of all ages and 800 aged 17 to 69 years old received an antiviral treatment more than five days from the date of recorded symptom onset. Under the policy, patients can be treated with the antiviral remdesivir within seven days of symptom onset.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 antiviral courses have been administered to patients in a hospital setting since those courses became available.

Between 5 July 2020 and 15 May 2022, 635 courses of Paxlovid and 55,523 courses of remdesivir were administered to hospitalised patients and those with hospital-onset COVID-19 in England.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of how many immunocompromised individuals of (a) working age and (b) all ages are continuing to shield against covid-19; and whether he has made a recent assessment of the impact of shielding on (i) economic activity and (ii) social interactions.

No specific estimate has been made. However, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) recently published ‘Coronavirus and clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) people in England: 4 April to 23 April 2022. Analysis of people previously considered to be clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) in England during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, including their behaviours and mental and physical well-being’.

This surveyed people previously considered to be CEV which includes but is not limited to those who are immunocompromised. This found that the proportion who were continuing to shield during April 2022 was 13%; 29% were in paid employment; 7% reported lost income due to shielding or isolating; and 20% reported continuing to work at home. While 5% said they were not receiving visitors, 37% said they were avoiding social gatherings as an additional measure.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many doses of covid-19 antivirals have been administered to (a) immunocompromised individuals and (b) people of working age after contracting covid-19 during the period of 17 March 2022 to 17 May 2022.

Between 17 March and 17 May 2022, 15,793 courses of antiviral treatments were provided to eligible individuals in England, who had tested positive for COVID-19. Of these patients, 10,256 individuals were aged 17 to 69 years old. However, the information requested on those who are immunocompromised is not held centrally.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March to Question 141960, whether he can provide an estimated date for the availability of Evusheld on the NHS.

Evusheld was granted a conditional marketing authorisation by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency on 17 March 2022. However, the initial positive trial data on Evusheld was published prior to the emergence of the Omicron variant.

The UK Health Security Agency is currently testing the efficacy of Evusheld against the Omicron variant and the Department and National Health Service are identifying appropriate patient cohorts and approaches to the potential deployment of pre-exposure prophylaxis. There is no current estimated date for the availability of Evusheld in the NHS.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women have been enrolled in (a) cancer, (b) stroke and (c) dementia clinical trials in each year since 2017.

Clinical trials are funded by a range of public, charity and commercial organisations, including by the Department, via the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR). Information on the sex of patients enrolled in NIHR-funded clinical trials is not currently collected centrally. However, the forthcoming Women’s Health Strategy aims to ensure that data collected through research improves women’s health outcomes.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were recruited into National Institute for Health and Care Research supported phase 3 trials for (a) dementia, (b) cancer, (c) stroke and (d) coronary heart disease in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is shown in the attached table.

The numbers of participants recruited declined in 2020/21 and 2021/22. While the exact reasons for this decline are unknown, it is likely that the reduction is related to the impact of the pandemic and a focus on recruiting participants to urgent studies related to COVID-19 in these years.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of reversing compulsory covid-19 vaccination requirements in all sectors that contain them.

Following a public consultation, the legislation to revoke vaccination requirements for all sectors came into force on 15 March 2022.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women have been enrolled in (a) cancer, (b) stroke and (c) dementia clinical trials in each year since 2017.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many participants were recruited into National Institute for Health and Care Research supported phase 3 trials for (a) dementia, (b) cancer, (c) stroke and (d) coronary heart disease in each of the last 10 years.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is taking steps to deliver on the manifesto commitment to double research funding into dementia.

We have committed £375 million for neurodegenerative disease research over the next five years to fund projects into a range of diseases, including dementia. To increase research in this area, the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) launched a Highlight Notice on Dementia in March 2021 and a £9 million call inviting research proposals on digital approaches for the early detection and diagnosis of dementia in November 2021.

We will set out our ambitions for dementia research in the forthcoming dementia strategy, which will be published later this year.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many participants were recruited into NIHR supported phase 3 trials for (a) dementia, (b) cancer, (c) stroke and (d) coronary heart disease over the last 10 years.

The following table shows the number of participants recruited into phase three trials in England supported by the National Institute for Health Research since 1 April 2012.

Dementia

11,227

Cancer

107,569

Stroke

27,577

Coronary heart disease*

20,549

Note:

*Includes studies on atherothrombosis and prevention of coronary artery disease.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on the implementation of the proposals in his Department's policy paper, Saving and Improving Lives: The Future of UK Clinical Research Delivery; and what funding has been allocated to the longer-term implementation of those proposals.

In June 2021, a phase one implementation plan was published setting out deliverables for 2021/22 and a six-month progress update was published in December 2021. The development of the phase two implementation plan is ongoing, following the outcome of the 2021 Spending Review and further information will be published later this year.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department for Health and Social Care recently announced up to £200 million to support National Health Service-led research into diagnostics and treatment through new privacy-preserving platforms and clinical research services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to implement the strategy set out in his Department's policy paper, Saving and Improving Lives: The Future of UK Clinical Research Delivery, to ensure the attractiveness of the UK for early-stage clinical trials.

In June 2021, a phase one implementation plan was published setting out deliverables for 2021/22 and a six-month progress update was published in December 2021. The development of the phase two implementation plan is ongoing, following the outcome of the 2021 Spending Review and further information will be published later this year. We are working with the devolved administrations and, wherever possible, take a United Kingdom-wide approach.

On 23 February 2022, the National Institute for Health Research announced approximately £161 million to fund 28 clinical research facilities, expanding the delivery of early phase clinical research in National Health Service hospitals in England.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2022 to Question 96910 on National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, how many oncology technical appraisals have been rescheduled in the last six months directly as a result of NICE operational challenges; and what the average time taken has been to reschedule those appraisals.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has rescheduled one appraisal of an oncology technology in the last six months for operational reasons. NICE’s appraisal of pembrolizumab in combination with chemotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of triple negative breast cancer has been delayed by approximately three months due to the volume of topics in its work programme. NICE’s final guidance is expected to be published in November 2022.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2022 to Question 96909, on Cancer: Drugs, how many breast cancer drugs are being assessed through the Project Orbis licensing route.

The United Kingdom is aware of one Project Orbis product aimed at treating breast cancer. As with all medicines and treatments, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will ensure a thorough and expedited assessment of any medicine’s safety and efficacy before any authorisation. The MHRA continues to work with other participants to review and approve applications for promising cancer treatments as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of operational challenges faced by NICE on its ability to deliver timely patient access to new medicines.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is committed to publishing draft recommendations on new medicines around the time of licensing, with final guidance within three months of licensing wherever possible. The Department holds regular accountability meetings with NICE on a range of topics, including capacity issues. NICE delivers timely guidance on new medicines in the vast majority of cases and expects to continue to do so.

Project Orbis has been established to allow participating partners, including the United Kingdom, to review and approve applications for promising cancer treatments efficiently. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, NICE and NHS England and NHS Improvement are ensuring an integrated, timely approach to access new products, including those licensed through Project Orbis. NHS England and NHS Improvement and NICE have agreed principles to allow potential interim access ahead of NICE’s guidance where timely guidance is not anticipated, which has supported early patient access for a number of medicines licensed through Project Orbis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the MHRA joining the Project Orbis scheme in January 2021 on the speed of patient access to new oncology medicines.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is committed to publishing draft recommendations on new medicines around the time of licensing, with final guidance within three months of licensing wherever possible. The Department holds regular accountability meetings with NICE on a range of topics, including capacity issues. NICE delivers timely guidance on new medicines in the vast majority of cases and expects to continue to do so.

Project Orbis has been established to allow participating partners, including the United Kingdom, to review and approve applications for promising cancer treatments efficiently. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, NICE and NHS England and NHS Improvement are ensuring an integrated, timely approach to access new products, including those licensed through Project Orbis. NHS England and NHS Improvement and NICE have agreed principles to allow potential interim access ahead of NICE’s guidance where timely guidance is not anticipated, which has supported early patient access for a number of medicines licensed through Project Orbis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with NICE on their (a) current and (b) future capacity to deliver final draft guidance on medicines within three months of regulatory approval by the MHRA.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is committed to publishing draft recommendations on new medicines around the time of licensing, with final guidance within three months of licensing wherever possible. The Department holds regular accountability meetings with NICE on a range of topics, including capacity issues. NICE delivers timely guidance on new medicines in the vast majority of cases and expects to continue to do so.

Project Orbis has been established to allow participating partners, including the United Kingdom, to review and approve applications for promising cancer treatments efficiently. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, NICE and NHS England and NHS Improvement are ensuring an integrated, timely approach to access new products, including those licensed through Project Orbis. NHS England and NHS Improvement and NICE have agreed principles to allow potential interim access ahead of NICE’s guidance where timely guidance is not anticipated, which has supported early patient access for a number of medicines licensed through Project Orbis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 59814 on the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, what amount of funding was provided through (a) specialised commissioning and (b) highly specialised services to the NHS Genomic Medicine Service annually; for the most recent time period that data is available.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs on regular activity reporting including standardising approaches and reporting methods. This does not involve sharing of patient identifiable or clinical data but provides insights on the delivery of the service to support service improvement. Since April 2021, relevant activity data has been collected via a new mechanism and is currently being validated to improve its quality and completeness. Once validated, the intention is to include this information as part of routine publications.

The NHS Operational Planning Guidance will be published to outline priorities for the system. Following publication, additional guidance will be prepared for the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs and system partners for delivery of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service.

Due to the COVID-19 response, NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place an interim financial regime, with funding allocated in provider blocks. The amount of funding made available by NHS England and NHS Improvement is currently being reviewed and validated. Whilst the formal funding figures are not currently available, this will remain under review by NHS England and NHS Improvement to be provided during the 2022/23 financial year, once validated.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 59814 on the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, what plans he has to develop operational level guidance for the NHS Genomic Medicine Service to further support NHS delivery and Genome UK.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs on regular activity reporting including standardising approaches and reporting methods. This does not involve sharing of patient identifiable or clinical data but provides insights on the delivery of the service to support service improvement. Since April 2021, relevant activity data has been collected via a new mechanism and is currently being validated to improve its quality and completeness. Once validated, the intention is to include this information as part of routine publications.

The NHS Operational Planning Guidance will be published to outline priorities for the system. Following publication, additional guidance will be prepared for the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs and system partners for delivery of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service.

Due to the COVID-19 response, NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place an interim financial regime, with funding allocated in provider blocks. The amount of funding made available by NHS England and NHS Improvement is currently being reviewed and validated. Whilst the formal funding figures are not currently available, this will remain under review by NHS England and NHS Improvement to be provided during the 2022/23 financial year, once validated.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 59814, on Genetics: Screening, whether data will be (a) collected and (b) published to outline performance on delivering the national Genomic Test Directory across each of the seven Genomic Laboratory Hubs.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs on regular activity reporting including standardising approaches and reporting methods. This does not involve sharing of patient identifiable or clinical data but provides insights on the delivery of the service to support service improvement. Since April 2021, relevant activity data has been collected via a new mechanism and is currently being validated to improve its quality and completeness. Once validated, the intention is to include this information as part of routine publications.

The NHS Operational Planning Guidance will be published to outline priorities for the system. Following publication, additional guidance will be prepared for the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs and system partners for delivery of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service.

Due to the COVID-19 response, NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place an interim financial regime, with funding allocated in provider blocks. The amount of funding made available by NHS England and NHS Improvement is currently being reviewed and validated. Whilst the formal funding figures are not currently available, this will remain under review by NHS England and NHS Improvement to be provided during the 2022/23 financial year, once validated.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will hold discussions with NICE on ensuring that their Methods Review achieves the Government's commitment for life sciences as set out in the Life Sciences Vision, published in July 2021.

Departmental officials regularly discuss a range of issues with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), including the ongoing methods and process review.

NICE recommends the vast majority of medicines it appraises. It has consulted on proposed changes to its methods and processes which will ensure it retains global leadership in the evaluation of new medicines and technologies and provides more equitable access for patients with severe diseases. NICE has undertaken analysis of the impact of its proposed methods in developing the proposals.

NICE is proposing a number of changes to ensure its methods and process are fairer, more consistent and accelerate the introduction of emerging new types of technology. This will support the Life Sciences Vision’s commitment to make the United Kingdom the best place in the world to develop, trial, launch and adopt innovative new medicines, improving patient access to medicines.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NICE Methods Review, if he will hold discussions with NICE in the event that its new methods for appraising medicines impact on the number of patients receiving access to promising treatments.

Departmental officials regularly discuss a range of issues with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), including the ongoing methods and process review.

NICE recommends the vast majority of medicines it appraises. It has consulted on proposed changes to its methods and processes which will ensure it retains global leadership in the evaluation of new medicines and technologies and provides more equitable access for patients with severe diseases. NICE has undertaken analysis of the impact of its proposed methods in developing the proposals.

NICE is proposing a number of changes to ensure its methods and process are fairer, more consistent and accelerate the introduction of emerging new types of technology. This will support the Life Sciences Vision’s commitment to make the United Kingdom the best place in the world to develop, trial, launch and adopt innovative new medicines, improving patient access to medicines.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ask NICE to undertake an analysis of whether its proposed new methods for assessing medicines will improve the access of NHS patients to new treatment in comparison to other developed countries in Europe.

Departmental officials regularly discuss a range of issues with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), including the ongoing methods and process review.

NICE recommends the vast majority of medicines it appraises. It has consulted on proposed changes to its methods and processes which will ensure it retains global leadership in the evaluation of new medicines and technologies and provides more equitable access for patients with severe diseases. NICE has undertaken analysis of the impact of its proposed methods in developing the proposals.

NICE is proposing a number of changes to ensure its methods and process are fairer, more consistent and accelerate the introduction of emerging new types of technology. This will support the Life Sciences Vision’s commitment to make the United Kingdom the best place in the world to develop, trial, launch and adopt innovative new medicines, improving patient access to medicines.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the findings of the Association of British HealthTech Industries' Cardiovascular Health Check report, published November 2021, what steps his Department is taking to help reduce the number of deaths from cardiovascular disease in the UK each year.

To deliver the priorities in the NHS Long Term Plan, a cardiovascular programme has been established led by national clinical directors and national specialty advisors. The programme is supported by senior clinicians from cardiac and stroke specialties and primary care.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with regional and local teams to develop cardiac networks and integrated stroke delivery networks in England. These networks take an evidenced-based approach to improvement from prevention, diagnosis, treatment and through to end of life care. The networks’ priorities include opportunistic case finding and the improved management of risk factors such as hypertension, atrial fibrillation and familial hypercholesterolemia.

To increase the volume of diagnostic activity and reduce patient waiting times, the National Health Service opening 44 community diagnostic centres which could deliver over one million additional scans and tests across computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray, ultrasound and echocardiograms by the end of March 2022.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations of Association of British HealthTech Industries' Cardiovascular Health Check Report, published November 2021, what plans he has (a) to appoint a national cardiovascular disease director and (b) create a national cardiovascular disease strategy to help reduce the number of deaths from the disease each year.

To deliver the priorities in the NHS Long Term Plan, a cardiovascular programme has been established led by national clinical directors and national specialty advisors. The programme is supported by senior clinicians from cardiac and stroke specialties and primary care.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with regional and local teams to develop cardiac networks and integrated stroke delivery networks in England. These networks take an evidenced-based approach to improvement from prevention, diagnosis, treatment and through to end of life care. The networks’ priorities include opportunistic case finding and the improved management of risk factors such as hypertension, atrial fibrillation and familial hypercholesterolemia.

To increase the volume of diagnostic activity and reduce patient waiting times, the National Health Service opening 44 community diagnostic centres which could deliver over one million additional scans and tests across computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray, ultrasound and echocardiograms by the end of March 2022.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of the Association of British HealthTech Industries' Cardiovascular Health Check report, published November 2021.

No assessment has been made.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the variation in access to home kidney dialysis for patients from Black, Asian or minority ethnicity backgrounds compared to patients from other backgrounds; and what assessment he has made of the reasons for that variation.

No recent assessment has been made of the variation in survival rates for patients receiving dialysis at home compared to those receiving dialysis in-centre. Data on survival rates between home and in-centre dialysis is currently unsuitable for detailed comparative analysis, as there is a natural patient selection bias.

Information regarding the socio-economic and ethnic background of home dialysis patients is not collected centrally. As such, no specific assessment has been made of any variation in access to home dialysis. NHS England’s Renal Services Transformation Programme aims to increase the provision of and equitable access to home therapies for kidney dialysis patients, following the recommendations of the Getting it Right First Time (GiRFT) national report on renal medicine published in September 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients from lower socio-economic backgrounds have received kidney dialysis treatment at home in the last five years compared to patients from higher socio-economic backgrounds.

No recent assessment has been made of the variation in survival rates for patients receiving dialysis at home compared to those receiving dialysis in-centre. Data on survival rates between home and in-centre dialysis is currently unsuitable for detailed comparative analysis, as there is a natural patient selection bias.

Information regarding the socio-economic and ethnic background of home dialysis patients is not collected centrally. As such, no specific assessment has been made of any variation in access to home dialysis. NHS England’s Renal Services Transformation Programme aims to increase the provision of and equitable access to home therapies for kidney dialysis patients, following the recommendations of the Getting it Right First Time (GiRFT) national report on renal medicine published in September 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the variation in survival rates for patients receiving dialysis at home compared to those receiving it in-centre.

No recent assessment has been made of the variation in survival rates for patients receiving dialysis at home compared to those receiving dialysis in-centre. Data on survival rates between home and in-centre dialysis is currently unsuitable for detailed comparative analysis, as there is a natural patient selection bias.

Information regarding the socio-economic and ethnic background of home dialysis patients is not collected centrally. As such, no specific assessment has been made of any variation in access to home dialysis. NHS England’s Renal Services Transformation Programme aims to increase the provision of and equitable access to home therapies for kidney dialysis patients, following the recommendations of the Getting it Right First Time (GiRFT) national report on renal medicine published in September 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help tackle the policy and system barriers NICE has flagged as preventing the implementation of the discount rate in their Methods and Process Review.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is responsible for its methods and processes. NICE recently consulted on proposals for changes to its methods and processes, including the discount rate, and is now carefully considering the comments received.

NICE’s consultation stated that there is an evidence-based case for changing the reference case discount rate to 1.5% but acknowledged the wider policy and fiscal implications and proposed further consideration of changing the discount rate through wider policy discussions. NICE also proposed to maintain a non-reference case discount rate of 1.5% for use in exceptional circumstances.

The Government will take NICE’s findings into account in due course.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of progress in (a) improving patients' access to new medicines and (b) meeting the UK's ambitions to be a global life sciences hub in response to the recommendations arising from the NICE Methods Review; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to ensuring patients can access clinically and cost-effective new medicines. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) appraises the clinical and cost effectiveness of all new medicines and National Health Service organisations are legally required to fund medicines recommended by NICE, normally within three months of the publication of final guidance. NICE recommends the vast majority of new medicines for routine use on the NHS and many thousands of patients have benefited from access to effective new medicines as a result.

NICE consulted on a range of proposed changes to its methods earlier this year as part of the ongoing review of its methods and processes for health technology assessment. The methods and process review will ensure that NICE retains global leadership in the evaluation and appraisal of new medicines and technologies. As reflected in the Life Sciences Vision, this will support the Government’s ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to develop, trial, launch and adopt innovative new medicines, improving patient access to medicines.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the evidential basis for a change in the discount rate to 1.5 per cent, including the advice in HM Treasury's The Green Book in 2020; and whether he has received representations in support of that change.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is currently reviewing the methods and processes in its health technology assessments, including the discount rate applied to costs and benefits. NICE has recently consulted publicly on proposals for changes to its methods and processes and is considering the responses received. NICE’s consultation stated that there is an evidence base for changing the discount rate to 1.5% but acknowledged the wider policy and fiscal implications and proposed to maintain the existing reference case discount rate while further data is collected on the likely effects.

NICE also proposed to maintain a non-reference case discount rate of 1.5% for use in exceptional circumstances. The Department supports NICE’s proposal which is in line with the expectations for the review as set out in the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access 2019 agreed with industry. The Department has received representations from industry and other stakeholders supporting a reduced discount rate.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the cost neutral approach taken in the proposals for change to NICE methods and process in the context of the Voluntary Pricing and Access Scheme agreement which commits industry to pay back any growth in the medicines budget above the agreed level.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body responsible for the review of its methods and processes. The Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access (VPAS) states that NICE’s methods review should be consistent with improving the health gain achieved by spending on new innovative medicines, meaning that the proposals should result in the same or lower prices for new medicines on average. Whilst the VPAS aims to contribute to maintaining affordability of overall National Health Service spending on branded medicines, it not the only mechanism for doing so. The financial impact of any changes to NICE’s methods and processes will extend beyond the life of the current VPAS and NICE considers the budgetary impact of its proposals.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many gene and cell therapies have been appraised by NICE through a Single Technology Appraisal; and what category of recommendation made in each of those cases was (a) recommended, (b) optimised, (c) Cancer Drugs Fund, (d) not recommended and (e) only in research.

As of October 2021, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published technology appraisals guidance on seven gene and cell therapies. The following table shows NICE’s recommendation for each cell and gene therapy.

Technology

Categorisation

Talimogene laherparepvec

Optimised

Holoclar (ex vivo expanded autologous human corneal epithelial cells containing stem cells)

Optimised

Holoclar (ex vivo expanded autologous human corneal epithelial cells containing stem cells)

Only in Research

Autologous chondrocyte implantation using chondrosphere

Optimised

Tisagenlecleucel

Recommended (Cancer Drugs Fund)

Darvadstrocel

Not recommended

Axicabtagene ciloleucel

Recommended (Cancer Drugs Fund)

Tisagenlecleucel

Recommended (Cancer Drugs Fund)

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding was allocated to the NHS Genomic Medicine Service in the most recent financial year for which data is available.

The seven National Health Service Genomic Laboratory Hubs (GLHs) are commissioned by NHS England and NHS Improvement. The information requested on the budget for each GLH and funding allocated to the NHS Genomic Medicine Service is not held in the format requested. While NHS England and NHS Improvement allocate some resources through specialised commissioning and highly specialised services, funding is also provided through local commissioning budgets which is not held centrally.

The National Genomic Test Directory currently covers over 3,000 rare and inherited diseases and the majority of solid and haematological cancers. The national genomic testing strategy focuses on implementing comprehensive DNA and RNA testing through to a full repertoire of genomic testing up to the level of whole exome and whole genome sequencing to drive efficiency and productivity. The National Genomic Test Directory is reviewed on an annual basis to keep pace with scientific, clinical and technological advances, while delivering value for money for the NHS. The strategic approach of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service is also informed by the NHS Long Term Plan and the Government’s strategy for healthcare genomics, Genome UK.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the (a) budget and (b) testing strategy are for each genomic laboratory hub for the most recent year for which data is available.

The seven National Health Service Genomic Laboratory Hubs (GLHs) are commissioned by NHS England and NHS Improvement. The information requested on the budget for each GLH and funding allocated to the NHS Genomic Medicine Service is not held in the format requested. While NHS England and NHS Improvement allocate some resources through specialised commissioning and highly specialised services, funding is also provided through local commissioning budgets which is not held centrally.

The National Genomic Test Directory currently covers over 3,000 rare and inherited diseases and the majority of solid and haematological cancers. The national genomic testing strategy focuses on implementing comprehensive DNA and RNA testing through to a full repertoire of genomic testing up to the level of whole exome and whole genome sequencing to drive efficiency and productivity. The National Genomic Test Directory is reviewed on an annual basis to keep pace with scientific, clinical and technological advances, while delivering value for money for the NHS. The strategic approach of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service is also informed by the NHS Long Term Plan and the Government’s strategy for healthcare genomics, Genome UK.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish data on the number of covid-19 (a) tests delivered and (b) patients referred to each genomic laboratory hub in the 12 months for which that data is available.

From 14 November 2020 to 14 November 2021 a total of 306,675,071 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and lateral flow device tests for COVID-19 were conducted. The number of patients whose PCR tests were referred to each individual genomic laboratory hub is not held centrally.

20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the (a) technology capability and (b) workforce expertise in each of the genomic laboratory hubs; and if he will publish that assessment.

The information requested is not currently available. However, data is being collated across the National Health Service Genomic Laboratory Hubs to assess the capability and expertise of the workforce. We do not have a confirmed completion date for the data collection at this stage.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of aligning the treatment pathway for heart valve disease with the pathways indicated by recent international evidence.

NHS England and NHS Improvement assess treatment pathways for heart valve disease using the best evidence available, including international evidence and advice from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve access for patients to new techniques for tackling heart valve disease.

NHS England and NHS Improvement evaluate new technology and the commissioning of newer techniques in tackling heart valve disease as it becomes available. This has led to improvements for patients in accessing new surgical heart valves such as sutureless valve replacement and for mitral valve leaflet repair. NHS England and NHS Improvement are increasing availability to mitral valve repair through commissioning local centres to deliver this procedure, working to their own prioritised timetable. A number of specialised heart valve devices and procedures are being taken through the evaluation process to ensure an appropriate evidenced-based approach to commissioning new technologies and techniques.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the cost-saving benefits of (a) mitral valve repair and (b) open heart surgery.

No such assessment has been made, as there is no direct comparison between mitral valve leaflet repair and conventional open heart surgery. Patients must be assessed by clinicians as inoperable or very high risk to undergo mitral valve repair and the procedure would be expected to provide sustained quality of life benefits.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the implications for its policies of the US Food & Drug Administration Safety Communication entitled Flexible Bronchoscopes and Updated Recommendations for Reprocessing, issued on June 25th, 2021; and what discussions he has had with (a) his US counterpart, (b) the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency and (c) relevant stakeholders on the potential implementation of US FDA recommendations in the UK.

There are currently no plans to implement the United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recommendations in the United Kingdom. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is aware of the FDA’s ‘Flexible Bronchoscopes and Updated Recommendations for Reprocessing: FDA Safety Communication’, issued on 25 June 2021. While there have been no specific discussions the FDA’s recommendations broadly align to the UK guidelines and work practices set out in ‘Management and decontamination of flexible endoscopes’ Health Technical Memorandum, published in 2016 and regularly updated.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to publish (a) a report or (b) the research data that was used to impose the mandatory requirement for people to wear face coverings in June 2020 during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 21 April 2020, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advised that there was enough evidence to recommend that the public wear cloth face masks when in enclosed spaces where social distancing is not possible. In making its recommendations to the Government, SAGE considered the evidence from a number of different studies and their conclusions are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sage-minutes-coronavirus-covid-19-response-21-april-2020

In June 2020, Public Health England (PHE) used an established methodology to complete a rapid review of the evidence related to face coverings in the community and COVID-19 and concluded that “the beneficial effects of wearing masks may be increased when combined with other non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing and social distancing.” A second review, published in January 2021, found evidence consistent with the findings of the first review, that the use of face coverings in the community helped reduce the spread of COVID-19. Therefore, PHE continue to advocate the same measures of wearing face coverings in specified community settings, alongside social distancing and good hand hygiene.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of progress in improving patients' access to new medicines in response to the recommendations of the case for change arising from the NICE Methods Review; and if he will make a statement.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) now aims to publish draft recommendations on all newly licensed treatments around the time of licensing with final guidance within 90 days of marketing authorisation wherever possible. NICE also recommends the vast majority of new medicines that it appraises for some or all of the eligible patient population.

NICE’s review of its methods and processes is ongoing. The purpose of the review is to ensure that NICE’s methods and processes support the National Health Service to provide high quality care and value for money. NICE consulted on proposals for the case for change in late 2020. NICE expects to consult on the draft programme manual in the summer, with implementation of the changes from early 2022.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the changes needed to (a) NICE and NHS England and Improvement's health technology approval processes and (b) NHS England's commercial policy to improve (i) access to and (ii) uptake of new medicines and vaccines; and if he will make a statement.

The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body responsible for developing authoritative, evidence-based recommendations for the National Health Service on whether new medicines represent a clinically and cost-effective use of resources. NICE is responsible for the methods and processes it uses in the assessment of health technologies and it is currently reviewing its appraisal methods.

New commercial flexibilities and support structures have been introduced to support access and uptake of transformative medicines, including NHS England and NHS Improvement’s Commercial Framework.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use prescribed in the UK, either privately or on the NHS, are subject to robust standards of (a) safety, (b) quality and (c) efficacy.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible for regulating medicines in the United Kingdom and continues to provide scientific and regulatory advice to any company at any stage of product development to support companies intending to apply for clinical trials authorisations or marketing authorisations. However, the MHRA cannot solicit applications.

The Department has called on industry to invest in clinical trials and subject their products to full scrutiny by the regulators. To stimulate research proposals, the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has issued two calls for research into cannabis-based products for medicinal use and has taken steps to advertise the call to all manufacturers interested in supplying the UK market. The NIHR also remain open to the submission of proposals outside of these specific calls.

The vast majority of cannabis-based products for medicinal use are unlicensed medicines and have not had their safety, quality or efficacy assured by the MHRA, nor their cost-effectiveness determined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. However, any unlicensed medicines manufactured in or imported into the UK must be manufactured to Good Manufacturing Practice standards. This is assured through licensing processes and import controls.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to encourage companies to (a) collect high-quality evidence through randomised control trials and (b) pursue regulatory approval for cannabis-based medicinal products.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible for regulating medicines in the United Kingdom and continues to provide scientific and regulatory advice to any company at any stage of product development to support companies intending to apply for clinical trials authorisations or marketing authorisations. However, the MHRA cannot solicit applications.

The Department has called on industry to invest in clinical trials and subject their products to full scrutiny by the regulators. To stimulate research proposals, the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has issued two calls for research into cannabis-based products for medicinal use and has taken steps to advertise the call to all manufacturers interested in supplying the UK market. The NIHR also remain open to the submission of proposals outside of these specific calls.

The vast majority of cannabis-based products for medicinal use are unlicensed medicines and have not had their safety, quality or efficacy assured by the MHRA, nor their cost-effectiveness determined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. However, any unlicensed medicines manufactured in or imported into the UK must be manufactured to Good Manufacturing Practice standards. This is assured through licensing processes and import controls.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how the forthcoming NHS Bill will support patients' ability to receive the most effective therapeutic innovations as early as possible in their treatment.

The upcoming Health and Social Care Bill will build on the work of the National Health Service to support integration, joint working and the delivery of the NHS Long Term Plan.

It will put integrated care systems on a statutory footing focusing resources on effective treatments and innovations and working to streamline referral and patient pathways as far as possible. This will support the NHS to deliver the most effective therapeutic innovations as early as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how the NHS plans to tackle (a) the current backlog in cancer diagnosis and (b) ensure that any additional referrals for diagnosis are not delayed.

The National Health Service priorities and operational planning guidance 2021/22 sets out how the NHS aims to tackle the backlog in cancer treatment which includes:

- Increasing people with symptoms coming forward through cancer-specific messages as part of the ‘Help Us Help You’ campaign;

- Rapidly increasing diagnostic capacity, with immediate action plans to increase endoscopy and computed tomography capacity; and

- Focusing on reducing the number of patients waiting over 62-days on cancer pathways, rescheduling diagnostic procedures or treatment for those who have had their care delayed by the pandemic.

Local health systems, drawing on advice and analysis from their Cancer Alliance, will ensure that there is sufficient diagnostic and treatment capacity in place to meet cancer need to ensure that any additional referrals for diagnosis are not delayed.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how long lateral flow tests for Covid-19 will remain free to members of the public.

From 9 April everyone in England has been able to access free COVID-19 testing and there are currently no plans to end free testing using lateral flow devices.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future use by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential for the NHS Test and Trace database system to have wider uses beyond its current application.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been ringfenced for developing (a) the NHS Test and Trace and (b) other database systems.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to use a development of the NHS Test and Trace database system to improve public services beyond what is necessary to tackle the covid-19 outbreak.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to close the NHS Test and Trace database system once the covid-19 pandemic has ended.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using the information held in the NHS Test and Trace database system for other purposes.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to close the NHS Test and Trace database system once the covid-19 outbreak in the UK has ended.

No assessment or decisions have yet been made on the use of NHS Test and Trace data systems for other purposes beyond those related to COVID-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with the World Health Organisation on the criteria for declaring the end of the covid-19 global pandemic.

There have been no recent discussions. Such considerations are for the Director-General of the World Health Organization, with the advice of independent technical experts and based on public health evidence and data.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department plans to use to define the end of the covid-19 outbreak in the UK.

Over time, scientists expect COVID-19 to become endemic, meaning the virus will reach a stable and, it is hoped, manageable level. Scientists do not yet know how or when that transition will occur, so the Government has not determined criteria for the end of the pandemic. The Government will continue to be guided by the best available scientific advice and the latest data when responding to the virus.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total budget is for NHS Test and Trace.

The NHS Test and Trace budget for 2020/21 is £22 billion and £15 billion in 2021/22, a total budget over two years of £37 billion.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether financial or other resources have been allocated to assessing potential futures uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Spending plans for the £15 billion budget in 2021-22 are currently undergoing a detailed financial planning exercise and will be finalised in due course.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much has been spent on NHS Test and Trace to date.

Actual audited expenditure will be published as part of the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the (a) financial viability of the community pharmacy network in England and (b) adequacy of the interim covid-19 support package provided to that network; and if he will make a statement.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework five-year deal, agreed in 2019 with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC), commits £2.592 billion annually to the sector. Maintaining access to pharmaceutical services is a priority for the Government and the Department continues to closely monitor the market. Discussions are ongoing with the PSNC about additional funding for costs incurred during the pandemic. As part of its ongoing assessment of COVID-19 costs incurred by the sector, the Government will take account of the £370 million increased advance payments paid to community pharmacies


The COVID-19 support package for community pharmacy also included general COVID-19 business financial support, funding for Bank Holiday openings, social distancing measures, the medicine delivery service to shielded patients and free personal protective equipment; as well as non-monetary support, including the removal of some administrative tasks, flexibility in opening hours and the delayed introduction of new services.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak and associated lockdown restrictions on cancer survival rates.

Local systems, drawing on advice and analysis from their Cancer Alliance, will ensure that there is sufficient diagnostic and treatment capacity in place to meet the needs of cancer to return the number of people waiting for longer than 62 days to the level of February 2020, or to the national average in February 2020 where this is lower, and meet the increased level of referrals and treatment required to address the shortfall in number of first treatments by March 2022.

No assessment has yet been made of the effect of COVID-19 on cancer survival rates because data to assess the full extent of its impact on patient outcomes is not yet available. The NHS Cancer Programme is currently establishing a task and finish group to review alterations and/or disruptions to care pathways. Once this group has been established a timeline will be agreed and they will consider the most appropriate data sources with which to make this assessment.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the length of time it will take to clear the cancer treatment backlog.

Local systems, drawing on advice and analysis from their Cancer Alliance, will ensure that there is sufficient diagnostic and treatment capacity in place to meet the needs of cancer to return the number of people waiting for longer than 62 days to the level of February 2020, or to the national average in February 2020 where this is lower, and meet the increased level of referrals and treatment required to address the shortfall in number of first treatments by March 2022.

No assessment has yet been made of the effect of COVID-19 on cancer survival rates because data to assess the full extent of its impact on patient outcomes is not yet available. The NHS Cancer Programme is currently establishing a task and finish group to review alterations and/or disruptions to care pathways. Once this group has been established a timeline will be agreed and they will consider the most appropriate data sources with which to make this assessment.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to alleviate the effect of infant respiratory syncytial virus on (a) the NHS and (b) population health.

To alleviate the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) on the National Health Service, Public Health England (PHE) is working with NHS England as part of its preparing and planning for the 2021 RSV season. This includes ensuring access to Synagis out of season in the event of a spring/summer outbreak and ensuring that clinicians have access to the most up to date and evidence-based guidance to support patient treatment and safe discharge from hospital. PHE monitors levels of RSV activity in the population of England and Wales and publishes information throughout the RSV season.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the long-term effect of infant respiratory syncytial virus on healthcare utilisation.

No such assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether covid-19 vaccines are eligible for the Medicines Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency’s Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway.

In principle, COVID-19 vaccines are eligible for applying to the Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (ILAP). Inclusion in the ILAP is subject to fulfilment of the Innovation Passport criteria.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to accelerate the (a) adoption and (b) uptake of vaccines approved by the Medicines Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.

The vaccines approved for adoption in the United Kingdom have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation regularly reviews MHRA approved vaccines and makes recommendations to the Department. These recommendations are considered thoroughly before putting in place new vaccines. Any vaccine that is approved must go through the same clinical trials and safety checks as other licensed medicines.

A range of actions have been implemented to improve vaccination uptake for children of all ages in England. This includes initiatives to improve access to the immunisation programme; communication with the public; data to better identify underserved individuals and populations; and training for healthcare professionals.

9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations made by the Decision Support Unit in its 2014 Report, Assessing technologies that are not cost-effective at zero price, what steps he is taking to support access to innovative medicines in response to those recommendations.

We reformed the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in 2016 to improve patient access to promising and innovative new cancer treatments.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) appraises all new cancer drugs and is now able to recommend cancer drugs for use through the CDF where there is too much uncertainty to be able to recommend them for routine commissioning. Thousands of National Health Service patients in England have benefitted from rapid access to new cancer drugs as a result of the CDF and NICE recommended 92% of the cancer drugs it appraised in 2020.

NICE recognises its procedures need to keep pace with developments in medical innovation and is currently undertaking a review of its methods and processes. The methods review explores issues relevant to the appraisal of new cancer drugs, such as addressing uncertainty and taking account of innovation. However, it is too soon to comment on the potential outcomes and any changes to NICE’s methods that may be implemented.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) support access to medicines in therapeutic areas where there is a lack of recent innovation and the unmet need is high and (b) ensure new treatments are not penalised as a result of being compared to a low cost standard of care.

We reformed the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in 2016 to improve patient access to promising and innovative new cancer treatments.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) appraises all new cancer drugs and is now able to recommend cancer drugs for use through the CDF where there is too much uncertainty to be able to recommend them for routine commissioning. Thousands of National Health Service patients in England have benefitted from rapid access to new cancer drugs as a result of the CDF and NICE recommended 92% of the cancer drugs it appraised in 2020.

NICE recognises its procedures need to keep pace with developments in medical innovation and is currently undertaking a review of its methods and processes. The methods review explores issues relevant to the appraisal of new cancer drugs, such as addressing uncertainty and taking account of innovation. However, it is too soon to comment on the potential outcomes and any changes to NICE’s methods that may be implemented.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) encourage medical innovation in blood cancers and (b) ensure access to newer targeted treatments are not restricted as a result of being compared to more toxic, low cost, chemotherapy alternatives.

We reformed the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in 2016 to improve patient access to promising and innovative new cancer treatments.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) appraises all new cancer drugs and is now able to recommend cancer drugs for use through the CDF where there is too much uncertainty to be able to recommend them for routine commissioning. Thousands of National Health Service patients in England have benefitted from rapid access to new cancer drugs as a result of the CDF and NICE recommended 92% of the cancer drugs it appraised in 2020.

NICE recognises its procedures need to keep pace with developments in medical innovation and is currently undertaking a review of its methods and processes. The methods review explores issues relevant to the appraisal of new cancer drugs, such as addressing uncertainty and taking account of innovation. However, it is too soon to comment on the potential outcomes and any changes to NICE’s methods that may be implemented.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans NHS England has to fund cancer molecular diagnostic tests centrally under the National Tariff Payment System in 2021-22.

The 2020/21 National Tariff:

“In addition, from 2020/21, all cancer genetic tests are now reimbursed outside of national prices. The existing funding arrangements will continue for diagnostic tests which have been excluded from tariff since 2015. These tests are: NRAS/KRAS testing, BRAF testing, KIT testing, ALK testing (1), ALK testing (2), Oncotype DX, PD-L1, Prosigna and EnoPredict.”

To support this £77.8 million was removed from the tariff. This is from the amount for National Prices and that was supplied to NHS England’s specialised commissioning.

These arrangements are proposed to continue and will be part of NHS England and NHS Improvement’s consultation on the contents of the 2021/22 National Tariff. The consultation is due imminently.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timescale is for NHS England to consult on the national service specification for clinical genomics.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently progressing the updating of the Clinical Genomics Service Specification.

Stakeholder testing on the Clinical Genomics Service Specification will be undertaken in line with the NHS England and NHS Improvement policy and is expected to take place in early 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS cancer patients in England received a fusion gene mutation test for (a) ALK, (b) NTRK, (c) RET, and (d) ROS1 in 2020.

NHS England and NHS Improvement currently do not hold this data.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timescale is for NHS England to expand access to routine genomic profiling for eligible cancer patients with metastatic/locally-advanced disease.

In the NHS Long Term Plan, NHS England and NHS Improvement outlined the commitment to offer more extensive genomic testing to patients who are newly diagnosed with cancers so that by 2023 over 100,000 people a year can access these tests.

A range of genomic testing for patients with cancer covering both adult and paediatric solid and haematological cancers is already available through the NHS Genomic Medicine Service as outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has in place to expand the scope of the MedTech Funding Mandate to cover new products not previously included in the (a) Innovation and Technology Tariff and (b) Innovation and Technology Payment programmes.

At the current time, there are no plans to expand the scope of the MedTech Funding Mandate. To identify medical devices, diagnostics and digital products which are likely to meet the MedTech Funding Mandate criteria, NHSX will regularly review the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s guidance and recommendations. The launch of the fund has been delayed until at least April 2021 due to the suspension of the 2020/21 NHS Standard Contract and the 2020/21 National Tariff Payment System during COVID-19.

8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure equitable patient access to proven remote diagnostics to support home testing.

The Department and the National Health Service are prioritising the improvement of connectivity and digitisation across all aspects of diagnostics in order to drive efficiency, deliver seamless care across traditional boundaries and facilitate remote reporting.

The first four phases of the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care award included innovations in remote diagnostics, including the Neuronostics Limited smartphone-based app which can receive electroencephalogram recordings from wireless headsets to assist with assessing epilepsy treatment; Senti Tech Limited’s project enabling remote chest examination for respiratory patients through sensors embedded into a jacket; and Healthy.io UK Limited’s smartphone albuminuria self-test, which uses a home test kit and a mobile app to allow patients to self-test at home with clinical grade results.

NHSX is supporting the COVID Oximetry @home services which remotely monitor the oxygen saturation levels of patients with COVID-19 symptoms. This offers both technology-enabled and standard services with paper diary and telephone check-in for those without smartphones. In some areas, devices are provided for people to use in their own homes. NHSX are also supporting the scaling of remote monitoring approaches across the seven regions in England. This includes a focus on vulnerable groups such as those living in care homes.

8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans Public Health England has to update its guidance on the diagnosis of urinary tract infections to reflect changes in remote diagnostic techniques.

The current Public Health England (PHE) diagnostic urinary tract infection guidance features a diagnostic flowchart for over 65 year olds, which can be followed during remote consultation such as telephone or video consultations and does not recommend urine dipsticks.

The flowchart for under 65 year olds encourages diagnosis based on three symptoms that can be assessed remotely. Current guidance advises that patients with only one of these are tested using a urine dipstick, this could be facilitated by patients providing a urine sample from home for testing.

The guidance advises that clinicians should consider in patients with milder symptoms a back-up antibiotic prescription with appropriate pain relief. This would reduce the need for patients to attend the surgery. This guidance was last updated in October 2020 and will be reviewed again in November 2021. The recently updated guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/urinary-tract-infection-diagnosis

PHE is collaborating with the Royal College of General Practitioners to develop training materials on antibiotic prescribing in remote consultations.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment the Commissioners have made of (a) trends in the level of closure of churches and (b) the ability of worshipping communities to fund ongoing repairs to church buildings.

The details of individual parish finances is not generally a matter for the Church Commissioners, though other parts of the National Church Institutions and dioceses have been keeping planned giving and donations under careful review. Churches that have a solid foundation of regular giving through direct debit or standing order appear to be withstanding the pandemic much better than those whose finances were more reliant on church hall income, fundraising events, visitor donations and cash in the offertory plate. During the first national lockdown whilst some parishes saw a substantial drop off in donations others have embraced new technology using digital giving, and social media and, when Church buildings are open, contactless giving.

Although there has been a significant reduction in parish payments to dioceses to fund ministry costs, this has been less than anticipated at the start of the national lockdown, in part boosted by use of reserves as well as the generosity of givers. We grateful to the Government for allocating over £30million from the Culture Recovery Fund to support major churches and cathedrals. The Church Commissioners have also made significant funds available where possible to support music, essential craft and tradespeople alongside sustainability funding and salary support for cathedrals. The continuation of the Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme is also important for the future funding of repairs to church buildings and the Archbishops’ Council have made representations to the Treasury about this.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve early accurate diagnosis for rare diseases.

The Government recognises the importance of patients across all areas of the United Kingdom being able to obtain a quick and accurate diagnosis.

The 2013 UK Rare Disease Strategy has helped to increase awareness amongst healthcare professionals to refer patients into specialist services. Earlier detection of rare diseases is benefitting from advances in genomics and the commitment to incorporate whole genome sequencing into routine healthcare by the NHS Genomic Medicine Service. The recently published Genome UK Strategy outlines the Government’s vision to help people live longer, healthier lives using new genomic technologies to diagnose and treat rare diseases. Additionally, the government plans to publish a new UK Rare Diseases Framework by the end of 2020 which will replace the UK Rare Diseases Strategy.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of patients with rare to diseases to access specialist care and treatment during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department, alongside NHS England, is considering the impact of COVID-19 on patients with rare diseases. NHS England has had discussions with some services and patients/patient groups to understand the impact of COVID-19 including what has worked well; what hasn’t worked so well; and opportunities for transformation.

NHS England will continue to look at what services can be delivered successfully through virtual communication technology such as telephone consultation and videoconferences. Where services do need to be delivered face-to-face, NHS England will work with providers to ensure that patients have a safe journey through the hospital to the treatment area.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to introduce an innovative medicines fund.

We made a commitment to extend the successful Cancer Drugs Fund into a new Innovative Medicines Fund to fund the most advanced, life-saving treatments for conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disease and for children with other rare diseases.

Proposals for the fund are in development and we expect NHS England and NHS Improvement and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to lead an engagement exercise early next year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department will publish the criteria for determining orphan designation for medicines after the transition period; and whether he plans to consult with (a) patient groups, (b) industry and (c) other relevant stakeholders to help inform this criterion.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) published guidance on 1 October 2020 on how orphan designation for medicines will be managed after the transition period on our website.

The Department and MHRA have held a series of engagement sessions which were open to all our stakeholders to inform on how medicines will be regulated including such medicines after the end of the transition period.

20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of covid-19 tests returned a positive result, in each month since January 2020, by English county.

We publish data on daily pillar 2 tests processed by lower tier local authority and sperate weekly demographic information on people tested and people testing positive for COVID-19 across pillars 1 and 2 throughout England each week alongside other Test and Trace statistics. This data is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 tests have been carried out in each month since January 2020, by English county.

Weekly data for pillar 2 coronavirus testing is available for every lower tier local authority in England at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to mitigate the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the (a) diagnosis and treatment of and (b) support available for patients with heart valve disease.

Primary and secondary care have remained open throughout the pandemic and patients have been encouraged to access these services.

Since 29 April NHS England has prioritised the reintroduction of non COVID-19 services with the aim of recovering as much performance as possible before winter. To aid this, new COVID-19 secure hubs for surgery and diagnostics have been established.

Further planning is underway to ensure critical services, such as cardiac surgery, are maintained during any future waves.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on detection rates of (a) cardiovascular disease and (b) heart valve disease.

Detection rates are captured by general practitioner practices as part of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. This data is published yearly. Data is not yet available beyond 31 March 2020, which would show the impact of COVID-19 on detection rates.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve the early detection of heart valve disease within primary care and the wider community during the covid-19 outbreak.

Primary care and general practitioner practices have remained open throughout the pandemic and the National Health Service has prioritised treatment of the most urgent cases, including heart diseases. To continue to provide consultations in a COVID-19-safe environment, many practices are providing video or phone consultations. The NHS is prioritising restoration of the most urgently needed services, including diagnosis and treatment for patients with heart failure and heart valve disease.

In line with the diagnostics review ‘Diagnostics: Recovery and Renewal’, published on the 1 October, community diagnostic hubs are being established which will support with diagnostics, to improve the capacity to increase the detection of conditions such as cardiovascular disease and heart valve disease.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on people's health in Bolton local authority area of the reduction in GP referrals of almost 20,000 as a result of the covid-19 lockdown.

No specific assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the health impact of missed GP appointments as a result of covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

General practice is open and people should continue to access services by phone, online or in person.

Although general practitioner appointment numbers fell in the early stages of lockdown, practices remained open offering more remote consultations to see as many patients as possible while protecting staff and patients from avoidable risk of infection. Appointment numbers are recovering and are returning to levels seen before lockdown.

Practices continue to undertake routine and preventative work including vaccinations and immunisations and screening, as well as supporting their more high-risk patients with ongoing care needs. Although it is still too early to carry out a full assessment of the impact, we continue to monitor the situation closely.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of GP appointments that have been missed in the UK as a result of covid-19.

Data on the number of general practitioner appointments missed in the United Kingdom as a result of COVID-19 is not held.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons the Spring publication by NHS England of its MedTech Funding Mandate has not yet been published; and what the timescale is for issuing that publication.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 52079 on 10 June 2020.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) false positive and (b) false negative results from PCR testing for covid-19 since the beginning of the covid-19 outbreak.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with NICE on the lessons that can be learned from its agility during the covid-19 outbreak in order to enable the rapid review of paused appraisals now that that activity has resumed; and what additional support he plans to provide to reduce further delays to patients in accessing new and innovative treatments.

Departmental Ministers and officials regularly discuss a range of matters with colleagues in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

NICE is using the lessons learned from developing rapid guidelines in response to COVID-19 to review how it produces and presents guidance, while maintaining its commitment to providing robust, evidence-based and independent advice. NICE remains committed to publishing final guidance for new medicines within 90 days of licensing.

NICE is also working with NHS England and NHS Improvement on the development of an Innovative Medicines Fund so that doctors can use the most advanced, life-saving treatments for conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disease, or for children with other rare diseases. NICE and NHS England and NHS Improvement plan to consult on the proposals toward the end of this year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made in providing genomic testing for cancer patients who could benefit from treatment with histology independent therapies.

The first candidate histology independent therapy, larotrectinib, for treating advanced solid tumours with NTRK gene fusions has been approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) through the Cancer Drugs Fund, and final appraisal documentation was published by NICE on 21 April 2020. In line with the publication of the final appraisal documentation, NHS England and NHS Improvement put in place genomic testing for NTRK gene fusions, delivered by the NHS Genomics Laboratory Hubs (GLHs). NHS England and NHS Improvement is continuing to work with the GLHs to ramp up the capacity of NTRK gene fusion testing.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his timescale is for updating the National Genomic Test Directory for 2020-21 for genomic tests commissioned by the NHS in England for cancer.

Due to the impact of COVID-19, the publication of the National Genomic Test Directory for 2020/21 has been delayed. NHS England and NHS Improvement are establishing the timescale for the publication of the updated National Genomic Test Directory for 2020/21 in line with national COVID-19 recovery activity. It is expected that the National Genomic Test Directory for 2020/21 will be published by the end of September.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made in the development and implementation of pan-cancer testing panels as part of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service.

There are seven Genomic Laboratory Hubs across England which are each responsible for coordinating services for a particular part of the country, and together they form the national Genomic Medicine Service. Each Genomic Laboratory Hub has developed an implementation plan and are continuing to develop pan-cancer panels for implementation as part of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service. NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to monitor progress on the development and implementation of pan-cancer panels.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on genomic testing capacity for cancer within the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs network.

NHS England and NHS Improvement closely monitored the effect on genomic testing services of COVID-19, including the impact of the redeployment of equipment and staff to support COVID-19 testing. In order to ensure continuity of the genomic testing services, NHS England and NHS Improvement published prioritisation guidance at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/guidance-to-the-nhs-genomic-medicine-service-in-response-to-covid-19/

NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to work closely with the Genomic Laboratory Hubs to monitor any impacts on testing capacity.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2020 to Question 52076 on Diabetes: Medical Treatments, if he will make it his policy to ensure transparency in prescribing data in formularies in both (a) community pharmacies and (b) other settings.

The Government is committed to transparency in prescribing data and there are a variety of processes used to monitor prescribing patterns and variation in the prescribing of technologies in both prescribing in the community and hospital settings for people with diabetes.

The NHS Business Services Authority operates an Open Data Portal on their website which is available for public use to enable interested stakeholders to access prescribing data. Information is also publicly available at the following link:

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/open-data-portal-odp

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on (a) reforms to funding mechanisms and (b) other plans for community pharmacies set out in the five-year Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework.

Under the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF), £2.592 billion a year was committed to the community pharmacy sector in the five-year deal from 2019/20 to 2023/24 for the National Health Service pharmaceutical services they provide, a total of nearly £13 billion. To maintain access in areas where there are fewer pharmacies or higher health needs, additional payments, from within that funding, are made under the Pharmacy Access Scheme to eligible pharmacies.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made on the role of distance-selling pharmacies in ensuring patient access to repeat prescriptions is not disrupted during and after the covid-19 pandemic, including when the shielding programme ends.

The Department has made no such assessment. All pharmacies, including distance-selling pharmacies have a duty to patients to dispense prescriptions promptly regardless of whether they are part of the shielded population.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are encouraging general practitioners to issue patients with prescriptions via electronic Repeat Dispensing (eRD), where clinically appropriate, to facilitate easier patient access to their repeat prescriptions

NHS England and NHS Improvement commissioned a Medicine Delivery Service from both community pharmacies and dispensing doctors to ensure delivery of medicines to shielded patients during the duration of the programme which comes to an end on 31 July. NHS Volunteer Responders will continue to be available to support people including with medication delivery, beyond 31 July.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department will use to prioritise the backlog of outstanding applications created by the suspension of Part IX of the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff.

Applications to Part IX of the Drug Tariff will be reviewed in receipt order, with the earliest applications reviewed first, when the process resumes.

If an application is for a product that helps in the treatment of COVID-19 then it would be considered outside of the normal review process.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the assessment of new and pending applications to the NHS England and Wales Drug Tariff will resume.

The assessment of new and pending applications to the Drug Tariff has been suspended temporarily, to manage staff resource during the COVID-19 pandemic. A date for the resumption of the application assessment process has not yet been agreed.

This suspension is reviewed regularly to inform when the assessment process will resume.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the levels of precautionary antibiotic prescribed in primary care during the covid1-19 outbreak; and what steps he is taking to manage the effect of those prescriptions on antimicrobial resistance.

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) is working with the National Health Service and across sectors, to develop and maintain surveillance systems for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use and resistance in England. Data can be viewed on the antimicrobial resistance Fingertips webpage at the following link:

https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/amr-local-indicators

PHE will track the impact of COVID-19 on antimicrobial resistance and utilisation using these established surveillance data systems.

PHE has worked closely with the Royal College of General Practitioners to develop the Treat Antibiotics Responsibly Guidance Education Tools to encourage appropriate antibiotic use. E-learning modules have been developed which cover the management of COVID-19 and the importance of using antibiotics in line with prescribing guidance. The education tools can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.rcgp.org.uk/clinical-and-research/resources/toolkits/amr/target-antibiotics-toolkit.aspx

PHE is continuously monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends for key organisms isolated from respiratory and blood specimens reported via national laboratory surveillance and will alert stakeholders of changes relevant to clinical therapy decisions and policy recommendations.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government's timeframe is for the (a) publication and (b) implementation of the MedTech Funding Mandate; and if he will make a statement.

Due to COVID-19 NHS England and NHS Improvement have delayed the publication of the MedTech Funding Mandate and will not be launching this during 2020/21.

To maintain patient access to innovative devices, diagnostics and digital products NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to fund a range of technologies through the Innovation and Technology Payment.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the opportunities to provide other adult vaccinations alongside the flu programme to maximise every contact with a patient and decrease pressure on the NHS by avoiding multiple visits by vulnerable people.

The Department is working with colleagues at NHS England and NHS Improvement, and Public Health England on the delivery of the 2020/21 seasonal flu vaccination programme. The operational plans for flu include consideration of the requirements of vulnerable people, the workforce and providers, with respect to current social distancing measures, and the potential impact on other vaccination programmes. We continually assess opportunities to improve access to all vaccinations. This includes whether other adult vaccination can be delivered alongside flu vaccination where possible.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to introduce specific plans after the covid-19 outbreak to encourage eligible patients through proactive measures, such as call and recall, to attend primary care to get the shingles vaccine.

People in the age group eligible for the shingles vaccine are required to take particular care to avoid situations where they are at higher risk of acquiring COVID-19 and are therefore not currently being actively called for immunisation by their general practitioner (GP). However, if they are attending the GP practice for other reasons and it is clinically appropriate to offer shingles vaccine, they will be given the vaccine.

Maintaining routine vaccination services during COVID-19 and recovering delivery of our national immunisation programme are high priorities for the Government and the health and care sector but need to be considered in light of social distancing and shielding measures. An immunisation recovery plan is being drawn up by NHS England and NHS Improvement, taking into account risk assessment advice from Public Health England, which will include proactive use of call/recall.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase workforce capacity to support the school vaccination programme in 2020 and catch up vaccination programmes.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working to restore school-age vaccination programmes that have paused due to school closures. This planning is based on local need and will include an assessment of the workforce capacity needed to restore these services, as well as consideration as to whether an increase to the current workforce is required.

The operational planning also includes working with schools to consider other steps to increase capacity, such as vaccinating during the school holidays, where necessary.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of providers outside of primary care providing immunisation services and support catch-ups with patients to relieve pressure on primary care.

Providers other than primary care make a valuable contribution to the national immunisation programmes, for example, some maternity services provide pertussis and flu vaccinations, and most school-aged vaccinations take place outside of primary care.

The 2019 National Health Service review of vaccinations and immunisations delivery sought to explore how to increase uptake of vaccinations and consider if vaccines could be safely and efficiently delivered by providers other than general practice, building on the contribution of community pharmacies to seasonal influenza coverage, and the possibility to widen the range of health professionals who deliver vaccinations.

Any changes in delivery models would be carefully considered with due regard to patient safety, data flows, impact on outcomes and contractual requirements.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans are in place to ensure lessons learned during the covid-19 pandemic including the use of proven apps and digital solutions, are embedded into relevant patient pathways for long term conditions.

During the pandemic, digital and remote general practitioner consultations and outpatient appointments have become usual across England. Providers have been rolling out remote consultations using video, telephone, email and text message services as a priority. David Probert, chief executive of Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, has been leading a taskforce to support acute providers to rapidly create these capabilities, with NHSX leading on primary care. As the National Health Service moves to return to business as usual activity, services across the country will look to maintain and build on new ways of working that have demonstrated their effectiveness during the pandemic.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what processes are in place to monitor variation in the prescribing of technologies for people with diabetes in formularies throughout England.

There are a variety of processes used to monitor prescribing patterns and variation in the prescribing of technologies for people with diabetes. These are based on community pharmacy reimbursement data and include tools such as Open Prescribing, which is publicly available on the NHS Business Services Authority’s ePACT2 platform and PrescQIPP.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that Public Health England recommendations are being implemented for (a) people working in close contact with people who are at high-risk of chickenpox and (b) NHS staff without a confirmed history of chickenpox during the covid-19 outbreak.

In most cases chickenpox (varicella-zoster) is a self-limiting condition which can be safely managed at home. Post-exposure management using varicella-zoster immunoglobulin is used to protect individuals at high risk of suffering from severe chickenpox.

The ‘Green Book’1 guidance is based on advice from Public Health England, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and the standards expected of health and care professionals by their regulatory bodies. It is the responsibility of all health and care professionals to keep themselves informed of any developments which may have a bearing on their area of practice. Current personal protective equipment and social distancing COVID-19 guidance also applies.

Note:

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immunisation-against-infectious-disease-the-green-book#the-green-book

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason chickenpox is not a notifiable disease in England.

In England, notifiable diseases are outlined under the Health Protection (Notification) Regulations 2010.

When the regulation was created, the addition of chickenpox was considered, however, it was not included. This is because a provision is in place requiring notification of any infectious diseases which may pose a significant risk to human health. This was deemed to cover exceptional cases where public health action would be needed.

The Department keeps the diseases which are notifiable in England under review.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the reasons for the increase in the number of hospital admissions of people with chickenpox; and whether he has made an assessment of the correlation between the rate of cases of chickenpox and hospital admissions.

Public Health England has not assessed the correlation between the rates of cases of chickenpox and hospital admissions. However, in 2019, Eurosurveillance published a study of hospitalisation due to varicella in England between 2004 and 2017.

The study showed there were 61,024 admissions with varicella between 2004 and 2017 and 38.1% had a recognised varicella complication. Hospitalisation increased by 25% and the proportion with complicated varicella increased by 24% from 2004/05 to 2016/17. The most common complications were bacterial skin infections, pneumonia, febrile convulsions and encephalitis.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of social distancing measures put in place due to the covid-19 outbreak on the future incidence and outcomes of vaccine preventable diseases which (a) are included and (b) not included in the UK National Immunisation Programme.

Public Health England (PHE) and NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with regional commissioners to ensure that routine immunisations continue to be delivered in primary care settings to ensure those eligible are protected against a range of vaccine preventable diseases. General practices continue to offer routine vaccination services, using social distancing and personal protective equipment according to national guidelines. Programmes delivered through schools are currently on hold and will be rescheduled as schools open.

PHE continues to promote the importance of routine immunisations particularly for children and those in clinical risk groups, for example through the Vaccine Update at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/vaccine-update

Preliminary data indicates there has not been a significant reduction in the number of primary immunisation doses administered compared to the previous year, though there is some indication of a decrease in the first dose of measles, mumps and rubella vaccinations. These data can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.07.20094557v1

The Government’s COVID-19 Action Plan has stated that everyone should ensure that they and their family’s vaccinations are up-to-date, as this will help to reduce any pressure on the National Health Service from vaccine-preventable diseases. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-action-plan/coronavirus-action-plan-a-guide-to-what-you-can-expect-across-the-uk

Immunisations outside of the UK National Immunisation Programme, such as those for travel and occupational health purposes, are unlikely to have a significant effect on public health due to these being primarily individual risks not population level risks.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people working in (a) warehouse, (b) packing and (c) delivery services of manufacturers of medical devices supplied to the NHS are classified as key workers.

The Government has published guidance for key workers, specifically relating to schools, which can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision

The guidance states that ‘those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributers of medicines and medial and personal and protective equipment’ are classified as key workers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to help ensure that dispensing appliance contractors can deliver essential medical supplies on the same terms as pharmacists during the covid-19 outbreak.

Dispensing Appliance Contractors as part of their essential services have always been required to deliver certain appliances to patients’ homes and are reimbursed for doing so.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the role of Dispensing Appliance Contractors in the provision of key (a) products and (b) services to the NHS during the covid-19 pandemic; and what support his Department plans to provide intends to provide to ensure the provision of those contractors' services.

There are no known supply issues linked to COVID-19 for appliances routinely dispensed by Dispensing Appliance Contractors like wound dressings, stoma and incontinence appliances. We are working with the supply chain to ensure Dispensing Appliance Contractors can source these products and maintain supply to patients.

Dispensing Appliance Contractors like any other primary care providers should follow Public Health England’s guidance on COVID-19.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the GP contract 2020-21 supporting guidance will require all practices to implement a proactive call and recall for the shingles national immunisation programme to ensure the protection of older adults.

Immunisations play a critical role in preventative healthcare and in promoting health and well-being across the life course, particularly for older adults where protection against shingles is so important. The ‘Update to the GP contract agreement 2020/21 – 2023/24’ jointly published by NHS England and the British Medical Association on the 6th February 2020 states that practices should ensure their call and recall systems are in line with national standards. These will be defined in supporting guidance for each vaccination programme and over time will be updated to reflect use of the most effective technology. Some areas already use text-based reminders, and all practices must move towards this as soon as the infrastructure is in place. Call/recall will be delivered by practices themselves as a default or may be delivered by the local Child Health Information Systems (CHIS) on their behalf.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of working days that are lost each year as a result of parents caring for a child with chickenpox.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), which provides the Government with expert advice on the provision of vaccination and immunisation services, does not routinely include non-health-related assessments such as these when considering evidence towards their recommendations.

Our chickenpox (varicella) immunisation programme, following advice from the JCVI, is targeted at those who are in close contact with people who are at high risk from chickenpox, such as siblings of a leukaemic child, or a child whose parent is undergoing chemotherapy. The JCVI does not currently recommend universal varicella vaccine as part of the routine childhood programme.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many staff members within the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency are reviewing re-certification applications to comply with the Medical Devices Regulation.

The new Medical Device Regulation (MDR), which will become United Kingdom law from 26 May 2020 as part of the European Union Withdrawal Act 2019, substantially strengthens the regulatory framework for medical devices and notified bodies and manufacturers are having to make significant changes to meet the enhanced requirements.

The Government recognises the importance of having competent notified bodies in place to ensure continuity of supply of products to the UK market. Therefore, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has been engaging with UK industry and notified bodies on an ongoing basis to ensure that they are prepared for the implementation of the MDR.

There are also transitional provisions in place which enable existing CE marked devices to remain valid for sale until the date of expiry of that certificate. This means in practice that all devices on the UK market do not require immediate re-certification.

The MHRA will publish further guidance on how we intend to support businesses who may struggle to obtain certification under the MDR and to ensure continuity of supply of medical devices to UK patients.

16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been (a) diagnosed with and (b) hospitalised as a result of chickenpox in (i) England and (ii) the UK in each of the last five years.

Chickenpox is not a notifiable disease in England, therefore data on the exact number of people diagnosed with chickenpox are not available.

A count of finished admission episodes with a primary diagnosis of chickenpox in England for the financial years 2014-15 to 2018-19, provided by NHS Digital, is attached.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's proposed vaccination strategy will include an approach to limiting the impact of chickenpox on society; and if he will make a statement.

The forthcoming vaccine strategy will consider all vaccination programmes over the life-course. The strategy does not directly consider the impact of chickenpox on society. However, it will build on efforts already under way to improve national immunisation programmes and support innovation.

Our chickenpox (varicella) immunisation programme, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), is targeted at those who are in close contact with people who are at high risk from chickenpox, such as siblings of a leukaemic child, or a child whose parent is undergoing chemotherapy. The JCVI does not currently recommend universal varicella vaccine as part of the routine childhood programme.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the average cost to families of parents and carers taking time off work to care for children with chickenpox; and if he will make a statement.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), which provides the Government with expert advice on the provision of vaccination and immunisation services, does not routinely include non-health-related assessments such as these when considering evidence towards their recommendations.

Our chickenpox (varicella) immunisation programme, following advice from the JCVI, is targeted at those who are in close contact with people who are at high risk from chickenpox, such as siblings of a leukaemic child, or a child whose parent is undergoing chemotherapy. The JCVI does not currently recommend universal varicella vaccine as part of the routine childhood programme.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all medical device businesses are re-certified so that they comply with the Medical Device Regulation before the May 2020 deadline.

The new Medical Device Regulation (MDR), which will become United Kingdom law from 26 May 2020 as part of the European Union Withdrawal Act 2019, substantially strengthens the regulatory framework for medical devices and notified bodies and manufacturers are having to make significant changes to meet the enhanced requirements.

The Government recognises the importance of having competent notified bodies in place to ensure continuity of supply of products to the UK market. Therefore, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has been engaging with UK industry and notified bodies on an ongoing basis to ensure that they are prepared for the implementation of the MDR.

There are also transitional provisions in place which enable existing CE marked devices to remain valid for sale until the date of expiry of that certificate. This means in practice that all devices on the UK market do not require immediate re-certification.

The MHRA will publish further guidance on how we intend to support businesses who may struggle to obtain certification under the MDR and to ensure continuity of supply of medical devices to UK patients.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on national health of the Childhood Vaccination Coverage Statistics for England 2018-19.

Public Health England (PHE) monitors trends in the level of childhood vaccination rates.

Although vaccination rates remain high, England has seen a small decline in coverage since 2013. The most recent figures, published in December 2019, show that vaccine coverage increased slightly compared to the last quarter for most routine vaccines measured at 12 months, representing vaccines administered recently. This increase in vaccination rates is for the second quarter in a row, and although it is always difficult to draw conclusions from small variations in the quarterly data, we look forward to this trend continuing in future reports.

This data can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/cover-of-vaccination-evaluated-rapidly-cover-programme-2019-to-2020-quarterly-data

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the availability of GP appointments on rates of vaccination in England.

Access to general practitioner (GP) appointments is key to good vaccination uptake and coverage. The NHS Long Term Plan published in January 2019 committed to improve access to primary care through a range of initiatives including more healthcare staff working in and with GP practices where many patients receive their vaccinations. As part of this work, there has been a national review of access to general practice services that commenced in July 2019 and will complete in 2020, which has already informed contract discussions for 2020/21. The results of these discussions were published in February 2020 as part of the updated GP contract deal for 2020/21 which can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/gp/investment/gp-contract/

One of these actions relates to developing a nationally consistent extended access offer reflecting what works best in existing local schemes.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of mumps cases in England in each of the last five years.

Public Health England (PHE) has published annual data on the number of laboratory confirmed mumps cases from 1996 to 2019 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/measles-confirmed-cases/confirmed-cases-of-measles-mumps-and-rubella-in-england-and-wales-2012-to-2013

Provisional PHE data show that there were 5,042 lab-confirmed cases of mumps in England in 2019, compared to 1,066 cases in 2018. This is the highest number of cases since 2009. The rise in cases looks set to continue in 2020, with over 1,000 confirmed cases in January 2020 compared to 191 during the same period in 2019. This can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/mumps-outbreaks-across-england

The steep rise in cases in 2019 has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges. Many of the cases in 2019 were seen in the so-called ‘Wakefield cohorts’ – young adults born in the late nineties and early 2000s who missed out on the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine when they were children. These cohorts are now old enough to attend college and university and are likely to continue fuelling mumps outbreaks into 2020.This can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mumps-confirmed-cases/mumps-confirmed-cases-in-england-and-wales-by-age-and-region-2012-to-2013

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure the reinstatement of the UK's WHO measles-free status.

As a first step toward the World Health Organization reinstating the United Kingdom’s measles-free status, Public Health England (PHE) re-convened a multi-stakeholder measles and rubella elimination group, including NHS England, to develop a UK-wide strategy. The purpose of the strategy is to renew stakeholders’ commitment to elimination and re-focus efforts to ensure this will be sustained in the medium- and long-term. A multi-agency implementation board is taking forward the actions of the strategy working with key national and local stakeholders.

NHS England and General Practitioners Committee England also agreed the introduction of a new measles, mumps and rubella catch-up programme for 10 and 11-year olds who have not received a completed course of vaccines via the routine immunisation programme.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has had recent discussions with the Palestinian Authority on tackling corruption in that region.

There is regular high-level engagement between the UK and the Palestinian Authority, both through our Consulate-General in Jerusalem and through inward and outward visits. We will continue to encourage the Palestinian leadership to work toward strong, inclusive, accountable and democratic institutions, based on respect for the rule of law and human rights. The Minister for the Middle East, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon offered the UK's support in efforts to de-escalate the situation on the ground, in his meetings with Israeli Foreign Minister Cohen, Palestinian Prime Minister Shtayyeh and Palestinian Foreign Minister Malki, during his visit to Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories on 10-13 January.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what diplomatic steps her Department is taking to help ensure that that Iran will not become a nuclear power.

We are currently engaged in negotiations in Vienna aimed at restoring the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA). Iran must now decide whether to conclude the fair and comprehensive deal on the table, for the benefit of the Iranian people and economy, or collapse the JCPoA. In this scenario, we would carefully consider all the options in partnership with our allies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of Hezbollah's potential involvement in the narcotics trade in South America.

Illegal drugs are a global threat. The UK works with partners around the world to coordinate action and combat organised crime groups operating across borders. The UK proscribes Hizballah in its entirety as a terrorist organisation and has an asset freeze in place against the entire organisation.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place.

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of confirmation by Iran's envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency that Iran has two cascades of advanced centrifuges with almost four times the enrichment capacity of previous ones in operation at its underground Natanz facility.

Iran's continued systematic non-compliance with its nuclear commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) is jeopardising our efforts to preserve the JCPoA and risks compromising the important opportunity for a return to diplomacy with the new US Administration. We continue to engage closely with the US and JCPoA participants on this, and have made our position clear, including in recent E3 statements, that Iran must halt this activity, and return to compliance with its JCPoA commitments without delay.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his US counterpart on reports that Iran has started enriching uranium with a new cascade of centrifuges in its underground Natanz plant.

Iran's continued systematic non-compliance with its nuclear commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) is jeopardising our efforts to preserve the JCPoA and risks compromising the important opportunity for a return to diplomacy with the new US Administration. We continue to engage closely with the US and JCPoA participants on this, and have made our position clear, including in recent E3 statements, that Iran must halt this activity, and return to compliance with its JCPoA commitments without delay.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether (a) Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps and (b) other groups subject to UK terrorism and terrorist financing sanctions will be targeted under the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020.

The UK is committed to holding Iran to account on a wide range of human rights issues. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps is already sanctioned by the UK, as are a further 82 serious human rights violators and one entity, as an important part in keeping pressure on the Iranian regime to change its approach.

It is not appropriate to speculate on who may be designated under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime in the future. To do this could reduce the impact of the designations. We will keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of increasing the Marriage Allowance.

The Government introduced the Marriage Allowance (MA) in April 2015 to recognise marriage and civil partnerships in the tax system. It allows a spouse or civil partner to transfer 10 per cent of their Personal Allowance (PA) if their partner is a basic rate taxpayer.

At Spring Budget 2021, the Chancellor announced that the PA would be maintained from the years 2022-23 to 2025-26. The transferable tax allowance of £1,260 provided through the MA will remain at its current level until 2025-26.

As with all elements of Income Tax, the Government keeps this under review as part of the annual Budget process.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
23rd May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to reduce the tax burden on families.

The Chancellor’s Tax Plan cut the burden on working families by raising the threshold at which people pay National Insurance contributions from July 2022 and by cutting fuel duty by 5 pence for 12 months.

This plan will also spread the benefit of economic growth by cutting the basic rate of Income Tax from April 2024.

The Government has also provided at least £1200 to the most vulnerable households this year to help with the cost of living.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
23rd May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of calculating child benefit on household rather than individual income.

Child Benefit remains a universal benefit. The High Income Child Benefit Charge (HICBC) is a tax charge which applies to anyone with an income of over £50,000 who gets Child Benefit, or whose partner gets it. HICBC is calculated on an individual rather than a household basis, in line with other income tax policy.

Basing HICBC on household incomes would mean finding out the incomes of everyone in each of the 7.7 million households currently registered for Child Benefit. This would effectively introduce a new means test, which would be costly to administer and create burdens on the majority of families who receive Child Benefit. The Government decided that charging HICBC to those on higher incomes ensures that everyone makes a fair contribution, while those with the lowest incomes continue to be supported.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the life sciences sector to discuss the issue of territoriality for R&D tax relief.

At Autumn Budget 2021, the Government announced reforms to Research & Development (R&D) tax reliefs to support modern research methods. The Government did this by expanding qualifying expenditure to include data and cloud costs, to more effectively capture the benefits of R&D funded by the reliefs by refocusing support towards innovation in the UK and to target abuse and improve compliance. The review will continue to identify areas for further change. A report was published at Tax Administration and Maintenance Day. The report provided more detail on the reforms announced at Autumn Budget 2021 and set out areas where the Government is seeking views to inform the draft legislation that will be published next year.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect on research and development tax relief of territoriality restrictions having been in place for each of the last five years, by sector.

At Autumn Budget 2021, the Government announced reforms to Research & Development (R&D) tax reliefs to support modern research methods. The Government did this by expanding qualifying expenditure to include data and cloud costs, to more effectively capture the benefits of R&D funded by the reliefs by refocusing support towards innovation in the UK and to target abuse and improve compliance. The review will continue to identify areas for further change. A report was published at Tax Administration and Maintenance Day. The report provided more detail on the reforms announced at Autumn Budget 2021 and set out areas where the Government is seeking views to inform the draft legislation that will be published next year.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to Green Book recommended discount rate of 1.5 per cent per annum for policies that impact health or life outcomes, if he will have discussions with NICE on reducing the discount rate of 3.5 per cent that it applied in its recent Methods Review consultation.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)’s independent review into its methods is currently live. NICE is an independent body, and I look forward to seeing the outcome of the Review in due course.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps the Government is taking to amend the existing R&D tax credits scheme to expand qualifying criteria to encourage larger companies to invest in research and innovation.

At Budget 2021, the Chancellor announced a review of R&D tax reliefs, supported by the publication of a wide-ranging consultation on the nature of private-sector R&D investment in the UK, how that is supported or otherwise affected by the R&D tax reliefs, and where changes may be appropriate.

The consultation closed on 2 June and next steps will be set out in due course.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Throughout the pandemic, covid secure Treasury offices have been operating in line with government workplace guidance including use of the NHS Test and Trace service where appropriate.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of ministerial discussions are not normally disclosed.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

We have provided the Department of Health and Social Care with £15bn for NHS Test and Trace this year and they have also established the new UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) to lead on future pandemic preparedness. Any questions relating to plans for NHS Test and Trace or the new UKHSA should be directed to the Department for Health and Social Care.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the financial support required by bowling centres due to covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

The Government recognises the extreme disruption the actions to combat Covid-19 are having on sectors like the leisure and entertainment industry.

That is why the Government has put in place an economic package of support which will provide businesses and individuals with certainty over the Winter months, even as measures to prevent further spread of the virus change. This includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and government-backed loan schemes. The Treasury has further provided funding to local authorities, to support both open and closed businesses through the Local Restrictions Support Grants and the Additional Restrictions Grant.

During this difficult time the Treasury is working intensively with employers, delivery partners, government departments like the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and industry groups such as the British Association of Leisure Parks, Piers and Attractions, in order to understand the long-term effects of Covid-19 across all key areas of the economy.

We will continue to take a flexible approach and keep all impacts and policies under review as we respond to this pandemic.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were granted refugee status in each year since 2010 broken down by local authority allocation.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of the initial decisions made on asylum applications and the number of refugees resettled by local authority through one of the UK’s resettlement schemes are published in tables Asy_D02 and Res_D01 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets; breakdowns by year are available. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest published statistics relate to data up to the end of June 2021.


Please note the Home Office does not publish local authority breakdowns on asylum applications as the asylum system operates on a national level. Additionally, when an individual is granted refugee status they are no longer required to inform the Home Office of their address and are free to move around the UK.

Additionally, the Home Office publishes further data on asylum and resettlement in the asylum and resettlement summary tables. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of Hezbollah's potential involvement in the illegal drug trade in the UK.

Investigations into the activities of proscribed organisations are an operational matter for the police and intelligence agencies. It would not be appropriate to comment further.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Home Office currently has no plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system itself.

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has allocated any financial or other resources from her Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by her Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Home Office has not allocated any financial or other resources for this purpose.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Use of the Test and Trace system is discussed periodically at cross departmental meetings as part of the Government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the armed forces are supported by world-class technological capabilities.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Members for North Devon (Selaine Saxby), to Question 900383, and Newcastle Under-Lyme (Aaron Bell), to Question 900390, during Defence Oral Questions on 24 May 2021.

1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 156447 on International Criminal Court, what assessment he has made of the implications for UK military personnel of the International Criminal Court's decision of 5 February 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The UK respects the independence of the International Criminal Court (ICC), and we expect it to exercise due prosecutorial and judicial discipline. We continue to closely follow the ICC's work and are looking at the implications of this decision.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make an assessment of the implications for British military personnel of the International Criminal Court’s ruling that it has jurisdiction to open a probe into allegations of war crimes initiated by non-state actors.

We closely follow the work of the International Criminal Court and are looking at the implications of this decision.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with his International counterparts on the implications for military personnel of the ruling that non-state actors can initiate proceedings at the International Criminal Court (ICC), with reference to the February 2021 decision that the ICC has jurisdiction over the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem.

We closely follow the work of the International Criminal Court and are looking at the implications of this decision.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of planning reforms on facilitating access to health and social care services in high street and community settings.

The planning system has an important role in making sure communities have access to the infrastructure and services they need - including health and social care.

The planning changes, introduced through the Levelling Up and Regeneration Bill, will enhance this role and help to ensure new development is accompanied by the right infrastructure, delivered at the right time.

The new single, simplified Infrastructure Levy will aim to capture more land value uplift than the current developer contribution regime, ensuring big developers contribute more and allowing local authorities to use the proceeds for providing infrastructure such as GPs, hospitals, and social care facilities. New infrastructure delivery strategies will also make sure the infrastructure delivered is tailored and targeted towards the needs specific to local areas.

Marcus Jones
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions have been had with his ministerial colleagues, if any, to work with the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Government has not provided funding or resources to investigate the potential for MHCLG to make use of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

MHCLG does not use or access identifiable Test and Trace data and has no current plans to do so. Test and Trace data is sensitive health data shared with local authority public health teams on an exceptional basis to support contact tracing and containment of Covid-19, and to provide relevant support to those required to self-isolate. We continue to work with DHSC, the data-owners, to provide guidance to local authorities on how best to use the data


Ministers and officials from my Department have regular discussions with counterparts in other government departments on a range of matters relating to local government.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to work with the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Government has not provided funding or resources to investigate the potential for MHCLG to make use of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

MHCLG does not use or access identifiable Test and Trace data and has no current plans to do so. Test and Trace data is sensitive health data shared with local authority public health teams on an exceptional basis to support contact tracing and containment of Covid-19, and to provide relevant support to those required to self-isolate. We continue to work with DHSC, the data-owners, to provide guidance to local authorities on how best to use the data


Ministers and officials from my Department have regular discussions with counterparts in other government departments on a range of matters relating to local government.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government has provided funding or resources to investigate the potential for his Department to make use of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

Government has not provided funding or resources to investigate the potential for MHCLG to make use of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

MHCLG does not use or access identifiable Test and Trace data and has no current plans to do so. Test and Trace data is sensitive health data shared with local authority public health teams on an exceptional basis to support contact tracing and containment of Covid-19, and to provide relevant support to those required to self-isolate. We continue to work with DHSC, the data-owners, to provide guidance to local authorities on how best to use the data


Ministers and officials from my Department have regular discussions with counterparts in other government departments on a range of matters relating to local government.

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No assessment has yet been made, nor any decisions made, on whether to use the data systems used by NHS Test and Trace for other purposes beyond those related to Covid-19. Any work to assess potential future uses of these data systems would be met from within the financial resources already allocated to NHS Test and Trace for the 2021/22 financial year.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future uses of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

No such discussions have taken place.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jun 2021
What assessment he has made of the benefits of the Levelling Up Fund for Northern Ireland.

The Government is firmly committed to levelling up and bringing new benefits and opportunities to communities right across the UK. Through our excellent Levelling Up Fund, £4.8billion is being made available to fund capital projects that will regenerate town centres and high streets, upgrade local transport, and invest in cultural and heritage assets.

In Northern Ireland, the Levelling Up Fund is open to a range of business, voluntary and community sector organisations until 18 June. The successful bids will help drive the recovery of communities and areas hardest hit by Covid. I am confident that this new funding can make a real difference in Northern Ireland and I have enjoyed some enthusiastic early engagements with local government across NI.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and I speak regularly with Cabinet and Ministerial colleagues across Government to discuss a wide range of mutual issues, including the NHS Test and Trace database system. However, the Northern Ireland Office is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system policy. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

As health is a devolved matter, the Department for Health Northern Ireland make their own decisions on testing and tracing, however there is continued UK-wide engagement to ensure a coordinated and collaborative approach.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Northern Ireland Office is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system and does not therefore develop policy relating to the use of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Northern Ireland Office is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system, therefore does not allocate resources, including financial resources to investigate future uses of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).



15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

I discuss a wide range of issues relating to the Coronavirus pandemic with Cabinet colleagues on a regular basis. However, The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system policy. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Public Health is a devolved matter in Scotland. NHS Scotland has created NHS Test and Protect and supports the Scottish Government’s test, trace, isolate and support strategy.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system and does not therefore develop policy relating to the use of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system, therefore does not allocate resources, including financial resources to investigate future uses of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on using the NHS Test and Trace database system.

I discuss a wide range of issues relating to the Coronavirus pandemic with Cabinet colleagues on a regular basis. However, The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system policy. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Simon Hart
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, whether he has allocated any financial or other resources from his Department's budget to investigate potential future uses by his Department of the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system and does not therefore develop policy relating to the use of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Simon Hart
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, whether his Department plans to use the NHS Test and Trace database system.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales is not the lead UK Government Department responsible for the NHS Test and Trace database system and does not therefore develop policy relating to the use of the system. The lead department is the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC).

Simon Hart
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)